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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, October 13, 1889, SECOND PART, Image 16

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1889-10-13/ed-1/seq-16/

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'ST
16
I POWERFUL 'BODY.
'Sketch of the Organization of Loco
motive Engineers.
THE FIRST GKA5D CHIEF.
temperance
and Morality One
Main Features.
of the
CHIEF AEIHDE'S GOOD MANAGEMENT
tCOBBISPOXDEJCE OP THE DISTATCII.;
Cleveland, October 12. A hort,stocky
man, dressed in a blue jumper, a jaunty
cap and a pair of OTerslls, and engaged in
oiling his locomotive and scanning it with
critical attention, was a familiar figure at
the Albany depot of the 2Tew York Central
Railroad not so many years ago. Peter M.
Arthur, for it was he, was a Tery capable
engineer, and the fact alone that he was in
charge of a locomotive attached to one of
the fastest passenger trains on the line
proves the statement. Then he earned $125
a month; now his salary is said to be 100 a
week and his income from his rent-roll of
houses and lands and interest on money in
bank and stocks is double xbat amount.
3Ir. Arthur is a knight of the foot-board no
more, and his jumper has given place to
broadcloth and his overalls to doeskin. He
so longer carries his dinner in a tin bucket,
and his hands are no longer hard with
honest callous. Then he lived in a modest
cottage; now he maintains an establishment
in Euclid avenue, the most elegant resi
dence street in all America.
As the chief officer in the Brotherhood of
JjoeomotiveEDgineers, Mr. Arthur has been
in the public print and mind for 15 years. The
executive head of the very best organized
body of workingmen in the world, he has
been a man of no little influence from the
day on which he took his oath and assumed
his functions. The great strike of 1877
soon lollowed, when men with burning
torches threatened every house and public
buildins in the citv of Pittsburs. Mr.
Arthur's power was felt then as it has been
a score of times since. In the recent strike
of engineers on the Burlington road he
igain became a figure in the national eye,
and a thorn in the flesh of certain engineers
who sought war rather than peace. On
"Wednesday of next week the twenty-sixth
annual convention of the Brotherhood will
meet at Denver, Col. Mr. Arthur will be
a candidate for re-election to the office
of Grand Chief Engineer and it is certain
that he will be opposed by those who
DO KOT APPEOTE OF HIS POLICY,
as well as those who think he has had the
office and its $3,000 salary quite long enough
for one man. The future ot the organization
depends to a large degree upon the result of
the election. The brotherhood was founded
upon the policy that a settlement of differ
ences concerning wages and other vital
questions should be made by consultation
between employer and employe, rather than
by a concerted abandonment of work and
pnysical force. The three chief engineers
of the organization Robinson. Wilson and
Arthur always were in harmony with that
policy. The new chief, if there is to be one,
may be an entirely different sort of a man.
Every person, therefore, who ships a pound
of freight or rides from one town to another
will be interested in the meeting next week,
and the election to follow.
The first annual session of the brother
hood was held at Indianapolis in August,
1864. W. D. Bobinson, who was afterward
disgraced by the order tor neglecting his
family and immoral conduct, was the grand
chief engineer. In his report to the dele
gates he gave an entertaining stetch of the
origin of the association, saying that a
handful of engineers employed on the Michi
gan Central road had assembled at the home
of one ot their number in the town of Mar
shall, Mich., to discuss their grievances and
to-colder the advisability of some united
effort. That was in April, 18C3. This,
then, was the
BEGINNIXG OP THE BROTHERHOOD
that in the vear 18S9 has 26,000 members, is
divided into 425 subdivisions, is established
in every State and Territory in America and
throughout the British provinces, and has
paid in hard cash to the widows of departed
engineers nearly $2,500,000.
