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The broad ax. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 05, 1896, Image 1

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"It is Erkor alone which
NEEDS THE bUPPOET OF
GovernmektjTruth CAN
STAND BY ITSELF.'
-s-Vjfc
&-
Thomas Jefferson
bszfiszfisxAzt
Hew to the Line.
Vol. II.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, SEPTEMBER 5, 1896.
No. 2.
f "THE TOTTED STATES SHOULD SS AN J
EXAMPLE IN ALL THAT B GOOD, J
AND THE LEADING SPTBIT IN EVE8T
MOVEMENT WHICH HAS TOE ITS
OBJECT THE UPLHTINQ 0? THE 1
I HUMAN RACE."
f -WILLIAM J. BETAS. J
kL tJOssc-sryMMX-
JJLJ ' XsSESSfws
OUR TICKET
FOR 1886.
For President:
WILLIAM J. BRYAN,
OF NEBBA8KA.
For Vice-President:
ARTHUR SEWALL,
OF MAINE.
McKINLEY AS A LETTER
WRITER.
The long delayed letter of can
didate McKinley, accepting the
nomination for the high office of
President, has made its appearance,
and doubtless has been read and
studied by all those who were inter
ested in the key note of the gold
tandard Republican party.
The document is lengthy, and in
a short article like this we cannot
review it as fully as we would like;
but we will notice a few points and
call attention to the weakness of
part of his sophistry. Notwith
standing McKinley stands as the
greatest apostle of "protection,"
and his name is the synonym of
"high tariff," yet he discards the
chronological order of the St. Louis
platform, and treats the money
question as the paramount issue of
this campaign. In all his labored
argument on the silver question, he
has not advauced a single new idea
or answered logically a single ob
jection to the present .gold stand
ard. The gentleman says the Re
publican party is not opposed to
the use of silver money, but he
says: "Bimetallism cannot be se
cured by independent action on our
part." He is like the man who
called upon Hercules to lift him out
of the mire. Hercules told him to
first try and help himself, which he
did, and to his surprise extricated
himself with ease. As long as it is
to the interest of foreign countries
to keep us where we are, how long
will it be e're we shall get their aid
to establish bimetallism? "Will
McKinley answer? While this
would-be President confesses our
weakness as a nation to fix our own
financial policy, in the same letter
he asserts our ability to regulate
our commerce and trade through a
high tariff, which in some instances
would amount to a prohibition in
trade, and yet all this is to be done
without an international agreement.
In other words, England, a gold
monarchy, can .dictate our money
laws, on account of our weakness;
but England, as.a free trade coun
try, cannot force us to imitate her,
on account of our commercial
strength. The narrowness of the
man is shown in his remarks about
the bullion and mine owner. He
says: "The owner of bullion woum
get a dollar for 53 cents worth of
silver;" that "it would belong to
him and nobody else;" that "other
people would get it by labor or by
giving something for it." He then
goes on to show that these same
dollars could not be kept on a par
with gold, and that they would at
last become only 53 ceafc -dollars.
If this be true, then will be please
explain where the profit or benefit
would come to the owner of bullion.?
On the other haad, ie says: "R
the silver dollar cooU Ie kept
equal to the gold dollar, tbea we.
would have ao cheaper oey thas.
now, and be so sawer to get."
Alter
rach a Iadd bust of logfe,
the Buckeye Napofeoa mast have
felt weak. Tfce troWe with him
is, he, like all of bis ekM,cMt task.
oinostastk! otvft Wt tt of
gold. With him gold is his god,
his only test of value, the end of
the law. Why is the silver in a
silver dollar onlv wnrtti Fin .nt9
It is because the gold in a gold
dollar is worth 200 cents. What
we want to do, is to reduce the un
natural value of gold by bringing
it to the value of silver, by giving
silver an even start in the race.
Statesman McKinley makes the
absurd statement, that no matter
how plenty money is, it is just as
hard to get as if it was scarce. The
law of supply and demand has
nothing to do with it, according to
his idea. If they be true, then
why not abolish money altogether,
and end this vexed question?
