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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, August 05, 1922, Image 1

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BROAD AX
St-? ""! rf
id The Broad Ax aa4 W
i
XXVII.
CHICAGO, ILL, SATURDAY, AUGUST S, 1922
No. 46
lie Ku Klux Klan or "KriUts of the White Light"
rTrrjr"
THE
SCENTS
per copy
i mT
re Engaged in Laying a Debp Seated Plan or Scheme
;o Drive the Colored People Out of This Country Back
;o the Wilds of Africa. More Than One Million and
Half "Knights of the White Light" Are Scattered
hroughoiit the Southern States to Aid the Movement.
COLORED PREACHERS WILL
AND HAVE RECEIVED CONTRIBU
TIONS FROM THE "KNIGHTS OF
THE WHITE LIGHT" FOR ASSIST
ING TO TURN THE HEADS OF THE
COLORED PEOPLE TOWARDS
AFRICA.
:0L. MARCUS GARVEY, THE PRO
VISIONAL PRESIDENT Ob AfrKMJA,
EXPECTS TO CONTINUE TO RAKE
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS FROM
HE POOR SHORT-SIGHTED AND
thot Tni-rn .F cq mi .ORED PEO
PLE, HAS JOINED HANDS WITH
THE "KNIGHTS OF THE WHITE
xrrmy
lulVJ
TIME
MAY COME IN THIS COUN
TRY WHEN THE COLORED PEO
PLE BOTH MEN AND WOMEN WILL
BE FORCED TO FALL DOWN ON
THEIR HANDS AND KNEES AND
LAP WATER LIKE THE BLOODY
DOGS OF WAR WHILE FIGHTING
TO MAINTAIN THEIR CIVIL
RIGHTS ANQ POLITICAL INDE
PENDENCE. x
'HE FOLLOWING LETTER OR STATE
MENT WHICH WAS INTENDED FOR
ONE OF THE "KNIGHTS OF THE
WHITE LIGHT" FELL INTO THE
HANDS OF JULIUS. TAYLOR.
By mistake the following letter or
bffidal statement ' of the Kn Klux
lane or the "Kniehts of the White
Lieht" found Its way into the hands
bf the -writer instead of reaching one
bf the orosnective members of the
rKniehts of the White light": From
its beginning to its end it is full of
real solid food or serious tnougnts
tor reflection and its contents .shows
to all the nvilized world just what
the honest and the better class of
colored people are up against in some
Parts of this country, a country, at
Beast some parts of it, which for more
nan three hundred years has moomea
cd Mntcnmnt lfr the rose in June
by the nnrequitted toil or hard labor
fcy'and night on the part of the
colored men and women (slaves)
ironghout the southland.
Sometime we firmlv believe that it
"Quid have been ten million times
ietter for the colored neonle. those
who were left behind on the planta-
"Ons at the time their masters were
aay from their southern homes
aghting for the farther continuation
of the Hellish system of slavery in
this coimtW, if the slaves' would have
rebelled arthat time and put to dea'th
every rebelwho raised his hands
against the federal government, for
that would haVe been the "best and
onlv way to have settled once and for
all "time to come the slave holders
rebellion in this country.
The very fact that the slaves re
mained behind cultivating the large
plantations, protecting the lives, the
honor, the virtue and Vie homes of the
.,:. .nmn ami children left in their
absolute charge, counted for naught
and it has not and neve will bring
them any reward for tlieir services
honestly and faithfully perfonnea in
hat direction, hut: come to think of it
it r..mm., fiUUM Tve -xhA those
U1C "" .. .
-who have come after them are being
mnstantlv rewarded by being mobbea
and lynched, burned at the state on
t.- -i:,rJ,Mrf nrnracation in the "Pres
ence of forty to fifty thousand wkite
Christian men and women, iaclsdbi
KTreet. innocent little cniloren a
- . t. t j1
oarts of the fflesa 01 w ,
' HN1BHr&v H
HON. MARTIN B. MADDEN
Member of CongreM from tke Fkt CongrekHaI District of IUmott,
Who Will Assist President Harding to Review the Great
Knight Templar Parade in Washington, D. C, This Coming
Week.
BOOK CHAT BYMARY WHITE
OVINGTON, CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
THE ADVANCEMENT OF COL
ORED PEOPLE
"THE VENGEANCE OF THE
GODS"
By William Pickens. Published by
the A. M. E. Book Concern, 631
Pine St, Philadelphia, Pa.
Price, L25 Postpaid
victims who are treated tnusly have
been proven to be innocent of com
mitting any crime whatever, and as
ah.evideuce of the highest civilization,
culture and refinement on the part of
the so-called white Christians of the
south they delight to sell the burn
ing flesh of their colored victims to
the highest bidders for cash.
Bnt that is not strange when we
remember, that any race of people who
will cheerfully and willingly sell their
own aesn ana dioou mi mv. -.w
pilingiup wealth, are amply prepared
for the commission of all of the most
revolting crimes that-have so far been
invented by the most bloodthirsty vil
lains who have disgraced the name of
But at this point we will step aside
for a few moments and permit the
-Knights of the White Light" to. do
soae talking.
PURPOSE
"Knights of the 'White Light" (Kn
Klux Klan)
Dear Sir: In the fewest words pos
sible the purpose of out; organization
is this, to transport all "Xegroes" in
the United States to Africa, As there
is no law to compel the coon to leave
unless he wants to go; the first step
is to make him want to emigrate.
