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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, June 23, 1889, Image 6

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THE PITTSBURG- ' DISPATCH, SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 1889.
4
IV
.
E
Armstrong's Speedy Horso
Wins Another Derby.
CHICAGO'S GBEAT EYEXT.
Teemer Figuring on a Trip Across
the Atlantic
WINNERS AT SHEEPSHEAD BAY.
McClelland Beats Nikirk in an Exciting
Local Foot ace.
GENERAL SPOETING NEWS OP TEE DAI
The Winner.
At Chicago First race: Marchma, 1; Robin
.Hood, 2. Second race: Penn P, 1; Monita
Hardy, 2. Third race: Spokane, 1; Sorrento, 2.
Fourth race: Pat Donovan, 1; St. Nick, 2. Filth
race: Red Light, 1; Protection, 2.
AT Sheepshead Bat First race: Drizzle,
1; Bectare, 2. Second race: Bine Rock, 1; Ben
Harmon, 2. Third race: Iaverwick, 1; Bene
dictine, 2, Fourth race: Inspector B, 1; Tea
Tray, 2. Fifth race: Toroso, 1; CuybuKO, 2.
At Kansas Citt First race: Bridcelicht
1: Lizzie B, 2. Second race. Churchill Clark, 1;
Thankful, 2. Third race: L.HL Fourth
St. Albans, 1: Virginia, 2. Fifth race: The Elk,
1: Leruan,2.
SPOEANE ONCE MORE.
Xoah Armstronc'a Wonder Win. the Ameri
can Derby, Beating Proctor Knott.
Chicago, June 22. The sixth American
Derby vras won by Spokane to-day in the
presence of the greatest crowd that has
ever assembled on an American race coarse.
Fully 35,000 people were in attendance.
There was hardly a vacant foot ol standing
room on the ground and not a vacant seat in
the huge grand stand. The track was in
fair order but not fast. The betting, es
pecially over the American Derby, was
something tremendous. It was almost at the
risk of life that the bookmakers' stands were
reached, the struggle in the bettinc ring beg
gaiini; description.
ZCoab Armstrong's horse farm lies in the
Rocky Mountain divide, between the Columbia
and Missouri rivers, in Montana, close to the
Indian reservation. Two years ago Armstrong
purchased at The Meadows, near Carlinville,
Ilk, a yearling thoroughbred by Harder All,
out of Interpose. When General Hewlett saw
the newly foaled colt be declared the youngster
must be shot. He was so puny and out of pro
portion that it would not pay to raise him, so
the General said. However, when Mr. Arm
strong priced this weakling among other racers
its owner thought himself well rid of a cast-off
tor 20. Armstrong shipped the colt to his
Montana farm. The rawboned brute sniffed
the air of the Rockies and was fed the wild
flower of the Indians. Ho grew big and lusty,
his sides expanded, his limbs became rock
" strong, and turning into bis third year the Illi
nois outcast was a thing of equine beauty. Ho
was named Spokane, and without dreaming of
turf honors, modest Armstrong entered his
horse in several stake events. This spring
Spokane was shipped to Kentucky, and while
the Southerners marveled at his sight, their
money was intrusted to
THEIE OWN PEOCTOE KNOTT,
whose fame was great. But Spokane defeated
the ideal in the classic derby. A week after
ward the pair again met in the Clark stakes
and again Spokane's chances were scoffed at.
But the great futurity winner once again fell
before the despised Montana entry. To-day at
Washington Park the rivals for the third time
, faced the flag together.and with them journeyed
five other fleet racers, the very cream of 117
horses originally nominated for the greatest 3-year-old
prize, the American Derby. Of no
avail wa the blue crass of Kentucky on which
Proctor Knott, Long Dance and Retrieve had
fed: to no purpose had Once Again been care
fully nourished on famous Tennessee bran; im
pure must have been the air in California's
glorious climate for Don Jose and So
rento, for Spokane, cast from the prai
ries of Illinois and nursed to life by
the dew of the Rockies and the little wild
flower of the Flat-Head medicine man, raced
away from them all and became at once an
equine marvel, winner ota triple event Forty
thousand people shouted in aDpreciation of the
performance and nearly $1,000,000 changed
hands on the result. The race was an exciting
one because the tremendous crowd made it so.
The great show was made in the preliminary
parade, in which
EACH OF THE CONTESTANTS
looked fit to compete for the valuable stakes.
SoTtento was first on the track with Taral in
the saddle. Then Proctor Knott, with Fiti
patrick. appeared and was followed by Long
Dance (Barnes), Don Jose Winchiel (L Lewis)
and Once Again (Murphy. Last came Spokane,
whom Tom Kilev allowed to lope past the
cheering crowd to the post. During the three
breakaways, Proctor Knott broke away in form
each time, plainly showing that Bryant's disap
pointment was to be the pace-maker.
When the flag fell for the Derby race Onco
Again was in front, followed by Sorrento, Don
Jose, Proctor Knott, Long Dance, Retrieve
and Spokane in the order named. The 'Dare
Devil' immediately plied the whip and Knott
shot ahead like a flash, Once Again being
taken back by Murphy. The pace was fast
and seemed content with the positions which
down the stretch and past the stand were not
changed except that for a moment Don Jose
made a SDurt There Knott had an advantage
of two lengths over the others who were.- ell
bunched with Spokane bringing up the rear
under
KILET'S STBONG PULL.
Past the club house, with its wealth of fash
ion, Knott lost some of bis lead, and as the
seven horses raced past the three-quarter pole
Sorrento was one and a half lengths behind the
leader and one-tnird that distance better than
Don Jose. Then as Fitzpatnck let out a link,
all moved up and the pace became desperate.
"When the half-mile mark fell behind the racers
there was just daylight between him and Re
trieve, who had come up in the rush, while Don
Jose was still third and Spokane fourth, Long
Dance and Once Again being practically out of
the hase. Sorrento, who had been running
easily in second plaqp all along was cut off on
the great turn, and while making for the
stretch was actually last Then Taral pulled
the Californian to the outside, and, making up
josi ground, new to tne leauers so rapioiy tnat
bis backers trembled with Joy. As tbo home
stretch was touched be was second again to
Proctor Knott, but there the futurity winner
gave ont and there
SPOKANE MADE HIS BUN.