Chief Bobinson, who was really the
founder of the brotherhood, thus enumer
ates the causes which led to the meeting at
Marshall: ''The disposition manifested on
the part of the superintendent of motive
power on that road the Michigan Central
to wage a remorseless war upon the best
interests of labor, and especially his en
croachments upon the established "rights and
usages of the engineers In his employ, and
the reduction ot their pay, had at length be
come insufferable, and the engineers as a
class had become satisfied that the safety of
their positions as engineers,and the security
ot their pecuniary interests demanded a
unity of purpose and combined and organ
ized action." This conference resulted in
the call for a meeting at Detroit on the
Cth of May, at which engine drivers
from the Michigan Central, Michigan
Southern, and Northern Indiana, Detroit
and Milwaukee, Grand Trunk (on the
American side), and the Detroit branch of
the Michigan Southern were invited to at
tend. A constitution and a series of by
laws embodying the fundamental principles
of the organization as it exists at the present
time, were drafted and accepted, and 12 en
gineers signed their names thereto. In
three months the Brotherhood of the .Foot
board, as it was calied, was represented by
divisions or lodges at Marshall and Adrian,
Mich., Chicago, 111., Xorwalk and Crest
line, O., and Michigan City, Lafayette and
Iiaporte, Ind. Dnring the following Au
gust these divisions were organized into a
grand national division (now the Grand
International Division) and this is the body
which will meet at Denver.
At the organization of the grand division
Bobinson was elected grand chief engineer.
In hU address to the delegates he related
HOVT HE HAD BEEJT PERSECUTED
because of his prominence in the new move
ment. "Prom the time of my first connec
tion with the brotherhood, as a delegate to
Detroit in May," said he, '"the Master Me
chanic of the middle division of the Michi
gan Central Railroad, at Marshall, had given
evidence of his hostility to the organization,
and his dislike of myself especially, as one
of its originators, by pursuing me with everv
conceivable annoyance, and this enmity at
last culminated in myditcharge from the
service of the cjmpany."
The first serious trouble to confront the
brotherhood came with a controversy in
which the Pittsburg, FL Wayne and Chicago
Eailroad company and its locomotive engi
neers were the central figures. The engi
neers, who left their employment, weremem
bers of Division No. 12. After they were de
feated by the railroad company theydeserted
from the brotherhood and tore up their char
ter. Chief Eobinson hurried to Fort "Wayne,
the scene of the defeat and desertion, but his
offices were of no avail. In his review of
the disaster he said the officials of the rail
road "used the combined influence and
power of centralized wealth and a corrupted
press to mislead the public mind, and at
last succeeded, by stratagem and falsehood,
in dividing the counsels and destroying the
confidence of the members in each other."
However, the deserters soon came back to
the ranks of the brotherhood, and division
lSTo. 12 flourished, notwithstanding a "cor
rupted press" and the machinationsof "cen
tralized wealth." The receipts of the entire
order the first year were 2,000; now they
re 50 times that turn. The expenditures o'f
the supreme body were about 51,500; now
they are many thousands of dollars in excess
of that amount. Then the headquarters of
the chief executive were in the cab of his
locomotive; now they are on the second
floor of one of the finest blocks in the city of
Cleveland. Then there was no clerical
force; now there are typewriters, stenogra
pher, bookkeepers, auditors and private sec
retaries. At the second annual session of the rrand
.division Charles "Wilson succeeded Eobin
j Mo, ftid'for tea yean wm at the head of the
I
fWJv-gj
fTJV ;
a
brotherhood. Bobinson turned up as a dele
gate, but he was not admitted because of
the shameful manner in which he had
treated his wife and children. A commit
tee was appointed to investigate his conduct,
and it returned a shocking report of the
former Grand Chiefs immoral life. The
scandal annoyed the engineers not a little,
as Bobinson was known as the founder of
the (brotherhood, and correct deportment
was one of the necessary qualifications for
membership therein.
