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The broad ax. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, February 13, 1915, Image 4

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THE BROAD AX
(857 rBDS&AXi 8TBZBT,-CHICAGO. ILL
PBJ3M:
fCtXUB T. TAYLOR, Editor aad PaMUhar
Entered ae Becond-CUss Katter Aatr. 1.
Ittt, at the Feat 0e at Caleag-e, HUaals,
aader Act ef March t, XS79.
THE STORY OF WENDELL
PHILLIPS.
By Charles Edward RusselL
When, before the War, Wendell Phil
lips denounced chattel slavery, he was
assailed by the slaveholding interests
of the South; when, after the war, he
rejected all proffers of high political
office and threatened wage-slavery, he
was assailed by the manufacturing in
terests of the North. In both instances
he threatened somebody's profits. That
was all, and for this reason Southern
fireeaters offered a price for his head.
Yet, in his long life of ceaseless ac
tivities, he debated for no crown, argued
for no fees," strove for no reward,
sought no place nor any fame, cared
for no achievements for its own sake,
and used his unequalled gifts only for
some cause of justice or freedom in
which he could earn nothing but
obloquy, hatred and isolation.
No, man ever gave up more for the
sake of his faith. All his brilliant
career was wrecked in an instant. His
friends and family deserted Tiim. Some
of his relatives declared that he was
insane and planned to have him con
fined-in an asylum. The press covered1
'"Elm with ridicule and abuse.
For more than twenty years -he lived
in daily danger of his life, with a price
on his head.
When a cause was won, as in the
case of the abolition of slavery in the
South, and in the natural revulsion of
popular feeling men sought to make
him its hero, he put aside their tributes
and demanded their attention to the
next unpopular reform.
Compared with such a career, the
stories of the men that on the grounds
of material triumph have won place
in the world's regard, seem poor indeed.
They toiled for themselves, or for the
glory of achievements.
This man's single and unselfish pur
pose was to win better conditions for
the "unfortunate, wherever they might
be, to strive against injustice, to fur
ther brotherhood, to spread liberty.
As ardently as other men sought
wealth and power, he sought the Com
mon Good.
The above is an outline of the story
of Wendell Phillips by Charles Ed
ward Bussell who is a magazine and
newspaper writer with a world wide
reputation and we only wish that it
was possible for every Colored man
throughout the United States to read
this wonderful little, book which con
sists of 185 pages, including many glow
ing passages from the brilliant orations
of Mr. Phillips which is -in neat, strong
cloth binding and retails at the small
sum of 50 cents postpaid, it is pub
lished by Charles H. Kerr and Company
US West Kinxie Street, Chicago.
Por if the Colored men would do so
-it -would cause them to become bold
and fearless and they would naturally
feel like renewing the fight in behalf
of Justice, Liberty .and a new freedom.
After reading this new story of 'the
life of Wendell Phillips and what he
wasforced to endure -during his long
and great struggle for the cause of
Justice for -all mankind, it would grad
ually dawn upon the minds of the
Colored -men those who are not coward
ly slaves; that liberty or freedom never
descended from the starry heavens
Above to this earth, arrayed in her na
tive purity tot the' Bpeeial benefit of
any one race of people ihat all races
of mankind must raise themselves upj
to liberty or the new freedom, if it
seeds be -through anarchy and bloody
revolution;
- Mi and" Mrs. William Boblnson, who
' owna nice two fiat bufldinir at -8511
r" Federal Etrcetj are Jotli ,warm Bup
?j?orters of Hon.J)scaV pi Priest'forthe
TiswiTTTatiaa for Alderman of the second
ward. -j.
GBITFIN'S POLITICAL MASS
MEETING AT "PEXIN THEATER
MONDAY UVEHINa" A GRAND
SUCCESS.
By BetttyT Forston.
The hand bills, that were distributed
throughout the second wardior the
Chas. A. Griffin meeting drew a very
large crowd. The crowd was very
much surprised to find that the first
part of the entertainment was moving
pictures. But those people who at this
particular crisis are most interested in
the issues which concern us as a race,
grew impatient and shouted, "Start
the speaking; ake the movies off,"
and to follow the whim of the crowd
the chairs were carried to the stage
and many of our prominent leaders
took their seats. AaDr. Harlan began
to speak, the manager of the theater
told the door man. that the house was
full to overflowing .and no one else was
to be admitted. Attorney J. S. Simms
followed the chairman's speech, but ow
ing to illness was not able to speak
very long. Mr. Parker followed with
an original poem dedicated to Mr. Grif
fin, and it was well received. Mr. Wm.
