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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, March 11, 1922, Image 1

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THE BROAD
AX
C CENTS
per copy
v-
VOL.
XXVIL
CHICAGO, ILL, SATURDAY, MARCH II, 1922
No. 25
lead The Broad Ax aBdlte
happy ,
" T
'
The Fort Dearborn Hospital
Hands of the Receiver,
A.
Setting
Items k. Sullivan, ot the Superior Court.
SOME OF THE LAWYERS CONNECT
ED WITH THE COURT PROCEED
INGS OF THE FORT DEARBORN
HOSPITAL CONTEND THAT THE
R. W. EYSTER LINEN COMPANY
AND THE COLONIAL HOSPITAL
SUPPLY COMPANY HAVE ON THE
SLY RECEIVED SIXTEEN HUN
DRED DOLLARS WHICH WAS COM
ING TO THEM FROM THE FORT
DEARBORN HOSPITAL, WHILE ITS
NUMEROUS OTHER CREDITORS
HAVE BEEN LEFT HANGING HIGH
AND DRY.
Prior to the last stormy meeting of
tie Board of Trustees of the Fort
Darborn Hospital on January 26,
1922, and at the first meeting of the
newly elected members of the Board
of Trustees November 22, 1921, be
fore we -would consent to become one
of the members of the executive com
oiuee, we informed all of the officers
jnd trustees present at the meeting
tilt the very first thing that we
would want to do would be to re
xaoTe the women's six-bed ward from
the main or ground floor of the hos
pital, that it had no basement under
rt, and that the thin cement floor
rested right flat on the ground and
tilt it was always damp and cold,
Tkch was unhealthy and unsanitary
for a well person, without saying any
thag about a person who was sick
or who enjoyed poor health; that it
dd not show good taste or culture
or refinement to have the door wide.
pen leading into that large room or
nrd so that anyone in passing
trough the main.hallway would have
oo trouble in gazing in upon the sick
b4 scantily clad, helpless women
P&ats.
After we had plainly set forth our
tiers along that line and declared
ki h was not the proper thing to
kve any of the wards on the main
or the damp basement floor of the
Hospital which caused it to resemble a
tortcher shop, our distinguished friend,
fr M. J Brown, finally admitted
flat what we had stated in relation
to the basement on the main floor
king damp, at least part of the time,
is true.
Xot long before that time, he went
n to say, one of the women patients
wHo had been confined, in that ward
wntracted a severe cold from the
dampness coming up through the floor
hfch transformed itself into pneu
monia ia i?i. 4li.ffi tn her
feath. The death of that woman pa- j
POST GRADUATE COURSE TN
MEDICDJE, SURGERY AND
NURSING
To Be
Held at Tuskezec Institute,
April 1 to 30
Seventh AnnasT" Clinic and Fifth
Annual Meeting of the John A.
Andrew Clinical Society To
BeHeldApril'3.4,S
Tuskegee Institnte. The second an
nnal post graduate coarse in medicine
and surgery at the John A. Andrew
Memorial Hospital, of Tuskegee In
stitnte, will open April 1 and continne
ttrongh April 3a At the same time
a post graduate course in.nBrsmg -will
conducted and on April 3, A and S
toe eleventh annual clinic of ibe Joan
A. Andrew Clinical Society will be
held.
The post graduate coarse in medi
ae and Surgery is open to all reg
etered physicians and .sargeons, and
31 consist of instruction and prac-
in the most modern theories, of
j&edicine and surgical methods The
Pital staff wHI be assisted ia con
acting the course by some of the
l0jt prominent physicians and sur
s in the country, including pro
fcssw of some of the leadicg medi
Williams
Forth Its Assets an& Liabilities Before Judge
tient simply showed that we had the
correct conception in relation to
maintaining a women's ward on the
main or the basement floor of the
hospital.
Coming on back to the last meeting
of the Board of Trustees January 26,
1922, it 'was not long after 12 o'clock
before the stormy meeting wound up
in disorder. Dr. M. J. Brown and
Mr. Alfred Clover tumbled to the
mat together in hurling charges back
and forth at each other. Mr. Clover
claimed that Dr. Brown and some of
his associates acted in bad faith some
way or other at the time that he do
nated $1,100 to the Fort Dearborn
Hospital.
Notwithstanding that fact, Mr.
Clover was willing to advance $1,000
that very' night in order to take care
of the monthly current bills providing
the doctors would sign papers releas
ing their interest in the hospital so
that it would-become a public institu
tiorstheyaajreed to do at the time
thatthe"$iO00i89pve was on for the
benefit of the .Fort "Dearborn Hospital.
For some cause or other, Dr. M. J.
Brown. Dr. B. R. Bluitt, Dr. C W.
