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The morning times. (Washington, D.C.) 1895-1897, August 10, 1895, Image 3

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THE TIMES, SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 3895.
That Sport
ing Depart
ment is on
the third
floor and
contains a
stock of
athletic
goods and
fixings such
as v o u ' 1 1
find nowhere else. Instead
of asking regular prices we
have reduced everything in
stock-to close up a most suc
cessful season. Everything
of any sort, that an athlete
needs.
315 7th St.
PRINTERS FIELDED POORLY
But for That They Could Have
Easily Beaten the Y. M. 0. A.
Short, as Usual, Also of Two Good Men
mid Had to Put In Itnw
.Recruits.
If the Government Printing Office ag
gregation Lad fielded as -well as they hit
the ball In yesterday's game with the Y.
M. C. A.'s at Capitol Park they could
easily have carried off the victory lu a
gallop, but as it -wu6 their ten miserable
errors, each of -which was responsible for
a run, lost them the gamo to Mauager
Marshall's people.
The Y.M.C.A.teamhadsevcral additions
sine.' its Jaet apjiearauco. "Mont" HarriB
covered first bate and Lougbran looked after
tbingsatt-aort, while JimHendleyhelddown
Ieftfield,aiid"Pop"Kellar,wbohusrecenUy
become a member of the association, took
charge of the left-hand batters in right.
The rrinters. as utual, found themselves
short a couple of men when it -was time to
play IkiII, bo they had to tubstitute fwo
new ones in order to commence the exhibi
tion. Smgleton,famiHarlycuIled"cifcsorf,"
took his ttand in the box when Umpire
Tade called play, but he was somewhat
of a good thing forhisopponents.asieiinien
crossed tlic plate in the eeeoud inning.
This was loo much for the manager of
the "has been" nine, so Moran, the crack
twirier of the Shamrocks, occupied the
point for the Printers during the remain
ing portioTTbf the exhibition. He pitched
very cleverly, holding the Y. M. C A. nine
down to five scattering hits. The second
inning told the tale, however, and as things
were becoming more disastrous every time
the teams changed places, the Printers
realized that there -was no chance for
them and gave the struggle up at the close
of the seventh, innnlg. Karns was rather
weak in the box, but that did not go for
much as he was excellently supported in
the field.
The Printers talc is a sad one. "While
the whole nine fielded bad enough, "Trilby"
GJeason, who assisted them, added greatly
to the agony by making four rank errors
at second base and short together.
In the last inning Capt. Havens tried to
Ebo'c Karns of f the plate as he was running
home from third base, but as luck would
have it, the "kicking printer" was un
suocesrul in his task and instead of get
ting itm on Karns received a tremendous
thump in his stomach himself.
An unusually large crowd was in at
tendance and plenty of enthusiasm pre
vailed throughout the contest.
The score:
Y. M. C. A. AB. R. H. PO.A.E.
Daltou, 2b 5 112 2 0
Harris, lb.. 4 3 2 7 0 0
HeiKlley, If 3 2 1 1 0 0
Loughrau.ss 4 10 2 11
II Brown, 3b 5 4-2 2 2 0
Carr, c G 3 3 7 0 0
E. Brown, cf C 1 1 1 1 1
Kellar, rf.. , 4 10 10 0
Karns, p 4 1112 0
Totals 39 17 11 24 8 2
G- P. O. AB. II. H. PO.A.E.
Havens, 2b, ss, & o. 4 4 2 5 2 0
Montgomery, c & ss-. 5 2 2 0 12
Dougherty. 3b 5 1 3 G 1 1
Ulchards, lb.. ........ 5 l 2 7 1 l
Gleubon, ss & 2b 4 12 2 2 4
"Woodward, cf 10 10 0 0
Moran, p.. .. - 2 0 0 1 11
Gallager,.rf 4 0 10 0 0
Bweitzer, If 4 0 1 0 2 0
Singleton, p A cf 4 0 0 0 11
Totals ..38 9 14 2110 10
Two-base hits Carr 2. Dougherlv, Glea
eoii. Three-base hits Harris, H -Brown.
Stolen bascb Harris 3, H. Brown, E
Brown, Carr, Kellar, Gleason 2, Singleton.
Hit by pitched ball Havens. Flrt base
onerrors Y.M C. A.,5;G.P.O.,2. Bases
on balls Off-Karns, 3; off Singleton, 3; off
Moran, 2. Struck out By Moran, 5
by Karns, 5. Passed ball Carr,2; Ha
voiis, 3. "Wild pitch Singleton. Left
on bases Y . M. C. A. , 6 ; G. P. O., n. Double
plays E. Brown to Loughran; H. Brown
to Harris. Time 2:10. Umpires Messrs
Tade and Lynch.
"Virginia State League.
IUchmond, lit; Rnnokc, 7.
Excursion to .Niagara Falls.
Thursday, August 15, the Royal Blue
Line will repeat its excursion to Niagara
Falls. "Welkins Glen, Mauch Chunck, Glen
Onoko. Rochester, ard Geneva. A special
express, with Pullninn parlor cars attached,
in charge of an experienced tourist agent,
will leave B. & O. station, "Washington,
8:10 a. m.. Baltimore :05 a. m., arm-mat
the falls 11:00 p. m.
The route is via the famous Lehigh Valley
giving tourists a daylight ride through the
"Switzerland or America."
Round-trip tickets, good ten days, $10.
IX A WOHTUY CAUSE.
Subscriptions Solicited for "Widow of
tho Unfortunate Cornlce-"Worker.
The Times has been requested by the
Eccentric Association of Steam Engineers
to open a subscription list for Mrs. Lucy
Phillips, widow of the cornice worker who
lost his life by the fall of scaffolding on the
corner of Twelfth and L streets northwest,
a few weeks ago.
The Times cheerfully acquiesces and
solicits liberal contributions for one who
is left iu distressfully destitute circum
stances. Already received:
C. G. Conn $5 00
Ecccutric Association of steam En
gineers 5 00
Painter 100
F. T. Forter 75
H. C. Davis .. 1.00
I H S 5.00
K. L. S .. 1.50
Amalgamated Society of Carpenters
end Joiners ,. ,. .. 6.20
Spend Sunday in ttio Countrv.
