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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, June 27, 1896, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1896-06-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Our Government is based
The Quality of Liberty,
oN the Consent of the
we fossess is Equal to the ,
Governed."
6t
Quantity of Restraint!
we Put Upon the Govern-j
&"
Thomas Jefferson.
MENT.
Daniel Webster.
Hew to the Line.
. "G'S) JP( &gc)"
JRfenssrM .7S
"
Vol. I.
TOTHE BREACH. ONCE MORE
MY FRIENDS.
On June 16th. President Cleve
tad in his omnipotent wisdom,
uat to the pnblic through the
pedium of a mugwump newspaper,
of New York, his manifesto of dis
approval of the "free coinage of
iflrer." Grover Cleveland stands
today as the personification of the
gold deity of the East. He poses,
in Us letter, as an unselfish Demo
crat with no desire or ambition to
jnlfill, save and except to preserve
tie "rich traditions" of Democ
racy. How the man can assume
such a position, and defend it upon
the ground of Democratic tradi
tion is one of the mysteries of
mazrnimp politics. In the face of
tie utterances of the fathers of
Democracy, for over half a cen
taT,and the platform of princi
ples for many years past, including
the one upon which President
Qereland was- elected to the high
ofice he now holds, his letter and
former attitude betakes more of
mockery than sincerity; it is more
like the plea of a police court pet
tifogger, than the reasoning of a
statesman. Not one single argu
ment is offered in favor of the
golden image, but the whole party
is commanded to bow down and
worship at his behest.
The letter is written manifestly
in a spirit of anxiety, lest the party
at Chicago should follow the dicta
tion of the people, and relieve
themselves from the oppressive
hand of the money power, and re-
huke this false prophet which has
arisen in the camp of the party of
Jefferson and Jackson. In his let
ter he assumes, that to restore sil
ver to its constitutional preroga
tne, would "bring disaster to our
party organization." This last sen
tence reads like a grim joke, when
tt remember the disaster that has
attended the country and the party
Rtr since he began his attack on
tie money of the people and in
firor of the Shylocks of the pres
ent day. In his self-conscious ar
rogance, he brands the silver move
ment as "un-patriotic and foolish."
Surrounded, as he is, by a few
nabobs of wealth, he is unable to
see anything but their immense ac
cumulations of gold, and can hear
naught but the clinking of their
bright coins, as they fall from the
toflins
masses into their rapacious
Pockets. He cannot see the stag
nation in all lines of business in
&e country, neither can he hear
we groans and murmurs of an op
pressed and outraged people. Gro
Ter Cleveland has been a disap
pointment to his party and the
country; he is inflated with the idea
f his own imnortanne. hence he is
throwing himself into the breach
ith the vain hope that he can
caeck the rising tide of a justly in
dignant people, in their determina
tion to right the most cold-blooded
wrongs ever perpetrated upon a
foe people. "
We are glad the President wrote
tkt letter; it will have the effect of
Modifying the free silver forces on
fte theory, that, whichever side
Grower Cleveland takes on the
fconey question, it is safe to get on
the opposite side. He has no more
political influence in the Democrat
ic party than the ghost of Hamletf a
fetter, unless it be with the cuckoo
office-holders, and even thev are
: to desert him, as did the
of Cardinal Wnlaev; asd
thhiaiy, may exclaim, "Hai I
JTEiniypeopieMreila.I fere
served the god of gold, they would
not now leave me to mine infir
mity." He closes his letter with the as
severation, that he seeks no further
honor but to be a "private in the
ranks." This was wholly unnec
essary, as by no possible contin
gency could any honors be thrust
upon him by the Democratic party.
The fact is, he could not be elected
to the office of school trustee in
any Democratic precinct in the
United States.
In the meantime let all true
friends of free silver take courage;
the prospects grow brighter every
day. The attitude of the Presi
dent is no new feature, and this
contribution to the cause of the
I single standard only concedes
the desperate situation in which he
and his co-partners are in. "We
only trust that Grover will con
tinue to write until the convention
meets; let him send out daily bul
letins and keep up the correspond
ence without break. "O! that mine
enemy would write a book," said
the wise man. We are hoping to
hear from you some more, Mr.
President.
THE SITUATION.