ME. WILSOX EMPHASIZED THIS POINT
at the third meeting of the giand division
at Rochester, K. Y. "The objects of this
organization," said he. "are mainly to im
prove the condition of locomotive engineer
nrst, by insisting that thev must be men o:
good character, and that practices that have
been common since the commencement of
railroads in this conntry, such as drinking
to excess, or being guilty of improper con
duct that would tend to injure their relia
bility as engineers or character as men,mnst
be abandoned, or they could not be mem
bers of this -organization." The engineers
from first to last have attempted, and
not without success, to elevate the moral
standard of the members of their order. Tem
perance has been advocated by the lead
ing men in the brotherhood, and no one who
is interested in tbe liquor business is eligible
to membership. The fact that a drinking
man is a vcry'dangerous individual to place
in charce of a locomotive is better known to
the engineers, perhaps, than to anyone else.
The annual session of 1866 was held at Bos
ton, and there for the first time P. M.
Arthur came into some prominence by his
election as one of the trustees of the fund
for widows and orphans. Two years later
he was chosen first grand chief engineer,
the duties of the office corresponding with
those of auditor in other orders. This place
he retained until 1874, when he was elected
Grand Chief. The headquarters of the
organization were removed from Fort
"Wayne to Cleveland, and Mr. Arthur came
here to live. He had a care for his pennies
and invested in real estate whenever a favor
able bargain was to be made. His friends
say that he has become wealthy in this man
ner. He is variously quoted, but men
about town who claim to know say that he
is worth at least 5200,000. However, he is
not an old man yet, and notwithstanding his
houses and stocks, is not quite Jjeady to re
tire from active participation in the greatest
labor organization in America. He will,
therefore, go to Denver prepared to meet his
enemies, and if he is vanquished it will not
be without a hard struggle on his part.
"Whatever the result may be, Cleveland will
hardly lose him as a citizen, for his financial
interests are here, and his children have
grown up and married here.
James B. Mobbow.
AET K0TES AND COMMENTS.
Me. H. Sj. Stsvexsox has a small water
color on view at Slayer's.
The two pictures by Scalbert, shown at
Young's, are part of the Hack-Johns collec
tion. Quite in addition to its supply of reproduc
tions of antique statuary has been received by
tbe Pittsbuig Art School during the past
week. t
A VERY tough Eaper, transparent enough to
render it serviceable for use in place of window
glass, is a recent Japanese invention. The ma
terial of which it is made is a kind of sea
weed. Several sales of pictures at tbe Blelman
collection are reported, and also a number of
offers for some of tbe more important works.
This collection will remain in the city during
the whole of the present week.
Me. A. F. King still continues to make a
success of bis still-life paintings, and bis work
in this line attracts attention wherever shown.
His latest study is one in which both solid and
liquid refreshments are depicted in a manner
that is calculated to fill tbe eyes of a hungry
man with longing and cause his month to
water.
Two of Mr. George Hetzel's Eidenan sketches
have been sold during the past week. The;
are works which the artist valued very highly
on account of some-especial features which
they possess. He has oust completed a. large
picture of a scene on the Connoquenessing, and
is at present at work upon one ot his favorite
studies a woodland scene, with some fine
rocks in the foreground.
hex jnbis.stadi? on Fourth avenue, Mr.
D. B. Walkley is surrounded by the sketches
of farm scenes in Eastern Ohio upon which he
has been engaged during the latter part of the
summer. The large picture of the glass-house
interior, which be has already well under wav.
is a stiong composition, and cleverly shows the
manner of working In one of Pittsburg's most
important Industries. He will work upon this
picture while the factory is in operation during
th2 coming winter, as he intends to send it to
one of the New York art exhibitions in the
spring.
At one of the art collections In the city the
other day a fine-looking and elegantly dressed
lady stood before a picture representing a fam
ily group, with an Infant sleeping in a cradle,
and ventured the criticism that, although the
work was fine in other respects, the child's
nose was not represented with fidelity to na
ture. Tbe owner of the picture, who was
standing near, being inclined to oSer an objec
tion to this criticism, the lady impatiently in
terrupted him, saying: "Oh, it is of no use
talking to me about it. I am an authority on
babies; 1 have six of them, and no child's nose
ever looked like that, even when it had a cold
In tbe head." There is not much doubt of tho
accuracy of the lady's observation; indeed, it is
characteristic of tbe artist whose work was
being called in question that in painting small
children he is given to the fault of introducing
too much red into tbe colonng of their noses.
