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The Dayton forum. [volume] (Dayton, Ohio) 1913-1949, August 11, 1939, Image 1

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•i ®*yton Public Lih
OMr and Third St^
CINCINNATI
COLUMBUS
DAYTON
E
VOL. XXVII., No. 8.
SIMPLICITY MARKS THE SETTING
FOR FASHIONABLE WEDDING
By SARA ELLIS
DAYTON—Before an improvised
altar decorated profusely with peach
gladioli, mixed summer flowers and
palms, and flanked on either side by
candlebra, Mr. Ebert Walker, of
Springfield, Il.inois, took Mrs, Rou
mania Payne Grigsby, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Price tQ be his
bride.
Father J. N." Samuels-Belboder
|»trformed the single ring ceremony
at 11:80 a.m., Wednesday morning
at the residence of the bride's par
ents at 919 South Broadway Street
before the immediate families.
Ida Price, the flower girl and
««ly attendant wore a short dress of
white gorgette. The very full ruf
fled skirt was atached to a tiny shir
red bodice and was trimmed with
white baby velvet, She carried an
arm-basket filled with old-fashioned
For her wedding, the very attrac
flowers.
tfve bride chose a violet chiffon gown
fashioned with a draped bodice. The
sjcirt was accordian-pleated and
hung gracefully to the floor and was
tapped by a tiny jacket. She wore a
fOingle strand of pealfs and a watch,
the gift of her mother. Ter corsage
*Vfas of pink rose-buds.
Mrs. Price, mother of the bride,
made a very striking picture in a
lenb pale blue lace dress fashioned
with a V neckline.
Immediately cere
mony, a very delectable breakfast
Was served1 to thirty "guests which
included members of the family and
intimate friends. For the breakfast,
Mrs. Walker chose a street dress of
]Mtle blue crepe created with a fit-
MISSOURI SUPREME COURT
REFUSES TO SHUT DOOR OF
UNIVERSITY TO GAINES
The supreme court of Missour
Handed down this week an opinion
reversing the decision of the Boone
County circuit court rendered orig
inal y in the Lloyd Gaines Case in
Which Gaines was seeking admission
to the University of Missouri Law
School.
This latest action in the famous
University of Missouri case is in
conformity with the opinion of the
U. S. supreme court, delivered last
December 12.
The state's highest court by its
opinion does not order the Univer
sity to admit Gaines to its law
school but does not shut the univer
sity to him. It takes notice of the
fact that the State of Missouri,
Since the U. S. supreme court opin
ion, has directed the establishment
Of a law school for Negroes at Lin
coln university and has appropriated
a sum of $200,000 for this purpose.
The court h( ds in its opinion that'
it cannot decide at this date whether
the law school to he established at
Lincoln university is the equal of
the law school at the University of
.Missouri. It holds that this ques
tion must come before the trial
court and be decided upon its merit
after the school is established.
The supreme court's present opin
ion hcj'.ds that if the lower court
ahould find as a fact that the newly
astablished law school at Lincoln is
ikot "substantially equivilent" to the
^facilities offered at the University
Of Missouri then the writ must issue.
The judgment of the Boone cir
cuit court was the original decision
In the Gaines case, and denied him
a writ
of mandamus compiling the
University to admit him. From this
jflecision an appeal was taken the the
Missouri supree court which affirmed
the denial of the writ. From this
decision an appeal was taken to the
U. S. supreme court which reversed
the Missouri supreme court,
JSeargument of the case before
"^'.'v»^1
v
T"
*u
ted bodice closed by a row of little
pearl buttons. Her accessories were
all of the same matching blue.
After the breakfast the couple
left for a short wedding trip mo
toring to Columbus and Chicago.
They will establish residence in
Springfield, 111., where Mr. Walker:
is associated with the postal service.
Mrs. Walker, a vary wel. loved
person was a native of Dayton. She
was a graduate of Steele High?
School and attended Fisk University.
She took up the'study of social work
at Chicago University and, for the
past few yearR has been executive
secretary at the YWCA in Camden,'
N.J.
