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The morning times. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1895-1897, October 04, 1895, Image 3

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THE MOIimNG TIMES, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1895.
3
Tarter. HrlJget Co.,
315 7tu St
Just as ready for
you as we shall be
any time this sea
son. They call us
"lucky" because we
have "built up this
big clothing busi
ness in so short a
time. No luck about
it. It is simply the
resulLof hard work,
low prices, liberal
dealings, attractive
ststv es. making" our
. j , 0
interests secondary
to vours, and refunding the
money when asked. As big
as it is, the present business
isn't a circumstance to what
it will be a few years hence.
As well as we have done for
3'ou in the past we intend to
do better in the future.
arker, Bridget & Co-
315 Seventh St.
mTZ.
foji-iss-rt
IkW jS
INSURE YOUR BIGYGLE
ANITSAVE THE
COST OF REPAIRS.
$C p;iys the
premium for
one 3-car's in
surance ag-aiust acci
eent or theft.
a If an accident
it. occurs take
Jy j-our wheel to
tue nearest
first-class
shop and it'll
be thoroughly
repaired free.
Full particu
lars gladly
j-iven on ap
plication. Telephone,
1593.
cncral Agent Pa. .Mutual Ricvctc lnsur
ancc Cnuipnn,
1335 F Street.
iiomi: orricii i sis Arch st, Phiin.
, f7 'v'
l'wv" I
A. MAN
who lias boon handling
bicycles all his life may
bo able to point out the
difference between the
flaw 21-pound Wheels
Wo are offering at S50
and SGO.andmany of the
so-called hleh-gradema-
S5 chines but it is doubt-
ful. Ccrne and have a
look at them.
i C. C. -McCOKMICK & CO.,
SIl G Street N. W.
Second-baud Bicycles at all prices.
S50
AAAAAA
ft
$60
$10.00 Cash
and $10.00
per month; that's the way we sell
our wheels, including the famous
SYRACUSE with "CRIMSON
RIMS,"
"We handle only goods bearing
original name plates, built by
makers with established reputa
tion no "cut price" or "auction"
stock.
till
j isrc
:t WHEELMCN.
908 New York Avenue.
Supplee, Elmore and -Aax lines
I Everybody Cycles at I
iHipj
f FIELD, Vrc,.c f
Fast tract, on dead level, en
closed hy jcradeil bauks instead of
objectionable rails, bis nwao
aiea reserve.! for no rices and
le.'itmr..
Nowhere else can riding
Tvhol baBonulcklr learn.
WSuarau.ee' tickets, 12.03 fnro-
Cclfiicy assured). Dressing rooms
lor lauics.
District Cycle Co.,
Hartford.'
"Columbia s,"
"aASS,B- 452 Pa. Ave.
ooe
CI CYCLE
FREEx
Call at your Scaler and get a sample caa oC
Dixon's Cjeln Lubricant tree, or at GUAKAX
TEE PAIN r itt Onlt-e G15 IS st. nw.
ClIAItI.i:S 1. IIOITGI.ASS' WILT...
Ho INi.ic of Ills Property to Xcur
Ilcluttves.
Attorney niuat.ucl-M. Hewlett yester
day Mel the -will or Charles 1. Douglas's,
a grnnc.son of the late Frederick Douglas-).
The testator Tva-s only sixteen years old
irlieii lie made tlie will, auirthc paper 'will
consequently not iass real property.
The Instrument was dated March 2G,
1895. and nnuics llr. Hewlett as execu
tor. One-hair of the estate coming to she
dercaH.il from Ids grandfather Is left to
Hubert Small Douglass, a brother.
LeTls II. anil Charles It. Douglass,
Slides, nre gtvcu $10') eacli, and Itosetta
Prague, on aunt. Is given ?300. Tlie
residue of the estate Is left to Emanuel
II. Hewlett and Ella M. Scott.
mimm it again
Orioles Were Clay in the Hands
of the Swift-Playing'Spiders.
WILD SCENES ON THE FIELD
Tlioiisjindn of XoJxi'-Miikliig Devices
Mndi tlie Air Hideous, and Tlironts
ffero Strained In Clieprlwi the
Victors, From Start to Finish the
liitlllniori Were Doomed.
II
Clciemiiil .
llnltliuoro
II. K.
7 lO 5
2 5 4
Kail Park, Cleveland, O., Oct. 3 Noth
ing approaching the exhibition or enthu
siasm at League Park this nlternoon has
ever lief on- bi-cn seen M a public exhibition
in this lily.
It ivas more I linn enthusiasm.' Fanaticism
would pnibably lie .1 more pal way of ex-pres-dns
it. I r ever baseball cranks crossed
the line lict ween sanity and insanity, they
dhnt toslay. '
Wednesday about one In cyery tin who
attended the came brought with lilm Some
artirici.il means of cxprc-slns his fci'hngs.
To-day the oilier nine got into line and
tlidollcctlon or noise-making devices thai
passed through the turnstiles was a i-i;;hl
to behold. There were big horns anil
liltlcliorns: blgbelSanJ llttleuill; ratlk-s
of all shapes and sizes, and other uulieanlsif
devices, that iiuittol munds that tieggar
deseriiition.
The eircct reminded the unwilling listen
ers of a noise tli.it seiral hundred coin
blned shows might make II Hie animals
were all turned loose. The most conspicu
oub device wa a horn made of sheet Iron
that seven men e.irrleil into the niMlllon
at the right or tlie grand Marul. The noise,
that came out or this Improvised musical
instrument shook the grand stand.
uiGcnsT citowu vi:tv
The crowd was larger by at liiist 1.000
tlian It was on Wednesday. The grand
stand was crowded to eurrfocatioiiand there
was not an inch of standing room anj
where. I'.very bit of space in both right
and left fields that was reserved for spec
tators was crowded. The crowd was esti
mated at 8.000. It made enough" noise
lor a 20,000 crowd.
