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The Dayton forum. [volume] (Dayton, Ohio) 1913-1949, September 20, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

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Vol I Number 16
Al n, iNUKitia
First
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Negro War
THE UBERIAN LOAN
Two Kotable Additions to the Big
Achievements to Credit of Recent
Conference Cmored £kUtt»A id
Washington.
RALPH W. TYLER TO REPORT
MILITARY HAPPENINGS ON
Washington, D. C., Sept. 16. Two
twtable additions have been made
Justly credited to the influence of the|abounds
anxious millions of colored Americans
in this country and to the end that
the correct story of the valor and pa
triotic devotion of their brethren
might be told fully and in a sympa
thetic vein by one of their own blood
and kindred.
In compliance with this request, the
committee on public information has
designated Ralph W. Tyler, of Co
lumbus, Ohio, former auditor for the
navy department at Washington, as
a regularly commissioned war corres
pondent, to specialize on the condi
tions surrounding the colored troops
in France and to make daily reports
of the activities and engagements in
which the colored soldiers are promi
nent. He will be on the staff of Gen
eral Pershing, commander-in chief
of the American Expeditionary
Forceo overseas. Every facility has
been provided by Mr. George Creel,
director of the committee on public
information, for the prompt and ac
curate gathering of all facts that
may be of interest to the colored peo
ple.
First Negro to be Named a» a
War Correspondent
Mr. Tyler is the first colored man
to be named as a regular war corres
pondent by any government in the
world. He is a native of Ohio. For
seventeen years he served in various
departments on the Columbus Even
ing Dispatch, and the Ohio State
Journal, which ga've him experience
in the technique of the newspaper
craft and afforded him opportunity
for association with many influential
newspaper men. This intimate con
tact with such forces will be invalua-
ble to him in his labors as a war cor-
respondent. The fact that he has a
wide acquaintance with correspond
ents now at the front, will make it
fibssible for him to get news concern
ing colored troops which, perhaps, no
other colored correspondent could se»
gtora.
The claims gf a number^ of men
were full con side red in connection
with this important assignment, but
I Mr Tyler was finally selected as the
g/ir Tjler wrote
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tendering his services in any capacity.
He has three sons, all of whom are
at the front in France.
$5,000,000 Loan to Liberian Republic
The second of this series of edi
torial conference achievements is the
authorization by the Government of
a loan of $5,000,000 to the Republic
WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE of Liberia, in line with the request
of the conference. This fund is al
U«ited States Agrees to Loan lotted to aid in the rehabilitation of
$5,000,*000 to Aid Republic of jthat country's public finances, which
Liberia jhave been reduced to a dangerously
i .iiwn»1HI..HIW low ebb by the cessation of trade, and
to develop the production of rice and
0ther
aa
{-0 pjace
on
within the past few days to the list greatly needed products with
of big achievements that may b6]which the little overseas republic
recent conference of colored editors
and leaders in Washington.
.One of the direct requests of the
*«&itor's conference in June was that
a reliable colored news writer be sent
to France to report the doings of the crelit through the United
colored troops on the western front treasury had its inception
in France, for the information of the
W01^
tjje market many of
Mucn 01 Llbee
'^a
la's com-
Much of Liberia's
,merce was with Germany, and this
has been totally cut off since the for
mer's declaration of war against the
Teutons.
The granting of this $5,000,000
States
several
months ago when Dr. Ernest Lyon,
the Liberian consul-general, made ap
plication on behalf of his government
for same, and was helped forward
quite perceptibly by a meeting at the
white house later, when a committee
laid before the President the puciliar
needs of Liberia and made plain the
faithfulness of her people to the
cause of the allies, emphasizing the
fact that Liberia is the natural ward
of this powerful government and that
its welfare must be safeguarded by
America in her hour of peril.
The members of the-committee, who
joined in the appeal to the President
were Dr. Robert R. Moton, principal
of the famous Tuskegee Institute
Emmett J. Scott, secretary of Tus
kegee Institute,* now serving as spe
cial assistant to the secretary of war
Dr. Ernest Lyon, former United
States minister to Liberia and now
Liberian consul-general in this coun
try Dr. James H. Dillard, of the
Slater and Jeanes fund boards Dr.
Thomas Jesse Jones, of the United
States bureau of education, and Hon.
William H. Lewis, former assistant
attorney-general of the United
States.
TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE OPENS
38TH ANNUAL SESSION
Tuskegee, Ala., Sept. 14.—Tuskegee
Institute opened its 38th Annual Ses-
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REV, MEADE
Correspondent
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foodstuffs for the allies, as well
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Army Training Camp. Inquiries and
application from all parts of the
country are already coming in.