Two very cleverly executed paintings bear
ing the name of "H. Hendrichs," are exhibited
at Mayer's. One is an excellently composed
marine view showing the waves breaking npon
a rocky shore. The work is well handled, in a
clean and free style of execution and preserv
ing a proper balance of relation between the
three parts of the picture, sky, sea and rocks.
The color is very lair, and the form and charac
ter of the rocks and waves very well rendered.
The second picture represents a pool of water
among some large rocks on the shore, with tbe
water breaking over their tops and pouring
down the sides. Upon one of the stones toward
tbe center ol the picture, a mermaid Is seated
amid a, shower of spray and looking out over
the sea. This rather quaint conceit has been
well earned out, particularly in regard to com
position. The style of handling is broad and
free, and the work, as a whole, is quite pleas
ing. A splendid painting by Schreyer has been
added to the fine collection which Mr. Mathews
is exhibiting at Boyd's. The work is entitled
The Chiefs Advance." This painting is in the
artist's best style, and it is safe to say that no I
better example of his work has been seen In
this city. Tbe subject represents a well
mounted Arab chief, surrounded by a number
of attendants. These latter, however, are kept
very much subordinate, and serve only to sup
plement and enhance tho interest of the cen
tral figure. The strength in drawing and com
position for which the artist is celebrated Is
present in an unusual degree in this painting,
and it has been executed with that real artistic
feeling tfblch renders it of such pleasing char
acter that one can never weary of looking at it.
Tbe large painting of Lake Luzerne is a pleas
ant example of work by a man who maintains
his own standard of excellence tbronghont
every detail, and so produces a well-balanced
picture. The works in this collection are be
ginning to find purchasers, and it is probable
that quite a number n ill be disposed of before
the time set for closing tbe exhibition, which Is
next Thursday afternoon. Those who have
not yet seen these pictures will do well to pav a
visit to the gallery before that time, as Mr.
MEDICINE JIM A ifli
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FATENG,,' ffiPH ELJHflTCfi
For Weak stomach Impaired Dfgestion Disordered Liver.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
PRICE 25 CENTS PER BOX.
reparedonlyI)yTHOS.BEECHAM,St.HeIens,IancasIiire,Enelanfl.
B. F. ALLEN & CO., Sole Agents
FOR UNITED STATES, 365 Sc S67 CANAL ST., NEW YOKE,
Who (if your druggist does not keep theni) will mail Beecham's
Pills oa receipt of price tut inquire inU (Please mentiCm this paper.)
KpSFf
; F-tA
THE
Mathews says that must positively he the limit
of bis stay In Pittsburg.
Just one week more of the Exposition, and
consequently one week more of the largest and
finest art exhibition ever seen in Pittsburg,
or In any other "Western city. Many persons
attending the Pittsburg Exposition, after re
cently visiting those held in other large cities,
have freely expressed the opinion that the art
exhibit is unsurpassed, and in most cases un
equaled. by those shown elsewhere. If these
views art correct, and they are held by persons
thoroughly competent to judge of the matter,
thev plainly evidence tbe important tearing
which the Exposition galleries will have on the
future art interests of this city. Nothing has
yet been done, or is likely to be attempted in
the near f ntnre. that will tend so immediately.
to the advancement of tbe fine arts, to place
them upon snch secure footing, and to give to
those who follow them professionally tbe
standing and importance which they merit, as
tbo holding of this present exhibition has
done, and the success of similar exhibitions In
tbe tutnre will be to the interest of all con.
rented. This being the case, it would seem
only natural that the project would receive
the hearty support and co-operation or
all our local artists as a matter of
course. From all appearances, however.