B. Cowan caused an uproar when he
told the audience that Mr. Oscar De-
Priest was wrong when he said that
the former had no time for the women
of our race. Mrs. McKinley, the or
ganizer of a Griffin woman's club, was
ntrodueed. Mrs. Manly followed with a
few remarks. Mr. Wallace made a
pointed speech. Then .Mrs. Phoebe
Whitley and Mrs. Brown rendered a
duet, "telling Oscar DePrieat what a
slim chance ho had." The song was a
big success. Bev. Callis of Zion A.
M. E. church was the next speaker.
Among the things he said, one was
about the women selling their princi
ples for a few dollars, and that he
would get his congregation to take up
a collection for them.
Mr. Ed. H. Wright was the next
speaker and he promised to give the
facts as they were and leave them for
the people to judge which of the three
men was capable of being alderman.
Of Mr. Anderson he said that "any
school boy reading law -for six months
could Ull .the position of assistant coun
ty attorney, which the latter boasts of
holding for seventeen long years. Mr.
L. W. Washington caused a not by
speaking of "Segregation, the Cause
and Effects." The address was so well
received that he was interrupted time
and time again by the deafening ap
plause, which prolonged his speech con
siderably. Mr. Griffin was then introduced and
an ovation which lasted for six minutes
was given him. He defended his abil
ity from the attacks of the other can
didates,- and when finished the audi
ence was well aware of the fact that
his research work and business ability
would make him the best man for alder
man of the second ward.
ENERGY OF MBS. S. W. GREEN.
Wife of Chief Pythian Official Handles
Important Details With Ability.
In most all movements having for
their aim the advancement of the race
women play an important part. His
tory records the testimony of many
great men, some living and others
dead, who attribute the source of their
success to the kind advice or assistance
and encouragement of a mother, wife,
sister or some woman friend. Mrs.
S. W. Green of New Orleans, La., wife
of Supreme Chancellor Green of the
Knights of Pythias, has played and is
playing an important part in many
movements for tho good of the race.
Fo a quarter of a century Mrs.
Green has gone side by side with her
husband in the affairs of life and has
contributed much to his success.- She
possessess rare business ability and
tactful qualities which make her a val
uable assistant in the affairs of Mr.
Green. She has both natural and ac
quired ability as well as practical ex
perience in business.
For ten years she. served as clerk,
bookkeeper, cashier and purchasing
agent for Mr. S. W. Green in Lake
Providence, La while he was engaged
in business in that town. She was also
a partner in the business being the
wife of the young merchant. She was
interested in him and assisted him long
before he became grand chancellor of
the Pythians of Louisiana. It was Mrs.
Green's zealous work and good ad
vice which greatly assisted Chancellor
Green in his upward climb.
Since 1900 Mrs. Green has devoted
her time and talent in helping to build
up the Pythian order in-the state. She
is private secretary to the supreme
chancellor, because most of the time he
is away from the city visiting lodges
and looking into details throughout the
country, and she is in: charge of 'the
office. She is well posted on the con
dition of the order.
Every morning when it is timo to
open the office she is there and- re
mains until dosing time. She gives at
tention to every detail. She is 4he.
banker and makes all remittances from
the office, so that when business claim
ing the attention of 'the supreme or
grand chancellor is to oe looked after
and he is out of .ihe city Mrs. Green
loks Rafter it jrcmptfy.T&e 'Pythians'
and members of zka Court of ..Calantho
are proud of her and. the service ahe
is .renderisgto tho order.
5HE BJOAD CHIOAGO FEBRPABYlgj 3ftl5
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HnjH
Hon. A. J. SABATH
Friend of the Afro-American race who will speak on Abraham Lincoln at
Bethel Church Sunday afternoon February 14
MBS. ELIZABETH McDONALD HAS
GBEATLY ENJOYED HER VISIT
TO HANNIBAL AND ST. LOUIS
MISSOURI.
Mrs. Elizabeth McDonald, 6130 Ada
Street; superintendent of the Louise
Training School, for Colored boys; has
spent her vacation trip the past three
weeks at Hannibal and St. Louis Mo.,
and she has greatly enjoyed her visit
to those two cities.
On Monday evening January 31, she
spoke at Bev. G. M. Tillman's Church
and on Monday evening February 1,
she delivered .a lecture on "Rescue
work" before the Woman's Mite Mis
sionary Society. On that same evening,
Mrs. Carrie Wing, of Hannibal, enter
tained the Allen Chapel Choir, in honor
of Mrs. McDonald. On Tuesday even
ing February 2, she was the guest of
honor at the Literary and Art Club, at
the residence of Mrs. H. R. Bohon, 2027
Broadway.
She was also the guest of honor) rat
a very pretty social affair given by
her hostess, Mrs. G. M. Tillman 1254
Lynn Street, on her arrival" in that
city Tuesday, x January 26th, compli
mentary to the Ladies' Literary ami
Art Club.
