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VOL. XXVlt
SATURDAY, MAY 13, 1922
No. 34
5
Col. Marcus Garvey , President of the Black Star Line Steam
ship Company, Admitted on the Witness Stand in New York
City That More Than $600,000 Has Been Blown to the Wind
or Recklessly Expended by the High Officials of That Com
pany and by the Officials of the Universal Negro Improve
ment Association.
MILLIONS OF COLORED MEN AND
WOMEN IN ALL PARTS OF THIS
COUNTRY HAVE LOST THEIR LIFE
SAVINGS AMOUNTING TO MIL
LIONS IN FOOLING WITH COL.
GARVEY AND HIS BACK TO
AFRICA SCHEME. '
THE JUDGE OR THE COURT SEVERE
LY REBUKED COL. GARVEY WHO
IS NOT A CITIZEN OF THE UNITED
STATES FOR LEADING THE
SHORT-SIGHTED COLORED PEO
PLE INTO HIS WILD CAT SCHEMES.
AT THE SAME TIME JUSTICE
PANKEN IMPARTED SOME SOUND
ADVICE TO' THE COLORED PEO
PLE, WHICH THEY SHOULD
NEVER FORGET.
While on the witness stand under
severe cross-examination Col. Garve',
who is president of the Universal Ne
gro Improvement Association, as well
as being president of the Black Star
Line Steamship Company, which pro
posed to transport all the colored
people in this country back to Africa,
admitted that he was not a citizen of
the United States and that he had
onh resided in ibless than, five years.
In that short space of time, through
his exploits of various money-making
undertakings, he had persuaded mil
lions of people to invest their life
anngs in his project.
Tells of Losses
While on the stand. Col. Garvey
told the court the "Yarmouth" cost
$143,000 and lost $300,000 on her first
tnp, while the "Macio" was pur
chased for $65,000 and on her maiden
voyage met with a loss of $75,000.
The "Shadyside," the old ferryboat,
was also mentioned, but the price
paid for it was not stated.
The mythical ship, "Phyllis Wheat
ley." named after the nbted race poet
ess, was never seen. It is alleged
that advertisements "were carried of the
Passage to Liberia on this steamship:
CoL Garvey. himself, denied know
ing anything pertaining to the adver
tisements about the "Phyllis Wheat
ley," of which an investigation has
been conducted by the Federal Gov
ernment. At the time of the admission of
the conditions of the, Blade Star line,
Garvey had been arraigned on two
other charges, aside from thatbronght
against him by Orr.
James D. Brooks brought two ac
tions against Garvey; one for wages,
and the. other for loans.
ronrtttinnti Exposed - -Thej
expose of the conditions of the
organization came to light, follow
ing Orrs charge of. fraud against the
Black Star Line. Orr asserted that
ke attended one of the meetings ia
Liberty Hall aad heard Garvey tefl
the audience bow he weald doable.
within sixty days,.the mosey they in
Tested in taeirst stearaslup line,
owned, operated aad controlled hy the
ce. Orr pat m $105 aad has sot
even recehed a dmdead, Garvey -neaienuy
denied the accns&ioa that
be would guarantee any sach tha? as
the return of the money a tm
months.
While oa the stand, CoL Garvey
was suacc of jnaaaer'and proved a
skrewd wksess whea qsestioaed
about the. fiaaaces-of .the -Black Star
Line aad many of the other eater
Prises whkh.he has fostered.
Under Indictment
Brooks, alleged to be under indict
ment for misappropriating funds of
the U. N. I. A. was a former officer
of that organization at $6,000 a year.
He sued for $750 wages, and a ver
dict for that sum was granted in his
favor, while on the loan of $1,000 Jus
tice Panken, before whom all of the
cases were aired, decided against him,
as no proof was shown he had given
the money.
Brooks asserts the officers of the
association which had a membership
of 4,500.000 people, were permitted to
draw whatever money they desired
for expenses
At the finish of the trial Justice
Panken, in addressing-his remarks to
Garvey, said: "It seems to me that
you have been preying upon the gulli-Mlitx-
of vour own people, having
kept no proper accounts of the money
received for investment, being an or
ganization of high finance in which
the officers received outrageously
Ktrh salaries and were permitted to
have exorbitant expense accounts for
pleasure jaunts throughout the coun
try. I advise these 'dupes' who have
contributed to these organizations to
go into court and ask for the appoint
ment of a receiver. You should have
taken this $600,000 and built a hos
pital for colored people in this city in
eMf1 of nnrchasincr a few old boats.
There is a form of paranoia which
manifests itself in believing oneseu
to be. a great man.
"From the evidence brought out,"
caM Tnstice Panken when later seen
in chambers, "these various move
ments that have been fostered Dy
fz-,rv liaire takfn millions of dollars
out of the pockets of the colored
people. In the Universal Negro im
provement Association he claims a
membership of 4,500,000. who have
been paying dues. He says nothing
.-- t-ff of the Black Star Line, a cor
poration he formed which told of won
derful shipping developments among
his own people. All the officers cared
about was how nrach salary they
woald receive, besides enormous ex-
I pease accounts."