It would seem that Pittsburg artists have
not done justice to themselves in the matter, at
least not if one may judge by the extent of the
display made as compared with what it might
have been. The work of home talent is. in
many cases," conspicuous by its absence. It is
true that they have made something of a show
ing, but it is nothing comnared to what they
are capable of doing, what they would have
done had they looked well to their own inter
ests. Soruo uf our local artists have not shown
a single picture, and others have been content
with sending one or two works that could
scarcely bo regarded as the result of very ser
ious effort, it is rather surprising that in a
matter of such vital Importance to themselves
they could be so careless, and when tbey let
such opportunities pass by unheeded they have
only themselves to blame if the public fails to
manifest an Interest in their work. Some sur
prise has been recently expressed that so many
toreign art works have been sold in Pitts
bnrg, and our citizens have been blamed
for beine attracted by the interest which sur
rounds whatever comes from abroad, and with
being blind to the merit of that which is pro
duced nearer home: but it is indisputably true
that if this state of things really exists the
artists themselves are largely responsible.
Theyshould do good work, the best tbey are
capable of doing, and allow It to be freely seen
In contrast with what comes from abroad, and
then if it still remains unappreciated they will
begin to understand the real reason why It is
so, and will be able to take tbe proper meas
ures to overcome Drejudice, if it la found that
any really exists. It is quite possible for the
American people to establish a school of art
npon as firm a footing as that of the French;
but the burden of the work rests upon the ar
tists, not the public.
Abused Fhilantfaropliy.
Keeper I wouldn't go into "Warped
Mike's cell, sir, if I were you. He's the
terror of the prison.
The Celebrated Prisoner's Friend I never
allow fear to override my sense of dnty.
Open the door.
Party Coming Out (ten minutes later)
Dat's a terrible hard case ypu've got in dat
cage, boss; but treat him kind treat him
kind. (Sobs.)
The Prisoner's Friend (in muffled tones)
-Helbpl Bnrderll B-poIicelll Judge.
Announcement Extraordinary.
In reply to an Invitation extended to
THEODORE THOMAS,
By many of the citizens of Pittsburg to
include this city in bis
Grai Testimonial Concert Tour,
Mr. Thomas begs leave to announce one
GRAND CONCERT
-AT-
Old City Hall,
Friday Evening, NoVi 1.
First appearance of the celebrated planlit,
RAFAEL JOSEFFY.
Choice of threo programmes to be voted for
by the ticket purchasers.
Programmes may he had and tickets will be
on sale October 23 at H. Kleber & Bro.'s mnsle
store, C06 Wood street.
Resorved seats $1 50 and $L oclS-93
pUENTHER'S ORCHESTRA
Furnishes Music for Concerts, "Weddings,
Receptions, etc, etc
Also Lessons on Flute and Piano.
sel5-lM-su 0 WOOD ST.
SS2&
"jniu
-i m. i
JHPMiF &U.NEtftx
fl h.
"fx4l
til 'wS
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PITTSBURG dispatch;
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
THEATRE
"Under tfre direction of
w M Oiroirw rH? (Rim
l a UMli a i"f
Fl!
Without
Coarseness.
j."wbek:
BEGINNING MONDAY, OCTOBER 14,
Matinees, Wednesday and Saturday. " ' '
J. M. Hill's Union Square Theater Company,
-IN-
APOSSIBLEGASE
THE GREAT COMEDY SUCCESS
-BY-
STDNET KOSENTELD.
A Brilliant Success Here Last Season.
Press and Public Unanimous in Its Praise.
Bnlt.
Breezy.
Beantii.
OCTOBER 21-OLIVER DOTJD BYRON.
WORLD'S MUSEUM,
ALLEGHENY CITY.
James Geary Manager
Harry Scott Business Manager
One Week Only, October 14.
Nature's Latest and Greatest
Wonder!
HALF UN, HALF HORSE !
Limbs and bind parts that of a Horse, Head
and Breast that of a Human Being. v
Tee Strangest Combination ot
AKIMAL MD HUMAN FORMATION
EVER KNOWN TO EXIST.