The Cleveland bojs iveregixen n great
reception when they were called to the
field for practice at 2.1.-.. Tilcy handled
the ball like Mire winner. Sonic or Mc
Kcan's practice work . was hair-raising.
He picked up grounders with hair on as
though they were easy ihaiiccs.rftnd lined
thini over to first true and fast as cannon
shots.
Chllds and Blake were also in evidence,
the letter picking cternl loi-s Hies ofr of
nght-fiiid lemv. The latteries were Ciip
py and Zimmer, Hotter and Clarke.
Keere and AIUoiiald olficiatcd as um
pires. okiolks wi:nn rurrcTS.
The Isiltimore crowd were as imppets
In the hands or Cuppy in the first. Mc
Graw went out on a measley grounder to
Childs. Kccler tapped an easy one to
Cuppyai.d wasout. McKeaiiinr.deagre.it
stop of Jennings' hot grounder and re
tired the runner at first.
Jose Uurkett, the champion batsman
of the world, hit the first ball pitched to
center field Tor a ingle. He advanced to
second on a passed Uill. McICean lined
out a great single to right ami liurkett
crsoscd tlie plate. Chllds was easy from
GUaeon to Carey, McKcau advancing from
second to third.
McAIivr was hit by n pitched ball"
and took first, l'nt Tilieau flied out to
Kccler and AIcKeaii scored on the llirow
in. JIcAlecr went to second. Zlmmer's
two base hit to left scored Mc-V leer. Wake
was out, from Jennlnss to Carey.
ccond iUKeau let Kelly grounder
get ajvay from him, and Kelly was safe.
Brodie fouled out to Zimmer. Glcasou
flied to Blake. Carey singled to i enter.
The lullgotaway froniMcAlivrandKelley
scoreil. Clark nksl to McAIecr.
JIcGarr opened with a single to left.
Cuppy sairlfited, Mcliarr adraneing to
scs.-ond. Burkctt fouled out to JltGraw.
McKean's long fly to left field was caught
by Kclley after a hard run to the fence.
TnilEATXS l'ATAL TL.Y.
Third Hoffer fanned the air three times.
JIcGraw was out on a nice stop and
throw by "istouewair ilcKcau. Keelcr
got a lucky single. Jennings flied to
Burkelt.
Chllds, McAlcer and I'at Tebeau died
on flics to outfield. Tour balls were
pitched.
rourth Kclley wailed for four Iialls
and walked to first. Brodie flied out
to Chllds. Glcasou lilt to JIcKoan, forc
ing Kclley out at second. Gleason tried
to steal second and was out.
Zlmmer's long fly to left field was
captured by Kclley. Blake died from
Jennings to Carey. McGarr hit into the
crowd in left field for two loses. Cuppy
was easy.
Fifth Carey singled to center. Tllakc
dropped Clarke's fly and threw Carey
out at second. Hoffer flied to Burkett.
Mc-Graw lilt to JUKenn. forcing Claike
at second. McGraw rumbled B.:rkett's
bunt and the latter got a life. .MiKcan
filed to Carey. Childs lilt to JeuuhiRS,
forcing Burkctt at second.
Hofrer threw to first to catch Childs
napping. The ball went wild and Childs
took third. McAlcer hit to Jennings.
He fumbled the ball and Childs scored.
I'at Tebeau filed to Kclley.
CROWD GUYED KELLY.
Sixth McKcau made a great dive and
caught Keeler's fly. Jennings hit to left
for a base. Kelly struck out and the
crowd, guyed him. Brodie hit to right
for a base, advancing Jennings to third.
Brodie started to steal sefcond, Zimmer
threw to Child3 to catch liim and Jen
nings scored from third. Brodie was pjt
out by Tebeau.
Zimmer sbo. cd good eye and walked to
first. Blake struck out trying to sacri
fice. Carey made a great stop of McGarr's
hot one, pulling him out; Zimmer going
to second. Zimmer took third on a i atsed
ball, Cuppy's double to center scored Zim
mer. Cuppy crossed the plate on Burkett's
double to left. Carey mufred McKean's
high foul tly Burkelt and McKcau worked
a great louble steal, Chile's foultd out to
Horrcr.
McALKER'S BAB MISTAKE.
Beventb Gleason flied to Blake. Mc
Kcau threw out Carey. Clark was easy
from Cuppy to Tebeau. ""
McAlcer flied to Gleason. Tat Tebeau
singled to left. Zimmer singled to cen
ter. He tried to stretch it Into a double
and was put cut. Tebeau scored on the
play. Blake fouled out to Carey.
Eighth Uoffcrstruck out. McGraw was
easy from McKean to Tebeau. Kccler
got four balls. Jennings was thrown out
by McGarr.
McGarr easy from short to first. Cuppy
died the tame way. Burkctt singled.
McKean fori cd. Eurkcrt at second.
Ninth Kelly easy. Brodie easy. Glea
son filed.
Tlie score:
Cleveland. All R. H.I'O.A..E:
Uurkett, If 4 13 2 0 0
McKean. ss 4 114 8 1
Childs, 2b 4 10 3 11
McAlcer. cf 3 10 10 1
O. Tebeau, lb 4 1 1 11 0 0
Zlmmcr.c 3 1 2 4 1 1
lllake, rf 4 0 0 2 1 1
McGorr.3b 4 0 2 0 10
Cuppy, V 3 1 1 0 2 0
Totals 33 710 27 14 5
Baltimore. AB. R. H.PQ.A. E.
