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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, May 02, 1896, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1896-05-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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n fc fc. Ill l f J H
on the Consent ofjthe.j llnVa . L o WZ
r Governed. .1 - (S -J TSv r'mtMa-E u.m rtl v xfe0 I
Thomas Jefferson; - IK V I'lrSl) tfFskJorimwb iY, " JD i
"The Quality of LibeAtyI
WE POSSESS IS KntTAT Trkirrw!
Quantity of Restraint
we rur upon the Govern
ment "
Daniel Webster.
Hew to the Line.
Vol. I.
RELIGIOUS INTOLERANCE
RUN MAD.
The Utah Presbytery, recently
assembled at Spanish Fork, Utah,
has made a public exhibition of its
narrowness and sectarian bigotry,
by its declaration decreeing that no
fellowship shall hereafter be ex
tended to the Mormon church by
the Presbyterian church. They
proceed to open an impassable gulf
between the two organizations, by
a series of ten reasons; and by their
avowals they conclude that the
Mormon people are not only un
christian, but hypocrites, liars, and
benighted heathens, such as flour
ished in Greece and Borne. The
writer is not a belierer in the Mor
mon creed, and no apologist for
their shortcomings; but from our
limited investigations of .the dom
inant church in Utah, and, from
our personal acquaintance with
many of the leading members
thereof, we would say the "ten
reasons" assigned by the Presby-!
terians are either misstated or ab
solutely untrue. But even if they
were all true, why in the world
should these "blue stocking" des
cendants of John Calvin at this
time seek tq anathematise and
damn their neighbors and fellow
citizens? Christian fellowship is to
be withheld from the church of the
Latter-day Saints, after so many
years association in this God-blessed
valley, by a set of men who, to any
rational mind, proclaim acraediar
more monstrous, enslaving and in
human, than any assigned in the
"ttn reasons" set forth. The
thought that, "there are infants in
hell not a span long," that "some
are decreed from all eternity to be
doomed to perdition," that "hu
man souls are sacrificed to the eter
nal fires of hell, simply to exalt
the glory of God," is so abhorrent
to the human mind, that it is no
wonder the world is becoming
skeptical, and that the adherents to
such a creed are becoming scarcer
every day. But we have no fight
with either of these churches; we
believe in liberty of conscience and
of allowing every man, woman and
child full religious-freedom; neither
do we believe in ostracising or de
nying fellowship to any human be
ing on account of their honest be
lief. The Great Master when on
earth made no such distinction, as
ilustrated by the man who fell
among thieves. "Who thinkest
thou was neighbor to him who fell
amongst thieves?"
Recently the Broad, 4 k
openly criticised the leaders of the
Mormon church for attempting to
usurp the prerogatives of the citi
zen; but this step of the Presby
terians shows them to be fully as
dangerous and far more narrow and
bigoted than, anything the .Mormon
church as yet attempted.
If given the power, such a body
of religious fanatics would apply
the rack or the fagots to the here
tics, and make their creed the state
religion by force of law. All ch
attacks on the Mormon ohmrck fall
harmless on the intended vktHB,
but react apon those who begin, the
warfare. We believe the preeeat
political crisis will be solved bj the
Mormon people thewelves; 4
such assaults as Bade by the syo4
of Utah, will retard the adjwtaaavt
of our political troubles BKxeJtol
anvthin? wTivb ku rwarrei-'fjav
TTfU . t. uit4
-a iur years, -raw aw-.
these bigots i utiles Cfcrist, is -
American
awl ummc ;ac,.as
THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH.
Bur -few of the people in the
North know of the opportunity and
good results therefrom accruing to
the colored people in the far awt
South. During the World's Fair
in Chicago, the editor of the Broad
Ax had the pleasure of making the
acquaintance of Professor Booker
T. "Washington, who ia sometimes
styled 'the Moses of the colored
race." And we wish to say a few
words as to his history and his great
work among our race in the South.