So fast did the Montana colt come that rush
ing past the last quarter he was actually lead
ing bile Knott had already fallen into third
place, Retrieve dividing the pair. Again Sor
rento advanced gamely, but though stronger
than those behind could not disturb Spokane,
-who came away under Kiley's upraised hand,
but without tasting whip or spur, and won very
easily by a full length. Sorrento was second, a
head before Retrieve, third, followed by Don
Jose, Long Dance, Once Again and Proctor
Knott The latter, cut up and very tired,
stopped at the saddling paddock and was taken
to his stable, while the crowds hurrahed and
the band played as a saddle of roses was being
placed upon the winners haunches.
So much money came down from the North
west that Spokane went to the post a heavv
favorite at 6 to Si The closing odds about
Knott were 2 to 1: Don Jose, 4 to 1; Once Again,
6 to I; Sorrento, 8 to 1: Long Dance and Re
trieve, SO to 1 each. 'When Spokane reached
liis stall be was almost mobbed by the Montana
(tables' frenzied attendants, who
CLUNG ABOUT HIS NECK,
and would not allow trim to rest until
Trainer Rodegap had shonted himself hoarse.
He was rubbed down and lightly fed. and as
the sun went down the stable boys gathered
under his shed and told of the great horse's
prowess. A lusty darky placed a big pot on the
fire and filled it with some white leaves taken
from a bag. It was the medicine man's life
giver, and it was being rtrenared for Snokane'a
jlextmeaL Shortly a talL led faeed man with
i.uiunuunuu,iiuu ins unuu? lurusb clumsily
in bis trouser's pockets, sauntered along the
stable path. It was Sam Bryant on his way to
bis own stables. As he passed the Montana
stables he was attracted by the laughter and
talk, and turning In that direction saw the big
nancy stirring a steaming mass in a pot bis
mouth stretched into a broad grin as he stirred I
and added the white leaves he sang, the only 1
SPOKANE OHC
ME
intelligible words being: "Spoke, my Spoke."
Sam Bryant sighed, a tear glistened in his eye
and he continued his way to join Proctor
Knott
THE OTHER EACES.
First ra"e, parse J000, 3-year-olds and upward.
one mile Robin Hood went off in the lead and
kept it until near the finish, where Harcbma
came up and won by a head, Lelderkranz third.
Time, IMS.
Second nee, purse fOOO, all ajres, three quarters
of a mile MonlU Hardy led to near the three
quarters, where l'eun 1' passed her and won with
iae. ilouita Hardy second and Van Trompe
third. Time, 1:18.
Fourth race purse SGOO, one xnile and a six
teenth Vidette led fora mile when he was passed
by I'M Donovan, who won by three lengths from
bt. Nick., with Vidette third. Time, 1:32(.
Filth race, purse S500, for 2-year-olds, flve
elf htlisof amlle-lted Light led all the war and
won by two lengths, Protection was second and
blso Leo third. 'Time, 1:04H.
A most unfortunate blunder on the part of the
Judges occurred, which led to serious results.
"No 7" was put up as the winner Instead of
"No. 3." making It appear that Haccage had won
the race instead of Kea Light, lirltton ho rode
tne winner went up to the Judges' stand to remon
strate, but was not listened to, the Judges appa
rently not yet discovering tbelr blander. The
crowd raised a howl, and for an hour the greatest
confusion prevailed. The number having been
hoisted the natural result was that the bookmak
ers paid out upon the 6trengthtof HagtMge being:
the first horse, and the Paris mutual did the same.
When the Judges an hour later snail) discovered
and acknowledged their error, the mischief had
been done, and nearlv all ready money betters
had been paid. An indignation committee called
upon Treasurer J. It Walsh and were assured
that tbe Injustice would bo rectified, at a meet
lug to be held to-morrow at tbe club house.
THOROUGHBREDS SOLD.
Colonel S. D. Bruce Sells Some Wcll-Bred
Youngsters nt Sheepshead Bay.
SPECIAL TELEGBAM TO THX DISPATCH.l
New Yoke, June 22. Colonel S. D. Bruce
sold a miscellaneous lot of thoroughbreds in
training at Sheepshead Bay to-day before the
races. Bidders were few and prices ran low,
with the exception of Beck, a 3 year-old. son of
Bertram and Addie Hart This colt was
bought bjjE. Alvord for 2,350. None of the
others reached four figures. Twenty-three
head were on the catalogue, of which 15 only
were sold. The order of sale follows:
Bay gelding. 2, bvimp. Kantaka, Sbebojga,
J. M. Jeffcott J2li): Junaway b f. 2, by Alger
ine. imp. Bella of Eltham, J. O'ShannneSsv,
S16: Beck cb c 3, by Bertram, Addie Hart, .
Elvord. S2.350; Benedict ch c 3, by Bertram,
Lady Langtry. A. Garson, $300; Chestnut flllv,
2, by Bertram. Lady Langtry, Fred Carter, $700;
bay filly. 4. bv King Ernst Bij.iu, A. M.
Hunter, J325: Chestnut filly. 3, by King Ernst
Nina. J. Dwyer. 210; Sonora, b f, 2,
by Spendthrift. Linaleo. S. D. Bruce. S130:
Topetca, b. g. 3, bv Ten Brook-Belle of Mon
tara, J. Dwyer, $loo; brown colt 2, by Lisbon
wild Rose, M. Barrett 5125: bav colt 2, by
King Alfonso-Traniata. T. W. DoswelL $100;
bay colt 2, bv King Alfonso-Miss Pnmro-e, C.
H. Joar, $230; Laurcntia, U f. 2. by Fiddlesticks,
Kingfisher or imp. St Blaiz-Lauretta, C.
Krauss $125; chestnut filly a by Willie Burke
Water Lily. S. Kennv, $75; Katie, ch. f.. Jeter
"Waldon, 250. Total So.135. Average, 361.