McGraw. 3b 4 0 0 10 1
Kccler. rf 3 0 12 0 0
Jennings, S3 4 110 7 1
Kclley. ir 3 10 3 0 o
llrodiccf 4 0 12 10
Gleason, 2li 4 o (K3 2 0
Carey, lb 3 0 2 11 0 1
Clarke, c 3 0 0 110
Holfer.p 3 0 0 10 1
Totals 31 2 G2411 4
Cleveluna 3 00 0121.0s 7
Baltimore 01000 10002
Earned, mm Cleveland' 2. Baltimore 1.
First base by errors Cleveland 4i, JJaltl-
&-
- 1
UNrVs
im
itaSfclA?
TOP COAT
weather this
sure a man
doesu' t look
or feel right
hese even-
"W inrs without
that v e r
necessary
j a r m e n t .
We've settled
the price in
our Top Coats
down to bed
rock $10,
$12, and $15 they're pleas
ing, but the cloths, cut, fin
ishing in the coats them
selves please more.
Clothes of a quality su
perior to anything at near
the prices. Light and dark
colors. Satin linings to the
coats.
Look over these Fall
Suits at $10, $12, and $15.
Vicunas, Cheviots, and
Cassimeres.
m
gmmm
999 REASONS WHY
STOLL
SELL
Loeb & Hirsh,
The Clothiers. Shtrtmakcrs. Outfittj.-i.
910-912 FSt.N.W.
You Can Save
50c. to $ 1 .00.
liyimylng your Fall and Wintor
Hal llhHE. Slnuy men useJ to
- Imacino thoy had to "pay fol our
iinuis" in a hat Investigation
proTeil their error.
Now Fall mid Whiter "Blocks"
llerbys anil boft Hats, at Jt M, JJ,
JiSP, 7. It to, H
ir-sxile 1). a .teents for "You-
- macs'" Hals.
James Y. Davis' Sons,
Hatters and Furriers, l'JOl Pa. are.
more 2. Left on bases Cleveland 7. Ilalti
niore 4. First base on lialls-iMf Cuppy 2,
off ltoffer 2. Struck out lly Cuppy 3. by
Horrcr 1. Two-liase hits Zimmer. Mc
Garr. Cuppy. Burkelt. Hit by pitcher Hy
Hofrer 1. I'assed tullsClarke 2. Umpires
Kccfc and McDonald. Time 2:15.
Xotesnf tlicOiinip.
It wa? tlie noisiest crowd that ever saw a
ball game In Cleveland.
McKean's stop nml throw of Jennings'
bad liouuillng hit in the first was a inar
velouly fine play and the crowd gave Mac
a great tend-off.
Cuppy had all klndn of speed and curves
and marled hi like a winner.
McKean'R error in tlie second was excusa
ble as the ball rolled badly.
President Robinson sat on the players'
bench Willi the boys.
Harrv lllake made a nice catch of Glea
son's long fly In the. second.
The audience was representative and con
tainer! many or the mo?t prominent busini'ss
and professional men in the city. Many ot
them were accomp.inl'-d by their wives.
Theilinbetweentlie innings wnsileafeniug
but tlie crowd showed good Judgment in
not interfering with tlie players while, the
game was going ou.
Cuppv- made an heroic effort to Mop
C.irevbSlngleinlhesecond Theballstmck
the thumb of his pitching hand and car
roinmeil Into left Held. Tin- thumb was
haillr hurt, although not seriously enough
to prevent him from pitching.
T.-beau's men seemed to take pret ty kindly
to Iloirt-r'a delivery from the riret. They
niadu three hits in the first liming and
McGarr opened tlie tecond with a corking
single to left.
Cuppy was presented with n bunch ot
flowers when he came to bat In tlie tecond.
He Fhowed ids appreciation by sacrificing
McGarr to second.
A battalion of police kept the crowd from
getting inside the foul lines.
The Baltimore crowd made n great kick
about Mcliouald's decision of McGarr's
double. They claimed It was foul 2nd a
great many thought they were right. It
was a close decision, but Mclionald whs
right on the Hue and had a better chance
to see where the ball struck than any
one else.
Both teams have accepted Col. Edward's
Invitation to attend the races Friday. Tbey
will leave tlie HoUendeu In a sieclal train
at 12:30 o'clock.
G1IA'I OLD -MAX OF BASEBALL.
Harry. Wriclit, tUi Vrtcmn l'lnyer,
I'11-.soh Anny.
Atlantic City, N. J., Oct. 3. Harry
Wright, the veteran baseball manager,
died this afternoon.
Harry Wright, the grand old man of
baseball, was the lust known, and by all
odds the most popular man ever con
nected with tlie great American game,
and he did more than any other to bring
the game to Its present high standing.
He was n thoroughly domestic man. ami
had been three limes married. Ills third
wife, to whom he was but recently mar
ried, survive him, as do also seven chil
dren by the roriner marriages. "Uncle
Harry," as he was airectlonately called,
began his athletic career as a cricketer.
He was born in Sheffield, England, Jan
uary 10. 1833, but his parents brought
hlinlul83(i-toNcw l'orkcity.
1 1 was in 1 857 that he commenced to play
baseball with the then famous Knicker
bocker club, of New York. In 18UC he
went to Cincinnati under engagement of
the Union Cricket Club of that city. In
July. 18iC, he helped to organize the
ntterwards famous Cincinnati Baseball
'Club.