He was horn a slave in Virginia in
1858, and among the earliest of his
recollections is the occasion when
forty or fifty slaves were assembled
on a veranda to hear read a docu
ment which made them freemen,
with the right to go and come as
they pleased. Professor Washing
ton, then a mere child, started to
walk to West Virginia with his
mother, and after many days of
weary travel arrived at the salt fur
naces and coal mines of that State,
where he began work to support his
mother. While thus at his daily
toil he beard of the colored school
at Hampton, Va., and determined
to get an education. He returned
to his native State, part way on
foot, and after wandering eastward
for days and weeks, he a last ar
rived at Gen. Armstrong's school
at Hampton, where he applied for
admission, on terms of working for
his schooling, and was admitted.
and worked hk way through that
institution. After completing bis
course of study at Hampton, he
concluded to go to the far south,
the black belt of the Gulf States,
and derote bis life to providing for
the youth of our race the same kind
of a chance that he bad found for
himself at Hampton In 1881 he
started the Tuskegee Institute in a
small shanty, with one teacher and
thirtv students. Since that time
the institution has grown until it
has connected with it sixty-nine
teachers and eight hundred young
men and women, representing nine
teen States. The work of Professor
Washington is highly appreciated
by all classes and races in the South,
but by none more than by the poor
colored youth, who are enabled
thereby to get a good English edu
cation, and a practical knowledge of
business. The effect of this Insti-
tate is quite marked in the vicinity
of its location, as many families
who were formerly shiftless and ig
norant, by the education of them
selves and. cbUdren. at this institu
tion, have become the owners of
comfortable homes free from debt,
and are prospering and happy,
growing wiser as they grow older.
The philanthropic spirit of pa
tience and peraifitency exhibited by
Professor Washington is best jshown
by hioself in a recent published ar
ticle, the closing part of which we
quote.
"If ever there was a people that
have obeyed the Scriptural injunc
tion, 'If they amite thee on one
cheek, turn tie other also that
people kas bee the Aateriean negro.
To right kk wrongs the Russian ap
peals to dynamite, Americans to re
bellioa, the Irkkman to agitation,
the Indian, to kk tomahawk; bt
tke negro, te moat jauent, we
moat nnreetfl Ur-abuliBg,
Hapvda for tke rigkting of hk
wroega npon wgyuB g,
hk midnigkt jrtyers, ad-aainksr-eat
faitk in tke jawtke of kk caW,
if we may je ! V
a Mat wk rr :
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, MAY 2,
slavery pagans, we came out Amer
ican citizens. We went into slavery
without a language, we came out
speaking the proud Anglo-Saxon
tongue. We went into slavery with
the slave chains clanking about our
wrists, we came out with the Amer
ican ballot in our hands."
Such words should inspire all the
members of our race to take cour
age and press onward and upward,
and keep in touch with the progress
of the age.
INDIVIDUAL RIGHT6 MAIN
TAINED. None the report of the speech
of Joseph F. Smith at Provo. In
this speech President Smith gave a
clearer definition of the duties of
the church members. During this
speech he made this statement:
"The church authorities have the
right to dictate both spiritually and
temporally." After this statement
the manifetso was read fc c the ap
proval of those who were present.
A great many left the house before
the vote was taken, and one man
held his hand up high in voting
against the manifesto
Every week the issue is being
more cieariy denned to the people
and they are beginning to think for
themselves and decide for them
selves, too. It has been the policy
of the church to dictate in tem
poral as well as spiritual affairs,
and the people have permitted the
church to hold this right over them
and thought nothing of it. But
the agitation on political lines is
caasing the people to assert their
independence of Bolitical action.
"There is nothing that a man is so
tenacious of as hk political liberty.
and when he thinks that someone
k trying to deprive him of that, he
resents the effort with all his
might.
The editor of the Salt Lake Her
ald suggests that the word "dictate"
k not the meaning or intent of the
manifesto, but counsel or advke
would bea better term. The terms
are altogether different and it k all
right for the church authorities to
advke or counsel when such service
k asked of them, but it is not right
for them to dictate in the political
actions of their people in any
sense. Much feeling is aroused
against any attempt at tbk kind
of work. Apostle Moses Thatcher
k being congratulated and praised
for the bold stand that he took.
The spirit of liberty is not dead in
this State, though it may have slept
ror many years in me lernrory.
Let the agitation continue until the
people are free from any dictation
of any power in the exercise of
their political rights. Box Elder
CotfMy News, April 24.
The foregoing shows very plain
ly the spirit of some, at least, of
the country press. As long as the
true spirit of Americankm sur
vives, the liberties of the people of
Utah are safe. Time at last will
bring our new State to the topmost
place for freedom of conscience.
FROM BRIGHAM CITY BUG
LER, APRIL 25.
At th recent Presbytery at
Spanish Fork, there was formulated
ten reasons "why Christians cannot
walk in fellowship with Mormons."