During the summer the B. & O. R. R. Com
pany will sell" excursion tickets at one fare
for all trains, Saturdays and Sundays, to
Charlestown, "W. Va., Annapolis Junction,
lid., and all intermediate poinisT Tickets
Eood returning until Monday.
e- . f . I 1 V Xfc J
Parker. Bridget&Co
HAD II INJOR MERCEB
Handicapped by Umpire Burn
ham's Rank Decisions.
WORST EVER SEEN IN BOSTON
KJclclng "Was tlio Chief Featuro of the
Game and tlio Spectator Hissed
und HootedLilkoHoodluiiiH A Bravo
Fight "Which. 'Would Have "Won
Under Any Other Circumstances.
STAXDESG OF TIIE CLUBS.
CIalK. W. L. 1.C,
CleYeland,57 37 .606
Pittsburg, 68 86 .096
Balti'ore, 49 38 .583
Boston, 4836.871
Chicago, 5242.553
Cincin, 4838.858
NewYork, 46 40 ,535
Pnila, 45 40.529
Brooklyn, 45 41 .523
Wash, 28 82 .380
St. Lonis, 29 62 .319
Louisville 63 .289
iU
Gn m vn Voter-day.
Boston, 4; Washington, 3.
New York, 15; Baltimore, 8.
Second game Baltimore, 8; New York, 2.
Philadelphia, 4; Brooklyn, 1.
Louisville, 4; Pittsburg, I.
Cleveland, IS; Chicago, G.
Games To-day.
"Washington at Boston.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn.
New York at Baltimore.
Louisville at Pitttburg.
St. Louis at Cincinnati.
Cleveland at Chicago.
(Special to The Times.)
Boston, .Mass., Aug. 9. Washington made
the pluckiest of struggles to-day and should
have won.
Boston was on the anxious seat to the
very last and won amidst the most hor
rible din imaginable of Tom Tucker and
his satellites behind first base.
Boston looked for an easy win, and
judging by the way Nichols mowed the
visiting batsmen down iu the early part of
the contest it did seem as if Washington
would fall an easy prey.
Although Boston took the lead early in
the game and had two runs before the
Senators made one, "Washington plugged
away and by great pitching of Mercer
kept Boston from scoring and tied the
game, besides taking the lead in the last
innin g.
Mercer had to encounter the handicap
or about as incompetent umpiring as was
ever seen on a ball grounds. Bumham's
work was the worst seen here this Season
and no such scvu.es have been enscted iu
Boston this season aB those this afternoon.
EVERXBODY KICKED.
There was kicking galore in which every
body took part and it was no wonder
the game was prolonged to over two and a
half hours. No less than three men should
have been out on strikes on Mercer who
got their bases. The Washington pitcher
was fairly beside him-elf with disgust.
There was uo such tiling as discipline and
repeatedly the captaius stopped the game to
protest.
Ills simply inexplicable how such an acmo
of ignorauoe of the rules and of Jack of
judgment and ability can be allowed to
umpire. "Willi him the gamo degenerates
into u. farce, as -was the caee to-day. The
spectators hooted and howled incessantly.
Trangren-ions of the rules wore allowed
constantly.
At the outset it looked as if it would be
an easy thing for Boston, as Washington
could do nothing with Nichols. During the
game ten men struck out off him. A mos-t
unusual number and of these Peven in
the first four innings, and three in suc
cession, the number that came to bat in
the third. Not a "Washingtonian taw first
base in the first three innings.
McGUiRE BUOKE TIIE ICE.
McGuiro broke the ice with a hit In the
fourth, after Joyce had been caught out
by Duffy clo6a to the renter field fence.
Haesamer made a hit in the next inning
but was doubled up by Ciooks and that
settled matters for that inning. In the
sixth, Joyce made a drive over the right
fence, but unfortunately for "Washington,
the bases were clear at the time.
In the seventh Selbaeh s double and Has
samer's single brought in the tying run.
Here "Washington had more hard luck,
McCarthy making an extraordinary fine
catch of a long dnvo by Crooks. Had that
ball dropped pa rely, Selbach's hit would
have scored two runs. Boyd had a great
chance to putt Washington In the van but
was thrown out at first by Nichols. In
tho ninth, through the grace of the umpire,
"Washington succeeded in making the run
that gave a temporary lead.
Selbaeh lilt a hot one that glanced from
Nash to Long and the latter made the as
sist in plenty of time Tor the out, but Burn
ham refused the out. Hassamer then In
dulged in three unsuccessful attempts to
bunt, and that after he had already made
two safe hits. Crooks went out at first,
and by great base-running Selbaeh found his
way to third. Then Schelbeok got his base
on balls and stole second, while Boyd
poked oncKafcly to left, scoring Selbaeh.
Boyd stole second, and It all lay with
Mercer.
The boy wanted to send In two run?
bad enough but his fast one was grabbed
by Lowe In time for an easy out at first.
TIIE INNINGS IN DETAIL.
Bostou made the first bid for a run.
After blanking "Washington In the first
and with two out Duffy was given safe at'
first after he was fairly out. .McCarthy
hit clearly but Joyce handled Nash's bail
grandly, retiring the side.
In the secoDd Tucker made a hit and was
forced by Bannon, who In turn was forced
by Ganzcl and Nichols wentout to Relbach.
Scoring began in the third. There were
two outs, two Btrikcs on Duffy when he
was hit by a pitched ball. McCarthy lilt
to right jnd would have been a easy out
badlnot Crooks left a convenient hole, by
running to cover second. Boyd helped
matters along by fumbling and Duffy
scored on his error and a badreturn.
In the fourth Bannon made a hit and Sel
baeh failed to gather the ball cleanly, al
lowing an extra basa Ganzel'a out and
Nichols" hit when there were three balls
and two strikes on him sent Bannon home.
Long got first in the firth on a ball Joyce
could have fielded had not Mercer tried
for it. Long stole second, and after Duffy
had struck out essayed third, and to his re
gret, McCarthy struck out.
Nash got first on balls in the sixth.
Joyce made a splendid catch off Tucker.
Bannon was thrown out to Joyce, tlfen
Ganzei hit to Scheibeck and got to first
ahead of the ball, but all Nichols could do
was pop a fly to Scheibeck.
THREE IN SUCCESSION.
In theseventh Boston, withstrongestbats
men up, retired in order.
The ninth saw Lowe get his base after
he should have been out on strikes,
he should have been out on strikes. Schei
beck making a low throw, Long and Duffy
hit safely, Lowe scoring amid tremendous
cheers. McCarthy was purposely given
his base, and then Abbey made a fine
one-handed catch off Nash, but could not
head off Long at the plate, he making
the winning run.