It seems that the vast majority ot
- ,tA ole in this country are
always waling to follow wild cat
dreamers and with their ears cioseo. w
all reason aad with their eyes-shnt
:, tn-.. ;mnnn children, they are
mot rM5v to dost their hard earned
'money iato large rat Aofcs.aad'h&dly
follow that das ot toad-aaosttcea o
calledrleaders ofctfhewceSred race
Editor. " "
SBF
sSr
sr&tr
'VX.A.'S
SENATOR WILLIAM E. BORAH
DENOUNCES SEIZURE
OF HAITI
United States Senator William E.
Borah of Idaho, one of the most pow
erful Republicans in the Senate, has
tVon nn the charccs against the
American Occupation of Haiti, first
pressed by the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored Peo
ple. In a ringing lecture delivered be
fore an audience of 3,500 people in
r-,.. Wall. New York, lately.
Senator Borah declared United States
marines had invaded the black repub
lic and held it in military subjection
for five years in the interest chiefly
of New York bankers.
z,-nr Wnrah told the story of the
invasion of Haiti, of the overthrow
by military force of the riaitian gov
ernment and the setting up of a presi
dent, D'Artiguenave, who would be
subservient to American military au
thorities. "I am convinced we are in there to
stay unless American opinion brings
ns out." said Senator Borah urging
all Americans to make ineir views
heard. "Unless public opinion is
aroused, directed and sustained, we
will stay there."
"Don't forget that the soil of those
: :. !,.. nriest in the world
coaauio -
and labor is cheap and abnndant-20
cents a day is the wage, it nas dc-
.,- nMm for an independent
people to let it become known to the
world that they are in possession of
vest natural resources.
c.Un, of the atrocities charged
against United States marines, Sena
tor Borah saia:
v v how American marines
i- .i? That the storr of
can dc w ""- - -
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HON. OSCAR DE PRIEST
One of the Big Chiefs of the Thompson Wing of the Republican
Party in This City and County, Who Will Be Elected Com
mitteeman of the New Third Ward in 1924.
these people and the honor of the
American people, we ought to get out
of Haiti and but of every place where
c have no right"
Senator Borah's championing the
cause of Haiti follows a two year
campaign waged by the National As
sociation for the Advancement of Col
ored People. The initial expose of
conditions in Haiti was made by Her
bert J. Seligmann and by James Wel
don Johnson, Secretary of the N. A.
A. C P., both of whom were in Haiti
at the same time.
Several military and naval commis
sidns endeavored to whitewash what
had been done. But the X.A.A.CP.
continued the fight, helped Haitians
who came to the United States to pre
sent their case to the American Peo
ple, and finally" cooperated in the
formation of the Haiti-Santo Domingo
Independence Society under whose
auspices Senator Borah spoke in Car
negie Hall.
SUDDEN DEATH OF PROF.
RICHARD THEODORE GREEN
ER AT HIS HOME IN THIS
CITY
Early Tuesday morning, Hay 9,
Prof. Richard Theodore Greener sud
denly dosed his eyes in death in his
lovely home at 5237 Ellis ave. Cere
bral hemorhage was the direct cause
of his passing on into the next world.
ProL Greener was one of the best
educated and most prominent colored
men in the United States. He was
born in Philadelphia, Pa in 1844, and
attended many colleges and educa
tional institutions, finally graduating
from Harvard college with high
honors.
As .he progressed m Efe he held
several, important and responsible
positions withia the gift of his- gov
m
9Xt
M5
-S&S-
ernment, suitfi as United States Consul
to Bombay, India, and United States
Consul in Vladivostok, Russia.
In the midst of troops of warm
friends his remains were laid to rest
yesterday afternoon at Graceland
cemetery-
ATTORNEY JOHN R. AUTER
LANDS IN THE COOK COUNTY
JAIL, BEING COMMITTED FOR
EMBEZZLING MORE THAN
TWELVE THOUSAND DOL-
' LARS BELONGING TO THE
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
The first of this week Lawyer John
R. Auter, who is one of the most
prominent members of Knights of
Pythias in this city or state of Illi
nois, who has always had his finger
in the pie along with Lawyer Albert
B. George and Hon. S. A. T. Wat
kins and the other high priests of that
order when it has come dowu to hand
ling the money belonging to that qt
der, was found guilty before Superior
Court Judge, T, D. Hurley, of mak
ing away with more than twelve thou
sand dollars belonging to the Bene
ficiary Board of that order. Being
unable to furnish a fifteen thousand
foliar bond, to the great regret of
his many friends, Mr. Auter will re
main in jail until Saturday, May Z7,
when his attorney will argue for a
new triaL
Attorney Israel Cbwen, has re
moved his law oEces from the Ta
coma Bailding to Suite 400, West
minster Banding; telephone 7950.