ZiaiMEUMAVS HOUSE SOLD.
Tbe Only Horse Saved nt Johnstown Brines
3300.
Charles Zimmerman's mare, by Almont, tbe
one saved from Johnstown, was put up for pub
lic auction at Jackman's yesterday afternoon.
There were about 50 admirers of horseflesh
present who bid spiritedly for the animal. If
the pedigree goes for anything the price paid
was far below value. Robert McMunn, the
iron man. was tbe purchaser, and bis intention
is to have the horse trained and bring out,
if possible, the great qualities of his sire,
Almont
Tbe Eastern Winners.
SnEErsnEAD Bat Race Trace, June 22.
Tbe usual Saturday throng, about 15,000 per
sons, was here this afternoon, and it had a fine
day's sport The racing was high class in every
respect The track was very fast and the
weather delightful.
First race, three-quarters of a mile Drizzle
won in ins. Hectare second, Burlington third.
frecond race, seven-eighths of a mile Blue Rock
won in 1:29, Ben Harrison second. Gipsy Queen
third.
ThlKi rice, one and one-eighth of a mile Inver
wlcLnonla 1:26 1-5, iiencdictlne second, Kern
third. ,
Fourth race, one and one-half of a mile Inspec
tor B won in 2:39 1-5, Tea Tray second, Terra Cotta
third.
ifth race, five-eighths of a mile 1 oroso won fn
1:01 4-5t Cuyhuga second, St James third.
At Kunsas City.
Kansas Citt. June 21 The Kansas City
meeting closed to-day w ith five good races. The
track was still slow from Thursday's heavy
rain. Most of the borses there left for Chicago
to-night The results were:
First race, three-fourths of a mile Brldgeilght
first Lizzie B second, Mamie U third. Time,
1:1
becond race, one mile Churchill Clark first
Thankful second. T. J. Husk third. Time, l-.U'A.
Third race, five rurlongs L. H. first Time,
1:07.
Fourth race, seven furlongs St Albans first,
Virginia second. Derby third. Time, 1:325.
IIFUIh race, one and one-eighth miles-Th Elk
first J. L. kecond, Leman third. Time, 2312.
91'CLELLAKD WON.
He Made Xiklrk Quit Before the Race Wai
Ended.
About 300 people w ere at Exposition .Park
yesterday afternoon to see tbe foot race of a
mile and a half for $250 a side, between E. C.
McClelland and Ed Nikirk. The contestants
have been considerably before tbe public dur
ing the last two or three years, McClelland par
ticularly, winning several long distance races.
In yesterday's'race the Dispatch representa
tive was stakeholder and referee. The track
-Hasina muddy condition next the fence and
the runners kept on the outride, which meant
that more than a mile and a half was covered.
It was about 6 o'clock when the contestants
toed tbe mark. They started on their journey
at an even start, after some lively betting. The
Nikirk money seemed to be plentiful, and
when the first half mile bad been traveled the
odds were a trifle in favor of Nikirk. He was
running apparently well, but close observers
could see that McClelland was really boss of
tne situation, no toot tne lead at tne start
and evidently according to orders, kept it be
cause when Nikirk tried to get to the front
McClelland shook him oft Nikirk only made
two real efforts' to take the lead and was dis
pensed with quite easily bv McClelland. To
make a long story short, when the mile and a
quarter Dole was being reached Nikirk shot bis
bolt. A few yards further he collapsed en
tirely and lay down against the fence suffering
from the cramps in the stomach. McClelland
then jogged home a w inner In the slow time of
S The mile was corcred in 530.
TEEMEU'S PLANS.
He is Rowing Well and May Go Among the
Britishers.
rtPECIAI. TELEGRAM TO THE D18PATCK.1
McKeespokt, June 22. The Sioux City
regatta, in which John Teemer will take part
has been postponed until August and Teemer
will remain in Boston in the meantime and row
in the regatta to take place July 4. He says he
never rowed better than what he is rowing this
season. He has great power of endurance in
holding out in long distance work which he
lacked sadly last season and is in the best of
trim. It is generally concluded by his close
friends here that he will see England before
tbe season is over, but it cannot be proven by
him as he his notbing to say.
All in Clover.
IBT CABLE TO THE DISPATCH. I
London, June 22. Copyright The superb
weather and the presence of the Prince of
Wales and the crowd of minor royalties and
aristocrats made the Ascot race meeting this
week -a tremendous success. The Duke of
Portland, who is still on his honeymoon, won
several valuable prizes. The Henley regatta,
an equally fashionable meeting, commences
week after next and already there are an
chored along the course two miles of sump
tuous floating cottages, locally known as house
boats.
They're Getting Ready.
If FECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.l
New York, June 22. At8 o'clock to-morrow
morning Frank Stevenson, W. E. Harding,
Mike Donovan and Johnny Dooley will leave
for New Orleans to make arrangements for the
Sullivan-KIIrain fight Kilrain and Mitchell
will meet them in Baltimore at 1:30 this after
noon. Kilrain and Mitchell will leave for New
Orlean about the middle of tbe week to be
present at Mike Donovan's exhibition on Sat
urday night Bob Smith was appointed ring
master to-day and will leave for New Orleans
on Tuesday.
IT. EIFFEL'S GDEbTS.
The Builder of the Tower Entertains Promi
nent Americans.
Parts, June 22, The American Engineers
visited tbe Exhibition to-day. They were wel
comed by M. Eiffel, tbe engineer who superin
tended the building of the Eiffel tower, and en
tertained at a gala breakfast on the first floor
of the toiler. Mr. Whitelaw Reid. the United
States Minister, was among the guests.
M. Eiffel offered a toast to tbe President of
the United States, and Mr. Towns recnnnditrl
with a toast to the fraternity of France and
America.
PROMISING PLATERS.
The Local Amateurs Have
Great Contests.
Some
McKEESPORTS WIN A FINE GAME.
St.
Louis Gets Two From the Paralyzed
Colonels.
GEXEEAL BASEBALL NEWS OF THE DAI.