Bibb and Mr. C Crook absolutely re
fused to sign away their interest in
the hospital and accept notes for their
monev. which would be endorsed by
Mr. Alfred Clover and by the other
officers of the Board of Trustees.
Hon. George B, Holmes, Hon.
Henry Stuckart ary: Hon. Emmett
Whealan wereiJireflit and each one
of them let it be "known that they
were ready and willing to contribute
$100 each to the hospital.
As stated before, the meeting ended
in a bad mess or colored row. Dr.
Brown lead in the bitter fight against
the members of the executive commit
f. inA ivhn 4t finally wound up that
was the end of the newly elected offi-
i'cers and trustees of the Fort Dear
born Hospital.
cal colleges.
The course in nursing, which is
open to registered nurses, will con
sist of practically evry phase of this
profession, including hospital manage
ment, operating room technique and
surgical nursing, private nursing, pub
lic health nursing, and sex hygiene,
with the alGer branches of each
course. As in the course of medicine
spared id the effort to secure compe
tent instructors to assist in conduct
ing this course.
Present indications are that many
physicians and surgeons and graduate
nurses will take advantage of the op-
. 'a: GrA Ktr these courses.
The John A. Andrew Memorial Hos
pital, which is of Uraae a ran,
splendidly equipped to conduct the
post graduate courses, and the loca
tion and prestige ot tne nosyii
well as of the annual clinics will fur
nish ample practice as is demon
strated by the fact that during the
post graduate coarse in medicine and
surgery last year, 1,136 patients were
treated, mciBOiBg o succeu u-j
operations. '
-n- Tt. A Wnnev fUrpetor of the
John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital,
announced that the post graduate
courses had receveo tne approval w
Will
physicians and surgeons and regis
tered nurses throughout the country
and that many men, eminent in the
science of medicine, had signified
their willingness to deliver lectures
during this period. Among those who
lectured to the physicians attending
last year were: Dr. J. Whitndge Wil
liams, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Bal
timore, Md; Dr. Frank R. Ober and
Dr. James S. Stone, Harvard Medical
College, Boston, Mass.; Dr. A. M.
Greene, American Medical Associa
tion, Chicago; Dr. M. L. Goodkind,
University of Illinois, Chicago, and
Dr. E. H. Carey, dean medical school,
Baylor University, Dallas, Texas. .
Dr. Robert R. Moton, principal, as
sures those attending of ample and
comfortable accommodations.
SENATOR OVERMAN ACCUSED
OF WATCHDOG A LYNCHING
The National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People, 70
Fifth Avenue. New York, has- made
public a published accusation that
Senator Overman of North Carolina
bad "looked interestedly on" during
the lynching 'of three Negroes taken
hv a mob from the Rowan County
jail in North Carolina. Senator Over
man is a member of the Senate Com
mittee on the Judiciary which is con
sidering the Dyer Ann-Lynching
Bill, passed on January 25 by the
House of Representatives. The"
charge against Senator Overman will
be laid before that committee, the
Advancement Association has an
nounced. The ehanre against Senator Over
man is taken from the Greensboro
CK C Daily News of February 28,
1922, which says editorially:
"Lynching take place m .North
r,rUna. extent in the very rarest in
stances, whenever and wherever a
mob has sufficient leadership witn it
tinrfertake them. And Governor
rmrn knows M. And the trash
and off-scourings of humanity which
make up the personnel of these tiI
lainoas murder gangs most often are
neither friends nor relatives 'of the
outraged persons and Governor Mor
and! Within
jig - - j$M8i$$b& w ''KrB
ftXg F X V -fry , vwAfif
HON. ROBERT E. CROWE
The Brainy and Fearless State's Attorney of Cook County Who Has
in a Very Short Time, 'Forged to the Front as the Far Seeing
Leader of the Grand Old Party in This Neck of the Woods.
rison knows that What 'friends or
relatives' either of the 'outraged per
sons' or of his excellency, who speaks
so knowingly of mob habits, broke
into that Charlotte Hospital and
lynched that wounded Negro? He
doesn't know nor does anybody else.
What friends and relatives of the
Lyerlys broke into Rowan jail while
Judge Long was there with a govern
or's high commission to hold a spe
cial court, took six Negroes from the
jail, lynched three, and without inter
est enough to wear masks, save for
the brute faces of the several execu
tioners, and got away with it while
Judge Long, Congressman Hammer,
Congressman Kluttz and United
States Senator Overman, Sheriff Ju
lian and thirteen special deputies and
the Rowan Rifles looked interestedly
on?"
Senator Overman is reported to be
bitterly opposed to the Dyer Anti
Lynching Bill.