ILe Cincinnati club having disbanded,
Harry Wright -In 1871 was engaged to
play center field and captain of the then
neivly-organlzed Uotoii team.
He was. one of the Hoston-riilladclphla
combination that -tited England In lb74.
He was engaged In 1882 to manage the
Trovldcnce cl.ib. and It fiulshed second in
the championship race of that 8eaon,anil
thlrd In 1883. Harry Wright in 1884 was
engaged to manage the Philadelphia club.
ilr. Wright continued as manager of
the Philadelphia club until the close of
the season of 18'.'.!, when be was made
chief of tlie league staff of umpires, a
position which was created for bitn, and
which lie held at the time of his death.
TWO LUCKY CADETS.
President Snved Tliem From Beiiijj
JJIsiiilsHcd From tlie Service.
The President has saved military cadets
Ralphord M. Seary and Hubert L. Wismora
from lieing dismissed from the service.
These cudets belonged to the fourth class
and were court-martialed at the Military
Academy on the charge of "conduct to tlie
prejudice of good order and military dis
cipline." The specifications were leaving
camp without authority and reporting "all
right" on their return.
They pleaded "not guilty," but the court
found them "guilty" In both cases, and
sentenced them "to be dismissed from the
service." The President approved toe
findings of the court but mitigated the
Ecntence "to confinement to the barracks,
area ot the barracks and gymnasium for
three months."
Look out for the Evening Times, Friday,
October 4, Has the PrizeJpuzzle.
Artistic
Decorations
At little expense. A house
may be much beautified by tk
decorator's alt.
We make a special study of
how to produce the best effects at
the least expense.
Horace J.
LONG
&Co.t
Carpets, Wall Paper, Window Shade,
524 Thirteenth St X W.
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Ktli
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Till
8th
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13th
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17th
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20th
21st
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31St
32ud
33rd
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folks want 'cm.
folks want elu.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
rnlks want eln.
toIkH wane 'tsu.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em.
rolks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
rolks want Vm
folks want 'em.
rolks want Vm
folks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em
folks want Vm
rolks want Vm
folkn want 'em.
rolks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want "cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want. Vm.
folks want 'tin.
folks want 'em.
folks "want Vm.
rolks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
llk want Vm.
folks want Vm.
rolks want 'cm.
rolks want 'em.
rolks want 'em
folks want 'cm.
rolks want Vm.
rolks want 'em.
folks want "tin.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vni.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want m.
folks want Vm.
folks wjnt Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'tm.
rolks want 'cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
rolks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
rolks want 'em.
rolks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
rolks want 'cm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
rolks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
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until
11 Gth
117th
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120th
121st
122nd
1 23rd
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132nd
133rd
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Reason Ik ciuisu
Reason Because
Reason liecuuse
Reason Ik-ca use
Reason llecatise
Iteason lk-cause
Reason Because
Reason ll viuse
Re.is,ai lk-e:iuse
Reason I leca use
Reason ikmuse
Reason !kcause
Reason Bec-aiise
Reason Because
lteaon Because
Reason Ik-cause
Reason lk c-aiise
Reason Ik-cause
If,. tSriTlaltj .i-Illsn
Reason Because
Reason Herauso
Reason Ik-causc
Reason Itet-aiise
Iteason lk cause
Reason Ik-canso
Reason Because
Rkisoii Because
Reason lk-cause
Lea sen license
IteaPoii Ik-causo
Reason Ife-cuuse
Reason lks.-ause
Reawiu Ikiiiuse
Reason lk-cause
Reason Ik-cause
Reason Hecausc
Reason Ik-cause
Reason Ik-cause
Reason Ik-iause
Reason lk-cause
Iteasnii I !c cause
Reason It-cause
Reason Ik cause
Reason lU-cause
Reason Ikiiiuso
Reason ll-caiiso
Reason Ik-cause
Reason Iks.11 use
Reason lk-cause
Iteason Hecaii-e
Reason lk-cause
Reason lk-cause
Reason lleca ttso
Reason 1 -cause
Reason lk-cause
Reason Ik-cause
Reason lk-cause
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folka want 'cm.
rolks want Vm.
rolks want 'cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
rolks want 'cm.
folks want 'em
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
rolks want 'cm.
rolks want 'cm.
rolls want Vm.
folks vant 'cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
rolks want 'cm.
folks want "cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want '1 in.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks waul 'em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
rolks want 'nil.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vni.
folks want Vni.
folks want. 'em.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em.
rolks want 'cm.
rolks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vni
folks want Vni.
folks want "em.
folks want "cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want'Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'em.
folks want 'em.
folks want "em.
folks want Vni.
folks wont "cm.
follcs want "em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vni.
folks want Vm.
folks want 'cm.
folks want "cm.
folks want 'em.
folks want "em.
folks want 'cm.
folks want Vni.
folks want Vni.
rolks want 'cm.
folks
folks
folks
folki.