Games Played Yesterday.
Bostons 1....Pittsburqs. 0
Bostons ....Pittsburos. 3
Clevelands 8.. ..New Yorks 6
Indianapolis.... 10....WASHiKOTOirs..... 3
ClIICAGOS 5....PHILADELPHIAS.. 1
St. Louis 3....Louisvilles 2
st. louis 7....louisvtz.les 6
baltimores 9....brookltn8 5
Athletics 13.. ..Columbus 12
CiNCiNNATrs 11.. .. Kansas Citys.... 3
buffalos 10....toledos 3
kociiestees....... 6....londons 5
Syracuse M....Torontos 8
DETROITS 10....1lASnLTONS(Ont) 3
DETROITS 9....HAMILTONS(Ont) 1
Dattons 16.. ..Wheelings 6
mckeesports.... 4....0aklands 3
scottdales 8....gbzensburgs. .. s
Gnmcs To-Dny.
American Association Baltimore at
Philadelphia; Columbus at Brooklyn; St Louis
at Louisville, Kansas Citys at Cincinnati.
Aisoclntlon Record.
Perl Per
Won.LostCt. Won.Lost.Ct
St Louis 38 16 .703 CInclnnatls. ..-.a 25 .509
Athletics 35 17 .673KansasCltya..Zl 29 .-120
Krooklvns 31 20 .busjuolumbus 18 29 .387
altlmorei....23 23 .MDlLoulsvllles.... S 43 .148
PRETTY LIVELY.
Tbe McKpesports Win n Good County
League Gamo From Onklnnd.
TEFECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCB.1
McKeesport, June 22. The best game of
Dall of the league season was played by the
Oakland and the home team this afternoon
and resulted in the defeat of tbe visitors by
four to three. The game was played in short
ordcr.and the work done by the clnbs would do
justice to professionals. They were evenly
balanced and played with might and main. In
tbe first half of tbe ninth inning Oakland was
sent out and the homo club being in the lead
it didnotgoto the bat or tbe score would prob
ably have been increased Torreyson and Hart
man did heavy hitting, while Hartman as usual
distinguished himself nabbing difficult foul
flies. The middle fielders of both teams took
in several beautif nl files while Provins did ex
cellent base sliding. The pitching of Karnish
was the chief leature, he having struck
out ten men. wbile that of the Oaklands was
fair also. Oakland played a good game all
round, and gave the home club all the trouble
it desired, the playing of tbe first and second
basemen of the visitors being also leading
features. Martin, shortstop, and Costello,
second, earned tbeir share of honor for good
work. Costello ran from third to home when
McKeesport needed a score, and came in all
right although the catcher had tbe ball at
hand. The applause was terrific when the
middle fielder of tbe visitors ran nearly back
to the fence, and jumped into the air and se
cured a long fly. There was an uproar over it
Tbe game was certainly a fine one. Score:
m'keesp't. b b p II!
OAKLANDS. K B P A E
Qutun,!....
Torrey'n, 3
Frovlns, r..
H'm'n, c.
Gibbons, m
Costello, Z.
Martin, ...
Banker. 1..
Hornlsb p..
0 8
1 0
1 1
2 13
1 0
2 2
0 1
1 1
0 1
Brav. 2
Cargo, s....
Kler, 3
Keys, 1
Hardle, m..
Kinehart r.
Edm'ds'n, 1
'1 minor, c.
Faas, p
0 0 4
110
12 3
1 Oil
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 0
Total 4 8 27 13 1
Totals 3 3 24 12 2
McKeesports 0 2010100' 4
Oaklands 2 00001000-3
Earned runs McKeesports, 2; OaJUands, L
Two-base hit Torreyson.
Passed balls Hartmau, 3; Tralnor, 4.
" lid pltches-Hornlsh, 2.
Stolen bases Provins, 2; Hartman, 1; Gibbons,
3; Bray. 2; Cargo, 1: Keys, 2; Tralnor, 2; Faas, 1.
Struck out Llornlsli, 10; Faas, 3.
Bases on balls Hornlsh. 6.
Hit by pitcher Hornlsb. 3.
Umpire ahaner. Very satisfactory to everyone.
A BAD BEATING.
Tbo Riverside Grays Just Slaughter the
Sewlcklcy Team.
In a game at Sewickley yesterday the River
side Grays simply pulverized the Sewickleys.
When it is stated that only one hit was made
off Dillon it can be understood how the Sewickr
leys were beaten. Score:
B. GRAYS. B B P A S
SEWICKLEY. B B F A X
Dillon, p... 2
Buckley, s.. 4
Good, c 1
Kctzell, 3... 1
Meuhart m. 1
Graham, 1... 1
Marshall, r 2
JIannan. I... 1
Moran, 2.... 1
Naugliton, c 1 0 7 4 I
Bovlon, 2.... 0 0 4 2 2
McMillan, m 0 0 1 0 0
Oliver, s 0 0 0 12
warden.l&l 0 0 S 0 0
Porter. 3 0 0 3 2 1
Totten, rAl, 0 0 0 0 1
Taylor, 1& p. 0 14 4 1
Kicn'n, rp u u u z u
Totals.
14 13 27 17 2
Totals.
1 I 24 13 8
Riverside Grays. 1
Sewlcklevs .' 0
0 4 2 113 2 '-14
0000000 I 1
Earned runs-urays, 5; Sewickleys, 0.
Two-base hits-Dillon, Buckley, Good, 2: Gra
bam. btrnck out By Dillon, 0; Blcbardson,3: Tavlor.2.
Bases on balls By Dillon, 3; Blcbardson, 3; Tay
lor, 4.
Double plays-Buckley and Graham.
Passed bail Kaugbton.
Wild pitches Dillon and Taylor.
Umpire Jones.
Time of Game One hour and 50 minutes.
THE CARNEGIES WIN.