With the training of the soldiers
and the regular students, Tuskegee
Institute will have fully 2000 persons
regularly under instruction here this
fall.
SOME FACTS ABOUT AFRICA
By Rev. S. B. A. Campbell, Native of
Sierra Leone, British, West Africa
Of all the eontinents, Africa is sec
ond in size to Asia alone, and three
times the size of Europe, Africa has
about 12,800,000 square miles tf ter
ritory to Asia's 10,000,000 and about
half larger than either North or South
America.
There is room yet enough on the
lower end of the African Continent
for the whole of Europe and her
entire inhabitants. Africa is bounded
on the north by the Mediterranean
Sea, on the south by the Atlantic and
the Indian Ocean, on the east by the
Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. On
the west by the Atlantic Ocean.
The principal Mountains are the
Rewenzora, Abeokuta, Futa Jallon.
There are two great deserts univer
sally known as the Saharra and the
Kalahari. The chief British colonies
are Sierra Leone, Lagos, Gold Coast.
Accra, Calabar, Nigeria and Zungern.
sion Tuesday, September 10th. More Sierra Leone, my home, is the Me
than 1500 students have been granted tropolis of West Africa and one of the
admission this year, and0 the first most beautiful colonies in the tropics,
day's enrollment was one of the larg-: It lies largely in the Torrid Zone and
est in the history of the school. has a varied climated of which ele-
Dr. R. R, Moton, Principal, an
nounced today that the War Depart
most efficient of those available. Im- on Education and Special Training, ized. There are churches of every
mediately after the war was de- Washington, D. C., that Tu&kegee In- denomination established by English
cl&mi by th« United States on Ger- stitute has been selected as one of the and American Missionaries respee
tin Pmeides^ conduct a Stadeats' lively.
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it
vation is partly responsible for this
variation. The nights are generally
ment, through the Committee on Edu- cool but the days are extremely hot,
cation and Special Training has asked no winter season unless in the month
the Institute to continue the training!of June, July and August in which
of soldiers in contingents of 400 each.1 we have the rainy season or Africa
These soldiers are being trained in spring weather, so-called. The capi
trades but their work will not inter- jtal of Sierra Leone is Freetown, with
fere with the regular work of the stu-1 an area of 39,000 square miles and a
dents. Principal Moton also an- population of 995,000 of which 60,000
nounced today that "ha had received rre Protestants, 50) Paprans, 5 000
*rom the Committee Mohammedan and the rest un-civil
The Cbikiijn
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DAYTON, OHIO, TODAY SEPT. 20, 1918
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ING'S FIELD HEADQUARTERS
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This Is the field headquarters of nerai l'«r»hing. eaiubliKln-d sluee he it ft the ht.mJ«|uarter.H «it Paris.
rica today is one of an excellent char
acter which is a fulfillment of Biblirul
prophecy. Ethopian shall stretch
forth her hand unto God."
There are various schools of pri
mary and secondary training includ
ing the Pourah Bay College for the
purpose of educating the African
youngsters. We have seveml profes
sional men and women who have
graduated from London and univer
sities in England and from other col
leges in the U. S,
Productions in Africa: Any thing
suited to a tropical climate can be
raised with a minimum of labor be
cause of the fertility of soil. The
chief products are corn, yam, cocoa,
coffee, sugar-cane bango, dates, po
tatoes, palm-oil, bananas, plantain,
oranges, peanuts, wheat, cotton, rice,
The interior produces rubber, ivory, J* rtvv«ry|»'Bmnl-«r
gold, diamonds, lumber, ostrich feath- V/Ufill-illiiljll j' Ullig
ars, tobacco, ebony, salt and nut-oil.
One vein in the mabang nnd gold
coast vicinity in the interior of Africa
a 80Vz miles long, from six to seven
feet of gold thick and so far as it
•as been followed extends in a slant
ing plane for a mile beneath the sur
•ace. but diamonds are found chiefly!
n Johannesbury and the adjoining
district in South Africa.
In conclusion let me say briefly that
'Ethiopia shall live and to her shall
be given by God who is the Governor
of the universe, the blessings of the
Gold of Sheba. Prayer also shall be j)y'
made for her continually by the Chris
tian people and the holy church uni
versally. APPRECIATE SERVICES
MITE MISSIONARY SOCIETY
i *_
The Mite Missionary Society of the rendei'ed, in long years to come. Your
Eaker street church held its regular kindness will be ever remembered.
monthly meeting at the residence of
Mrs. Jessie Cralle, 1858 Lakcview
ivenue. Business of importance was
transacted, after which election of offi
cers resulted as fallows: Mrs. Susan
Sloan, president Mrs. Delia Brown,
'/ice President Mrs. A,
Secretary Mis. F. D. Day, Assistant Fifth street, Mr. Jones wishes to
Secretary Mrs. Jessie Cralle, Cor. thank his patrons for past business
Secretary Mr.-.. Ella Farrow, Treas- and to solicit further work. Besides
iirer. A deligfctfui luncheon was doing repair work he ii alao seUing
second-.band furaitai*.