folks
folks
folks
rois
rolks
rolks
rolks
folks
folks
folks
folks
folks
folks
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
want
JGlst Reason Ik-cause folks want
I"! 2nd Reason lk-cii use folks want
103rd Reason Ik cause folks want
l4tli Reason lk cause folks want
liisili Reason lk-cause
106th Reason lkcause
H7th Reason Hccause
KS8U1 Reason Because
Hilltli Reason Because
170th Reason Because
171st Reaoii Ik-cause folks
l"2nd Reason ikitiuse folks
173rd Reason Ik-cause folks want
I71th Reason Because folks want
I7oth Reasiiii Ik cause
1711th Reason Ikcause
177th Reason lk-caue
178th Reason lk cause
17!'tli Reason Ik-cause
I15OH1 Reason Ik-cause
181st Reason Because
182nd Reason Ikcause folks want
183rd Reason Hecnu-e rolks want
184th Reason Ik-cause rolks want
185tli Reason Ikcause rolks want
I8H1I1 Reason Ik-cause folks want
187th Reason Ik-cause folks want
188th Reason Ikcause
18!ith Reason Ikcause
liiOt'i Reason lkoiuse
101st Reason Because
l!i2nd Reason Ik-cause folks want
103rd Reason Bec-aiise rolks want
l!i4t'i Reason Ik-muse folks want
l'.l.Mli Reason Ik-cause folks want
lniltli Reason Ik-cause folks want
107th Reason Ikcause folks want
l!i8t!i Reason lieeause rolks want
l!i!)lh Reason Ikcause folks want
200th Reason Ikcause folks want
201st Reason Because folks want
202nd Reason Ik-canso folks want
203rd Keasoii Ifc-caudo folks want
20 llli Reason lk-cause folks want
2l)3ih Reason Ik-cause ri.lk want
20itli ReasoiIk-c-au.so folks want
207tli Reason Because folks want
20Mh Reason lk-cause folks want
20!)tli Reason ltecause folks want
210th Iteason Because folks want
211th Reason Ik-cause folks want
212th Reason Ikcause Tolfcs want
213th Reason lk-causo folks want
214th Reason Because folks want
215tli Reason lk-cause folks want
21th Iteason Because folks want
2 17th Reason Hccause folks want
218th Reason lk-cause folks want
2ltli Reaon Because folks want '
220th Reason lk-cause folks want '
221st Reason lk-cause folks want '
222nd Reason P-ec-ause folks want '
223rd Reason lk-cause folks want
224th Reason Ikcause folks want
223th Reason lk-cause folks want
22lli Reason lk-cause folks want
227th Reason Ik-ca use folks want
228tti Iteason Because rolks want
22!H!i Reason Because folks want
230tii Reason-lk-cause folks want
231st Reason lk-cause folks want
232ud Reason lk-c-ause folks want '
233rd Reason Because folks want
231tli Reason Ikcause folks want
235th Reason Ik'causo folks want
23i;tli Reason Because folks want
237th Reason Ikcauso folks want
238th Reason lk-cause folks want
2391H Reason Because folks want
(To be continued.)
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
'cm.
'em.
Vm.
Vni.
'em.
Vm.
'em.
'cm.
Vni.
Vni.
Vm.
Vni.
Vm.
"cm.
' 111.
Vm.
Vm.
"cm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
'em.
Vm.
Vni.
Vm.
Vni.
Vni
cm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vni.
Vm.
Vm.
'em.
'cm
Vm.
Vni.
"cm.
Vni.
Vm.
"cm.
Vni
'em.
'till.
'em.
Vm.
'em.
'.m.
Vm.
Vm .
'cm.
"em.
Vni.
Vm.
em.
Vm.
Vni.
"cm.
'cm.
'cm.
Vm.
'cm.
Vm.
Vm.
Vni.
Vm.
"em.
Vm.
STOLL'S "810'' Seventh Street Northwest.
GL'm'IIHilMnMnH"i77'Ea'k"aHi'MM ataawaat -sBaM aa )siaMnisBia psaawsrswaa aiiawaymi-iaMMSijiaiB tmwmmmmrmamt-mmaxmtrwmmiim'rmrmmrmmmwwmmmmB
M-rirei win 11 laniinhiw mi iMmgpTiTmiifiTiT ifffflirm
'$ QUEER F
Tompkins' Horse Gave Evidence
of Having Been Pulled.
BENDER WAS GIVEN A WHIP
i
butch Girl's CiiMt TVas Almost Equal
ly iim Hud Hit Owner Deceived
tlie Talent and Should He I'uiiNtied.
Only Two Favorites Succeeded In
Cashing Other i:entt..
There have been Eomc reversals ot form
Ehown by the horses racing at the Island
track that have been hairralscrs because of
the barefaced manner in which they have
run dead last one day and come out a few
days later and won, but not a case on record
can touch that shown yesterday by O. R.
Tompkins' Gallatin.
On Tuesday last he -was in a mile dash
with nearly exactly the same field that ho
rnet yesterday and finished absolutely last,
the mile being run In 1:45 3-4. In this
race the boy was not supplied with a whip
and it was rumored before the horses went
to the post that the horse was not tryjn?
and his price went from six to five to Tour
to one.
When Gallatiu went by the Judges sland
yesterday before going to the post Bender
did not have a whipand it looked 1 cry much
as it he was again a lobster. While at
the post, however, the boy was handed a
whip and as a result lie went on with the
horse and won the race. Gallatin Is a
sluggish beast and docs not seem to extend
himself unless he receives considerable
Iiersuaslou from the bat.
Such cases as this where there Is no doubt
wMtcvcr that the horse has been pulled
f vuld not be allowed to go unchallenged.
There was, however, no action taken as
Tompkins appears to have a gigantic pull
with the Island officials.
DUTCH GIRL'S SHOWING.
There was another case that was nearly
as bad as the Gallatin aff fair, and thatwas
the showing made by Dutch Girl, In the
opening event. Steve l'Hommedieu, who
owns this filly, is one of the worst owners
at the outlaw tracks and ruling off is far
too- good for him. His horses are noted
as in-and-outers and how ho has escaped
punishment so far is a mystery.