They Beat the Benvera In a Very Interest
ing Game.
rSPXCIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.l
Beavee Falls, June 2Z-The Camegies, of
Pittsburg, and the Beaver Falls club played an
exceedingly interesting game here to-day and
tbe former came out victorious by a score of
10 to 7, Robertson and Brady were the battery
for the visitors and Kerner and Cole occupied
the points for the home team. Gumbert's
borne run bit and a magnificent three bagger
byB. Robertson were the features of the visi
tor's play. Cole, Kerner and Cooper did the
best fielding for the home team and Ray made
one of the finest catches seen on the home
grounds this season. The Climax club plays
here next Saturday.
BE'B FALLS. B B P A El
CABNEG1ES. R B P A E
Kerr, 2 0
Denliart m. 2
Cole, c 0
Gilllland. r.. 0
Kerner, p... 0
Gaston, ss... 1
Bea. 1 1
Scott 3 2
Cooper, 1.... 1
2 0
0 0
9 4
0 0
111
0 2
3 0
3 1
6 0
Feirs, 1 2
B Kobt'n. 3. 2
2 2
i 1
Uumbertss. 2
bcully, 1.... 0
Brady, c. . 1
2 1
0 11
111
0 0
1 0
Stewart z
Curry, in... 0
K ltobt'n, p. 1
Shuster, r.. 2
2 114
10 0
Totals 7 -J 24 18 5
Totals 101127 22 7
Beaver Falls 1 200040007
Carncgles 0 0 0 1 3 0 S 3 -10
Earned runs-Carnegles, 2: Beaver Falls, 2,
Three-base bit B. Robertson.
Home runs Uumbert Brady.
btruckout By Kerner, 9; Robertson, 1L
Baces on balls-Kerner, 4; Robertson, J.
Umplre-McOlaln.
BEAT THE EAST ENDERS.
Homestead Looms Up With a Good Victory
nt Home.
The Homesteads beat the crack Athletics
from the East End yesterday by a score of 7 to
14. Oliver, who pitched for the Athletics, was
hit hard and that won tbe game. The contest
took place at Homestead and tbe local victors
were cheered. Jones pitched well for the
Homesteads. Score:
ATHLETICS B B P A E
HOMESTEAD B B V A E
Gray, 3....
Lauer, 1....
Barr, D.2..
Tener, 1....
Oliver, p...
Schoyer, c.
Swift, in....
O'Dou'lL s.
Barr, W. r.
10 0
112 1
Ar'or.r. 142 1
Yo'g'n,c... 3
HCol'n.mic 2
Uolgan, 3. .. 1
Rowe, 2..... 2
Kennedy.s.. 2
Kulmer, 1. . 0
Woods,l 1
Jones, p 2
2 14
0 I
1 4
8 0
1 0
0 2
1 1
Totals .... 7 7 24 13 9
Totals ...14 13 2414 7
Athletics 1 0 3 0 10 3 0-7
Homestead! 0 0 0 0 0 3 210-14
Karned runs Athletics, 3: Homesteads, 5.
Two-base bits Gray and Youngman.
Three-base hit Lauer.
Struck out-By Oliver, 7; by Jones, 4.
Bases on balls Athletics, 1; Homesteads, 2.
Hit by pitched ball-Bone.
Passed balls Schoyer, 2; Youngman, 3.
Wild pitches-Oliver, 1; Jones, L
Umpire Bose.
Bent Them Easily.
ritrXCTAL TELZOIIAH TO TBE DISPATCH. I
Gkeexsbubg, Pa, June 22. The weakest
game of ball probably that has been played
this season by the Western Pennsylvania
League was the one here to-day between the
Hcottdales and the borne club. The batting of
tbe Greensburg club was exceptionallypoor,
and gave the game to the visitors by a score of
9 to 5.
CALLING THEM DOWN.
Davidson Shows the Colonels What a Real
Fine Means.
Louisville, Kt June 22. Louisville and
St Louis played two games here to-day, both of
which were won by the visitors. Play on both
sides was spirited throughout and both games
were taken on their merits. Ebret in the first
game for Louisville, pitched with .exceptional
energy and effectiveness and strained his arm
so that be had to be relieved by Hecker at tbj
end of the sixth inning. King's pitching was
weak; in the second Hudson was steady and
effective, while Ewing was not fully up to his
best work. Both teams fieided sharply, but
there was no strong bitting on cither side. St
Louis batted hardest and in this largely the
victories went In the second game, Louis
ville's base running was a feature, and pro
longed the contest to 11 innings. In tbe first
game, Hecker took Khret's place at tbe end of
the sixth, and in the second, Boyle took Robin
son's at tbo end of ninth. The dav was fair,
attendance small. President Davidson's nav-
ing off last night was much of a farce. Hecker,
who is said to have got most received $1 95.
The rest were in debt to Davidson. This state
of affairs was caused by lines on the Eastern
todr. Tbe players have filed a protest with
President W ickoff, and are in the meantime on
their good behavior. Score:
Bt.Louls 1 000010000 1-3
Loulsvllles 0 100000100 0-2
Base hlts-St. Louis, 11: Loulsvllles, 7.
Stolen bases Wolf,- Heoker, Kaymond, Brown
ing 2, Vaughan, Toinney2.
Time or game One hour and K minutes.
Umpire Ferguson,
St. Louis 0 0060000 17
Loulsvllles 0 030021006
Earned runs bt. Louis 3, Loulsvllle9 6.
Base hits t.Loui8. Loulsvllles 15.
Pitchers King and Khret
Struck out By Ehret 2, by Hecker 1, by King 5.
Passed balls Cook 2.
Wlldpltches-Hei-kerl.
Time One hour and 60 minutes.
Stolen bases Uovle, Hecker.
Umpire Ferguson.
A KEAL WALE0YEK.
The Athletics Show the Bnbles Where They
Are n Little Sborr.
Philadelphia, June 22. The Athletic men
to-day put up a splendid game and had a verit
able walkover with the Columbus team. The
visitors fielded so poorly tbat the home team
could not earn a run. The camo was called at
the end of the eighth inning to allow the Co
lumbus team to catch a train. Score:
Athletics 0 0 5 0 0 5 2 1-13
Columbus 0 00100001
Two-bascbiis Welch, Feunclly.