On Tuesday, this week; Mrs. McDon
ald, departed, from Hannibal, for 8t
Louis Mo., where she will spend two
weeks.
'THE SILVER CHORD" POEMS BY
ADOLPHUS JOHNSON THE NEW
POET OF THE EAST.
The latest literary production by an
Afro-American; is a new book of
poems by Adolphus Johnson, poet and
playwriter, 718 S. Nineteenth street,
Philadelphia Pa., entitled "The Siiver
Chord" poems.
The little book, consisting of 48
pages, is very attractively gotten 4ip
and it sells for $1.00. It is printed 'on
fine Aberdeen book paper, highly glazed.
It is handsomly bound in olive green
cloth, with large gold letters ornament
ing the front rage "The Silver Chord
Poems."
Several of the poems in our humble
opinion, possess considerable merit and
any one could spend some time in read
ing the poems it contains with much
JCkV J3WLTC KSTHMEL
Strong and Inflasntiai Ceeasaaa-AsericaaciatlaMTnisJaesB nan and aesocratic
.candidate Xor. dty,cl?k ef CWcagte be Totd for'at &e primaries; 'Toe
d37 Fekrsaxy 234. "' - "
profit If its author could see his way
clear to sell the book for 50 or 65 cents
a wide demand would soon be created
for it.
ST. MARK CHURCH NEWS.
Rev. John W. Robinson, pastor of St.
Mark M. E. church, 50th street and
Wabash avenue, has proven himself a
man of exceptional character; first of
all, a minister of great ability; sec
ond, a profound leader and one capable
of doing great things. Note the prog
ress the church has made since his re
turn here. Surely God hath chosen him
to do a great work. The benefit of his
splendid sermons preached eaeh Sunday
is told by the fact of the growth the
church is making. Selecting his text
from "The Acts" Sunday evening,
6-8, "And Stephen full of faith and
power, did great wonders and mira
cles," the pastor preached seemingly as
never before.
The dramatic, reeUal last Tues.day
night was splendidly given under the
auspices of Ladies Aid No. 2. The cut
glass bowl was awarded to Mrs. J. T.
Bussell.
ALPHA SUFFRAGE CLUB.
The regular meeting of tho Alpha
Suffrage Club was held on last Wednes
day evening. -at the club room, 3005
State street. The club had planned to
decide on which aldermanie candidate
to support in the coming primary, but
were unable to come to any agreement.
It therefore decided to have a primary
of its own at the next meeting, Feb
ruary 10th, at which time the candidate
receiving the highest number of votes
will be the one it will support on Feb
ruary 23rd.
. ST. MARK: LYCEUM.
' The City Federation of Women's
Clubs will hold Douglass Day at St.
Mark, February 14th, Sunday after
noon. Opening hour, 3:30 p. m. All
aro cordially invited. Principal speak
ers will be Mrs. Ida B. Wells-Barnett,
Bev. John W. Robinson.
We are sorry to learn that tho fol
lowing ladies are on the-sick list: Miss
Lucile Beatrice Bobinson, Mrs. Eliza
beth Jackson, Mrs. Minnie King, Mrs.
Nona Williams.
Contestants Heed. Just
Two More Weeks! John
Whitson, J. N. Black.
shear Are the Last Two
to Enter the Contest. No
More New Candidates
Are Allowed to Enter,
to Compete for the
Prizes. You Win or Lose
In Two Weeks ! ! !
In two weeks you will know the re
sults of your work. In two weeks your
anxious friends will know that you have
a good race and a strong race right
up to the last minute, or that you have
failed to hold the pace required of tho
winners in The Broad Ax's $2,500.00
gift campaign.
A Great Finish
is certain because every candidate is
','on the job" early and late, combing
the city for subscriptions and getting
the subscribers.
Choose Your Judge.
Select somo interested friend to rep
resent you in counting and checking
tho votes. This work will be done by a
committeo which the contestants will
select. Select the person you want to
appear as judge of the contest and we
will draw three names from the list
sent in, and appoint them as judges.
Or have the names drawn by a responsi
ble party, to assure satisfaction to all.
Send in the names of the judges you
SCALE
1
$2.00 One Year
4.00 Two Years
6.00 Three Years .
8.00 Four Years .-.-
10.00 Five Years ."
NAMES -OF CONTESTANTS.