Jockey Xeary got Ulmnelt Into trouble
after tho last race. During the racs
some Jostling took place 'on the turns, in
which Neary, who rode,Grand I'rlx, got
the worst of It. He 'blamed McLaughlin,
who -was on Marguerltirll; for the jostling,
and while weighing out after the race he
struck the boy In the face. The stewards
of tho club held a meeting and ruled
htm off.
He should certainly have been punished
for his action, but it'would seem that the
Island peoplo plied "It 'on pretty thick.
A suspension would have taught him a
lesson and would likely! have done as
much good as ruling him off. He had no
business to strike McLaughlin, who Is a de
cent little fellow and is on pleasant terms
with everyone with whom' he comes in con
tact. The books again had n good day, as only
two favorites- succeeded In cashing.
Al Helcnbolt was the first to land the coin
for the talent, and King Taul, In the next
race, was tbo only other winning favorite.
KNEW SHE HAD NO CHANCE.
Helcnbolt was an 8 to 5 shot, with
Dutch Girl a close second at 2 to 1. The
latter was so soro that It was a shame to
start her, yet her owner let her go to tho
post and allowed her to be backed by the
public when be well knew that she did
not have a chance to be In the money.
Helcnbolt led all the way and won easily
from Lady Watson, with Bob third.
The second favorlteto win wai King Paul,
in the second event. Both he auduarter
master received considerable support, but
Paul closfcd'o, sUcht'Tavoriteilt 2 to 1.
Tommy Brophy maGo tbo rUDtyng until well
Into the stretch, whole the fvr'!e moved
up and Tron cleverly liy-twiensths.
Eclipse, Jr., 'was vkejk of the handl
cappcrs In the third'raBut the best he
could do at the' fiidsfc fourth. Co
lumbus at IS won tnlBr ahead from
Pattlc, who was as much in front of
Blizzard.
Gallatin came to life In the fourth race
nrd In a driving finish won from Hazel
with Pocahontas third.
The bookies forgot their old friend In
the firth event and laid as good ns 15 to
1 against Purest They must have thought
he was very bid but he fooled them and
at the end won under double wraps from
the favorite. Mid Rose, with Jersey third.
Pat6ey McDcrmott had the mount en
Traitor and he t'emonstrated very -'le.vly
not only that he knows how to ride, and
well, too, but that Mr King who em! Hie
mount the last time the horse .vas cnt
does not know the first principles f Ihe
art Patsey had to shake lilm up a bit
at the erd but on by open daylight from
Grand Prix.
Itcsiiltss nt Alexander Island.
Weather clear. Track fast
;qi First race Oao-half mile. Selling.
OO-r puree, siiw. 'time, oat
IniL Horse & Wt. St Ji St. Fin. JVk'r Bt
(SO Al HelenMUai 3
t) Laiy Wats'n.W i
tSO Hob, 09 2
M) .Murray. 99 C
51t I)utcttGlrl59.. 4
an f. Munch, item. 5
1" 11 1 ( Neary 8-5
2' 21- 2a
SI, 31 3n
6 5 4
5 4 5
4 C 6
Mitchell 20
It,KlnB5-2
Hayes 6
.11drew32
Narvaez-7
Start good. Won handily.
or-Second race. Seven furlongs. Selling.
OOO Purse, SIOO. Tlme,l:32ii
Ind. Horse & Wl St. St Fin. .Pcfy Bl.
-aui mug I'aui. uu it
Si; lo'yBro'y.HO. 1
in: Quarter'r.110.. 2
iTi llayTay.llO... 7
tS5 Psyche, 107 ... 6
ISS Bolivar. 107.... 3
"77 L'e Bravo. 110.. 4
31 1 2 13 .Miller
1 1H 21 Cole 1G-5
4 3e' V0 Criffiu 11-3
5 4 4 Brewer 3U
6 6 5 Dorsey 7
2n 5 6 Narracz20
7 7 7 Uatric'uOO
start gooj. ou cieveny.
COC-Third race. Four and a half furlongs.
COO Purse SILO. Time, 0:57?i
Ind. norse & Wt St. & SL Flo. Jck'y Bk
400 Columbus, 1C9.. 1 mi 3H In llui t Im'r 15
ITS Paul, 10. 4 4 4 2n Dorsey
S Blizzard. 109.... 2 , 2"3 Carter 20
I9 Kollpae, Jr.,113. 2 In In 4 Grinlu 3-10
)) Connies-,. 154.., 5 5 5 5 I'hilllvt SO
Start poor. Won driving. '
:Q7-Onemllo. Selling. Turse, 100. Time,
-5J' l:i5Ji. '
nd. Horse Wt St i St Fin. J'ck'y lit
Ml Galla'n, 102.... 4 4 "h la lCllendcrfi
561 Hazel, 10? 2 3QU 2! Cleasou 2
"512 Pocahontas, 102 5 11 21 3J-' Narvaez 2
581' C. O. D., 102.... 3 2ii In 4 Neary 8-5
o-JI rr.Klamath.I05 15 5 5 Carter 12
Start good. Won driving,
rocj Fifth race. Five furlongs, Turse J103,
JOO Time, 12,14.
Ind. Horse Jt Wt St U St Fin. J'ck'y Bt
(552) Forest, 126 2 4 Hi V Voung 33
KS ilia Rose. 103.. 1 14 2l 2n Andrews 1
BSS) Jersey, 129 1 2n Si S'VJ Fitzsra 1G-5
571 'I'm'jllail, HE 5 5 5 4 Brewer 12
55J Sonora, VX .... 3 3 4 5 Neary i
13d Jack Lorell. 119 9 6 6 6 Cole 49
titart good. Won easily.
