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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, February 07, 1890, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1890-02-07/ed-1/seq-5/

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"90B0DI BDT A TOOL
Would Sinn That Ballot Box Con
- tract, According to Sherman.
4TEE SENATOE UPON THE STAKD.
.He Grows Indignant as He Talks of the
ow Famous Forgery.
"MUEAT HALSTEAD TELLS HIS STORT.
JH Insists That the Gora-nor and Himself Wen
Completely Decelted.
Senator Sherman appeared before the bal
lot box investicatlnt: committee yesterday.
He stated that member of Congress who
would sign sueh a docnment would be a
fool ai well as a criminal. Halstead related
the history of his connection with the forged
contract.
Washington, February 6. Two star
witnesses, Senator Sherman and Hurat
Halstead, appeared before the ballot box
investigating committee to-day. Their
testimony, while not of a sensational order,
developed many interesting features. Jur.
Sherman said he did not receive any inquiry
before September 28 from Governor For
aker or Mr. Halstead, as to whether he had
been a party to a ballot box contract On
October 8, "got from the Evening JPorf, of
Cincinnati, a telegram saying he (witness)
and Butterworth had been connected by
gossip with the ballot box contract "Wit
ness replied that the statement was a lie and
any subscription was a forgery.
"Witness was shown Exhibit A, and de
clared that he bad never signed it Saw it
first when it was sent to bim in November
by Mr. Halstead. Tbe signature was a copy
ot his rubber frank stamp, and not an imi
tation of his signature. Did not think the
McKinley signature looked like a genuine
signature, but did not profess to be an ex
pert on signatures, and might take the But
terworth signature as genuine il there was
nothing to call it in question. His own
signature on the paper would naturally
raise a question and excite wonder why he
had contracted to pay money to John Mc
Lean. A POINTED STATEMENT.
Then the naper showed that the signers
bad committed a crime. In addition they
would seem to be fools, tor the United States
had never bought a ballot box. (He was
one of those who thought that the United
States should, however, regulate the elec
tion of Representatives.) All of these things
should raise a question as to the authenticity
of the paper.
Witness never heard or knew of a bal
lot box contract and never heard of the
Campbell bill before Governor Foraker's
Music Hall speech.
Mr. Halstead called upon witness after
the recantation, and witness asked whether
his name was on the paper. Mr. Hal
stead hesitatingly replied that he
had agreed with Mr. Campbell not
to sav anything about tbe paper.
After 'the election, witness called upon
Mr. Halstead to make a fair statement ot
the whole matter. Mr. Halstead, in reply
on November 11, said he had anticipated
his advice, and sent the original for his
amnsement He wrote that it occurred to
him that he had been under the impression
that witness bad signed the letter. He
hoped he had heard the last of it, but feared
he would not for some time. In conclusion
he wrote: "I thought you might have the
curiosity to see the uaper." Laughter,
in which Mr. Halstead joined. Witness
never mentioned tbe paper in the campaign,
but it became an issue between Governor
Foraker and Mr. Campbell.
In answer to Mr. Turner, witness said if
the signatures on each were attached to a
recommendation, they would not excite sus
picion in the ordinary mind, bnt if they con
cerned a draft for 55,000 or 510,000 they
would; it depended on the character ot the
paper.
MUBAT HALSTEAD'S STOBY.
After identilying the ballot-box paper,
Mr. Halstead said he had first seen it on
September 14, on the cars at Springfield, O.
He met Governor Foraker on the train, and
the Governor showed him the paper which
he had obtained from "Wood. The witness
asked Governor Foraker how he obtained
the paper, and the latter replied thatB. G.
Wood had given it to him. They had some
conversation previous to this about Wood,
and the latter's offer to get the paper. To
Mr. Halstead's question as to where Wood
got the paper. Governor Foraker replied:
"It came right out of John McLean's safe."
"How was that?" asked the witness, and
he was told that Wood was a party to the
ballot box transaction and had a right to the
paper. The Governor told the witness that
the paper shocked him, and that it was
ranch more than he wanted. While Gover
nor Foraker went forward in the train, the
witness studied the paper. He thought that
there were reasons why a person should at
tach some credit to the paper.