Thrce-liase hit Furcell.
Stolen bases Welch, Stovey, 3; Larkln, Force 11,
Kappel.
Struck out Bv Wevblng, 4: Gastrlght, 4.
Passed balls Cross, l: Blight 1.
Wild pltches-UatrIght.
Time Ode hour and 45 minutes.
Umpire Gdffney.
WILL TEST IT.
President Stern to be Arrested To-Dny for
Sunday Ball Playing.
rSPXCIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.!
Cincinnati, June 22. Unless it rains to
morrow, Mr. A, S. Stern, President of the Cin
cinnati Baseball Club, will be arrested. Tbat
was tha programme mapped out by Mayor
Mosby this afternoon. The Reds and Kansas
Citys will be allowed to play the regular sched.
uled Sunday game without fear of interrup
tion, but the president is booked for capture
and arraignment The players will not be dis
turbed, apd the case will be simply a test one.
Under the law Sunday games of baseball are an
offense, but tbe crusade Is not against tbe sport,
but against the concert saloonists, who have
brazenly defied all laws which seem to clash
with their ideas of personal liberty. Mayor
Mosby believes in Sunday ball, for it keeps
many people out of worse places.
There will doubtless be protests from the
semi-professional teams if they are again
stopped. For two Sundays past the police have
prevented all ball games at the old avenue
league and Cumminsville blue parks. Both
are inclosed grounds.
BELLEVUE AGAIN.
They Beat the Castle Sbnnnon Team and
Score a Fourth Strnigfar.
The Bellevue Athletics defeated the Castle
Shannons yesterday afternoon on the Athletio
grounds, at Bellevue, by a score of 11 to 4.
Base hits Bellevues, 12; Castle Shannons, 4.
Batteries For Bellevues, Coylo and Morgan;
for Castle Shannons, Brown and Hamilton.
The features of the game were the battery
work of Coyle and Morgan, of the Bellevues,
Coyle striking out 14 men and Brown, of the
Castle Shannons, 4; also the excellent throwing
of Hamilton.
Tbe large score is accounted for by tbe loose
field work of tbe visitors, they going all to
pieces at critical periods of tbe game, besides
throwing the ball all over the lot when men
were on bases, thus allowing them to score.
They are in sad need of a field captain to direct
them play and it would not be a bad idea to
play with a foot ball so they could bit it a little
more often and to some effect.
This is the fourth consecutive victory for
Bellevue and Bellevue people are proud of
their club and show their appreciation by
gracing the game with tbeir presence,
especially the ladies, who turn ont inj great
numbers. Game next Saturday between tbe
Bellevue Athletics and Mt Washington Ath
letics THE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE.
At Buffalo
Buffalos 0 1
Toicdos 0 0
At Rochester
Kochesters 2 0
Londons 1 0
At Syracuse
Svracuses 2 0
Torontos o 0
1-10
1-3
16
05
2-14
0-5
At Hamilton, first game
Hamiltons 1 0 2
Detrolts 0 2 0
Second game
Hamiltons 0 0 0
Detrolts 0 3 0
0-3
0-10
1-1
0-9
BARNIE'S MEN WIN.
Some Good Batting Beats the Bridegrooms
nt Their Home.
New York, June 22. The Baltimore nine
played in good form to-day, and defeated the
Bridegrooms. The Baltimore men won
through good batting early in tbe game. Score:
Baltimore: 0 302300 109
.Brooklyn! 0 022001005
Base-hits Baltlmores. 15; Brooklyns. 8.
Time of game Two hours and five minutes.
Umpire Goldsmith.
Trl-Stnte Lcngnc.
ISFECIAL TELEQBAUTOTI1E DISPATCB.1
At Dayton
Daytons 6
Wheelings o
3 3 0 2 0 0
2 0-16
0 2-6
0 0 0 3 0 1
Base hlts-Daytons, 15; Wheelings. 7.
Errors-Daytons, 3; Wheelings, 2.
Very Close.
SPECIAL TILEOEAM TO THE DISPATCH.l
Brooklyn, June 22. Brooklyn-Athletic As-
1 sociatlon.
Brooklyns 1 00000000 0-1
Kew Jersey Athletlcs.O 01000000 12
SULLIVAN'S TRAINING.
A Statement That He Is n Better Wrestler
Than Muldoon.
ISFECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.l
New Yoek, June 22.-John L. Sullivan is in
training for his fight with Jake Kilrain at the
farm of William Muldoon, the wrestler, at Bel
fast a quiet little town in the center of Alle
ghany county, ten miles from Belmont, on tbe
Western Division of the Erie Railroad. Mul
doon's place is several miles from any railroad
station, and is otherwise very secluded, bnt
comfortable and healthy, and equipped with
all tbe facilities for a thorough course of phys
ical training. The bouse itself is a large
country residence surrouuded by broad piazzas
and shaded by fine trees. Sullivan, according
to all accounts, is getting into the pink of con
dition. He has worked off tbe fat of dissipa
tion and laziness, and in tbe healthy mountain
air, under the scientific handling of Muldoon
and bis other trainers, is hardening his muscles
and cooling off his nervous system with a rapid
ity that bis friends believe will mike him the
most perfect animal in existence when be faces
Kilrain. His pictures made film look over
stout but that is on account of the heavy
woolen clothing that he wears.in training.
The course of training that he is pursuing
includes, beside the usual pugilistic exercise of
punching the bag, running and walking, and
tbe utmost care as to diet and sleep, several
other exercises not usually in such prepara
tions for tbe ring. His wrestling is one par
ticular feature of tbe training. Sullivan has
always been weak as a wrestler, and Muldoon
bas undertaken to perfect him in that It is a
question already, it is said, whether Sullivan
has not become tbe more- powerful, if not the
most skillful, wrestler or the two. He and Mul
doon have it hot and heavy every day. The
big fellow enjoys bis wrestling bouts as a child
would a new toy and is proud of his skill.