Both catchers put up a brilliant game.
McGuire made some fine foul catches,
and but one base wus stolcu off of him.
Joyce did finely, and but for his poor
throw in the last inning Scheibeck would
have had a clean record.
McGuiro, Selbaeh and Hassamer did the
best batting and the former fielded in
sK'npdid shape. Abbey was extremely
weak in batting, striking out twice and
twice hitting to pitcher.
Mr. Wagner said to-day lie did not ex
pect Cartwrightto play In the Boston scries.
Anderson will pitch against Boston Satur
day and many of his friends will ba on hand
to give him a send orf. The weather to
day was perfect, but the attendance small,
doubtless on account of the double game the
day before.
Boston. AB'.R. H. PO.A. E.
Lowe, 2b 5 1 0 0 10
Long, ss 5 12 12 0
Duffy, cf 4 1 12 0 0
McCarthy, If 4 0 2 3 0 1
Nash, 3b 4 0 0 0 2 0
Tucker, lb 4 D 2 11 0 0
Bannon, rf 4 12 0 0 0
Ganzei, c 3 0 1 10 0 0
Nichols, p 4 0 10 5 0
Total ..37 4 1127 11 1
Washington. AB. R. II. PO.A.E.
Joyce, 3b 4 1 13 3 0
McGuire, c 4 0 2 5 10
Abbey, cf '.. 4 0 0 3 0 0
Selbacti.lf 4 2 2 3 0 1
Ilnfcsamcr.lb 4 0 2 G 0 0
Crooks, 2b 4 0 0 2 0 1
Schiebeck.ss 3 0 12 5 2
Boyd, rf .401100
Mercer, p 4 0 0 0 0 0
Total -. .. 35 3 025 0 4
Winning run scored with one man outout.
Boston 0011000 0 24
Washington 0000011 0 13
Earned runs Boston 1, Washington 3.
Home run Joce. Stolen bases Long,
Schiebeck, Boyd. Flrut base on balls orf
Nichols 1, off Mercer 3. First base ou
errors Boston 2. Struck out By Nichols
10, by Mercer 3. Double plays Long and
Tucker. Hit by pitched ball By Mercer
1. Umpire Buruham. Time 2:40.
PHILADELPHIA WINS IT.
Tommy Smith, the Boy Pitcher, Too
Much for the Bridegroom.
New Yotk, Aug. 9. Tommy Smith, the
boy member-gSr the Philadelphia elub,
was responsible for the Brookiyns down
fall at Eastern Park this afternoon. Smith
pitched 18-karat ball, and until tho eighth
inning the men from Churchtown were
completely at his mercy. Abbey, late of
the Chicagos, made his first appearance
in a Brooklyn uniform at home, and was
hit hard. Sam Thompson's batting and
Coreoraifs fielding were the features. The
score:
Brooklyn AB. R. II. PO.A.E.
Griffin, cr 4 110 0 0
Shlndle, 3b 3 0 2 111
Trcdway, cf 4 0 0 3 0 0
Daly, 2b 4 0 0 3 4 0
La Chance, lb 4 0 0 13 2 0.
Anderson, If 3 0 2 1 1 0
Corcoran, ss 3 0 13 5 0
Grim, c 3 0 13 10
Abbey, p 3 0 0 0 10
Totals . .. ..31 1 7 27 15 1
Philadelphia. AB. It. II. TO.A.E.
Hamilton, cf 4 2 3 3 (I 0
Turner, If 4 0 0 3 0 0
Hallman, 2b 5 0 3 110
Thompson, rf 5 0 3 110
Cross, 3b 4 0 0 12 0
Grady, c 2 2 0 a 2 0
Sullivan, ss.. ..........201040
Boyle, lb 4 0 0 0 0 0
Smith, p 40 1 0 1 0
Totals 34 '4 11 27 10 0
Brooklyn.. ..00000000 11
Philadelphia 101101-0 0 01
Earned runs Brooklyn, 1; Philadelphia,
1. First base on errors Philadelphia, 1.
Left on bases Brooklyn, 5; Philadelphia,
f. First base on balls Off Ahbev, 3; off
Smith, 1. Struck out By Abbey, 1; by
Smitli, 5. Three-base hits Anderson",
Thompson. Two-base hits Griffin, Shin
die, Anderson. Sacrifice hit Sullivan
Stolen base Hamilton. Double plays
Sullivan, Hallman and Boyle; Anderson,
Corcoran and La Chance. Hit by pitched
ball Sullivan. Parsed ball Grady. Wild
pitch Abbey. Time 1:40. Attendance,
3,500. Umpire Kecfe.
THEY SPLIT EVEN.
Baltiinoro and Now York Piny Two
Games, Each "Winning One.
Baltimore, Md., August 9. Baltimore
and New York split even on the games to
day. Baltimore hit Meekin hani in the
first game, but had no chance of winning
on account of the poor -work of Hoffer
and Hemming. Pond pitched the last two
innings, and was quite effective.
Clarke and McMahon were the opposing
pitchers in the second game, and McMahon
had the New Yorkers at his mercy. Ems
lie's mistake in rerusing to allow Kelley's
great catch of Tieruan's lilt gave the New
Yorks their only runs. Clarke was hit
hard throughout the game, and Baltimore's
score would have been larger but for
stupid base running. Kelley, Ticrnan,
McGraw and Robinson did telling work
at the bat, and Stafford putup a greatgaiue
at second. Attendance, 0,800. Score:
FIRST GAME.
Baltimore: AB. It. II. PO.A.E.
McGraw, 3b 5 2 3 10 1
Keeler, rf s. 5 2 2 3 0 0
Jennings, ss 5 2 2 4 3 1
Kelley, if 5 14 2 2 0
Gleason,2b 5 10 2 3 1
Brodie, cf 4 0 11 11
Clarke, c 3 0 0 7 11
Carey, lb 4 0 0 7 0 0
Hoffer, p 2-00000
Hemming, p 1 0 0 0 1 0
Pond, p 10 10 10
Totals 40 8 13 27 12 G
New York. AB. It. H.PO.A E.
