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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, December 30, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1922-12-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE BROAD AX, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, SATURDAY, DECEMBER CO, 1922
BANK
H H-M- M-M-H-H-M-M-l-M-1-
I I I I t I I J I frm-m-rrrrrrrrr
SHAWL, PARIS FAD
Spanish Shoulder Decoration At
tracts Attention to Gown.
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Binga
fan n 1 1 1 n i n i n n i n i n i
Mr. Jesse Binga, President of the
Binga State Bank, was born In Detroit,
Michigan, coming from one of its old
est and most highly respected fam
ilies, receiving his common and high
school education in the city of his
birth; in time he received his early
real estate training in the real estate
business by assisting his mother and
father Mr. William and Mrs. Adelphia
Binga; in 1901 Mr. Binga decided to
permanently locate in Chicago, and
cast his lot with its hustling and enter
prising citizens, and the first year after
becoming a resident of the Windy
City, he became a curbstone broker in
garden vegetables, in fact he was a
huckster and with his horse and wagon
he sold garden truck up and jiown the
streets on the south side, to many of
the people who are now occupying
many of his houses and stores either
owned by him or under his control.
In the winter of 1902 he decided to
launch out in the real estate business,
and he opened a small office at 3333
S. State street. His capital at that
time consisted of a half month's rent
three old rickety chairs, a small flat
top table, an old worn out stove rest
ing on two legs, and a brick, but be
ing a hustler and full of courage and
pluck Mr. Binga began to do business
and make money right from the start.
On May 1, 1905, he leased the Bates
Building, 3635 and 3637 S. State St,
where he moved his real estate office
and he caused the white tenants to
vacate and colored tenants followed
after them and from that day to the
present time the complexion of the
whole neighborhood has changed up
and Mr. Binga opened the way for
LESS BLINDNESS IN COUNTRY,
Flguree Reveal a Gratifying Decrease
ef Terrible Affliction Throughout
tho Unite States.
Imagine, If yon ess, a city of 120,000
Inhabitants, where every tingle soul la
totally blind; where doctor, lawyer,
merchant, chief, along with The rich
nan, poor man, beggarman and thief,
are all In the same boat sightless !
America has the makings of just
such a city. There are more than 120,
000 totally blind people in the United
States, and many times that number
partly blind. The terrible part of it
Is that more than 57 per cent of blind
ness Is classed as preventable, a large
portion being the result of eyestrain.
It is encouraging to note, however,
that blindness In America has de
creased more than 20 per cent since
glasses have become more common.
Every other country has a far greater
percentage of blindness, and they show
a yearly Increase. Three of every ten
Americans wear glasses. Statistics
prove that seven of each ten have
enough eyestrain to warrant the wear
ing of correcting lenses. When we
realize the relation of good vision to
health and happiness. It is hard to un
derstand why sa many people neglect
their eyes until they are permanently
Injured. In the first draft of Ameri
can, soldiers In 1917 bad sight caused
nearly three times as many rejections
as any other physical defect. At the
Use of the draft 210,T08 sen were
examined and 2L88 per cent were re
jected beeaaee of grossly defeetive
vatazu ntestrated World.
Setae. One Better.
Oae ef the brightest "stars" a The
Wend Kbc" at the AeeJnal theater la
Xande Lent See stiffs aad aea
eharmlsffiy.
I aid at Lovat a vieit the ether
events, aad the asked ae'If I ae
aeare taa eae," I aadat.
Tire Uddtas were engaged la a brae
ftng Match.
lay assay's cone te the shoes Se
KT eeae bHU," said Jean, proadly.
"My aaaay tioeeat have te,"
sneered Deris. "The Ben ceeae te the
house for oars."
Here a another ef Mis Lerafa
stories.
"Georgel" aeraared the gki,
aestled clese to him, "dears are aoth-
ag but a newt" v
"Tea, and you've now broken eae ef
say habits," said the ysumg man, as
he sadly withdrew the remains ef a
Havana from his pocket London Tit
Sits.