Now that the Republican party
has in its national convention pro
nounced in favor of the single gold
standard, and borrowed the term
"sound money" from Grover Cleve
land, it remains to be seen what ac
tion the silver Republicans will take
throughout the country in support
ing the candidates of the St. Louis
convention. It is one of the most
difficult things, to break away from
the party of our choice, that an
American can think of. Party ties
are strong; and the official pie is
tempting. The partisan whip will
no doubt be used to attempt to lash
recalcitrants into line, and all the
usual methods resorted to for the
purpose of uniting the rank and
file to secure the election of Mc
Kinley, the ideal representative of
gold and high protection. Never
before has there ever been such a
general and deep seated revolt
within this great party, as exists
today, especially in the West and
Northwestern States. It would
seem incredible, that such a vast
number of intelligent and suffering
men could be coerced into party
fealty, by the promise of the loaves
and fishes of office, or by the brass
band hurrah of party pride.
The great Democratic party is
also confronted with a divided
house on this, the supreme question
of the hour. The result, however,
will be exactly opposite in Chicago
to that in St. Louis; in which event
we believe the free silver forces of
all parties ought to unite with the
silver Democrats to accomplish the
reformation of the money question.
We urge this for the simple reason
that united we succeed, but divided
we fail. The silver wing of the
Democratic party can carry every
Southern State, as well as several
of the middle and Western States.
The party is organized, and has a
hold on the people that no new
party -can acquire this year; there
fore, we believe, if the country is to
fce redeemed from the money power
Democrats. If the aer Bepofab
eswilldo this, there should be
actual concessions as to Con
gional nominations, and the
SlaotiatiHiaorboti
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, JUNE 27, 1896.
would be secured for the enactment
of such laws as will restore pros
perity and happiness to the toiling
millions of our people.
There is no sense in the silver
men disagreeing over collateral and
immaterial questions, when we all
agree on the important matter.
Let these small side issues be put
aside for the present, and let the
people unite as they did in 1861, to
save the Union. The importance of
this year's election cannot be over
estimated. The weal or woe of
seventy millions of Americans de
pends on the result of this contest.
Let us be patriotic and true, and
let our motto be, "Country first,
and party afterwards."
TO THE FAITHFUL SLAVES.
Polk Miller, of Virginia, that
polished gentleman and splendid
dialectician, was the orator on the
AMAAnann t- 4 It 4 n rm "f- m I
ututuiuu ui iuc uuvc.uu ui. a uiuu-
ument "To the Faithful Slaves of
the Confederacy," at Fort Mill, S.
C May 31, 1896. This beautiful
monument was erected by Capt.
Samuel E. White, of Fort MiU, S.
C. Capt. White was himself a
large slave owner, and at the out
break of the war was among the
first to enlist in the cause of the
South, and remembering and appre
ciating the true worth of the old
slaves, has, at his own expense,
erected this splendid marble shaft
in memory of their kindness and
faithfulness.
The monument is surmounted by
a statue of an old-time plantation
negro as he rests on his hoe. There
is at the Oase a perfect representa
tive of Old Black Mammy pressing
tenderly to her bosom "Mammy's
Little Boy."
Mr. Miller, in his speech, paid a
beautiful tribute to the Faithful
Old Slave, and with consummate
skill moved the immense audience
to tears and laughter at will.
The above was handed us by
Judge A. G. Norrell, of this city,
a cultured Southern gentleman, and
a true friend of the Broad Ax. It
shows a teader sympathy and just
appreciation of the colored race by
the white people of the South.
Never will our race find truer or
better friends than exist on the very
soil where they were once held as
slaves. These white people know
us best; they understand our na
ture, our wants, and our hopes for
the future, and they can be de
pended upon to aid and assist their
colored brethren more than any
other people on earth. The negroes
of the South are fast finding this
out, and they will show their grati
tude by co-operating with their "old
masters" in fraternity and pros
perity. DEMOCRATIC NEGROES TO
MEET.
Call far a National Convention in
Chicago, Aug. 11.
Indianapolis, Ind!, June 16. A
call for the national convention of
the Democratic League was issued
today from the headquarters of the
exf cutive committee in this city.
The call is addressed to "the
members of the Negro National
Democratic League, and to all ne
gro Democrats who are in accord
with Democratic principles as
-,f w Grover Cleveland and
our brave leaders of the negro De
mocracy." The convention will be held in
Chicago, Aug. 11. Every loyal
negro Democrat who believes i in or
ganised negro Democracy is invited
to take part. The chairman of the
State League is requested to see
that the convention is called in
srifficiemt time.