Fuller, ss 5 2 11 3 0
Tiernan.rf 4 1 2 2 0 0
VanHaltren.cf 5 112 0 0
Davis, 3b 3 3 10 2 0
Doyle, lb 5 0 0 1G 0 0
Bums, If 4 2 11 0 0
Stafford, 2b 5 2 3 3 0 1
Wilson, c 5 8 2 1 0 0
Meekin, p 3 11110
Totals 39 15 12 27 15 1
Baltimore .101 420 000 18
New York. 0 4 0 2 8 4 0 1 0-15
Earned runs Baltimore, 7; New York, 3.
Two-base bits McGraw, Tiernan, Jen
nings, Van Haitren, Davis, Kelley. Three
base hits Tiernan, Brodie. Home runs
Burns, Kelley. Stolen bases McGraw,
Jennings, Davis, 2; Doyle, 2. First base
on balls By Hoffer, 4; by Hemming, 1; by
Pond, 1. Hit by pitched ball By Meekin,
1; by Hoffer, 1. Struck out By Hoffer,
3; by Hemming, 0; by Pond, 2. Passed
Sunday Excursion to Luray Caverns.
Special train will leave B. & O. station,
Sunday, August 18, 8:30 a. in. Bound
trip tickets, including admission to the
cave, $3.50. Seats reserved in ad
vance without extra cost, at ticket office,
cornerNewYorkavenueandFifteenthstreeti
balls Wilson, 3. Sacrifice hits-
Doyle, Burns. Prime 2.55. Umpires
Eniblle and Hunt.
SECOND GAME.,
Baltimore. - .r .AB..R. H.PO.A. E.
McGraw,3b.... .. . 4 0 10 2 0
Keeler, rr.. ..- 4 1 1 s 0 0
Jennings, ss.... ....".... 3 2 2 1 3 0
Kelley, If .402200
Gleason, 2b.. i 1115 1
Brodie, cr.. 3 1 0 1 0 0
Robinson, c.. ..,.. ..323211
Carey, lb.. .. 3 1 0 12 0 0
McMahon, p.. ., 2 0 10 11
Totals 30 8 112112 3
Now York, AB. R. II.PO.A.E.
Fuller, ss.. .. ..J; 4 0 2 3 5 1
Tiernan.rf.. ,. .. 4 .1 2 2 0 0
Van Haitren, cf.7.. .. .. 3 ?0 0 2 2 0
Davis, 3b.. 4 "0 01 2 0
Doyle, lb 4 0 0 7 1 I
llurui, If.. ,).. ..200320
Stafford, 2b.. ' 3 0 110 0
Wilson, c. 3 0 0 3 0 1-
Clarke, p 3 1 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 2 G 21 12 3
Baltimore.. ..7. 7. 0 0 1 3 0 0 4 x 8
New JTork.. 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 02
Earned runs Baltiihnre, 2. First base
by errors JJalUmo're, 2. Loft on bases
Baltimore, -i; JNew lork, 5. lirstbaseon
v. iiHnmrnMnlinii.i1''ArrPifipi-. Rtriif.'-
out By McMahon, rl;i by Clarke, 1. Two
base hits Robinson, 2; Kelley. Sacrifice
hith McMahon, 2... Stolen bases Stafford,
Gleasou, KccIerrHalli'by. pitcher By Mc
Mahon, l. Wild pitch Clarke, 1. Um
pires Emslie andUunt. Time 2 hours.
COLTS BA DLY BEATEN.
SpldoroPiledUp Thirteen ItuiiHlnTwo
IniilngH.
Chicago, Aug. jL For five innings to-day
the game was 'a pretty cpntest. Hutchin
son htarted In for Ghicago.'and was doing
nicely when Kit t ridge hurt, a linger.
Then Thornton and Dofiohue went in.
The former was as wild as a hawk and
allowed five v.ub on balls iu the sixth
inning, each of which afterwards scored.
Cuppy was lilt hurd and the Colts had a
good chance to win before Thornton came'
in. It was a miserable exhibition towards
the finish. Attendance 3,500. Score:
Chicago. AB. It. H.PO.A. E.
Everett, 3b.. 5 12 4 3 1
Wllmot. If 5 0 1 1 0 2
Lange, or -10 10 11
-Decker, lb 4 1 1 14 0 0
Terry, &s 4 0 0 12 1
Ryan, rf 4 2 2 0 0 0
Stewart. 2b 4 12 3 4 0
Klttridge, c 1 0 0 3 0 0
Uonohue, e 3 0 2 12 1
Hutchison, p 10 0 0 1 1
Thornton, p 3 12 0 10
Totals 30 G 13 27 14 7
Cleveland. AB. R. H.PO.A. E.
hurkett, If.. ..-. 522110
McKean, t-a 2 2 0 0 7 0
O'Connor, lb G 1 2 14.1 0
O. Tebeau, 2b.. .... ..422 3 3 0
Zimmer, c 5 2 2 2 0 0-
McAleer, cf 4 1 1 3 0 0
McGarr, 3b 4 1113 0
LSlake, rf 5 2 12 0 1
Cuppy, p 3 5 2 12 0
Totals 38 1813 27 17 1
Chicago.. 0001.20201- G
Cleveland 02 0 30 5 8 0 018
Earned runs Chicago 6, Cleveland 1.
Home run Thornton. Three-base hit Ev
erett. Two-basehits Stewart. Decker, Ziin
mer. Sacrifice hits McGarr 2, McKean.
Stolen bases Blake, O. Tebeau, Everett.
First base on ball. Off Hutchison 3, off
Thornton 9. First base mi errors Clevelaud
3. Wild pitches Thornton 2. Struck out
By Hutchison 3, by Cuppy 1, by Thornton 1.
Double play McKean. Tebeau and O'Con
nor. Umpire O'Day. Time 2:40.
EAItNED T1IE1K ItTJNS.
Pittsburg -Pirates Downed ly Ail
Around Playing of LouUvllle.
Pittsburg, Aug. 9. The Louisvilles played
all around the Phtsburgs. Weyhing was
hit in only one inning. The balance of the
game lie had the Pirates at his mercy.
The Colonels earned all their runs. A ttend
i!ance, 1,200. Score:
'"'" Pittsburg. T ' - AB. R. H.PO.A.E.