Putting tbe iron ball is another exercise tbat
forms a part of Sullivan's daily routine. It is
Strengthening to the back and arms and helps
to open and develop tbe lungs. The bigBos
toniarr makes a handsome picture as be puts
the heavy ball with force enougb.-seomingly,
to send it through a wall as smoothly as a can
non ball might go.
The walk as an accessory to physical training
has rarely been used to tbe extent that Mul
doon bas pushed it in Sullivan's case. Fifteen
or so miles a day is a mere "breather." Before
starting the fighter Is loaded down with heavy
woolen clothing enough to last an Esquimaux
through a hard winter. Even bis bands are
heavily gloved and bis feet are weighted. A
beavy collar muffles his neck and a thick cap
sets well down over bis ears. Of course be
perspires copiously in the warm sun and with
the violent exercise of rapid walking, but that
is just what the trainer wants, and the more
the fighter perspires the more clotbes are
heaped on him so tbat it will be absorbed and
its full flow not clogged. Probably the most
really comfortable thing about the training for
Sullivan comes after the hard work of. the day
is over. The rubbing down at tbe hands of his
trainers is tbe real luxury of.the pugilist Sul
livan revels in it Any one who wants ,to see
perfect physical manhood should be present
then, when for once In tbe day the beavy wool
ens are removed from tbe pngilist's form. Tbe
long course than Sullivan'bas undergone i ill
end in a few days, when he starts for tbe fight
ing ground. Tbe battle will be a test not only
of tbe merits of the men, but of the merits of
those who trained them. It will be a big
feather in Muldoon's cap if the man whom he
has transformed from a huge wreck intu a
mighty animal comes out the winner in that
contest
Baseball Notes.
TnET were two tough games to lose yester
day. Morris deserves a cheer, and a good one at
that
TnE Golden Stars beat the Valley Stars by
8 toO.
The St Pauls beat the Erleweins by 9 to 0
yesterday.
The J. L. Kanes beat the E. E. Sieberts by
29 to 12 yesterday.
The Beltzhoover Blues defeated the Twen
tieth Street Stars by a score of 21 to 17.
The S. S. Browns want'to hear from any 18-year-old
club in Western Pennsylvania.
TnE Shadysides and Mt Washlngsons played
a fine game yesterday, which ended -in a tie.
Score 6 to 6.
The Pittsburg Locals want a game for July
4 with any 15-year-old club. Address J.P.Kerr,
7S Bedford avenue.
The Pittsburg and Allegheny club3played an
interesting game yesterday. The former won
by a score of 15 to 14.
The TJresaits have organized and want to
hear from any junior club. Address M. M.
Ames, West Carson street.
THE Fishers have organized and want to
hear from all 13-year-old clubs. Address Harry
Fisher, 81 First street, Allegheny.
The Electrics, the 15-year-old champions, are
out n ith a challenge to all clnbs of that age.
Address S. Griffen, 39 Boston street.
The Rosedale and the Eclipse teams plaved
a tie game at Woods' Run yesterday. The
score was 10 to 10. Darkness stopped the game.
THE John Mei'ters want to hear from any
club whose members are not inorethan 13 years
oia. Aaaress &. w. nann, n MeagwicK street,
Allegheny.
The "Newsies," as the boys of the News
boys Home have called their club, want to
bear from any club under 14. They want two
games lor Independence Day. Address tbe
Newsies, care of the Home.
Sporting Notes.
Joseph A. Glesenkamp recently pur
chased two horses from Kentucky which caused
a sensation among Pittsburg's equine ad
mirers. They are bred awav up, and can make
trotting marks down in the 30s.
THE WEATHER,
T
.For Western Penn
tylvania, West Vir
ginia and Ohio, fair,
cooler, followed in
western portions of
Tennessee andKen
tucky by slightly
warmer ; northerly
winds.
PrTTSBlTBG, June 21, 1S89.
Tbe United States Signal Service officer in
this city luxmshes the following.
Time. Ther.
liter.
.. 64
.. 70
.. no
.. 10
8:00 A. M 64
12:00 A. M: 68
1:00 P. M
2:00 h. M 65
5 OOP. M
Meantemn
Maximum temp.
Minimum temp..
Range
Precipitation. ...
8.00 P. M 64
Trace.
Klver at S p.
hours.
v., 9.4, a fall of 1.6 feet in 24
The Entire Lutheran synod
Had their photographs taken by Aufrecht,
photographer, 516 Market street, Pittsburg,
last week.
FLEMING'S
BEEF, IRON and WINE.
A nutritive tonic.
A restorative for the convalescent
Pint bottles, 50c. Fresh Beef, Sherry Wine
and Iron.
BITTER WINE OF IRON
A nerve tonic.
A blood maker.
Strengthens the nerve tissues.
Pint bottles, 75c.-
WINE OF PEPSIN.
A digestive wine for dyspeptics.
A potent remedy for indigestion, dyspepsia
and nausea.
Pint bottles, 75c
These remedies ate used and prescribed by
the physicians of all schools in their dally
practice.
Ask your family physician about them. For
sale at the Pharmacy of
JOS. FLEMING & SON,
Wholesale and Retail Druggists,
412 Market Street, Pittsburg, Pa
je20-TTSSu
PHOTOGRAPHER, 18 SIXTH STREET.
A fine, large crayon portrait Si 60: see them
before ordering elsewhere. Cabinets, $2, and
W 60 per dozen. PROMPT DELIVERY.
apH-16-MWFSu
HAMBUItO AMERICAN PACKET CO. -EX
1'BKSS service between Iiew York, South
ampton and Hamburg bv the new twin-screw
steamers of 10,000 tons and 12,500 liorie power.
Fast time to London and the Continent. Steam
ers unexcelled for safety, speed and comfort
Regular service: Every Thursday from New
York to Plymouth (London), Cherbourg (Paris)
and Hamburg. Through tickets to London and
Paris. Excellent fare. Rates extremely low.
Applrto the
General Office Hamburg I General Passage Office,
American Packet Co., O. B. RICHARD & CO.,
37 Broad wav. N. Y. 61 Broadway, .N Y.
MAX SCH AMBEKO, 527 SmlthHeld St., Pittsburg.