"Pardners,"
la these days of bonding ceapsales
ad eaeraeas corporations the eld
narase, "Hie word was as feed as hJf
bead," has a homely seani. cad little
tales ef long partnership with never
a sard and fast legal Jaetraaeat aea
a what Is hie and what is ether's,
seem like eld tales out of the cast
Bat the ether day whea Sam Harris
aad Q eerie J Cohan rilssnTTtd their
ateea-year-eld partaeral-, Sue
a period of agreeaeat la taeftr
Joint nredacmg business la which as
esatract cm existed, aad yet
Mt eae where aere
; aJtthes eccar than la
are the eeae whea twe
efwaeeewerdaeea,
totether. Christian get ease
n 1 1 1 n i ii 1 1 n 1 1 n 1 1 1 n n :
colored people to reside on every
street and avenue from State street
east to Lake Michigan.
In 1908, Mr. Binga removed his real
estate office into the present three
story brick building which was erected
according to his instructions which is
now occupied by the Binga State
Bank, State and 36th Place. Shortly
after that time Mr. Binga opened his
private bank and safety deposit vaults
and he 'ably conducted his bank from
that year until Jan. 3, 1921, at which
time it was transformed into the Binga
State Bank. President Binga has long
since proven himself to be by far the
most successful and conservative Afro
American banker in the United States
President Binga and his good wife
Mrs. Binga who is one of our warmest
lady friends in this city, at the present
time pay taxes on more than seven
hundred thousand dollars worth of
Chicago real estate, their frontage on
State street amounts to almost one
thousand feet and there are very few
persons in this city who owns such
a long frontage on that rapidly im
proving thoroughfare, and Mr. and
Mrs. Binga who are a great credit to
the AfroiAmerican race, own large
blocks of stock in some of the largest
and most substantial business con
cerns in this city.
The officers and directors of the
Binga State Bank are as follows: Mr.
Jesse Binga, President; CoL John R.
Marshall, Vice-president; Mr. C N.
Langston, Cashier. Directors: Jesse
Binga, John R. Marshall, Oscar De
priest, W. A. Robinson, R. S. Abott,
U. G. Dailey, C N. Langston, H. R.
Smith and Rev. C H. Clark.
BRUSHES FOR HOUSEHOLD
They May Bo Divided Into Three
Classes, Which Are Bristle, Hair,
and Fiber.
There are two dasses of brushes,
those with backs and those with
out These come In bristle, in hair and
In fiber. It Is fiber and bristles that
are of special interest in discussing
household needs.
The backless brush has the ad
vantage of being usable in any posi
tion and thereby being at least twice
as long-lived as the brush whose only
working surface is one side. These
brushes are marvelously nude and the
bristles, hair, fiber or fabric (mops)
are ;o fastened in as to make a falling
bristle almost an impossibility. These
brushes come in every department of
house life: toilet bath, pantry, laun
dry, clothes, kitchen, halls and walls.
The Bussian pony gives the best horse
hair, and the wild boar gives the most
and best bristles. The test for the
bristle Is that It wIU not break If
bent back and will spring into place
again. The hair and bristle when
burned give a characteristic hair odor.
The fiber brush, though a cheaper
brush, la adapted to things for which
the bristle brush is not adapted. The
fiber makes a good scrubbing brush,
but the bristle would not be stiff
enough. Many fibers are made to look
like bristle, but the bristle test will
save you from a rash purchase. The
bristle brush is expensive and so la
the brush of camel or badger hair
from which painting and shaving
brashes are made.
Radium From Bohemia.
Government-owned raise at Jechy
bot, Bohemia, are turning cut ura
nium ore, rich In radium, and the
known supply Is said te he saSdeat
for 20 years at the present rate ef
production; In addition, there are
three large mines not yet prospected
as to depth. These facts are glvea
out by the Sdentlflc American. Twe
grams of radium a year are new be
ar produced and net pretts to the
Csechoelovak republic for the past year
were about 800,000 crowns. The ra
ttan Is selling today at 10,000,900
crowns per gram, a crown being now
worth about X94 cents. While pre
dactlon In the United States a greater
a quantity, the Jachymev ares are
reputed to be richer In aaality.
Caribou Swarm In Yukon,
Teas ef theasaade ef wSd caraea
are reported to be swaralag ever the
kills threagh the saearbt ef Dawson.