CCO Sixth race Six and one-quarter fur
OO J lonira. I'urae. J100L Time. Iri.'l.'.
U St Fin. J'ci'y Bt
4 lh lsJIc!)o't 11 5
Si 4 25 eary 3
ill 3l3s Colo C-5
lis 2ttM JlcLa'n 15
6 5 5 Avery a)
Ind Horse & Wt St
583 Traitor. 102.... 1
577 Grand lTlX.lOt. 3
(199) Jla'e Lovell.lOa. i
504 JlarEtierIteII,99 2
50J Irish Pat, 104... 5
573 Ialdio.M, 112... 6
434 Craftsman, lot 7 5 '
Start good. Won cleverly.
Mtolors toSt Asaph series.
6 C
Fisher 50
Dorsey 20
Down the Lino.
The officials of both ncross-ilie river
tracks have decided to bar all ovijiers,
jockeys and trainers who go to Mapeth
from racing ou the Virginia tracks, should
they wish to return. In other words, they
will give them "the marble 'leart" Jf
they make a visit to De Lacey's r:y-uy-ulght
merry-go-round.
It tlie track had been muddy "yw'rday
Blizzard would have won tlie 'li'r.l lace
in a gallop. He is easily a twenty -pound
better horse in sloppy going.
Johnny "Slick" went down the line
for "der boss," but had nearly ns bad a
day as they did on Wednesday. The
handlcappers wlll'be on the bum it it lasts
much longer.
For once In his life Irish Tat managed
to land outside of the money. Avery
made a desperate finish on him, but the
horse appears to have lost some of his
speed, and again the company may have
been a little too good.
Anyone who think3 that Eclipse, Jr.,
was pulled had better smoke a fresh pill.
The stable got down on him In' chunks
at 1 to 2 and 2 to 5, and thought they
were stealing money at that 'price.
Sonora's race yesterday will hardly do.
She did not show a particle of her ojd
speed.
'
Ball Game Postponed.
The game between the teams of the
Pension Office and the Washington Ath
letic Clunrwhlcu was to have been played
at Columbia Field yesterday afternoon,
was Postponed until next week, owing to
Bome misunderstanding aboot the rnraada.
FORMED IHTOWUIES
Preliminary Organization of the
High School Cadets.
UNIFORM CONTRACT LET
I'arkc-r, Hrldjjet fc Co. tlie Siic-ces-s-ful
Hidd.-r Outiside Firms UN
tunccd In llio Bidding Examina
tions l'rofircnlnp; tlnusuul Kniliu
bliisni of tliel-nds TblK School Year.
A preliminary organization of the nigh
School Cadets at the Central was effected
yesterday. One hundred of the boys be
longing to the corps were formed into two
companies, to march In connection with
the Washington Light Infantry at tlie recep
tion of tho Liberty bell. They were in
structed to report at 11 a.m. today.
Major Burton Ross will have command ot
the whole parade, while Major H. T.
Domer, aided by Capts.Sommerand Auer,
will direct the movements of the cadets.
Major Ross yesterday gave the cadets
the new manual ot arms. They took it
up with zeal and In half an hour had mas
tered it. Their proficiency will be shown
la the parade to day. The Central and
Normal schools will bo closed after 10
a.m.
AWARDED THE C0XTP.ACT.
Tlie committee on military held a meet
ing;, at which Principal Lane, Major Ross,
rrofs. Hughes, Pringle, Sites, and Davis,
and Military AssUtant lteichclderfcrwere
present.
The contract for the uniforms for next
year was awarded to Parker, Bridset 4 Co.,
and the fatigue cap recently approved by
the Secretary of War for Hie regular army
was adopted for the use ot the cadets also.
The examination of cadets for officers
which lias been In progress at the Fif
teenth street armory for pupils, of the
Central School will be concluded Satur
day. On Monday pupils or tlie Business
School will be examined, ami on Tuesday
the examination of Eastern School cadets
will begin. This will be followed by the
Western School examination, and by the
close of the week this work will be com
pleted. NOTHING WILL INTEKFEP.E.
Immediately then tlie organization of
the regiment will be flnk-Iicd and nothing
will be permitted to interfere with the
progress ot Its work.
The cadets are starting off with an
enthusiasm and spirit that promise Uie
best results. The officers expect every
thing to be moving within a week -with a
vim and snap that will admit notrifl'iig,
and wlll'turn out well-drilled and dis
ciplined men at tlie end of tl.e year.
...in
..111
,..102
...102
. :102
To-dny's Entries nt St. Avuiili.
First Race Five furlongs.
Ind. Horre. Wl. Ind. Horse. Wt.
S07 O.Uolden III 07 510 Weetovcr 97
110 Surprise 07 243 Iiiacl.fiiit.. ..07
4!l.- I.ittleCharIlc97 MfcG PattobbiU...97
Oil Couitney ....07
Second Race Five furlongp.
Ind. Hone. Wt. Ind. Horee. Wt.
49(1 St Laurent 100 r,07Thc-resa .. .. 0i
400 C.Rotighan.lUO rt2 Trtunpler .. ..9 .
150 Kelme .. ..100 50l Marlboro 97
10G Pathway .. 100
Third Race Four and one-half furlongs.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt,
125 Dr. Faun ..ion -in:i Meteor .. ,
( t97)Tanglefoot 102 V.75 Ilorcasl...