Jell-WFSU
P
ATBK" q?S
O. D. LEVIS. Solicitor of Patents.
131 Fifth avenue, above Smithfield, next Leader
office. (No delay.) Established 20 years.
se29-hlu
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFT.
WAiTED-A STENOGRAPHhB AND ONE
familiar with Kemlngton machine. Address
A., Dispatch office. Je23-123
LOSr-FOX TEBRIER DOG. WHITE WITH
brown points: S3 reward If finder will return
him to 52 1BWLN AVEN UE, Allegheny. Je2S-121
WANTEU-DKUG
sneaks German,
patch office.
CLEKK-ONE THAT
Address DBUGS. DIs-JeZ3-120
TO LET-PLEASANT COUNTRY HOUSE OF
6 rooms, furnished, large ground, fruit trees,
garden, etc., seven miles rrom the cltv on P. Ft.
W. Jt C. R. K. : terms reasonable. For further
information address COUNTRY, Leader office.
Je23-118
NOTIOK-MEMBERS OF INVINCIBLE
LODGE 114, K. of P. .are requested to
meet at Castle Hall, cor. Frankstown ave. and
Station st, E. E., at 1.30 p. m. TO-DAY, to at
tend the funeral ot our deceased brother. It.
M. Powell. Msmbers of sister lodges are cor
dially invited. By order of
Attest: L. G. KlEHIi C. C.
JONATHAN WOOL3LA1R, KotR. S.
Je23-U7
1& ikx4i-iiteteAI$P
F3 1Pi
flWf
mgmt
:tL-
it
FAIR PLAY IS A JEWEL."
READ THIS AND LET US HAVE IT.
Last Sunday morning the citizens of Pittsburg were amazed by the
assurance of one who has been pleased to dub himself the "Leading
Clothier." Arrayed in this title he took several columns of matter to strut
about in and call down malediction on those who do not do business to
suit him. How his old time neighbors in Chatham street, New York,
would smile if a stray copy ot his egotistical (to draw it mildly) advertise
ment should fall into their hands. They would for a moment cease hawk- -ing
their "hand-me-down" clothing and indulge in reminiscences of the
days when he was one of and "wid 'em.
THE
Da
of arraigning the entire clothing trade because they returned their business
to the Assessor in compliance with the requirements of the law and not to
make capital out of the proceeding by inflating it a couple of hundred
thousand, calls for severe terms of denunciation. If the clothiers of Pitts
burg so choose they might argue that; accepting the figures of this great
hilking mentor, a large portion ot it must represent the sales of women's
apparel, notions and other trinkets, the taste for handling which, by a re
puted LEADING- clothier, is a clinging appetite cultivated in the denizens
of Hester and Baxter streets.
WHAT IS ALL THE ROW ABOUT.
Let's see, when a merchant cries out, somebody must have stouck'him.
Where? you ask. Why in the pocketi of course. We cannot be blind to
the fact that part of this onslaught was intended for us, equally with the
other three clothiers who disturb his repose. It was no nightmare that
disturbed him, it was a solid fact and the fact is that right here in Pitts-'
burg we are selling the trade, some of which was probably his, before we
demonstrated by figures and the clothing we carry that we could under
sell, through our New York house, this firm that has been charging high
prices to Pittsburgers, lo! these many years.
THE PUBLIC APPRECIATE THE FACT
that we give them good, reliable clothing at New York prices, cheaper
than they have been able to obtain them from the "MAN WHO MOUTHS"
and we were satisfied, but when he gets up and starts a harangue we feel
called on to tell the public just what is the matter. Old fogyism is apt to
go off into queer antics when it is shaken up and wakes to find the day of
big profits ended.
Now, do not be biassed by what we have said. Call and inspect our
stock of Clothing, Hats and Men's Fuirdshing Goods, and if we cannot
undersell the 'LEADER" with a grievance, ours will be the task of con
soling him.
.:. IMZOZRAJLi. .:.
) 4
The clothing house which recently drew a comparison between him
self and all the clothing houses in Pittsburg, reminds us very much of the
fable of the frog, who tried to swell himself to the dimensions of an ox.
The catastrophe that overtook the frog should be a warning to this jeal
ous merchant, not to blow himself out so much and to endanger his life.
The frog, so the fable reads, became so puffed out with his own wind that
he really believed in his imaginary size and considered the rest of the ani
mal kingdom very small fry indeed, but it was all wind. There was a sud
den collapse and where, oh where, was the frog.
TJOlsPT F-AIL TO CALL
AT OUR STORE
MONDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY,
And take your choice of 1,000 styles of Men's elegant Suits, equal to
custom make, from costly Cassimeres,, Tweeds, Serges, Worsteds, Diago
nals and Whipcords, at the ridiculously low prices of
Eight Dollars, Ten Dollars and
PITTSBURG COMBINATION
COR. GRANT
xC' .H.Ldk.i, . t-Mi , . . .. .J . . .ii.i,0.,-t-,!ij,.' i, fi i i TisHl Tit i flit i .iliffiMr T i n ssMMWssMBMli ii'S
II fnig1Fi"sSi JfiflfflBWSTsstf IMBalw ?-"'.-'-lflK'J"'"frft'aiJtty.AyAff jsjnWsMMSi MSMlrsPlwTTTTBSllMBSMlSlWfBWsltMBSll1BSMBWm ir
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
CONSUSVliVlATE
$8, $1 0, $1 2,
AND DIAMOND STREETS.
OPPOSITE THE NEW COURT
wit
GALL
i-i
i
Twelve Dollars
CLOTHING CO.
.,-
HOUSE.
.
i i. !t.
. . rr,j iLm&Jx
i
v- )
aHs)sft.iCJM " -JSSBJstAsBa3s3ste5y.
W ) Jk. itlflf st f- Ja, SHCfctf"' ''-"'sisi 1 fcfyf't) 4jSi.i f ? r j1 ij isstfs 'ttlslWllTfi allli - -MsV-Jgj. if ay Cj tfcaaBMbbaMJMELnfa4KSS

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