Bre«lif«it Guest*
Guests who attended the wedding
breakfast included:
Capt. and Mrs. Malory, Mrs. B'lora
Mallory and son, Robert, Mrs. DeJa
Miller, Miss Ethyl Stewart, Mr. and
Mi's. Joseph Hickerson, Mr. and Mrs.
Reynold Jackson, Father and Mrs.
Samuels-Belboder, Mr. and Mrs. Ar
thur Odum and daughter
Mrs. Flosse Cox, Mrs. Jessie Hath
cock and son, Scott, Mus., Bel Pat
terson, Russel Patterson, Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey Howe, Mr. and Mrs.
George Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Taylor, Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Shaw,
Matthew Shields, Miss Sue Shields,
Dr. Richard Price, Miss Lillian Cole
Wendd Grigsby, Miss Hallie.
Douglas, Thomafe Wright Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Warmack, Verrel Price,
Mr. and Mrs. George Hall of Frank
lin, O. Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Taylor,
Ida Price, Charles Price, Jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Ebert Walker, and Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Price.
the Missouri supreme court was held
May 22 with Charles H. Houston of
he New York office of the NAACP
and Sidney R. Redmond of St. Louis
member of the national legal com
mittee, "appearing for Gaines.
The present opinion of the state
uj^reme court TSverses its affirnia
toin of the denial of the writ by the
Boone circuit court, and remands
the case to the circuit court far fur
ther proceedings.
The opinion said in part:
'Respondents (the State of Mis
souri) urge that Sec. 9618, supra,
as amended, (the new law directing
the establishment of a |law school at
Lincoln university) makes proper
provision for relator's legal training
within the borders of the state, and
affords him an opportunity for such
instruction equal to that available
to whites at the University of Mis
souri and that, by invoking the rule
of law presuming right acting on the
part of officers charged with a man
datory duty under a statute (i. e.,
the Curators of Lincoln wjl per
form their legal duty to establish a
School of Law equal to the one in
the University of Missouri) appel
lant's constitutional rights will have
been satisfied, and, therefore, the
writ should be denied. Although
expressly conceding that the new
act 'eliminates the discretion left to
thecurators and places on the cura
tors an unconditional obligation tc
open new schools and new depart
ments.' appellant (Gaines) say?.
'But assuming, for the purpose of
argument only that the curators did
create some sort of a law school* by
Steptember, 1939, this court, coulc1
not determine by judicial notice
whether such law school satisfiel the
constitutional requirement of equal
protection of the laws. That would
be a matter of evidence to be pre
sented to and weighed first in the
trial court.' In this we think ap
pelant (Gaines) correct.
(Continued from Page fcj-
MRS. FLORENCE B. PRICE, of
Chicago, noted composer whose new
composition, "Three Little Negro
Dances" was played "by the United
States Marine Band in its Washing:
ton concert last Saturday and at the
Lake Front summer concert series
in Chicago. The only Negro woman
to write a svmphony, Mrs. Price's
A. D. CAITHER
APPOINTED
SUPERVISOR
NYA IN OHIO
COLUMBUS— S. Burns Westonj
Ohio Youth Administrator, announc
ed today the appointment of A. D.
Gaither as State Supervisor of Ne
gro
Activities for the National Youth
Administration in Ohio. Gaither
formerly was director of NYA's
A, D. GAITHER
Wilberforce Work Experience Cen
ter, co-sponsored by Wilberfbrcc
University.
His appointment fills the vacancy
'.-eft when Dr. James H. Robinson of
Wilberforce University was called
upon to devote all his efforts to his
increased duties and responsibilities
at the University.-
Gaither received an M.A, (degree
from Ohio tSate University in 1938,
his thesis being on "Negro WSmen
Domestic Service in Columbus,
Ohio." He received his B.A. degree
from Knoxville College, Knoxvide,
Tenn., and for five jrears was jprin-
^1 "TO.'""• n v^,* A,u.&., Ifiw.rr, „t ii,i• *. kjk jr Aurs 2 i a v
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f4
Th&iHuman A ace Mas Hi
sen On Protest
FRIDAY, AUGUST II, 1939.