He admits that we have now more
silver in circulation than gold, thus
conceding that we are now doing
business on a silver basis, with a
gold standard, but without the
gold. If this is not about as dis
honest a kind of a dollar as can be
imagined then we don't understand
the Ten Commandments. It is a
dollar 'of false pretenses. The
claim to be on a gold basis when
we have not two per cent of gold
with which to pay our indebted
ness. He attempts to give respectabil
ity to the old lie, that there was
less than nine millions of silver
dollars coined prior to 1873. He
neglects to state that thpre was
140,000,000 of silver coined prior
to that date, according to the offic
ial reports of the U. S. mint. The
object of his using the word "dol
lars" instead of the word "silver,"
was to mislead and deceive, which
is unworthy a truly great man of
such high ambition.
He asserts we have now in cir
culation more silver than a number
of other foreign counties. In this
statement he again goes astray, as
he says "we have 150,000,000
more silver money than France."
We have just $137,500,000 more
than France, therefore-he lacked
just 12 per cent to telling the
truth. But what of it? Does not
Mr. McKinley know that we have
almost double the population of
France?
That the Republic of France is
but little larger in area than the
State of California?" He did not
;'nrnrm the countrv. that while
France is far behind us in com
mercial rank, she is the most pros
perous nation in all Europe, and
that she is a bimetallic nation, anu
has $12.94 per capita in silver,
while we have only $8.77 per capi
ta. By implication he attempts to
deerade the silver cause, by reter-
ence to India, China and Mexico.
Yet he does not tell the whole
truth, by saying that India only
has $3.21 per capita of all kinds of
. P.hina onlv 82.08, and
Mexico $4.54.
Another ridiculous position is
assumea uj "' w
namely: According to his own
figures, the volume of money
hL decreased over $78,000,000 in
the last three years in this coun
try, and yet he gives it out that,
"the per capita for the nation, too,
has been practically the same for
the whole period.
With a population increasing at
j V.w h or.crnTprnor.
the rate of two million per year,
and the volume of money decreas
ing at the rate of twenty-six nul
li dollars per year, how the per
,-oiU of money can xeaaia the
JL is oae of the probteM the
A gotfbae cmb-
aleae- caa
pfjteftiLtMX p-
He talks about "opening up the
mills." "We need no more money,
but factories and mills." The
river has run dry, the ferry boat is
stranded upon a sand bar, and is
cracking and warping in the sun.
The owner is despondent and lias
nothing to do. Mr. McKinley
comes alone and savs: "Mv friend. t
why don't you build more ferry
boats?" "If you had more boats
and confidence vou could make!
uu u.u "
This mav sound all
owner would un-.
"If there was
more money,
right; but the
doubtedly say:
tyof water in the river, I could do,
very
well with the boat I now
have."
When money is scarce the river , doVm jomed Jq a choru9 and
of trade is low; everybody begins to made tfae h()use gong
economize; they eat less, wear less, The mus;c and singing was a rare
take less pleasure, and buy less of treat, and our sincere wish is that
the producer. The producer in long may live the Bryan Silver
turn produces less, and cuts down j Quartette, and success to its organ
, . . , , , , A, ., izer, Mr. Wm. Macon,
his force of help; and thus tne 1.
laborer is out of employment, and I
all suffer. Mr. McKinley has ab- j
solutely failed to grasp the situa- j
tion of his countrymen. He shows
himself to be the willing tool of
the money power, and ready to
carry out their demands. He is not
a free man himself, having been
bought and paid for by the Hanna
syndicate, and he stands ready to
deliver the goods. But the people
of this country are not yet ready to
turn our financial policy over to the
gold barons of England and New
York.
After a careful reading of this
long-winded effort, it is clearly ap
parent to any one that the author
of this letter was trying to write to
please his bosses, and discharge a
legal obligation, rather than express
the sentiments that honestly sug
gested themselves to his mind. The
poor man had to perform a con
tract, and he done the best be could
with the material on hand.
LET US HAVE UNITY.
The action of the Democratic
State and County comm.ttees, in
appointing conference committees,
is commendable, and should meet
with a hearty co-operation from all
the patriotic friends of free silver.
In union there is strength. This is
a year of unusual political affilia
tion. The people are breaking
away from old party ties, and unit
ing for a common purpose of self"
preservation. This is no time for
partisanship to rise above the in
terest of home and country.
There are hundreds, yea, thous
sauds of pure, honest men and wo
men in Utah and in Salt Lake
county, who have heretofore been
identified with the Republican par
ty, who now seek to secure the free
minaee of silver and elect Mr.