Witness said he told Governor Foraker
that in his judgment it certainly connected
Campbell with a questionable transaction,
and should not be concealed. He also said
that he was exasperated at the idea that Mc
Kinlev, Butterworth and the others, were
connected with the matter; that he thought
he would explode it under them, and that
under whatever delusion others might have
signed this paper, Mr. Campbell certainly
knew all about it, for he had introduced the
bill.
THE OBIOIN OP THE POBGEBY.
Mr. Halstead explained to the committee
hU theory of the forgery and Wood's mo.
tlve in getting up the paper. The motive,
he believed, was Wood's extreme anxiety
to get hold of the Smoke Inspectorship.
He was certain that the paper was never in
tended to hurt anyone. It was utterly pre
posterous to think that Governor Foiaker
had any knowledge that there was any
forgery He was certain that Wood bad put
Senator Sherman's name to the paper to
keep Governor Foraker from using it during
the campaien.
The witness published an editorial card
warning Mr. Campbell that be was con
cerned in a questionable transaction, "and
then," said Mr. Halstead, "I wasn't able to
hold it back, and the paper got out earlier
tban I intended." The witness said he was
rather staggered at Sedator Sherman's de
nial of anv knowledge of the paper.
Governor Foraker had cautioned him to
be careful ot tbe paper, as it would throw
tbe party into confusion if ail of it got out
fcThe way the rumor got out that there were
other names than Campbell's on the paper
'was that Jordan intimated as much in some
very unpleasant speeches.
A PEBTINENT QUESTION.
Mr. Cogswell asked why witness 'did not
Verify the character of the paper by Sher
man and Mr. Butterworth. He replied that
Mr. Butterworth was not in the country, or
had just landed, and Senator Sherman was in
Washington. He recalled the sayingthatyon
could get a member of Congress to sign a
petition to get himself hanged. It was not
a pleasant matter to put a finger upon a sore
spot like that.
The publication had been forced by cir
cumstances beyond bis control, so he did not
consult tbe signers. Tbe logic of the ballot
box bill was that somewhere there was an
adjustment by which tbe people interested
could get their earnings. Then Wood had
said to a witness yet to comehere that there
was an original paper. Witness, however,
knew of no such paper.
Turner inquired If witness had suggested
to Governor Foraker tbe suppression of the
other names, and he replied that he had
spoken to the effect that tbe paper could be
used to connect Campbell and McLean with
the matter. Mr. Turner asked if witness had
not been moved by political considerations
rather than moral and patriotic considera
tions. CAMPBELL POOLED THEM.
He replied that he had not; that he did not
disassociate politics and morality, and that
this was a proper use to make of the paper.
He admitted that they conld not draw
Campbell in and out as they tried to do.
"The fact is," said he, "he turned out a
more difficult person, than wethoueht
Mr. Turner-asked: "Then if the Governor
had succeeded in getting Campbell drawn
into a corner, you were to stand at the head
of the cannon and touch it off?"
"2fo, sir. I did not intend to stand at the
head of the cannon, but I got there. Great
laughter.
Mr. Turner wanted to know why witness
had characterized Wood as a fraud on Sep
tember 28. He replied that Wood did not
commend himself to approbation. Mr.
Turner remarked that he was willing to
fight Campbell on Wood's material. Wit
ness replied that the character or his
material seemed to be all right bnt he did
not fancy Wood's methods of getting the
papers. His course had been a piece of
treachery to his employers and associates.
NOT EXACTLY BBOTHEKS.
Continuing, he said that tliere was sup
posed to be feeling between Senator Sher
man and Governor Foraker growing out of
events at the Chicago Convention. Ohio
contained more than her share of distin
guished men, and there was necessary fric
tion where they are so crowded. The deli
cate relations existing between Senator
Sherman and Governor Foraker made it
highly inexpedient to allow a paper to get
out through Governor Foraker's agency that
reflected on the Senator. It would have
been fatal to the party. The Governor had
been very considerate of Messrs. Butter
worth and Sherman.
"What was your relation to them
queried Mr. Turner.
1 was weir oia menu, ibp"u vus
witness. Laughter. Continuing, the
witness said that he had known of a great
many calamities befalling public men. He
believed that if the members had signed the
paper they should be put to the sword. He
had no knowledge connecting any member
of Congress with any corrupt act or job in
relation to the ballot box matter. He had
not rested upon Woods word, but had been
guided in his action by the internal evi
dence of the paper a document far beyond
Mr. Wood's ability to produce.