A strong movement should be
started at once to make or compel
Senator Overman to hot-foot it out
of the United States Senate, for it
seems to us that he should not be
permitted to bring reproach upon the
members of the United States Senate
and everlasting disgrace upon himself
for aiding and abetting in a lynching.
EDITOR.
MR. BERT A. WILLIAMS, THE
GREATEST COLORED COME
DIAN IN THE WORLD, HAS
PASSED ON OUT OF THIS
LIFE
New York City. On Saturday eve
ning, Bert A. Williams, who was the
most famous colored comedian in the
wide world, closed his eyes in death
at his beautiful home in that city.
His dutiful and devoted wife, Mrs.
Williams who spent the holidays in
this city with her many friends, was
at his bedside at the time of his death.
Pneumonia was the cause of bis pass
ing on out
He had been in poor health for
more than one year. A few days ago
he completely collapsed on the stage
in Detroit, Mich., and was forced to
Is Almost Out of the
rt
nil
leave his company, which was pre
senting "Under the Bamboo Tree."
He was removed to his home in
New York City and blood transfusion
was resorted to in a vain effort to
save his life but he continued to sink,
lower and lower, and at last failing
to rally, when the end came.
Mr. Williams, who was 46 years
old, came to this country from Nas
sau, British West Indies, when a
child. He 'worked at odd jobs about
New York theaters in his youth and
after serving an enlistment in the
United States army went on the stage
He began his career as a banjo play
er with a minstrel show. Then he
and his partner, George Walker, went
into variety, as it was called in those
days, and made a name along the Pa
cific coast
In recent years Mr. Williams was
engaged by Ziegfeld for several of
his "Follies" productions.
He had a comedy method of his
own. The slow, shambling gait the
balanced intonation, the clear diction,
the skillful pauses, are familiar to
theatergoers.
Mr. Williams was well known in
this city and he had thousands of
friends among its white and colored
citizens alike. Only recently he filled
a long successful engagement at one
of the leading downtown theaters.
May he find favor in the sight of
the Gods throughout eternity!
SUCCESSFUL MEETIJf G AT THE
WENDELL PHTLLD?S HIGH
SCHOOL WEDNESDAY EVE
NING IN THE DiTEREST OF
THE PASSAGE OF THE DYER
ANTI-LYNCHING BILL BY
THE U. S. SENATE.
Alderman Robert R. Jackson Ahlv
Presided and Read the Contents
of die Bui
Resolutions Were Drawn Up and
Passed, Urging Senators MedQl
McCormick and Wffliam B.
Mc&nlcy to Work and Vote
for Its Passage
On Wednesday evening a fair nam-
and Inventory,
GOVERNORS OF SOME OF THE LEAD
ING STATES IN THE UNION:
MAYORS OF SOME OF THE MOST
PROMINENT CITIES; ROMAN
CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT
BISHOPS AND MANY COLLEGE
PRESIDENTS ARE AMONG THE
SIGNERS OF THE ANTI-LYNCHING
MEMORIAL TO THE UNITED
STATES SENATE.
The following Memorial to the
United States Senate was read and
adopted at an Anti-Lynching Mass
Meeting held by the National Asso
ciation for the Advancement of Col
ored People, in the Town Hall, New
York, on the evening of March 1,
the meeting being addressed by Sen
ator William M. Calder of New York,
Representative Leonidas C. Byer of
Missouri, whp introduced tiie Dyer
Anti-Lynching Bill in the House of
Representatives; by former Attorney
General George W. Wickersham, and
By James Weldon Johnson, secretary
of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
Memorial to the
United States Senate
The killing and burning alive of
human beings by mobs in the United
States is a reproach upon our country
throughout the civilized world and
threatens organized government in
the nation.
Since 1889 there have been 3443
known mob murders, 64 of the vic
tims being women. In only a few
instances has prosecution of the
lynchers been even attempted. Amer
ican mobs murdered sixty-four per
sons in 1921, of whom four were pub
licly burned at stake
The House of Representatives on
January 26, 1922, in response to in
sistent country-wide demand, passed
the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill, which
invokes the power of the federal gov
ernment to end the infamy of Amer
ican mob murder.
This bill is now in the hands of the
United States Senate. The under
signed United States citizens earnestly
urge its prompt enactment.
Among the signers of the Memorial
are the following:
Governors Thomas E. Campbell of
Arizona, William D. Denny of Dela
ware, Len Small of Illinois, Warran
T. McCray of Indiana, Edwin P.
Morrow of Kentucky, Channing H.
Cox of Massachusetts, Albert C
Brown of New Hampshire, Harry L.
Davis of Ohio, Joseph M. Dixon of
Montana, Charles R. Mabey of Utah.