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COL. FIELDING HERE
Col. Jolm S. Fielding, S. G. C., Good
Samaritans and Dt. of S. Pres., Union
Fraternal League of Hamilton County
and Commander of the Cincinnati
Camp No. 1, Americ in Woodmen,
made an official visit to Queen of
Dayton Lodge No. 2. While here he
.vas the guest of Mr. and Mrs, Wm.
Hopkins.
lie and the Hon. H. L. Billups, Vice
Supreme Commander of the American
Woodmen, of Denver, Colo., and the
Rev. Dr. Smith, pastor of Zion Bap
tist church enjoyed a most delightful
dinner, in his honor, in the home of
his host and hostess.
At Eaker St.
Church Sun.
The Third Community Sing of the
Phyl,"i
"c,'"f C'rps,wl"
bc
given at Laker Street church, Sun
day, September 22, at 3 p. m., John
Wesley Arnold, director. All who
participated in the first and second
and any who so desire are kindly re
quested to take part in the third.
Miss Rita Higgins, pianist. Address
L. II. Cox.
Mr. II. P. Loritts:
Mr. and Mrs. Bass and Family wish
to express their deep thanks and ap
H'W'iation for your wonderful services
MR. AND MRS. BASS & FAMILY,
20 Emily Street.
NEW LOCATION
Mr. W. H. Jones' upholstering and
D, Grayson, repair sl-op :s now located at 1011 W.
1 ii'CI US!
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ADVERTISERS realize quick
results when using these col- .i
umns to reach tiie people. -n
Phone Us Main 7696.
Price 5 Ce&U
The exercises of the day will begin
with a parade at 9 o'clock in tha
morning. The column will fall in
line at the Boulevard, south of Third
street, headed by the People's band,
followed by civil war veterans and
other uniformed bodies.
The second division of the line will
consist of lodges and other civic or
ganizations. The third and fourth di
visions will include the Sunday
schools, juvenile lodges and organiza
t.ons in carriages and automobiles.
Parade Program
The parade will begin to march at
9 o'clock, as follows: East on Third
to Wilkinson, north on Wilkinson to
Monument, east on Monument to
Main, south on Main to Fair Grounds,
where the program of the day will
begin.
The first division will rest on the
east side of the Boulevard south of
Third the second division will rest
on Fourth street, east of Boulevard
the third division will rest on Syca
more street, east of Boulevard.
The following program has been
arranged:
11:30, women's horse race 12:00,
dinner 1:00, band concert 1:30, ex
ercises in grand stand music by Peo
ple's band, "America Prayer by
chaplain of the day, the Rev. F.
Day reading of the Emancipation
Proclamation by Mrs. Maud Walker.
Ten minute addresses by Rev. J. EL
Burton, Atty. M. H. Jones, Rev. T. J.
Smith, Attorney Thomas Norris, Rev.
J. B. Meade, and Charles W. Price.
At 2:30 o'clock there will be a run
ning match and barrel race 3:00,
base ball game 3:30, juvenile drill
1:00, motorcycle race 4:30, dress:
parade by uniform ranks 5:30, 'The
Star Spangled Banner," by the Peo
ple's band.
The Emancipation Day dance will
be held at Memorial hall at 8 o'clock
and promises to be the largest affair
of the day. Moving pictures will also
be shown at Memorial hall after the
afternoon program at the Fair
grounds. J. L. Thomas and R. A,
Jackson will have charge of thia
work. Part of the proceeds of the
day will be given to the War Cheat
Committee for our soldier boys in
France. Every boy and girl, man
and woman is earnestly requested to
march in the parade and make it the
largest affair of the kind in the his
tory of Dayton in honor of 311,803
colored soldiers in the national army,
Stirring patriotic Address «t
1 Eater St. Church Emancipation'
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Emancipation-'"
Day
Horse racing, running match, bar
rel race, base ball, contest drills, a
military review, a picnic dinner and
oratory will feature local observance
of Emancipation Day at the Faif
Grounds, Saturday, September 21,
1918. Celebration of the day in Day-*
ton will be under direction of tha
Union Body of Civic Societies and
will conclude with a grand ball at
Memorial hall.
On account of the great patriotic
atmosphere, a greater interest thaa
usual attaches to the observance of
the anniversary of the signing of tht
Emancipation Proclamation and a
large attendance of colored people i»
expected by the committee in charg*t~
'Vt
Program
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