T. T, f er a radlae ef 60 afles. The
great herd, which aaaeally treks
through the datrlet, w new sseviag
northward. Large herds swtaaiag
the Yukon have Interfered with the
progress ef steamers. The herd to
so vast that the hnatag by aea, wea
ea aad children, who have provided'
nearly every hoae wKh deer aeat fee
the winter, has aade ae setireable
effect ea it
America's Pife Lines.
Ax eae Mae or aaeCMr twieet ewy
aarrel of on product I a, the United
Mates tr area threagt a pipe line. The
lew of en la the fifty theaeand 3e
ef pipe Use aever seeps. DaTereat
grade ef eft are separated frea eae
aether by -headers," which are
aerely partitions ef '.water three eet
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THE FRONT OR INTERIOR VIEW OF
THE BINGA STATE BANK OF
CHICAGO.
THE ABOVE FLASHUGHT PICTURE
OF THE OPENING OF THE BINGA
STATE BANK MONDAY, JANUARY
3. 1921, WAS TAKEN EXCLUSIVELY
FOR THE BROAD AX. READING
FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: MR. JULIUS
F. TAYLOR; SECOND, MR. M. T.
JOHNSON; THIRD, MISS MARVE
LYN CANTEY; FOURTH, MISS
. INEZ CANTEY; FIFTH, THE SIL
VER LOVING CUP PRESENTED TO
MR. BINGA BY HIS FORMER EM
PLOYES; SIXTH, MR. JESSE BLNGA,
PRESIDENT OF THE BLNGA STATE
BANK OF CHICAGO; SEVENTH,
MISS VIOLET GALLOWAY;
EIGHTH, MISS LUCDLE ADAMS;
NINTH, MR. HARRY GAINES;
TENTH, MRS. LUCILE FARMER;
ELEVENTH, MR. WM. JONES;
TWELFTH, MR. JOHN BELL.
Noted Dressmaker Stresses the Nip
ponese Note in Exquisite Out-
fit for Formal Wear.
The Spanish shawl has brought out
an entirely new type of evening dress
which Is nothing more than a simple
crepe de chine, low neck, sleeveless
robe which matches the shawl In col
or. There is nothing more lovely be
ing worn In all Paris at the present
time, says a writer In the New York
Tribune, than this type of dress, a fad,
as It were, among chic women who
wish to attract attention by their
striking clothes. When wearing such
a costume one looks like a brilliant
hued tropical flower or a bird of rare
plumage.
Recently at a fashionable restaurant
In Paris a charming outfit of this kind
was seen. A beautiful red-haired girl
wore a vivid empire green crepe de
chine dress and Spanish shawl. The
shawl was embroidered in enormous
peonies in dahlia shades, covering a
range from the beautiful dahlia pinks
down to a deep clematis blue. This.
In contrast with the vivid green of
the foundation, made Indeed a bril
liant spot of color. The woman wore
a chain of silver beads, braided
through her"auburn tresses.
Another restaurant gown In burnt
orange crepe de chine had an ex
tremely low neck, sleeveless bodice
and draped skirt It was entirely
without trimming and had a match
ing Spanish shawl, this embroidered
In the most vivid colors with deep
fringe having knotted ends.
It Is to Paul Poiret the eccentric
though admittedly talented Paris man
dressmaker, that fashion owes some
sf her more remarkable turns. Just
bow M. Poiret distinguishes himself
Dy emphasizing the Japanese note.
At a recent ball given in connection
with the dressmaking trade of Paris
a Poiret mannequin wore an exquisite
dress deddedly Japanese in effect,
with her coiffeur a la Japanolse and
her face made up to resemble a Jap
anese masque. The dress was de
veloped from black satin, silver fringe
and a gorgeous silver brocade, on
which there were Japanese flowers in
nattier blue and rose.
DRESS AND CHIC 0VERBL0USE
The feature of this charming out
fit, worn by a popular film favorite, Is
the pointed overblouse. Note tho but.
tons under the arm.
SMART RIBBON BOWS ON HATS
Colored 8trands Supply Simple and
Attractive Trimming; Black
Shapea Preferred.