Runs, lopes, jumps and trots as a Horse;
laughs, talks and sings as a
Human Being.
In conjunction with
Geary's Goliathan World's Circus,
the Greatest Novelty of the Age Circus, Side
show and Concert, Clowns, Ringmasters, Gym
nuts, Aerial Artists and Acrobats.
FREE HIGH-WIRE EXHIBITION DAILY
AT1AND7P.M.
A Hundred Interesting Objects to Amuse You.
The Ladies' and Children's Popular Place
of Amusement
OPEN DAILY PROM 1 TO 10 P. M.
Admission, lOo; .-: Children, 5a
Next, October zl Grand Prize Baby Show.
Coming, BASS, the Ossified Man. oclS-S8
PITT
'ADULTS,, 25c.
,
w
- ? sjcnv '
'!
'W'wj
5U
. f
Kissto
SUNDAY,
OCTOBER- .s:i3,
iy 1 a vK w 'H
Wit
Wlont
Vulgarity.
o:f fttin"
4? -
Elegant
Costumes.
Smnptnons
Staling,
OC12-43
HARRIS' THEATER.
WEEK COMMENCING
MONDAY, OCTOBER 14.
EVKBT APTEEHOON AND ETBOTHO.
Big Spectacular Production I
H. RIDER HAGGARD'S
"SHE"
WEIRD, MYSTICAL, BARBARIC I
Gorgeous In Scenic Effects! ,
Great Dramatlo Cast!
THE ELECTRIC STORK
-ANB-
WRECK OP THE "SLAVE DHOW."
HEAD OF THE ETHIOPIAN,
"SHE'S" CAVERN PALACE,
THE RUINS OF KOR,
THE BOTTOMLESS CHASM,
The Most Realistic Scene Eyer Attempted,
THE FIRE OF LIFE,
Words are inadequate to convey even a faint
description of this weirdly mysterious
and awe-inspiring scene.
Week of Oct. 21 DAND2L BOONE. oclS30
TMPERIAL HALL,
Corner Seventh avenue and New Grant street
RECEPTIONS EVERY THURSDAY
NIGHT 8 to 1 Admission Sue
MATINEE EVERY SATURDAY AF
TERNOON 2 to 5-Admission 23c.
MOZART AND ROYAL ITALIAN
ORCHESTRAS.
OC13-105
POSITIVELYTHE LASTWEEK
OF THE GREAT
SBTJRG
EXPOSITION.
ONLY SIX DAYS MORIii in which to hear
Innes' Magnificent New' York Thirteenth Regiment
Band, to examine the superb collection of paintings
in the Art Gallery and to visit the greatest and
most complete Exposition in this country.
Special Musical Attractions every afternoon
and evening during the entire week. Four Con
certs daily. By universal request the musical gems
entitled, the "Congress of Nations," "Le Miserere"
and "Le Pere la Victoire," which scored such great
successes during the past week, will be repeated
with Artillery Accompaniment on Monday, Thurs
day and Saturday evenings.
Do not fail to improve the last chance to be
present. Open from 9 A. M. to 10 P. M.
3D3ynissio3sr
CHILDREN; 15c.
i'r
$5?
-tr t?rt f
THE
The
Event
B. D. WILT,
T
H
E
MATINEES WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY.
ANNUAL ENGAGEMENT OF THE FAMOUS
RUDOLPH ARONSON
THI BRIGANDS
MUSIC BY JACQUES OFFENBACH.
LIBRETTO BY W. S. GILBERT.
t
B
R
I
G
A
N
D
S
A RECORD OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE PERFORMANCES
AT THE. CASINO, NEW YORK," AND FOUR WEEKS AT THE HOLLIS
STREET THEATER, BOSTON.
A success equal to "Efmenie." New York, Herald, May 20.
Thecompany must be accepted as the best ever seen in- a conic opera.
Boston Herald, September 17.
The Original' Cast, Including the Following Well-Known Artists!