One of the reasons is because Mor
monism "teaches its adherents to
depend on their own righteousaeaB
or good works as the bask for
actual persoaal sins." These goad
Christian geatlemea seem to thiak
a Baan can go on thiering and aaHr
deriag all hk life; but if, jast be
fore he kicks hk last kick on the
gallows, he says he "has faith' the
hood will be drawn, the trap will
drop and the suddenly-made good
mab. will be instantly jerked into
the arms of J ecu. We sort o
dobt that hk hading place will be
as soft a saa'p as all that
We wool add, that it shotdd
read, "Why Pretifferums cuiaot
walk a laMewehifl with X&mom?
1896.
mean the same. See the New Tes
tament for proof of above
rection.
cor-
Patrick Henry said: "Give me
liberty, or give me death." Let
Utah send to the Chicago Conven
tion six modern Patrick Henrys;
but do not send a man who to get
his liberty is compelled to go to a
nepuoucan nign priest for counsel
and consent.
DxspONDENT Democrats should
take counsel from Republican lead
ers whether it fs better "to be or
not to
copy.
be'
in it. Herald please
PROFESSIONAL.
MOYLE, ZANE & COSTIGAN,
Attorneys and Counsellors- at-Law.
Deseret National Bank Bldg.
DICKSON, ELLIS & ELLIS.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Rooms 512 to 515 Progress Building.
RA Y YAH COTT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
607 McCoraick Block, Salt Lake City.
FERGUSON & CANNON.
ATTORNEYS-ATM, A.W,
332 Constitution Building.
CHERRY & TIMM0NY,
LAWYERS.
Rooms 0 and 10 Walker Bros. Bank Bldg.
Salt Lake City.
POWERS, STRAUP AND
LIPPMAS,
Attorneys and Counselors.
EAGLE BLOCK,
SALT LAKE CITY.
Rnwitijis & GflrrcH&ow,
Rooms 25-27 Hooper Block.
J. L KAWLIN3.
B. B. CRITCHLOYT.
S. W. STEWART.
C. B. STEWART.
STEWART & STEWART
tt0rat$-at-Caw,
317 McCoraick Block, Salt Lake City.
EUGENS LEWIS,
in Commercial Block, Salt Lake City.
Real Estate Loans
R. N. BASK1N.
E. D. HOOE.
BASKIN & HOGE,
140 SOUTH MAIN.....
Sidney W. Darke John B. Anderaoa
Darke & Anderson,
Attorhkvs-atLaw.
Rooms, 63-4-7 Hooper Block,
Salt Lake City, Utah.
JAMES A WILLIAMS,
Attorney-at-Law,
404-405 - Progress - Building.
h: j.dininny,
atr;gtr.
Commercial Block, Salt Lake City, Utah
A. J. WEBER, .
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
2408 WaskiBgtoa Ave, Ogdes, Utah.
FRANK K. HEBEKER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Koom No. 2, Rick's Block, Logaa, Utah.
SAM1IEL.A."KIN6,
Jfktf NafeMt Bsk-:8aMig,
I Sole agaata tor YomTiin'a Krr York Hat Tka
Leader. We tin carry Stotaoa't cad
otter floe bate.
W. P. Noble Mercantile Co.
1SS ifalTt, StxMt.
HATS, CAPS k GENTS FDRSISHISGS.
Sita-Santar Coal Co.
Uptown Office: f Jfe" offiee "J
1 161 Main. Y3"1 5"Hot
Telephone 675. f sH5SSilgr
ALL KINDS,
fliBjgcorily SB
Capital, 75.000.00
Office under Deseret National Bank.
TtLEPHONE NO. 142.
Utah Mining Bureau.
46 E- Second South St., Salt Lake
MINES BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Careful examinations made of mining
properties. Reliable reports made.
Mercur property a specialty.
Utah Poultry and
Produce Commission Co.
108 W. FIRST SOUTH ST..
ISALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
VALT2B L. PRICE, Ifrufer.
fi. (, I(EBLBY,
. Telephone 27. Manufacturer
. of Pure Ice Cream. Water
. Ices, Candies, Home-Made
. Bread and Cakes.
66 8. MAIN ST.
iit i iir rirv
- "r-v
WHEN
BUYING
SHOES
Whj not buy the bet then ia for the
money on the market.
ROBINSON BROS.,
The Shoe BuUders, mannfartare them.
98 W. ITB3T SOUTH ST. SALT LAKE CTTT.
I now hare In xaj employ a flrt-claa practical
Optician, Am better prepared than heretofore to
grind and fit gUasea to salt the tight.
EYES TESTED FREE.
1TW f fflVAW Jeireler and Optician.
AM&LnaAla miUlnSt. SaltLaxeCltr.
Mrs. Anna Macon,
( Artistic Hair Dresser. Shampooing 1
i and straightening a spec ally. 42 B. y
(.First South St., up stairs, room 5. J
Hair dressing done at private residences.