The States will be allowed dele
gates in proportion to the number
of votes cast for Ckvekad in 1892.
The coaY8Btk, k d, will be
cos$Q6sd of at Its 380 delegates,
with a representation from thirty
three States. The call is signed by
A. E. Manning, Chairman of the
Executive Committee, Negro Na
tional Democratic League. Press
Dispatch.
The foregoing plainly indicates
that the colored people are advanc
ing with the age. They are coming
in large numbers into the Demo
cratic fold, where they will be rec
ognized as American citizens.
Neither will one of our race have
any trouble in securing decent ac
commodations in the city of Chi
cago; the Palmer House, a Demo
cratic hotel, is always open to col
ored guests.
PROFESSIONAL.
MOYLE, ZANE & COSTWAN,
Attorneys andCounsellors-at-Law.
Deserct National Bank Bldg.
DICKSON, ELLIS & ELLIS,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Rooms 512 to 515 Progress Building.
RA Y YAK COTT
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
507 McCornick Block, Salt Lake City.
FERGUSON & CANNON.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
332 Constitution Building.
H. L. PICKETT,
Attorney-at-Law.
Mining Litigation a Specialty.
Nos. 81 and 82 Commercial Building.
Reference, Commercial National Bank.
CHERRY & TIMM0NY,
LAWYERS.
Rooms 93 and 94 Commercial Block.
Salt Lake City.
POWERS, STRAUP AND
LIPPMN,
Attorneys and Counselors.
EAGLE BLOCK.
SALT LAKE CITY.
RftWItlflS & GrtfTGflliOW,
Rooms 25-27 Hooper Block.
J. L. RAWLINS.
B. B. CRITCHLOW.
S. W. STEWART.
C. B. STEWART.
STEWART & STEWART
ttornnjs-at-gaw,
317 McCornick Block, Salt Lake City.
EUGENE LEWIS,
gttomty at gaw,
117 Commercial Block, Salt Lake City.
Real Estate Loans.
B. N. BASKJN.
E. O. HOQE.
BASKIN & HOGE,
tfomei5-at-pw,
140 SOUTH MAIN.-..
Sidney W. mike
John B. Andenoa
Darke & Anderson,
Attorneys-at-Law.
Rooms, 63-4-7 Hooper Block,
Salt Lake City, Utah.
h: j.dininny,
awjjfr.
Commercial Block, Salt Lake City, Utah
A. J. WEBER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
2103 Washington Ave., Ogden, Utah.
FRANK K. NEBEKER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Koom No. 2, Rick's Block, Logan, Utah.
SAMUEL A. KING,
first National Bask Building,
PBOVO, UTAHl
Sole agent for Touman New York Hat The
leader. We aim carry Stetaon's and
other flue hat.
W. P. Noble Mercantile Co.
1SS
Street.
HATS, CAPS i- GENTS' FURNISHINGS.
THp Sppiiritv ABSTRACT
coBK)iTiD J CQHrAilY '
Capital, $75,000.00
Office under Oeseret National Bank.
TELEPHONE NO. 142.
HENRY PEERY,
INVESTMENTS.
Stocks and Securities bought and sold.
10 Wcat2ad Soutb, .U Laksj Ity.
References: National Bank of the Republic
Kepubl
c, Ogde
Salt Lake, Utah National Bank, Ogden
Utah Poultry and
Produce Commission Co.
108 W. FIRST SOUTH ST..
------ ?sai T LAKE CITY, UTAH.
WALTER L. PRICE, Manager.
. Telephone 27. Manufacturer
. of Pure Ice Cream, Water
. Ices, Candies, Home-Made
. Bread and Cakes.
266 S. MAIN ST.
SALT LAKE CITY.
WHEN
BUYING
SHOES
Why not boj the bet there 1 for the
money on the maikeU
I ROBINSON BROS.,
The Shoe Builder, manufacture them.
SS W. FIRST SOUTH ST. SALT LAKE CITY.
S. D EVANS,
Undertaker& Kmbaliner
EZJtxs tics. :i3 sri.?x s?..
8AL.T L.AKE CITY. UTAH.
Open all night Telephone 364.
ATLANTIC TEA CO.,
h. o. MOSTEB, Por.
Aasirr ros CHASE & SANBORN'S
Teas, Coffees, Spices & Extracts
SSSd. H 1. FIBT.IHT STHKT.