ONE INTERESTING FEATURE.
Governor Foraker had called attention to
the three blanks on tbe paper, and witness
had said: "Johnny (McLean) is a smart
boy, sure enough; he is not going to put his
name on the paper until the money is on the
table for division, and those blanks are here
for his name when the divide is made."
He had never contemplated a rivalry for
the Benatorship between himself, McKinley
and Butterworth. He believed, and had the
evidence, that from the beginning Governor
Foraker had been fooled as he (witness) had
been.
"We assisted each other," said the witness
as he concluded his testimony.
TROUBLES IN TROOPS.
A Sural Town Torn Dp Over the Liquor
Question, Bad Street and Other Things
A Test Case Brine Anxiously Watched
Gossip That Baa an Ugly Soond.
Coraopolis is generally opposed to the
whisky trade. On the 16th of June its vote
to insert the prohibitory amendment in the
Constitution was 99 for to 16 against, and
the temperance people congratulated them
selves that though sin, sorrow and death
might gain a foothold, there was no danger
to tear from "the rum power." They were
further fortified in their belier by a tradition
that at some time in tbe dim past ther had
been legislation malung Moon township a pro
hibitory distric There was some nervousness
exhibited to know whether the making of
Coraopolis a borough would render that law
nugatory, bnt the general impression was that
It would carry with it the prohibitory legisla
tion. 'Squire Ferree is qnoted as authority lor
tbe statement that in 1831 Moon township was
made a prohibitory district
It seems the question will be determined ere
long. A man named Figley is said to have ap
plied for license to sell in Coraopolis. and a
man named Manor for one to sell in the town
ship, and some people are up in arms, contend
ing that the drugstores keep sufficient liquor
for medical purposes in that section.
The streets of Coraopolis are in frightful
condition, and as they are the platform on
which savage electors insist Councilmen must
run at the approaching election, candidates are
laying in a stock ot gam boots lor therace.
Borne members ot the Junior Order United
American Mechanics are also worked up over a
report that their treasury is not in the best pos
siiiia rendition, thnurii dues have been paid in
promptly, and some of them said the matter
would be inquired into at next meeting. The
talk so far is not very loud.
A FINE STAGE OP WATfX
General Freighting Brisk and Considerable
Coal Going- Out.
There Is no animation of consequence shown
in the coal trade on this rise, but there will be
a considerable quantity shipped. There was
12 feet of water in the channel yesterday, and
the Joseph Walton took six boats as a starter,
intending to return for the remainder or her
tow. Tbe Smoky City, John Penny, Fred Wil
son, Charley Brown and Raymond Horner were
preparing to go out also.
The freighters continue to do a good busi
ness, and their work has greatly relieved the
freight blockade by the assistance given tbe
railways, bnt it seems a pity that so much
water should run to waste. It is sngested that
some day tho power of the rivers will be util
ized in the generation of sufficient electricity
to run all the rolling mills and manufactories
in the city.
ANOTHER KAILR0ADLR HEBE.
The Qncen nnd Crescent Will Be Repre
sented By W. E. Reynolds.
The Queen and Crescent system is the latest
railroad company to locate a representative in
this city. TV. E. Reynolds formerly of Atlanta,
Ga., has been appointed Traveling Passenger
Agent for this district and will have his bead
quarters in Plttsbirg. Mr. Reynolds is well
known In tbe South as a prominent railroad
man and is a hustler.
The lst-rn and constantly increasing pas
senger business out of this city necessitated
the appointment of a man. to locate here. The
Queen and Crescent system extends from Cin
cinnati to New Orleans and embraces 1,15SJ
miles of railroads.
To Improve the Misslxiippt.
Washington. February 6. Senator Gibson
to-day introduced a bill to appropriate S4.0u0.000
for the improvement of the Mississippi river
and the harbors 'of, New Orleans, Natchez,
Vicksburg and Memphis, according to the
clans of the Mississippi Klver Commission, and
for the expenses and salaries of the commission.
A preamble recites that the appropriation is
necessary for the preservation of the plant of
unfinished works and for the continuance ot
tbe improvement.