TLANTIO TEA CO.,
- h. a MOSTEB, Pbo.
aoxxr ro CHASE & SANBORN'S
Teas, CoHces, Spices & Extracts
gL a I. flBT WEST STIEir.
WM. M. ROYLAXCE,
SPBIXOVIIXZ, UTAH, makes a pcllty
of ttvjisg aad tiling aU kinds of
FfilHTS, F0ULTE7, S3, SS, &SAST, Etc
WRITE FOB PRICES.
(StUs BICYCLES aad Stmdrle '
UUfU Yrdonhwe&t.BMrcor. viW
Q4 DTOO ADEBptO.
stun of OOAli of m nm.
UUUACeiataeTrTeleptioBeaea. HUM
W mwm a p aptAkirt eAitvu wjs
-Telephone 674 o
Washington Market.
813 Ham St., Salt Lake City,
DAY, HOWE & Co., Props.,
Dealers kx Meats, Groceries, Fish, Pool
try and Provkioas.
J. AX. KROGH,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER.
Seeeed Bant Sbeea Bapalrbag MttMj Bea
Jtor Sate. at Lev frVMC
108 E. Secoad Scetfa, Safe Lake Cky.
M. P. WELLS,
-7-A3XT.
FIXE TAILORING.
MOHami SfeMt
No. 36.
E. & Thomas
Dry Goods
M J. MvLvmr C:
Wholesalers and Retailers of
Whiskies, Winee,
Brandiea, Cigars,
etc.
213 south main street,
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
E. E. WILLIAMS,
MURRAY. UTAH;
Dealer in Wines-, Liquors, Imported and
Domestic Cigars. Cornea Saloon.
E. E. WILLIAMS, Proprietor.
H. J. Gnnt.Pre. John Henry Smlth,VIc-Frw.
J. F. Grant, Secy, and Twm.
WrectoriL-Joha Henry Balth, Hber 3. Gnat
J. T. Grant, B. P. Grant, Hainan Sears.
GRANT SOAP CO.
BfFIK AH FUTOIT, 751 T8 781 S.3M WOT ST.
Uanofactnren of High Grade Laundry
and Toilet Soap.
SPECIALTIES 'y
BEE HIVE. ELECTBIC and
5c LAUNDBY.
Brx Hm TonxTt
B.OTCrnOATINO.
COMMERCIAL BAB.
F GRANT, Manaqcr.
- Utah.
Salt Lam Cttt,
FREDC.LYNGBERG
Grocer.
OYSTERS, FISH AND
game. Imported
Cheese, Fancy
Fruits, etc., etc
8 E. FIRST
SOUTH ST.
Telephone 18
Co-operative Furdiure Cg
22T
FURNITURE
CARPETS
And Upholstery Goods, etc
Bicycles and Baby Carriages.
Best Goods and Best Fricea.
11 AND 13 MAH STREET,
SALT LAKE CITY.
A Com Comti.
"What are yoa going to do about it?"
"About what?"
"Why, about the Bicycle yoa are goiag
i am going to do just what every
sible person does, go to Browning B;
sea
ros.,
155 Main St, and ouy a Rambler. It's
good form to ride a Rambler aad. be
sides, there is some satisfaction in know
ing that you have got the best that money
can buy. I want a wheel that I can rely
on and one that I know k worthy the
confidence I place m it"
F.A.SAKUTH
TAILORING Ce.
Fine Arttetie TAILORING st
iskl prlees.
PRICES: fg
5 CO aad up.
350 aad ap.
Chas. W, Hckx, Cattor.
NO. 65 W. SECOND SOUTH
J. H. THOMPSON'S
Shoe Dressing Parlors,
34 E. SECOND SOUTH ST.
Prrrate Parte fee Ladtea '
Wiscomb & Co ,
''MM GM9CMMM
The bet pkee for TtaaHy SappOee.
58 E. FLBST SOUTH ST.
salt LAiE amm ci.
PAUL 5aHTM , Prayriater.
I Ootkea Qeased amA, Praaatd at
85citea9rpMtk. PamtaPraaa
25 emit. ftateDjsill. Laika'
olotaaCkaldDji Eapr-
lWMtlTiNfc 279 Sorta
,-jj
1
dwuld rececre tiis
awl .CTeesyienjjM peei.t
FKOVO.UTAH.
St.
11 classes, parties
TpTHFtr
- -. " . .
into
ST-'--.-,
.,
9
yzct,
.'
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jt
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