Mayors John F. Hylan of New
York Gty, James M. Curley of Bos
ton, Edward F. Leonard of Spring
field, Mass., George L. Oles of
Youngstown, O., Edward W. Quinn
of Cambridge, Mass., Daniel W. Hoan
of Milwaukee Huston "Qumn of
Louisville, Ky., Jeremiah P. Mahoney
of Newport, R. L, Herbert T. Cor
wine of Topeka, Kansas.
Archbishops Patrick J. Hayes or
New York, Henry Moeller of Cincin
nati, Michael T. Curley of Baltimore.
College Presidents and Professors
Charles F. Thwiug, president of
Western' Reserve University; Benja
mine He Wheeler, president Emeritus
University of California; Josiah H.
Penniman, vice-provost University of
ber of both men and women attended
the public meeting held at the Wen
dell Phillips High School -in the in
terest of the passage of the Dyer
Anti-Lynching Bill by the United
States Senate.
Alderman Robert R. Jackson ably
presided over the meeting, reading
the contents of the bill and urging
the Colored people in all parts of
this state to hold public meetings' ia
favor of its passage and to write let
ters, to United States Senators Medill
McCbrmSck and WilEam B. McKin-
Pennsylvania; Ellen Pendleton, pres
ident Wcllesley College; Ray Lyman
Wilbur, president Stanford Univer
sity; Bliss Perry, professor Harvard
University; E. R.' A. Seligman. pro
fessor Columbia University: L. M.
Burton, president University of Mich
igan; Ernst Freund, professor Uni
versity of Chicago: Andrew F. West,
dean of graduate school, Princeton
University; John A. Ryan, professor
Catholic University of America.
Editors Charles H. Dennis, editor
Chicago Daily News; Victor F. Law
son, publisher Chicago Daily News;
Edwin F.-Gay, editor New York Eve
ning Post; Phil J. Reid, editor Detroit
Free Press; C. A. Rook, editor Pitts
burgh Dispatch: Henry L. Mancken,
editor Smart Set; Royal F. Davis,
editorial writer New York Evening
Post; Paul Kellogg, editor The Sur
vey; William Allen White, editor
Emporia Gazette.
Bishops and Churchmen Rt Rev.
Chaunccy B. Brewster, P. E. bishop
of Connecticut: Rt. Rev. Hugh C.
Boyle, R. C. bishop of Pittsburgh;
Rt Rev. William F. Faber, P. E. bis
hop of Montana: Rt Rev. William A.
Leonard, P. E. bishop of Ohio; Rt
Rev. M. J. Hoban, R. C. bishop of
Scranton, Penn.; Rt Rev. Alfred
Harding, P. E. bishop of Washing
ton, D. C; Rt Rev. C. H. Phillips,
C M. E. bishop, Nashville, Tenn.;
Rev. Samuel Lane Loomis, secretary
American Missionary Society; Rt
Rev. William T. Russell, R. C bishop
of Charleston, S. C; Rt Rev. William
O. Shepard, M. E. bishop, Portland,
Ore; Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, New
York; Rt Rev. Charles E. Wood
cock, P. E. bishop of Kentucky; Rt
Rev. John Hurst, A. M E. bishop, ,
Baltimore, Md.; Rev. Charles S. Mc
Farland, general secretary Federal
Council of Church of Christ in Amer
ica; Rev. Charles E. Jefferson, DJ,
Broadway Tabernacle, New York.
Lawyers and Jurists Mocrfield
Storey, ex-president American Bar
Association; George W. Wickersham,
former U. S. Attorney General; Judge
Julian W. Mack, Chicago; W. Ashbie
Hawkins, Baltimore, MA; George W.
Kirchwey, New York; Charles H.
Strong, New York; Butler W. Wil
son, Boston; L. Hollingsworth Wood, '
New York; Clayton B., Blakley, city
attorney, Louisville, Ky.
General Leo S."Rowe, president
American Academy of Political and
Social Science; Edward W. Bok, for
mer e'ditor Xadies Home Journal;
Samuel S. Pels, Philadejphia; Talcott
Williams, former head Columbia
School of Journalism; Horace J.
Bridges, Chicago; Mary E. McDow
ell, University of Chicago Settlement;
Louis F. Post, former- assistant U. S.
Secretary of Labor; Florence Kelly,
Consumers' League, New York; John
G. Milburn, New York.
1
ley, urging them to vote first, last
and all the time in its- favor. :,
Hon. Edward D. Green, ex-member
of the Legislature of Illinois and
author or father of the Anti-Mob
Lynch Law Bui of this state, was the
leading orator of the occasion. He
was followed by Thomas H. Samuels,'
representing 22,000 Masons in Illi
nois; Stewart Jefferson, Prof. James
W. Eckelberger Jr, Her. J, A. Brock
et,1 and Richard E. Moore were, the
other speakers, and their remarks
were very timely and to the point
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