Donovan, r ,. .. ..--fVi. 30-1 20 0
.fimith, It .....,.,.:.. .i 4 0l"001
.Beckley,J.b i.j:.. 4 0 0 12 0 0
Stenel, c ..-... 3 11 01 0
Bierbauer, 2b ,,4 0 1 2. G 1
Cros-,. .-s : '. .' .. 4 0 0 540
Genius, 3b '..' .. 4 0 1 2 3 0
Sugden, o i '..".. 3 0 0 4 3 0
Hawley, p .-.-... 3 0 0 0 2 2
Totals :.. .. 32 l 5 27 19 4
Louisville. v - AB. It. H.PO.A.E.
O'Brien, 2b 5 0 2 0 3 0"
Collins, 3b 5 0 13 0 0
Clark, It .. 4 12 10 0
Holmes, ss f. .'S.. 3 0 0 2 4 1
Gettinger, cf .-.. 4 13 3 0 0
Wright, rf ...J.. 3 115 0 0
Spies, lb 1 .,!.. 4 1 1 10 1 '0
Warner, c i.. 3 0 0 2 10
Wejhuig, p ,.-. 4 0 11-20
Totals .?.. '.. .. .'. ,." 35 4 11 27,11 1
Pittsburg 00 0 100 00 01
Louisville 0 0 0 3 10 0 0 04
Earned runs Pit tsbrug, 1; Louisville, 4.
Two-base hits Donovan, S teazel. Three
base hit Getlinpcft Sacrifice hit Holmes.
Stolen base O'Brien. Double plays Bier
bauer and Beckley; Bierbauer, Cross and
Beckley. Bases on balls Donovan, Stenzel,
Clark, Wright, Warner. Struck out Haw
ley, Holmes, Gettinger, Warner, Weyhing.
Time 2:20. Umpire Jevne.
To-day's Entries at Alexander Island.
First Race One-half mile. Two-year-olds.
Selling.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Ind. Horso. Wt.
358 Crescent ....113 358 Illural 95
(438)Baccarat....llO 438 Wat 95
(42H)A1 Ileleub't 108 438 Rapids 95
Boueparte ..105 340 Pr. Helen .. 95
428 Bagnet .. .. 103 418 Vesta 95
438 Tyro 103 428 Ratt GoundvOS
231 Joneola .. .. 05 438 Litttlo Ralph 98
Second .Race Five-eighths mile. Selling.
Ind. Horso. Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
3G7Lilliptito... 115 422Arda 110
445 Joe Mack ..113 MissModred 110
422 Adaxus ....115 434 Carrie 110
221 O'llearn ....112 443 Dr. Faust .. 100
422 Jewsharp.. 112 412Fla8h 100
3G6 Redowao ...112 372 Susio R 95
430 Fiun water. 110 368 Imp. Savant 97
422 Siberia .. ..110
Third Race Six and one-fourth furlongs.
Selling.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Iud. Horse. Wt.
407 Li'e Sandy 110 363 Coal Mine- ..110
351 Gleuall .. ..110 410 Vespasian ..110
"311 Bella G. ..110 395 Home Run.. 110
444 Cadet HO "223 Moderate... 110
411 Red Jim ..110 381 Duke of Fief 110
Fourth Ttace 0no mile. Selling.
Ind. Horse. " Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
'(3G5)Lotion .. .103 444 J. M'LaTn 100
444 Mirage ...103 413 Sandstone ...100
419 Chieftain .103 437 Paris 98
435 Odd Socks 101 (380)Ncmo 98
(437)0porto . .101 412 Gorman 87
Fifth Race Four and one-half furlongs.
Ind. Horse. wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
(445)Ky West . 122 440 Life- Charlie 110
433Parvenue...H5 290 Bay Sccrot.. 105
414 Imp. Plun'rll5 442 Forest .. .. 105
427 Rd Star ...115 43G Elmstono ... 105
442 Eclipss, Jr.115 398 Saginaw .. .105
411 Nativity t. .110 426 Sonora .. .. 122
442Argyle III. 110
Sixth Race Six and one-fourth furlongs.
Selling.
Ind. Horso. wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
327 Fassett .. .. 101 440 Littli Joe . .110
441 Postal HO 444 Hia Grace .. 110
373 Flushing ...110 444 Billy Boy .. .110
441 Airplant ...110 420Kouyon 110
381 TearDrop..H0 423 Blue Bird ....110
431 C. 0. D. .. 110
Refers to St. Ashiih series'.
Selections.
First race W'at,' Baccarat, and Al
Helenbolt.
Second race Joe Mack, Fiunwatcr, and
Siberia. I
Third race Homo Run, Cadet, and Coal
Mine. -
Fourth race Paris, Mirage, and Oporto.
Fifth race Key West, Forest, and
Sonora. -
Sixth race Billy 'Boy, Teardrop, awl
Flushing. ...
Bright Articles,
Artistic pictures,
Interesting Features.
. - Local Features,
1 .; - Sunday Times.
MEN'S
SUMMER WEARABLES.
S usual, we're
in the lead when
it's a question
of making big
offers. Clear
ing Out Sum-
wKflw 1UC1 VJ J w u. o
gives us lots or
chance to make
cuts. We've
made them, and
there's not a bargain in the
lot that won't prove a real
bargain by the satisfaction
and service it'll give you.
Jlon'a Duck Trousors are ro- Q R -
ducedto OJw
All Wool Cheviots, and Cass!- T r 0 pr
mores, 87.50, Sulw, for JHr.OJ
All-Wool, Plain Casslmeres
nud Ctiovlots,that woro $10 and G' "7 2K
CHILDREN'S WASH SUITS.
it50 grade. . $1.00
$i00 grade SI. 33
81.75 grade $1.17
FURNISHING PRICES LIKE TIIESjE:
t lui. x mtk itrKit&cu :ijiiu fr-k r i
91, $150. uud $'.' goods for
Chlldrou'H Stilrt Waists, sizes
4 to V4 years, 50c and 75c Tal
ues, for
Odd SHIRTS that wore $1.09,
ei.50aud $i00
37c
85c
The Clothiers, Shirtmakers, Outfitters,
910-912 FSt.N.W.
VETERANS BY THOUSANDS
Boys in Blue in Force at the GK A.
Kr National Encampment.
Corporal Tanner Tells of the Organiza
tions That Will Be IlcprChentedat
the Great Gathering.