Pennsylvania nnd Ohio Postmasters.
Washington, February 8. Tbe President
nas sent the following postofflce nominations to
the feenate: Ohio-I. C. Light. Ottawa; 8.
Fogleson. Marion: A. M. Rice. Kenton: A. D.
Braden, Canton: C. EL Cooke, Paulding; George
Hall. Lima. Pennsylvanla-J. W. Faust, Rey.
noldsvUlej D. W. Morgan, Franklin.
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liable tonic and blood purifier like Hood's
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Hood's Sarsaparllla makes the weak strong.
"After recovering from a prolonged sicicness
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Hood's Sarsaparilla
Sold by all druggists. 1: sir for $5. Prepared
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100 Doses One Dollar
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160 COPS FOR .
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Ph?nffe:::::::::::::::::::::":'
IS
eorge B. "IVcrneberg SStbEJ
tama u Herman !:. ?
(JonnStensel 5 SB
X Maria Mnller..
Flttsbnrg
J John Fitzgerald H l.heny
iEmmaWeckesser ..AiicjtnenT
Harry North MJgta gwfgg
1 Minnie Uawden B
5 Arthur Ham pittsburS
i Carrie Carter ' CiSXUrf
J Theodore A. Beach pituburf
Josephine C.SlUler StUbnrf
$ GeorgeG. Walgand SttsbSfl
iveoronikaosterenan SttsbSX
J William B. Argo Aileeaenv
Pauline Schuceberger u,,,.
"William H. Kline nttrture
Ule O. Lynch 7VilJ,t
Joslah B. Clark - V&tnrluS
lUzzleBlckerd ... .ureennue
DIED.
BAUER CHAKIESAXBEET BArSB,SOn of
C. H.and Mary Bauer, aged 4 uioniu.. aim io
Funeral on Feiday, Febrnary 8. 1890. at 2
o'clock from the residence of., the parents, no.
3 Bates alley, Seventeenth ward. Pittsburg.
CLARK-At his residence, S3 Hfin"P
street" Allegheny, on Wednesday. February 5.
1890, at 9 A. M., P. F. CLAEK.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
Cincinnati and Georgetown papers please
copy.
CONNOLLY-On Wednesday, February 5.
1890. at 10.30 A. M.. Mrs. Mary Cohsoiw
relict of the late Michael ConnoUy, In her BZd
year. ,. .
Funeral from her late residence. Norton
street. Thirty-second ward, on Friday, the 7th
inst at 8 o'clock A. M. oernces . ou ..-. i -
of Mount Chapel, at 9 A. M. Friends of
family are resnectf ully invited to attend.
the
2
GORDON-At tbe family residence In
Mercer county. Pa.. Wednesday evening, Feb
ruary 6, William H. Gobdon, aged . 7o -years.
I atherof Rev. Seth R. Gordon of this city. 2
ORAHAM- At West Penn Hospital, on
TMSdayrFebruary 6. 1890, at 3 P. M.. SAMUEL
Graham, aged 23 years 3 months.
Funeral from Devore's undertaking rooms,
Grant street, on Friday afternoon, at 2
o'clock. Friends of the family are respectfully
invited to attend.
HIOKEY-On Wednesday. Febrnary fi, 1890.
at 3 P. M., M. J. Hickey, Jr., at Brusbton, In
the 15th year of bis age.
Services at Brnshton, February 7, at 10 A.
M. Interment private at a later hour.
HEILOn Thursday, Febrnary fl. 1890, at 12
o'clock m., John Heil, in tbe 86th year of his
age.
Funeral will take place from tbe residence of
bis daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Schaupp, No.
1721 Penn avenue, on Saturday morning.
at 8.30 o'clock, to proceed to St Pbilomena's
Church, where high mass will do reau ai
o'clock.
HALFIN On Wednesday night at 12 o'cl ock,
Margaret Jane Halpin, daughter of James
P. and Mary B. Halpin. neo Sexton, aged 1
year, 2 months and 10 days.
Funeral Saturday at 3 o'clock, from
Franklin street, Allegheny. Friends of the
family respectfully Invited to attend.
Washington, Pa., papers please copy. 2
KIRCHNER On Wednesday evening at 6.30
o'clock, John P. Kibciineb, aged 67 years S
months and 9 days.