C0H Ceremony ..102 aG9 Stanley M.
5ni Savant .. ..102 'SISS Mac Hunt.
5GB Cashmere ..102 COS Cody
4SG Prosper. ...m:: . .. . ,
Fourth Itace Six and one-half furlongs.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
589 IrtehFat.-104 000 Wyoming -. ..09
.rii4)Kllznb-tli 104 (cnG)Rennlssance .09
(331)P.de LeotilOl 000 Dr. Ilecd 04
(r.i51La.'yListcrl0 1578 Juliet .. ., ..84
S05 Siva .. ..U04
Fifth Race Four anil one-half furlongs.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
-179 Trojan .. ..100 noO Minnie 8 07
499 Eouda 100 CIO Uorllla 97
(SGBiChlnk .... 97545Arda. 97
COS Catechism. .97 5G6 Dr. PnrkhiiretO .
571 Nemo .. .. 97 (COb)num'mg IllrdO"
Sixth Race Six and one-fourth furlongs.
Ind. Horse. Wt. Ind. Horse. Wt.
575r.ddlc M. ..105 512 Harry M 102
511 Pone 105 581 Samaritan ..102
IU12 I W!c!i.irds.l02 57S Tim FlTIUlr.102
J-5-,Befers to Alexander Island series.
OFFICERS NEED MUCH ROOM
Great Commotion in the War De-
partment Over the Matter.
Col. Alnswortli Started tbe Itmiipua
by "Wuntlns to Chance Ills Office.
AmirtiiiL-nt fur Anal her.
There is much suppressed excitement per
vading high circles In the War Department
for a week past, and a disturbance Is
threatened over a disagreement in the dis
tributionof office room. Somctbreemontbs
ago CoL Ainsworth. of the Record and
Pension Bureau, made a deal by which he
was to secure possession ot an adjoining;
room occupied by Major George H. Davis,
who has lor many years been ensBged in
publishing the war records, I lavls meantime
to move along to thcad joining room occupied
by the ordnance board, and the ordnance
board In turn to move along to tcme other
room occupied by somebody i-Ue, aDd so on
through the gamut of many rooms, some of
whose occupants, of subaltern rank, wcro
probably not consulted, nor to receive any
npparentbeoefitsfromthepropocdcliange8.
These changes have been Incubating for
some weeks, and tlie high beneficiaries have
been patiently walling for theorder to Issue.
Hut somehow or somewhere a hitch haa
occurred. Somebody objects to "moving
along." Forthapasttwoorthreedaysthere
has been much running to and fro ou the
part of the various colonels, majors, cap
tains and lieutenants interested in the mo
mentous affair. Conferences, open and
behind closed doors, are hourly proceeding,
envoys passing from room to room, and
much diplomacy of a high order called into
play. Whoever has made the "kick" has
been able to quietly "hold up" the deal
for more than three months. The feeling
is runnlnc; high, and those at interest are no
longer "reticent," and the squabble is the
talk of the department
The trouble Is that the extraordinary In
flux of officers on special duty during the
latt few years has about absorlied all the
choice rooms in t he department building and
most of tbe available space. Nearly every
officer of any considerable rank who comes
to the capital "on duty" Invariably insists
an having a room to himself, an officer of
lesser rank as confidential assistant with
another room, a stenographic clerk and also
a messenger.
These naturally take up a good deal of
space. In another ten years at the present
rale the War. State and Navy building will
hardly be large enough to accommodate th
war establishment alone.
Entries nt Aqueduct.
First race, five-eighti mite. Lembald,
Wcllmau. Royal II., King Hero. 1 10 each;
True Love, Robea, Fay Second, Willie L..
Mildred D., Tar Dclle, Ml.-s Blanche, Prin
cess Jean, John Haines. SirCarleton, Uurt
rand. Trident, La Salle, Rcckledge, Miss
llclniar, 107 each.
Second race, one mile. Parthcna. 104;
Milton T.. Howling Green, Burgundy. 102
each: Redman H., Eelvina, 99 cadi; Flor
inria, 99.
Third tare, five and one-half furlongs
Sirocco, 110: Fass. Old Dominion, 107
each: Certainty. 100: Addle. 104: J-ioro,
Mabel Olcnn.ltolla, Juhen.Panw ay, Ina,99
each; Lady lUchmond, Fonliear.. Laneer,
Franciscan, 94 each: Tnnculo.Drum Major,
102 each; Golden Uate,'U7; Herwyn. 104.
Fourth race, thrcc-ouarters of a mile.
Helen H., Second, ltV; Sky Blue, 101;
Klrg T., 1C0: Dulcle. Ijrondie. Tomoka.
97 each: Berr.ardlne, 95; Gladiolo, Fifield,
91 each.
riftli race, one and onc-clshlh miles.
Dimgarven. Roller, 113 each;thcl!y Tuttle.
Mirage. Kilkenny. 110 inch; Galloping
King, MarbaH. Canadian. Harry Alouzo,
Little Tom, 101 each: Thurston. Long
Bridge, Gov Sheehan, 101 each: Nicolini,
Clarus, Pulitzer. Ducas. Lady Adams, Long
Dock. 98 eacK: Eaufeld.i.9."
In future the rule limiting entries to
IB lietrest will t-e enforced.
$100 REWARD
For any case of Chills or -Malaria
that
Bailey's Chill Pills
will not cure- Tor sale at
MERTZ'S .MODERN PHARMACY.
llthandFstrects,
And DrneeUU generally.
-Vs
:-
?05

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