Mme. E. M. Scott, 3611 S. State St 124.500 votes
John Whitson, 3130 Wabash Ave 109,500 votes
J. N. Blackshear, 3815 Vernon Ave 105,000 votes
Miss B. Forston, 2962 Wabash Ave., Flat 6 76,300 vote
Bev. J. W. Bobinson, 4925 Wabash Ave, Pastor St. Mark's Ch... 71,940 vote
Bev. W. S. Braddan (chaplain 8th Reg.), 5008 Fifth Ave 47,050 votes
Miss Hattie Winslow, 3535 South Wabash Ave.'.. 45,020 votes
Miss Pauline D. Owens, Mounds, HI . 43,790 vote
Miss Nellie Callaway, 3300 Bhodes Ave 21.000 Tote
Alma G.-Sowens, 3228 Calumet Ave 8,000 votes
Miss Stella E. McCoy, 6155 Wentworth Ave 5,000 vote
THE HYDE PARK NEWS
By L. W. Washington.
Ve are indeed sorry to hear of so
much sickness and suffering we are
having in Hyde Park at this time Mrs.
Piggott of 5537 Kimbark Ave. is very
sick and has been for quite a while.
Mrs. Mattio Brooks of 5037 Lake
Park Ave. is still very low.
Mrs. Eva Baymoro of 5606 Lake
Park Ave. is just about the same.
Hard times and sickness is makintr
severe inroads upon this people. May
the change soon come for the better.
The drama given by tho St. Solo
mon's Club was very good, but owing
to the inclemency of the weather, the
attendance, was not so large, although
financially it was a success. It was
given for the benefit of the Hyde Park
A. M. E. Church, W, H. Griffin, Pas
tor, Mrs. Annie L. Shelby Pres.
Mrs. Wilson the sister of Chas. A.
Griffin is on the sick list.
Mrs. Mary Blair of 5338 Kenwood
Ave. is very sick in the Post Graduate
Hospital. After undergoing two oper
ations, she .is resting easy at this writ
ing; we hope for her a speedy re
covery. Mrs. Mary Madison ofXlSW East
53rd St. is on the sick list.
Mrs. Flanigan of 5221 Lake Park
Ave. who has been- sick for quitea
while is now convalescing.
-Quarterly meeting will be observed
at the Hyde Park A. M. E. Church
xeoruary j.n as a . iU The chureh
would be pleased to have as manv to
attend as possible, W. ff. Griffin, "pasA-
V v
L. W. WashinetQn.OBATOa.ami
UBOTUBBS will address the Star later
select before Wednesday. February i;
1915. The names of the judges and tie
closing rules will apiar m the not
issue of The Broad Ax.
The Two New Candidates
promise to make a strong fight for tie
machine. They entered the eoatM
with that "vim and enprrv ,.
threatens to carry all before thea.
With the end of the contest drawii?
near, tho fight is becoming hot; tie
contestants are realizing that the prizes
offered by The Broad Ax to the popuhr
people are not things of 'dream aj
air," but real. And with the realiza
tion that the contest will positively
close on March 1st, and that we ;rin
give away the gifts advertised in Tie
Broad Ax, the contestants have ftnaHj
lost their indifference and have becore
very energetic; in fact, so much so that
the finish promises to be a hard tgit
for the first prize.
WHO IS THE MOST POPULAB
PEBSON?
OF VOTES.
1,000 votes
3,000 vciei
6,OOOTota
10,000 votei
15fiWitta
ary Society at 4 P. M. at the Zber
nezer Baptist Church. Subject, "Tne
and False Leadership ' '. A fine nnsie
al program will be rendered.
PHYLLIS WHEATLEY NOTES.
The Phyllis Wheatley Woman's Club
will meet at the residence of Urs. i
E. Hunter, SOS E. 41st street, Wednes
day, February 17th, at 2 p. m. Uns
eal and literary program. Visitors are
welcome.
Elizabeth Lindsay Davis,
President.
Jessie Taylor Johnson,
Secretary-Treasurer.
DR. H. REGINALD SMITH, ATTES
HIS SOJOURN IN ETJEOPE, IS
AGAIN READY TO LOOK ATTES
HIS MANY PATIENTS.
Several weeks ago it was annoMW
in these columns that Dr. H. KegiM"
Smith had returned home from Londos,
England, where for nice months be it
tended the London University, drisi
ing in many special studies in ailvanew
medicine and surgery, and Dr. Sroiu
announces with pleasure that be
again ready to administer to ta
wants of his many old V1"
as well as new ones; that he
impart to them the best medical sW
which he acquired abroad.
?
CHIPS
r- a Tir t. riinkscale bTe
JUX. 2U1U JUJO. ." " -,
removed from 5S39 S. Wabash aven
to 5652 S. State street.
e-i j, :- Ppbru3rv
luncheon wffl be given at heppg.
tox Club in honor of vt. '
Smith" and Mr. Julian Lewis,
University of Chicago.
JLi.
.5-";

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