Every person who. joins this Order
swears among other things to assist
the coons to the conclusion that it
is to their interest to place the Atlantic-Ocean
between themselves, and
the members of the "KNIGHTS OF
THE WHITE LIGHT."
The first step of this progress in
persuasion is simple and legitimate.
The members under severe penalty
for the violation of this oath, swear
that after January neither they
nor any member of their family will
for any consideration:
1. Sell a Negro anything to eat,
drink or wear.
2. Rent them land, houses or any
thing whatsoever.
3. Nor will any lawyer, teacher,
preacher or doctrfr give them any pro
fessional assistance.
4. Fail to boycott any merchant
who sells to them or buys from them,
the same with hotel keepers or any
one se who is not a member. Mem
bers will not dare do any of the above
things.
5. Fail to furnish any Negro with
a ticket who desires transportation to
a seaport where passage to Africa
might be obtained.
Speakers and agents are to tell
them 4ftthe beautiful home across the
Atlautjrora whence they came. Nor
is the pVess to be idle, all manner of
magariuf, papers, pamphlets, cal
culated To excite a desire in them for
a homacross the pond will be scat
tcred'jmg them.
Ppoijiiites of the cities are to take
the Elites of "the Negroes wno are
now working the large farms and
plantation i. Landowners 'who insist
: (Cc&tinued on Page 2)
Mr. Pickens is well known to
Americans as a public speaker and
an essay writer, but he is new to the
world of fiction. The Vengeance of
the Gods is a slight volume contain
ing four stories, or to be more exact,
two stories and two sketches of ver
itable happenings.
I confess to finding reality better
than fiction. The tale of the colored
man who didn't take the upper berth
for which he had paid and who there
by got its occupant, a white man, a
good thrashing and placed the white
man who had planned to attack the
Negro "in a false and ludicrous posi
tion, is almost too good to be true.
It laughs at white prejudice, and the
finest attack that we can make on
white prejudice, is the attack of ridi
cule. And the last sketch of the col
ored soldiers in France, "Tit for Tat"
is the best of all It is the story of
the 370th Regiment encamped at
Grand Villars. I cannot resist repeat
ing the gist of it.
At Grand Villars, France, the first
American regiment to be stationed
there was a colored one. The French
saw these soldiers and learned to like
them heartily. The colored men were
on their best behavior and were polite
and gentle, to the women and hearty
to all men. They pushed the baby
carriages, they carried up the water
for the girls from the spring, they
were genuinely democratic, helping
rich and poor alike. The girls, of
course, all took to them, the doors
of very home was open to them,
and they had a royal good ime.
Then came a white regiment, and
as it happened a white regiment that
did not take the trouble to be as
courteous to the inhabitants as the
colored regiment had been. As soon
as the white soldiers saw that the
French girls had been inviting col
ored soldiers into their homes, they
were shocked and they at once in
structed the French in race prejudice.
But they overdid it. They overdid
it so much that they gave the colored
soldiers their chance. One of their
lieutenants from New Orleans got the
French folk of the town out to hear
him, and-then explained to them that
these new soldiers were not real
Americans. Could they not see it?
Hod they not violated all those ideals
oil democracy of which they had
heard so much? "We allow them to
lire in our country but they hate us.
Many of them are the descendants of
the Germans and Anstrians and have
ranch of the arrogance of their for
bears. We do not associate with
them in out country; we call them
crackers and pecks 1" And. crackers
and" pecks they were to the end of
their stay, outcasts, unable to receive
recognition from any of the French
people of Grand Villars.
Mr. Pickens says in his preface
that "If the Negro wants to be ideal
ized he must idealize himself.
A race must present its own case and
ennoble its own ideals." He offers
these four stories as a beginning in
this direction. In the tales the col
ored are the heroes and heroines and
the whites occupy a subordinate and
by no means an attractive place.
It is a question whether we can
get artistic writing if it is undertaken
on this method. Rather we shall get
the sort of writing that we dislike in
the whites, special pleadings. Those
who follow the custom, as Mr.
Pickens puts it, of showing the Negro
either as a clown or a villain, have
their propaganda, and.it is because we
see the propaganda that we dislike
the story. So if we are conscious
that the colored writer represents his
heroes as virtuous and heroic because
he wants to teach us a lesson, we
shall sense the propaganda and just
so far distrust the story. And when
the facts as in this volume are ac
companied with much comment from
the author regarding the Negro and
his rights we shall distrust it all the
more.
When the Negro begins to write
great fi uion, and he will before long.
he ?ill write out of the intense
creative impulse of the' artist. He will
show us the. Negro in his strength
and his weakness. And despite all
the weakness, the truth ofthe life
of the Negro in America is so ter
rible, that he will tear at our heart
strings. But such a writer must give
all his life to his work. He must be
content "to live in a garret aloof, to
have few fr'mds and go poorly clad."
No creative work can be done at odd,
tired minutts.
But I am reviewing a volume of
four stories, not the great novel of
the future. The stories are entertain
ing and the presage of larger things.
We hope that we shall have more of
them.
CITIZEN WILSON THANKS
MAN WHO SAVED SLAYER
Washington, D. C Former Presi
dent Wilson '"as an American citizen
and as a native of Virginia" has writ-
fen Commonwealth Attorney Thomas
H. Lyon of Manassas, Va., it became
known, thanking him for the part he
took recently In saving Alvin Harris,
colored, from a mob. Harris shot and
killed a law ofBcer. Attorney Lyon
put fiim in his automobile and, avoid
ing a mob, placed htm in jail at Alexandria.
&&&&&&.

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