BOTH SCHOOL AND RELIEF LEVIES WIN
BY V E Y SUBSTANTIAL A ORITIES
COMPOSER
lb'' i..
m*
mphony in E Minor"
pteived by the
lias
hrci
Chiiig0
Orchestra. Her "My
chored In The LortJ'«,.^as been sunjy
by Miss Marian Anderson all over
the world and fdfttured by famous
orcrestras with Miss Anderson
soloist. (ANP)
FRANCIS KFXLY
TO TEACH AT
GLENDALE, 0H!0
By R. S. DARNABY
TUSKKGEK Institute, Ala.—Dr.
F. D. Patterson, President
eipal and coach at Nelson Merry
High School, Jefferson City, Tenn.
He has served as director of the
Wilberforce Work Experience Cen
ter since its establishment last fa.L
At the Center, approximately 70
unemployed Negro youth from all
parts of Ohio are receiving part
time employment, work experience
and related instruction. They par
ticipate in the educational and rec
reational facl ities of the University,
but do not receive University credit
for their studies. They have con
structed a field house lor the Uni
versity. and are using it aa. their
dormitory.
Gaither's successor as director of
he Center has not been named. A
recent addition to the Center's staff
was Joseph Winkfield, who has as
sumed his duties as Personnel and
Guidance Supervisor. Winkfield, a
native of Washington, ]p.C., is a
graduate of Lincoln University, Lin
coln, Pa., and received his M.A. de
gree in personnel and guidance from
Columbia University in June.
Mti
ja-~v---
s
Syinplum,\
•c?'ou,s
Been An
informed sources said that David B.
Turpeau, Republican Negro member
of the state Legislature, wouftd make
(he race instead.
The
doctor
of
is
Tns-
kegee Institute, was informed today
of the appointment of Frrmt'is
Kelly to the |rincipalshi| of the i
Kctstein High School at Uendale,
C#»io. Mr. Kelly, the son of the lale
Captain Charles G. Kelly, wh„ serv
ed with the American Expeditionary
Forces in France during' the World I
War, and Mrs. Fannye Mickens Kel
ly, received Ins Bachelor of Science
-ii^ree in Education from Tuskegcc
Institute in 1937 and his master of
rt«, degree in History At the Mareli
Convocation from Ohio State Uni
versity. Mr. Ktlly will assume his
(Continued on Page 8)
completing his
ortd t'^rm eouneilman.
1
i«1
ILLNESS FORCES COUNCILMAN
TO QIUT CONTEST
TURPEAU TIPPED
CINCINNATI Dr.vR. P. Mc
Clain, Negro Republican member om
City Council, notified the Republi
can city nominating committee late
Monday thut he would not be a can
didate at.the. November election and
Bec-
SHELLENBF.RGER WINS SCHOOL
AND RELIEF LEVIES PASS
Speice Is Close
To Breidenbach,
Trailing Munger
Dnvton's public schools were
guaranteed a nine-month term next
year and Dayton's relief clients were
assured of food and clothing by a$-
Harold L. Shellenberger
tion of voters in Tuesday's primary,
which saw the passage of the two
mit school levy and the 1. %-mill
relief levy by substantial majorities.
The vote of 252 precincts on the
school levy was 15,987 for and 11,
821 against, and on the relief levy,
15,587 for and 10,911 against.
Principal surprise in the uncon
tested nominations for city commis
sion was the strong race run by Fred
ff..
1,
-v .v ,t'' -.
v":
M'CLAIN WITHDRAWS
HOLLISTER ALSO OUT
His notification of his decision not
to run, because of ill health, came
as the nominating committee pre
pared t0 meet at Republican head
quarters, 125 East Ninth Street, to
continue further with its efforts to
prepare a slate for the November
city election.
Dr. McClain has been in ill health
for more than a year. He suffered
a stroke some time ago, and has
cu tailed his activities somewhat
ever since.
Three to Run
His withdrawal from ttie Repub
lican ticket added to the complexit
ies of ticket-making. The four in
cumbents had been considered cer
tain to run, leaving the nominal in
committee with the tast of finding
but titfe other candidates. Still in
the race, however, are Mayor Jame
(1. Stewart, Willis D. Grandison and
Nichcias Klein.