WM. M. ROYLdMCE,
SPR1NOVILLE, UTAH, make a rpeclalty
of bojlDK and telling all kind of
WRITE FOR PRICES.
-SeU BICYCLES and Sundries
o Telephone 574 o
Washington Market.
313 Main St, Salt Lake City,
DAY, ROWE & Co., Props.,
Dealers in Meats, Groceries, Fish, Poul
try and Provisions.
J-
BOOT
AX.
AND
KROGH,
SHOE MAKER.
Repairing Neatly Dona
at Low Price.
Second Band Shoe
For Sale.
106 E. Second South, Salt Lake City.
REAL ESIATET
MINES AND LOANS.
A number of cheap Uoxxx. Bctlddto Lot,
Bmxza axs PmoarECTTTZ Bcima Bma, Bxu
nzjicx Piorrarr ajtd Fakxs for ale or exchange.
Alao MorESfMonxo Pbootcti and Mcrao Stock,
me at way down price. ICxzcvx, 8usuiax,
PzzrsTcm, and properties adjacent thereto a pe
ctalty. Mohxt to Loax at Tery lowest rates. Call
on or address,
GEO. H. KNOWLDEN,
43 VEST &x SOUTH STREET,
Salt Lazx Cttt, Utah.
N. B. It will pay Inrestor with large or small
means to call on or correspond with
Q to. IL KaowiDXX.
IflSTUCTIOflS
pjHaHaaaaaasKaasasaaaaaaaaaasW'
In Oil Painting and
Art Needle Work
OIL PAINTINGS FOR SALE,
BY '
I)rs. J. p. Jaylor, f.rt.5t,
Student of the Chicago Art Isstitnte.
Studio No. 710 Main St.
Wiscomb & Co ,
gmecMms.
The beat place for FasDr SappHo.
58 . FULST SOUTH ST.
No. 44.
I aiaValZ3TC;&Siiwai
saSlfLSiaK2iiaV
R. K. Thomas
Dry Goods
M E. Jfmvjfr if Co.
Wholesalers and Retailers of
Whiskies, Wines,
Brandies, Cigars,
ettc.
213 south main street,
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
ED. WILLIAMS,
MURRAY. UTAH.
Dealer in Wines, Liquors, Imported and
Domestic Cigars. Corner Saloon.
ED. WILLIAMS, Proprietor.
IL J. Gnmt.Prcs John Henry SmIth,VIce-Pres.
J. F. Grant, Secy, and Treas.
Director. John Henry Smith, Hber J. Grant,
J. F. Grant, B. F. Grant, Nathan Sears.
GRANT SOAP CO.
Office and factory, 75 1 to 76 1 S. 3rd West St.
Manufacturers of High Grade Laundry
and Toilet Soaps.
SPECIALTIES
BEE HIVE. ELECTRIC and
5c LAUNDRY.
Bee Hive Toilet:
PINE TAR, PERFECT FLOATING,
CASTILE AND
COMMERCIAL BAR.
J. F GRANT. Manager.
Salt Lake City, - Utah.
Cs-operative Furaiinre Co.
FURNITURE
CABPBTS
And Upholstery Goods, etc
Bicycles and Baby Carriage.
Best Goods and Best Prices.
11 AND 13 MAIN STREET,
SALT LAKE CITY.
Tin vnn manttnhavea hanPUD tinte.
something you wfll remember and look
back to with pleasure? Well, just go to
Browning Bros., buy a Bicycle, a ham
mock, a fishing rod. some of their sure
catch 'em tackle, a Kodak and a gun.and
when July 15th rolls round take yourself
up into the canyon, stay there a month,
and note the result.
155 MAIN STREET.
JOHN HEIL, Mgr. OKumajSU..
INCORPORATED 1805.
Mountain Ice Co.,
KM W. Third Socth St.,
-SALT LAKE CITY.
Txxrraoxx i&. UTAH.
F. A. SAKUTH
TAILORING Co.
Fine Artistic TAILORING atautt
nasi prlem.
rojPEC. SuiU --- - 500 and up.
FiUUEa. jta .... 3 50 and up.
Chas. "W. Hem, Cutter.
NO. 65 W. SECOND SOUTH
J H. TROMPSOjY'S
Shoe Dressing Parlors,
34 C. SECOND SOUTH ST.
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