Wide rlbboti made Into loops and
ends or tied in very smart bows of
rood size, is making the trimming for
nany of the hats shown for immedi
ate wear. Black shapes particularly
show the preference for the bow trim
and models of hair, maltnes braid and,
of course, mllan, are used for this- pur
pose. In using these wfde ribbons it Is no
ticed that the hanging end Is still em
ployed, in some cases the ribbon
reaching almost to the waistline at
the side. Many of the large shapea
In poke effect that have the new cut
off back brim, employ the ribbon to
fill In this space wjth a long soft bow
reaching far out on each side. In
other cases, when a shape Is raised
slightly at the back, the ribbon loop
or bow may be placed on the under
side of the brim well to' ard the back.
Gray Umbrellas,
la contrast with the bright-hoed um
brellas of the moment Is a new de
mure umbrella Jn fashionable gray
tones. The cover Is of dove gray silk
aad the handle Is of gray bakellte
hand-etched "in black and white.
Frame, tips and ferrule are of silver.
Nothing could be daintier or aere
elegant than this silver-trimmed gray
silk umbrella, and because of Ks very
quietness of tone it Is a coaspleaeaa
asset of the costume oa a relay day
ll4 I'
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FROM THE ORIENT
Dresses and Wraps Embroidered
in Winsome Designs.
Arab's Costume Affords Color Inspira
tions; Originality and Charm Ap
peal to Fashion Devotees.
Fashions are steadily becoming
more artistic than they have been for
many long years. Color, writes a
fashion correspondent In the New
York Tribune, Is at last beginning, to
receive the attention which It de
serves. Designers In their enthusiasm
are searching in unusual and hitherto
nnthonght-of places for inspiration.
A wave of Russian peasant art has
Just swept the country. Before that
there was the Egyptian Invasion, as
well as the Chinese, the Japanese and
the Spanish Influence.
Now something new has appeared
In Paris In the form of dresses and
wraps embroidered by Algerian na
tive workers In designs taken from the
Orient. These dresses have been put
n the market by several designers.
Each dress Is seemingly as extraor
dinary as Its Inspiration, but It Is
Just Its originality and Oriental charxa
thxt will appeal to the fashion de
vote always In search of something
different
If one U seeking color inspiration
a wonderful place to find It Is In the
Arab's costume. The brilliant colors
that these dark-skinned people love
und wear so well are mellowed by the
scorching African sun until they have
bee ime fabrics of rare reanty. Even
the tents of these desert people are
striped in bold colors which have been
mellowed by time and the elements
to unusual and beautiful tones.
There are few women, no matter
bow great their love of color, who
Dress Called Prophet's Banner. It It
Made of Qreen Silk Embroidered In
Gold.
would care to depart se far from con
ventional dress as te adopt in their
entirety all the colors portrayed In the
Arab's garb, but, used with discretion,
charming effects may be achieved.
For instance, an eld Ivory tint that
combines beautifully with blues -a
shade of blue frequently seen la a
faded cotton fabric that la Its origi
nal color, was a strong French blue.
Then there are the beautiful tawny
gold shades which so often appear la
the Arab's turban. These are most
attractive used In combination with
red and purple. -
BERTHA HAS SQUARE CORNERS
Decoration Hangs in Ripples Over the
Shouldtrs; Round Collar Is
Popular Article.
A bertha which Is being featured has
square corners, which hang la rip
ples over the shoulders. 'This Is a
pleasant change from the round va
riety to prevalent recently. An at
tractive model combines both types.
It Is round across the back and to the
shoulder line where It runs Into a
square bib effect and bangs down over
the front of the frock.
The round collar attached to a
straight front vest Is the most popular
article. Another good number Is the
round collar and cuff set In eyelet
work. It Is said that the long square
collar Is vying In popularity with the
rounded type.
Trimming en Hats.
Staffed balls In all colors of velvet
are seen on hats. Fuschla color Is the
newest but many soft felt outing hats
are trimmed with groups of all col
ored balls.
Autumn Sparta Skirt.
Autumn fabrics for aports skirts lo
ci ude attractive tweed and horaespai
In smart striped and crone barred tdt
Mgns la ' contrasting wlors?"?"?
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