Bryan President of the United
States. They must know that the
mere election of Bryan could not
accomplish the enactment of a free
silver law, unless he was sustained
by a majority in both houses of
Congress. Therefore the election
of a free- silver Senator, and mem
ber of the House .of Representa
tives from Utah, is as important as
to have the electoral vote of Utah
cast for Mr. Bryan. To make sure
of this result, all true silver men,
be they Democrats or Republicans,
should unite their strength. To
accomplish this, there should be an
understanding between all parties
as to a plan f action. The Broad
Ax favors an equitable division of
local offices, such as members of
the legislature, county sad precinct
ogees, imnnp the varkwu Irieads
of silver, regardless of their former
political opinions. In other words,
we favor fusion on a fair and
equitable basis.
If this can be done, then Utah
will not only give Bryan the clcc-
toral vote, but will send men to
Congress who will hold up his
hands
MERRY SERENADERS.
On Thursday night of last week,
Mr. and Mrs. juiius F. Tavior
I , , ... ,
i were honored with a serenade from
the B Si,ver Quartette com.
pleii-l, . Mr , ,..,.
MacQn md J(jhn Htr,
After several
delightful
selections
were nlaved on tht miitnr mid man-
PROFESSIONAL.
MOYLE, ZANE & COSTIGAN,
Attorneys andCounsellors-at-Law.
Deseret National Bank Bldg.
DICKSON, ELLIS & ELLIS.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Rooms 512 to 515 Progress Building.
RA Y YAK COTT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
507 McCornick Block, Salt Lake City.
FERGUSON & CANNON.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
332 Constitution Building.
E. L. PICKETT,
Attorney-at-Law.
llining Litigation a Specialty.
Nos. 81 and 82 Commercial Building.
Reference, Commercial National Bank.
L. M. ARMSTRONG,
Attokxxt ass-Oouxsxlob at law. .
SI Commercial Block,
SALT LAKE CITY.
I Predict ia all lie Court:.
CHERRY & TIMMONY,
LAWYERS.
Rooms 03 and 01 Commercial Block.
Salt Lake Citt.
GRAHAM F. PUTNAM.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
31 32 Commercial Block, Salt Lake City.
M A. ROBERTSON,
ATTORNET-AT-LAW.
Room 214 Atlas Block, Salt Lake Cit.
POWERS, SIRAUP AND
LIPPMAN,
Attorneys and Counselors.
EAGLE BLOCK, - SALT LAKE CITY.
HflWMflS & GRITGflltOW,
Rooms 25-27 Hooper Block.
j. L. RAWTJNS.
S. B. CRITCHLOW.
S. W. STEWART.
C B. STEWART.
STEWART & STEWART
W0rnttS-at-saw,
317 McCornick Block, Salt Lake City.
EUGENE LEWIS3
ttarxty at gau;,
117 Commercial Block, Salt Lake City.
Real Estate-Loans.
R. X. BASK1N.
E. D. BOOK.
BASK1N & HOGE,
gMrMUS-at-sGaw,
140 SOUTH MAIN-.
H! J.DININNY,
sax$tf.
Commercial Block, Salt Lake City, Utah
A. J. WEBER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
&408 Wat&tatgteB AveOzdaa, Utak.
SAMUEL A. KING,
grttortuij.
First National Bank Building,
PROVO, UTAH.
Sola agents (or Tomnan' New York Ht The
Lrader. We io carry blebtnn'a and
other fine hat.
W. P. Noble Mercantile Co.
ISO 7VTw-i Street.
HATS, CAPS & GENTS FURNISHINGS.
The Security gg
Capital, J75.000.00
Office under Deseret National Bank.
TELEPHONE NO. 142.
HARRIS & WILSON,
NO. 15 WEST
SECOND SOUTH ST.
Companies
Bepreaented
Queen,
Connecticut
American
Central, and
New York
Undenrrit-
Barnes-Hardy Co.
28-80 Main Street
Lowest prices for Family supplies,
Dry Goods, Shoes, etc.
TRY THEM.
MTTATiri MA2JUFACTOBER OF
. HUJrr.Fine Candies
AND CONFECnONEBS' SUPPLIES.
Jobber of Nuts, Etc Telephone 301.
117 S. West Temple, 8alt Lake City.
Utah Poultry and
Produce Commission Co.
108 W. FIRST SOUTH ST..
iSALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
WALTER L. PIUCE, Manager.
. 9. IBELEY,
. Telephone 27. Manufacturer
. of Pure Ice Cream, Water
. Ices, Candies, Home-Made
. Bread and Cakes.