"TheTational Encampment, which will he
held at Louisville, Ky., September 11th,
12th aud 13th, will he the most interesting
event that hus ever taken place in Grand
Army circles," said Corp. James Tauner
yesterday, talking about tho attendance
from this city. '
"Everything conspires," said the Corporal,
"to make the assemblage one or the largest
and most inspiring ever gathered together
in this country. It will be held at a point
that may be said to be central, so lar as
veteran organizations, both Union and Con
federate are concerned. On the south will
be Knoxville, Chattanooga, Atlanta, New
Orleans and other great Southern cities,
and on the north and west, are Indiana,
Illluois, Ohio and other states which are
just alive with Union veterans. In ad
dition to all these favorable circumstances-
the dedication of the battlefield of Chat
tanooga which takesplaceonlyaduyorrwo
before tho opening of the encampment will
tend greatly to increase the attendance at
the latter.
There will be present large authorized."
delegations rrorn the Grand Army of the
Republic, Sous of Veterans, the Armies of
theCumlwrland.TennesseeandthePotomac.
Besides the representatives from these or
ganizations, it is Bare to predict that a large
majority of the members or every Post and
camp lu the country will attend. While all
these would, nodouht, make up a mostinter
csting gathering fetill it would not be com
plete without the presence of theladies, who
are so closely identified with all G. A. R.
movements.
Among the ladies' societies which will Ve
represented will be the Woman's Relief
Corps and auxiliaries connected with every
post of tho G. A. R.
Besides the regularly constituted repre
sentatives from this city it is expected that
at least a thousand more members from the
different posts and auxiliaries will attend
the encampment.
The conibiued delegations from this city
will be iu ctiarge of Col. M. T. Anderson,
commander Department of the Potomac,
who is by virtue of his ortice a member of
tlio Louisville Encampment.
"Two of the most important events which
will take place during the encampment,"
said Col. Tanner, "will be the election or a
new national commander and the selection
of the next place of meeting." Without
posing as either a prophet or sou of a nrophet
Col. Tanner said there was no doubt In his
miud but that Col. I.N. Walker, of Indiana,
would be the unanimous choice of the dele
gates. Col. Walker has always been promi
uout in G. A. R. circles and Is at present
tax commissioner of his State for several
years. The colouel also predicts the selec
tion of St. Paul, Minn., as the place for the
next national encampment."
To-dny's Entries at St. Louis.
First Purse; six furlongB: Vulture, 109;
Artist, Dago, Crank, Farmer, St.. Au
gustine, 107; Bayview, 104; Ottyanna,
Lizetteand Invercauld, 102.
Second Two-year-olds, six furlongs:
Lecinnle, A. B. C. , 101 ; Midland, Mis Truth,
108; Leasnian, 105; Waldena, 10 9; Whis
per,Paros,Southworth,95;Kiugstone,Ludy Claire, Oliver, 99.
Third Handicap, five furlongs: Mag
net, Linda, 109; Rey del Mar, 100;MoUIeA.,
103; Lobengula, 104 ;AmelJa May, 10 3;
Miss Galop, Sallie Woodford, 95.
Fourth Two-year-o Id maidens, five
furlongs: Cashier, Fred Foster, Black Knot,
103; Eldred, Belle of Oakgrove, Carrie V.,
J. W. Levy, 105.
Fifth Seven furlongs: Fandango, 114;
George W. Bailey,, Hassan, 110; Benson,
Overall, Miss Young, Kathleen, 105.
Sixth Selling; six furlongs: Ben Lo
mond, 104;Rapier, 100;Flus,h, SG; Min
nie Gee, Cuban, 95; Dorah Wood, 7.
Entries at Saratoga.
Saratoga, N. Y., Aug. 9. Eutriesfor to
day's races:
First race; five furlongs Axloml 15,
Floretta IV 115, Sannlo III 105, Perfidy,
Rosaliud III, Cissie B., Lavienta, Joan,
Elusive, 103 each.
Second race; one and onc-mmrter miles
Saragossa 122, Song and Dance 107, San
dowue 105, Stowaway 10, EgbartlOO.
Third race; G. II. Mumm handicap; five
and one-half furlongs Hazlet 1 23 , Merry
Princo 113, Lavienta 109, Refugee 107.
Raruiro 105,Midlo 100, Barrytone II 100,
Aniasctte 95,Swect Favordale90.
Fourth race; selling; six furlongs Rap-a-Tap
112, Discount 112, Jackor Spades 112,
Nick lOo.Bellicoso 105, Waltzer 104, Lady
Diamond 95, Pop Gray 107, Merry Monarch
105,Derfargilla 1U4, Silk Gown 100.
Fifth race; steeplechase; short course
My Luck 160, Red Pat 159, Hesperion
139, Cicero 152, Trillion 150, May Blossom
145, Beverwyck 137., Hellas 137.
jiff V L
TALENT Hi AN liiliiu
Landed on Four Favorites After
a Fortnight's Hard Luck,
JOOKEY BROWK SET DOWN
Given Thirty Days for Too Much En
terprise at tho Post Inheritance
Gave tho Favorite n Stroiur Push
in tho Event for Youngsters Mc
Mulion's Good Thing.
If it wasn't hot enough In town yester
day one had only to take a run down to
the St. Asaph track and they could have
easily thought that they were in the lower
regions before their time. The way that
the sun streamed down in the grand stand
was simply a caution. In the betting
ring, thanks to electric fans that are dis
tributed around, it was fairly cool but
In theopen stand with the sun breakingrec
ords at the rate of ten a minute and not
the slightest sign of a breeze it was some
thing Tearful.
It was pretty tough on the horses too, but
it evideutly did not errect their speed,
as Mrs. Stuart jumped nut aud smashed the i
six and a quarter furlong record all to
pieces. Sho had 99 pounds, up with little
itob Drown in the saddle ana covered the
distance in 1:20 1-1 seconds. She has
lately been running some good races and
with light weight up can give some of the
best of them a race.
SET DOWN FOR INTERFERING.
Brown tried hard to get away from
the iHist with her that he was set down
for thirty duys by the starter. It would
teem that this is a pretty heavy punish
meaut for showing a disposition to win,
and he should be given chance to get
back in the saddle by paying a fine. He
is a good jockey, and they are apretty
scarce article at the acrosvthe-river tracks.
For the firsjt time in nearly two weeks
the taleut got in their inning; They had
reached a stage wvhere they were desper
ate, a iid they landed no less than rour
favorites. .
A rather unusual incident of the day's
sport was the ruuuing up of Ponce de Leon
He won his race in his usual impressive
style, and Johnny Ryan went out on the
track and ran him up 200 above his en
teredpriceorSlOO. JudgeMcMahouknows
what a good thing he has in the old horse,
and refused to let him go.