Mr. Cowea will be dclightrd to meet
bis many clients and. friends at his
new location.
BOOK CHAT BY MARY WHITE
OVINGTON, CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
THE ADVANCEMENT OF COL
ORED PEOPLE.
'HARLEM SHADOWS"
By Claud McKay. Published by Har
court. Brace & Co. Price $1.35.
Postage 10c extra.
Claude McKay was born in the
West Indies and had attained to some
distinction there before he came to the
United States. He had written ex
quisite songs in the Jamaican dialect,
songs full of a love, for the simple
peasant folk and a longing for their
full liberty; he had. helped ,thc, street
car men on strike; he had received the
medal of the Institute' of Arts and
Sciences. And then he came to New
York. And though he sings of New
York as a city which he hates; we.
who love it, can rest content that he
stays with us. Hate is next to love
and far better than indifference.
"Harlem Shadows" centers about
New York, but to the poet's heart
again and again comes the call of the
Tropics. "It is. Easter Sunday and he
thinks:
"'Far from this foreign Easter damp
My soul steals to a pear-sbapea'plot
of ground.
Where gleamed the lilac-tinted Easter
lily
Soft-scented in the air for yards
around."
He stops at a shop window and
"Bananas ripe and green, and ginger
root. Cocoa in pods and alligator pears,
And tangerines and mangoes and
grapefruit flUf
t
recall the laden fruit-trees of home and.
the mystical blue skies. He goes into
the subway, the city's "great, gaunt
gut," where "the gray train rushing
bears the weary wind" and to him the
wind is captive, moaning for fields
and seas:
"Seas cooling warm where native
schooners drift
Through sleepy waters, while gulls
wheel and sweep.
Waiting for windy waves the keels to
lift
Liehtly among the islands of thi
deep."
The swallows fly north up from the
Spanish main and he questions them.
They have seen the children scamper
ing out of school:
"Do they still stop beneath the giant
tree
To gather locusts m their childish
greed.
And chuckle when they break the
pods to see
The golden powder clustered round
the seed?"
HOUSTON, TEXAS, BRANCH N.
A. A. C. P. GOE8 OVJZB -THE
TOP WITH L0 HXMBESS
The Houston, Texas, branch of the
National Association for the Advance
meat of Colored People, is the first
to go over the top ia the Association's
Spring-Drive, exceeding its quota of
1,060 meaibers, according-to anaosnee
raeatvmade at the national office, 70
Weary, he turns to the South as the
land of waking dreams.
"There by the banks of blue and silver
streams
Grass-sheltered crickets chirp inces
sant song.
Gay-colored lizards loll all through the
day
Their tongues outstretched for care
less little flies,
And swarthy children in the fields at
play
Look upward laughing at the smil
ing skies."
: - . . - . -,
When night comes he thinks of the
"dainty Spanish needle," the yellow
and white flower "shadowed by the
spreading mango." And in the New
York dawn of groaning cars and rum
bling milk carts, of dark figures shuf
fling sadly1 to work, he calls up his
island of the sea.
"Where the cocks are crowing, crow
ing, crowing,
And the hens are cackling in the
rose-apple tree." .
But America has a grip upon Claude
I McKay He tells us so in a wonderful
sonnet:
"Although she feeds me bread of bit
terness, And sinks into my throat her tiger's
tooth.
Stealing my breath of life, I will
confess
I love this cultured hell that tests
my youth."
He has written two great sonnets
uponJyaching and two unforgetable
picturesqfof women, Harlem Shadows
and The Harlem Dancer. As he ex
plains in his preface, America has
greatly affected his poetry at times,
but it has not yet taught him to use
tree verse.
Max Eastman, himself a poet as
well as a rare critic of poetry, has
written an Introduction to Mr. Mc
Kay's poems. I quote the end:
"The quality is here in all these
songs, the pure, arrow-like transfer
ence of his emotion into our heart,
without any but the inevitable words,
the quality that reminds us of Burns
and Villon and Catallus, and all the
poets that we call lyric because we
love them so much. It is the quality
that Keats sought to cherish when he
said that "Poetry should be great and
unobtrusive, a thing which enters into .
the souL and does not startle or
amaze -with itself bnt with its subject,"
It is the poetry that looks
upon a thing and sings. It is pos
sessed by a feeling- and sings. May
it find its way a little quietly and
softly, in this age of roar aad adver
tising, to the hearts that love a true
and unaffected sosg."
Fifth Avenue, New Yoric
John M. Adidas, Secretary of the'
Houston branch, in a letter tovthe na
tional office, says:
"I hare passed through four mobs,
lost everything I made in 27 years
through mob violence. . , . -Fash
Dyer Bill ia Senate push hard. Yos
have our prayers. "We never 'Jaieet
without asking Godto guide asdibless
you." vj - -
3.-
-1,
;.,.-

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