TiflHan Russell,
Fred. Solomon,
Delia Stacey,
Max Lube,
Eva Johns,
Fred Hall,
r
was presented
four weeks in
Parquet, 91 50.
Dress
To-mor-row
evening,
at 8
o'clock.
OCTOBER 21 LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY.
HARRY WILLIAMS1 ACADEMY,
Monday Evening, Oct. 14.
Matinees, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Hyde's
Big
Specialty
Tbe Clipper Quartet,
Mclntjre & Heath,
Miss Helens Niora,
Fields & Hansom,
Jas. McAvoy,
Edith Sinclair.
Ed. M. Favor,
Frank Howard
And the Ethiopian
Spectacular Fro-
duction.
Show.
'Way Down South.
Oct Sl-Harry Watson's Specialty Co. oc!3-17
1 A
M:
ite
V
,-$
k3
pJ5w
- ;
.C'.
.JHSW ABTBSTISEHEIffle?
.RUDOLPH AlOf SOF
GRAND OPERA HOUSE
Leasee
COMIC OPERA COMPANY,
PRESENTING THE SPARKLING OPERETTA,
A success that has never before been equaled in-this
country and is undoubtedly the most gorgeous production
of Comic Opera ever presented. v v
Fanny Bice,
George Olmi,
Laura Russell,
A. W. Tarns,
May Grosvenor,
Ohaa Renwiok,
Zsabelle Urquhart,
Henry Hallam,
Alice Greenway,
Henry Leoni,
Clara Randall,
Ohaa. Priest,
The performance will in every way be exactly
for 125 performances at the Casino,
Boston.
The Production Under the Direction of MR, MAX FREEMAN.
Director of Music, MR. GUSTAVE KERKER.
CHORUS OF 75.' . ORCHESTRA OF'30.
3PBICESi
Parquet Circle, three row's, $1 60. , BafeuaoefllL
Cirole,' three rows, 75a Balance, 50a
COMIC OPERA COMPANY.
KCnF
BROADWAY
(TRICES .XTCOaC S3 CO to $6.)
r .:." APROPOS!
Did you notice the flourish of trumpets with which'iorie '
of our so-called leading Hatters announced the "startKng"
fact last week that he had just secured the "sole" agency for
and received THE "LATEST" NOVELTY IN THE
HAT LINE, the new Buckle Derby, which he would sell
to his customers at the "indescribably" low price of $3. Why,
bless his sleepy soul, it's just three months since.we intro
duced the Buckle Derby, and during this time we have sold
thousands of them not at $3, however, but at the uniform
price of $1 50. But 'we need add no more. This straw
shows which way the wind blows.
1
KA-UFMANNR,
Fifth Avtnut and
TVi;
A
Of tbe"
.Season.
and Manager.
Anna CKleefe,
Rlphard Carroll,
Nellie Duglese,
J. A. Furry,
Isldora BranecCmb
Henry "v"ogel.
the same as it
New York,jmd
- A - ILTIDsrS'"
SILK HATh
leads 'em in beauty, of stylel
symmetry of shape,, richness
of finish and grade of quality
Other Hatters may and cer-1
tainly do charge from one-i
$Hi
,!! teg
o'etoetf I
third to one-half more moneyi
than we do, but the fact rer"
mains that the "Broadway" isl
the superior of all Silk Hats
ottered in this city. Ihis is 1
w ?
nftfr merslir rwif nninmn hur '
thesentiment freely voiced-byC
the army of stylish dresseny
whose heads are-resplendentl
- with our new Fall and Winter!
"Broadway."
OUR LITTLE ENGLISH
DERBY.
No Hat ever introduceilto
a Pittsburg Public has hacl
such a run as the one " de
picted here. It's gracefulnesVl
of outline, tastefully curled",
brim, and extreme neatness
have madeitauniversaWavor-
ite- with younp; men. U
prices for the Little English
Derby are $2, $2 50, 53
$3 50, according to quality,
Smithfidd Stri
urnk
andH
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