FIRST GAME.
Renaissance, who was a strongly played
choice in the opening event, managed to
capture the money after a hard drive hair
way through the stretch with Chink, a 15
to 1 shot, second.
HIGBIE'S STRONG FINISH.
Inheritance, the second choice in the race
for the youngsters, Jumped to the front and
appeared to liave it well in hand when
Washburn brought up Higbie, the favorite,
and withalittlesbaking landed themoney by
an open length. Yetter had the mount on
Inheritance and if he had been able to ride
a stronger finish would have won.
Annie T. was the first one to shove in
front after tho flag fell in the third race
but soon gave way to Eonda who opened
up a gap of a length and a half and
piloted his field to the rar turn. He was
then collared by Mrs. Stewart and they had
a hard drive clear down the stretch. Brown,
rode a clever rinish and at the end landed
his mount a -winner by hair a length
Ten sprinters faced the starter for the.
next race with Belle of Fermoy the choice
at Gto 5. She beat the Hag and was never
headed, winning In a dnverromrie who was"
horribly ridden by Dxitty. Harvest was
third, rour lengths away.
Results at St. Asaph.
"2AQ First race. Five furlongs. 3-year-olds
ou-' and up. Purse, $150. Timo.l:CHl
Ind. Horso & Wt. St i St. Fin. J'ck'ya. Bt
(3CG) R'nals'nce, 10L 7 4 3 IU M'rphy7-10
."H6 Chink, SS 2 2 32? Concdonlj
! Prosper, 67 1 13 2h 3h H'lah'n 100
4il Zamacraw, 101. 3 9 S 4 Leland 100
346 Meteor, 93. 6 7 9 5 Brown 8
359 Stanley 11., 97.. S 6 4 6 Ellis 15
331 I"nces3.Mix,97 5 8 7 7 Duffy 15
43-i illsory, 107..... 9 5 5 8 Dorsoy 5
345 Finance 11,105. 4 31, 6 9 ilorris 7
Start poor. Won driving:
Q'Tf) Second race. Four and one-halo fur-
"-) ' " lonca. ilniden two-year-olds. Purse,
?150. Time, 0:37.
Ind. Horse & Wt. St. fi St Fin. Jck'ya. Bt.
42S IIIsLIe, 107. 3 23 it Wahb'rn I
4C4 Inn'rit'nce. 107. 2 ir is 210 Tetter 2
85-J Y. (5rlC"o,I0S... 5 5 3 3 Parsoaa 15
N16 Elves, 10S 1 3U 4 4 Murphr S
292 Mario, 10S 4 4U 5 5 Ellis 10
3S1- Noxious, 10S-. 6 6 6 6 Zeller 30
Start fair. Won cleverly.
n T Third race. Six and one-ouartcr fur-
0 ' -1- longs, feiliuc Purse, $150. Time, .
Ind. Hoie Wt St. 14 St Fin. J'ck'ys. Bt
353 Mrs. Si'w'rt,09. 4 3 3h lt Brown 5
333 Eonda, 107 2 y. V. 2iUW,shb'ra SI
560 Monltoress, 90. 5 312h 3 "Ellis 5
336 Traleo,107..... 3 2 4nk4 Zeller 8
333 Irene, 100 6 5 5 5 Taylor 4
3C0 '1 he Snalco, 101 7 C 7 6 M'rphyll-5
(309) Annie T.,ua... 1 4 6 7 Dully 8
Start fair. Won driving.
Q'79 Fourth race Fivo furlongs. Throo-Ji-t
year-olds and up. Purse, f 150. Uline,
1.-05K.
Ind. norse & Wt St H St Fin. J'ck'ys. Bt
337 B. Fermoy, 102 1 la in Ink Ellis 6-3
357 Pie, 104 5 3"- a 2J-- Duffy 6
355 Harvest, 107.... 2 23 2il$3J4Zeller 5
845 & Queen, 102.. 3 5 8 Ih AndrowsSO
865 Sentinel II, 107 7 7 6 5 W'shb'ru30
293 Criterion, 101.. 6 6 5 6 Trener SO
337 Wyoming, 104.. 4 4 4 7 Brown 15
103 Susie R., J5.... 9 9 9 8 H'lahan 20
440 rhiTd'lphia.107 8 8 7 9 Yettor 15
442 Johnny F, 104.10 10 10 10 Avery 15
Start fair. Won driving.
'ITI Fifth raco. One mile. Sellinc. Purso,
3 '3 Time,l:14&
Ind. Horse & Wt St H St. Fin. Jckys. Bt
(3S0) P'nced'L'n. 109 2 ltik.liy.V- Zeller 3-16
&S5 Flushing. 109.. 1 3t 3J 2 Mnrphy 10
355 Pr. KTm'th, 112 5 5 4 3h Wshb'rn 6
412 Rufus, 03. 7 SS 2 9 4 Conijdon 6
302 Arehbiah'p, 112 9 9 6 5 Elite 15
365 Sir lino, 114.... 3 8 5 6 Carson 15
(830) P, Chief, 109... 4 7 8 7 DTh'ntylS
S65 Cnraccus, 111.. 6 17 8 Duffy 40
S6G Mlunio D., 107. 8 6 9 9 M'h'neylCO
Stnrt good Won ea3ily.
3T Sixth rnce. Fivo fiirloaga. Selling.
' T" Purse, $150. Time, l:0I3j.
Ind. Horse & Wt. fct i St Fin. J'ck'ys. Bt
365 J. D'unis'n, 111 3 2 1 13 Coleman 4
4tl Irish I'nt, 107.. 2 lb. 2. 2 Duffy G-5
316 Lithog'ph, 107.. 1 3 3J 3"i Wshb'rnlo
363 D. Gl'cest'r, 107 4 5 4 4 Zoller 3
362 Pu'nam, 109.,.. 5 4 5 5 Ciuson 30
346 Lorimer,103... 6 6 6 6 Bonder 5
Good st ait Won galloplny.
Refers to Alexander Island series.
Entries at Brighton.
Brighton Eeach , Aug. 0. Following are
the entries for to-morrow'sracea:
First race One milo; selliug. Fusileer,
107; Annie Bishop, 104; Lochinvar, 102;
GoldDollar, 103; Mabel Glenn, 99; Gutta
Percha, 9G; Emma, 02, ar.d Mangrove, 88.