Ending its session, the committee
announced the selection of former
(Jovenor Myers Y. Cooper as it.*
chairman, succeeding former Con
gressman John B* Hollister. Hollis
t.er, named chairman several weekfo
ago, has been out of the city since,
and he wired the committee that
his continued absence made it im
possible for him to participate in the
committee sessions.
Slate Nearly Ready
Cooper had been vice chairman
and had presided over the sessions.
He said late Monday that the slate
\vn"
"prael
ie Iy complete
liticil office, against John fc), Brei
den bach, now serving his second
term on the commission, and Harrs
J. Munger, former -member of the
general assembly, Speice came
close to nosing Breidenbach out ol
second place, Breidonbach received
11.733 votes, and Speice 11,607.
only 1U6 les»a
Munger led the field by more than
5,000 ballots, his vote totaling 17,
057,
Sheilenberger Win»
The contest for Republican nonit
ination for chief justice of the mu
nicipal court was won hands down
by Harold SS I eiiberger wh0 receiv
ed K,lf)5 votes against the 3,194 of
his ncerest opponent, George Don
on. Donson carried only six pre
cincts .according to board of elec
tion figures.
Claron H. Supinger, third candi
date in the ^Republican judicial con
test, received only 503 votes.
The sole candidate for judicial
nomination on the Democratic bal
*.ot was ,the incumbent. Judge Mer
ritt E. Schlafmon, wh0 received 12,
499. v^tes .'.
CHURCHES UNI^E
FOR PAGEANT
DAYTON "The Devil in the
Church" a religious pageant featur
ing combined ehurch choirs, Quar
tets and a galaxy of local talent will
be presented Thursday August 17 at
K p.m. at Linden Community Center.
The pageMt is directed and pro-
A. Speice,. who has never held po-1 duced b^ Rev. Wesley S. Matthews
y
S: ~y:vt.
'"."
y a. •». ",H
PRICE FIVE CENT
Turpeau, a minister, rah for the
Legislature oh the Republican ticket
in 1U3G and again in 1938.
Dr. McClain's letter of withdrawal
said:
"I have been seriously considering
for some time as to my position in
the forthcoming councilmanic race.
our years ago I was asked to
run and accepted after1 much urging.
Since that time my health has not
been so good. For the past year
sibly I made a mistake in running
in 1937. Recently I realized that
probably another strenuous* cam
paign would injure my already not
too good health.
"I appreciate the honor that ha*
been mine of serving my party in
the City Council and the wonderfei
cooperation you have always given
also I appreciate the fact ^at my
health should come first.
Fear* Repetition
"Because I am not sure that a
repetition of the ailment suffered
two years ago may not occur and
anxious not t(, embarrass or liandi
cap our chances in the control of
the
ISMO
Council
I
or
y
foul that
&
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v.:ji
»MA*|'-':
.-*
4
m:^OB
~z
I
should
ns one wh»fe interests hi the suc
cess of the party tl aSisct is any
personal desires
ambition, ask
Hiaf you do not further consider m
as a nominee
for
the
nfl'ice
T.
have
held.
"Please believe me to be acting
only in what I consider t-h1' best in
cr .-.ts of pa ty
success,
"I shall continue to be y.".l to
our party principles because I am
sold on the idea of Republicanism
as the only way out for our city,
state and nation. For the success
of the
party
I pledge you my word
that I will to the best of my ability
and strength aid in anything you
mav assign me."
—JL
Has Varied Career
..MARTIN MARQUE?,
The World of Tomorrow is full of
interesting people—people who have
done things who have seen things
who have vision to look to the fu
ture. Martin Marquez, an employe
at the Beech-Nut Building at the
New York World's Fair, who resides
at 125 West 121st Street, New York
City, is one of these. He started
his career as a soldier when at the
age of thirteen, he enlisted iii the
Hlighth British West Indian Regi
ment at Trinidad and sailed away
to war.
0—
COMMUNITY NIGHT
A very large crowd enjoyed com
munity night last Friday on the
playground. AH joined in t.ne com
munity singing and' afterwards wit
nessed a very good soft bajl game.
Iff
M:
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