266 S. MAIN ST. SALT LAKE CITY.
WHEN
BUYING
SHOES
Why not bur the best there Is for the
money on the market.
ROBINSON BROS.,
The Shoe Builders, manufacture them.
35 W. FIBST SOUTH ST. SALT LAKE CITY.
S. D EVANS,
Undertaker& Embalmer
E2JBS 21X3, !li S7ATZ ST..
8AL.T LAKE CITY. UTAH.
Open all night. Telephone 36L
o Telephone 674 o
"Washington Market.
313 Main St, Salt Lake City,
DAY, ROWE & Co., Props.,
Dealers in Meats, Groceries, Fish, Poul
try and Provisions.
REAL EST ATJi
MINES AND LOANS.
A number of cheap Hoxzs, Bunxao Lots,
Bcsxxza xtd Pzosncrrrx Bcsocxas 8ms. Ezc
snez PxcrzxTT axo fAXia for sale or exchange.
Also Mzxxs,Momo Fxoarxcra and itrsiso Stocks,
some at vaj down prices. Xxxocx, Scxsxnx,
Pxxrrroax.and properties adjacent thereto a spe
dalty. UoaxT To Lout at rerr lowest rates. C11
on or address,
GEO. H. KNOWLDEH,
18 WBST 2n SOUTH STREET,
Satt Ioxx Citt, Utah.
X. B-It will pay lnTcstors with large or small
mean to call on or correspond with
Qxo. H. Kxowlsxx.
IflSTftOCTIOflS
In Ofl Painting and
Art Needle Work-
OIL PAINTINGS FOR SALE,
BY
Irs. J. p. Jaylor, frtltt
Student of the Chicago Art Institute.
Studio No. 7IO Main St.
Wiscomb & Co ,
The beet place for Fasafly Supplies.
58 E PLB8T SOUTH ST.
rgr s
BBBBBBBVaiBC''jxfcBBBH
HnBHH
Wholesalers and Retailers of
Whiskies, Wines,
Brandies, Cigars,
etc.
213 SOUTH MAIN STREET,
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
R. K. Thomas
Dry Goods
0. B. MEREDITH,
TBTOX FACTORY. : : :
Bicycle and Trunk Repairing.
29 E. First South.
TheMajestic Oil Cooking Stoves
Are now within the reach of alL
Take adrantage of these prices:
One-Burner Store tt-00
Two-Burner Store 6.00
Three-Burner Store ..8.50
The only safe, reliable and odorless oil store
msde others are experiments. The Msjestio Oil
Cooking 8tore Is better, cheaper and safer than any
gasoline store. We haTe reduced the price of
M fell M te
When buying get the best and cheapest.
H, D1HW00DEY FUBHITURE Co.
H.J. Qrantres. John Henry Smith, Vlce-Pres.
J. F. Grant, Seer, nd Treas.
Dlrectom. John Henry Smith. Haber J. Grant,
J. F. Giant, B. F. Grant, Nathan Sean
GRANT SOAP CO.
OFFICE MO FACTOIY, 751 TO 781 S.3tDWUTST
Manufacturers of Hig'n Grade Laundry
and Toilet Soaps.
SPECIALTIES
BEE HIVE. ELECTRIC and
3c LAUNDBY.
Bzx Hive Toilet:
PINE TAB, PEBFECT FLOATING,
CASTILE AND
COMMERCIAL BAB.
J. F. GRANT, Manager.
Salt ulxx Crrr, - Utah.
Go-opcrative Foriiiture Cd.
XTTTATi"
IS Z23
FURNITURE
CARPETS
And Upholstery Goods, etc.
Bicycle and Baby Carriages.
Best Goods and Best Prices.
11 AND 13 lim STREET,
SALT LAKE CITY.
JOHN HEIL, Mgr. muanlttl.
INCORPORATED 1895.
Mountain Ice Co.,
SU W. Third Sooth St
.-SALT LAKE CITY.
TssXzrsoxx 43.
UTAH.
F. A. SAKUTH
TAILORING Co.
Flat Arttette TAHVeKIHO attawsw
tste yrleesr.
PRICES: 2,
360aadBp.
Chas. "W. Hchl, Cutter.
NO. 65 W. SECOND SOUTH.
J E. TEOMPSOJV'S
Shoe Dressing Parlors)
34 CSCCONO SOUTH ST.
"...N-rsx'
?' ? "
,-i
..CI
-cr-

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