Second race Otic-half mile; handicap.
Lorrainia, 1 13; Yankee Doodle, 112; Volley,
10S; King Hero, OS, and Ensign, 90.
Third race One and one-sixteenth miles;
selling. Marshall, 110; Doggett, 108;
Lochinvar and George Dixon, 100 each,
and Little Tom, 90.
Fourth race Mile handicap. Connoiseur,
120; Charade, 110; Bonibasetto, 107; Pala
din, 104; Appomattox, 9G; Little Tom,
95,andEmma,00.
Fifth race SixfurIongs.BestBrand.Gov.
.Sheehan, and Ameer, 1 1 2 each; Hawarden,
110; Harrington, 109; Maggie K., 107?
Buckeye, King Gold, Sun Up, aud Golden
Gate, 105 each; Cockade, 102, and Romp
ing Girl and Thyra, 100 each.
Sixth race Mile and one-hulf; -welter
weight handicap. Certainty, 138; Connois
seur, 135; Santiago, 127;Bonibasette, 115;
Warlike, 107; Daly, 103; Augusta Belle,
105; Tom Moore, lOOj Golden Gate, 98;
Sir Tom, 07.
f We Opened t
t the t
yesterday with just 269 m
of those $1.75 Pants, the X
balance left over from the g
great sale of $5, $4, S3 and
S2.50 pants at this wonder- $
ful price. $
we promised to sen tne
269 at
to close them out, and we
were quite busy all day living-
up to our promise. To
day ends the whole success
ful affair, and we don't be
lieve there will be a pair left
in the house from this sale.
Don't go home to-night with
out seeing these trousers.
o J
Hew York Clothing House
31 1 Seventh St. N. W. f
WASHIHGTOMN ARRESTED
Abraham Berwanger, Liquor Drum-,
mer, Traded in Alexandria.
C.sd to De Fonsht in the Court.- on tho
Ground That It Violates Interstate
Commerce Act.
Abraham Berwanger, a drummer for Rich
ards wholesale lumor hocse in Washington,
Is under arrest In Alexandria on a charge
of selling liquor without a license.
The arrest was made yesterday by Of
ficer William Furgesson, who was Stan-ling
in RIess grocery store on Fairfax,
and Princess streets when Berwanger tame
In and offered his samples.
The officer requested Mr. Berwanger to
show his license, and not haviag any ha
accompanied the officer to the pohc v sta
tion. Later in the evening he was re
leased under bond or S5GG for his ap
pearance before Judge Thompson tha
morning, Mr. D. Eeadhelm beeonuug hia
surety.'
There Is no city license, but the State
requires all liquor drummers to pay a tax
of S350. It Is understoid that the tast
will be fought on the ground tha the arrest
Is a violation of the mterstatecommerce law.
The- Consumers Browing Company or
Washington, which proposes to erect the
mammoth brewery at Eoslyn at the "Virginia
end of the Aqueduct Bridge, was yesterday
granted a charter of incorporation by Judge
C. E. KIcol. or the Circuit Court of AlfX
andria county. The capital of the com
pany as s"t lorth In the charter. Is to be not
less than S25,000,nor more than S50O 000.
which Is to t divided into shares of thenar
value of $100 each. The real estate hold
ings or the new company are limited, to
$500 acres, and the main "Wee is to be
in Roslyn,' Alexandria county. The of
ricers named in tlie charter are Denni3
Connell, or Washington, president; John
Curtin. vice president; Edward Jordan, sec
retary; James Richards, treasurer, ami W.
M. McGuire, Thomas Wateh, Edward Jordan
and Robert R.White.dlrectors. TneoWcera
are all residents of Washington city
Mr. Elteba J. Millr, one or the feuding
merchants or Alexandria, died at the roce
"of his' brother-in-law. Mr. R. 3. Farquhar,
near Rockville, Md., yesterday evening, af
ter an illness or some months of Bng!-t3
disase. Mr. Miller leave? two sons, Ir
Julian Miller and Mr. Ashby Miller, and me
daughter. Miss Gertrude Muler. His body
"will be brought home for burial.
The Dickinson & Randall Rail-joint Box
Company, whose purcose Is to manufacture
in Washington city a patent device box,
has been chartered by Judge Norton. The
caitapl stock is fixed at $50,000, divided
into 500 shares of $100 each. The real
estate to be owned by the company is lim
ited to 1,000 acres, and though the charter
names no officers, the following Wash
ington gentlemen are ixs incorporators:
Charles Dickinson, E. S. Randall, James
Watson, Alexander Grant, R. B. Browu,
D. T. Burtwell and F. J. McCreery.
Mr. John T. Harrison, foreman or the
Washington and Ohio division of th South
ern Railway shops in this city, had two
or his ribs broken by a fall from a car a
day or two ago.
Mr. Israel Holt, tne.veuerahte turnkey
of the city jail, died a. his home hi the
jail building yesterday afterujoo, after a
short Illness. Mr. Holt -was over seventy
years of age, and was a primer by trade.
For the past thirteen years he has been
connected with the city jail.
Mr. Charles Kaus has resigned the posi
tion of warden of the chain gang, and
Acting Mayor Snowden ha appointed Mr.
Wru. E. Grady, au ex-policeman, to the
position. ,
The case of Carry Myerg , a conductor of
the Washington Southern Railway, for
using Fayette street to make flying
switches was. called up in the mayor's
court, but at the request of Col F L.
Smith, attorney for the company. It was
postponed for two weeks, while Justice
Thompson looks out the the law govern-
ing the ca"-
Honors from Venezuela.
Surg. Gen. Tryon, of the Xavy, has been
notified of his selection as a member of the
Red Cross of Venezuela, and has been
awarded a bronze medal in recognition ot
his services in Venezuela during the revolu
tion of 1892, when he was attached to
the TJ. S. S. Baltimore.
Admiral Ammen Heeoveiinsr.
Admiral Ammen, who was stricken -witb.
vertigo Wednesday, is renting easy ac
hK home at Ammendale Md. , and his re
covery Is probable.
Iii a hurry ?
Do you want
your things
laundered in
a hurry? "We
can let you
have them
back again
the same day
if you will let
us know in
-In.
w
time to call for them before nine
in the morning. A telephone call
will bring a wagon. They will
be laundered well, too.
THE YALE,
F.H. WALKER SCO.,
611 10th at. Plant, 13 G

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