Funeral will take place from the residence of
bis son-in-law, John J. Bauman. No. 77 Walther
avenue. Thirty-first ward, on Friday at 12
o'clock sharp. Friends of tbe f amUy are re
spectfully invited to attend. 2
KERLOn Monday, February 3.nearPawnee
City Neb., Louise Z., wife of Wm. Kerl (nee
Miss Louise A. Zihn). aged 27 years.
KRILL At Milwaukee, on Wednesday. Feb
ruary 5, at 230 A. M., GKOBOE AUGUSTINE
Krill, son ot John and Minnie Krill, nee Wli.
helm, aged 2 months and 28 days.
Funeral takes place at Milwaukee.
IJNDSAY On Wednesday, Febrnary 6, at
930 o'clock A. m Elizabech Lindsay, relict
of the lato Alderman James Lindsay.
Funeral from residence of her son-in-law,
George H. Burton, 3S7 Rebecca street, Alle
gheny City, Friday afternoon, at 2 o'clock.
Friends of the family are respect! ully Invited
to attend. 2
MADDEN On Wednesday, February 5, 1890,
at 8 p. m., Bridget, wifei of James Madden;
aged O years.
Funeral from the residence of her husband.
Mo. 36 Ruthven street, on Friday at S 20 a. m;
Kriends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend. 2
McCANDLESS On Thursday morning,
Febrnary 6. JAME3 M, son of J. Matthew and
Carrie A. McCandless. aged 2 years and 2 days.
Funeral will take place from parents' resi
dence. No. 4116 Liberty avenue, on Saturday
afternoon, Febrnary 8. at 3 o'clock. Friends
of the family are respectlully invited to attend.
2
PITTAWAY On Wednesday. February 6,
1S90, at 7:30 P. M., LIZZIE MARIA PITTAWAY,
aged 4 weeks.
Funeral from the parents' residence, 3131
Denny street, on Friday at 2 p. m. Friends of
tho family are respectfully invitea to attend. 2
ROBB On Thursday, February 6, 1890. at 6
A. m.. at his residencenear Mansfield, Walter
G. Robb, aged 38 years.
Funeral from his late residence. Saturday
morning at 11 o'clock. Train leaving Pitts
burg at 920 A. M., P., C4St. L. B. R., will
stop at residence, Glenn station.
RHALL-On Thursday, February 6, 1890, at
8:20 pvm.. at his residence, comer Twenty-ninth
and liberty streets, Michael Rhall, aged 40
years.
Notice of funeral in evening papers.
SHANE Thursday, at 8 P. M., Mr. John P.
SHANE, in his 41st year.
Funeral will take place Sunday, at 2 p. h.,
from tho residence, 1109 Bingham street, then
will proceed to St. John's R. C. Church. Sonth
Fourteenth street. Friends of deceased are re
spectfully invited to attend.
SAHNER On Wednesday, February 5, 1890.
at 6.3U P. M., Viola E., daughter of Albert and
Veronica bahner, aged 4 years 1 month 5 days.
Funeral from her parents' residence. No. 1803
Sidney street, Southside, Friday afternoon
at 2 o'clock.
STEELE On Tuesday, February 4, at U:30
p. M., at Slippery Rc-k State Normal School,
Edna B.,daughter of J. 8. and Mary A, Steele,
aged 16 years.
Funeral services at the residence of her
uncle, George E. Foster, corner Washington
avenue and Fremont street, on Friday, Feb
ruary?, at 2 p.m. 2
WILSON On Wednesday, February 5, 1890,
at 7 P. M., in Jefferson township, SUSAN WIL
SON, in the 87th year of her age.
Funeral from the residence of Mrs. Carrie
Weyman, near Wilson station, in Jefferson
township, on Friday, at 1 p. m. Train leaves
Baltimore and Ohio depot at 9.10 A. H.
WEST At Brnshton station, P. R. R., on
Thursday, February 6, 1590, at 11 A. M., Mrs.
Susan, widow of the late James West, aged
CO years.
Funeral services will bo held at her late resi
dence, on Tioga street, Brnshton, on Satur
day, Febrnary 8, at 2 r. M. Interment at
Homewood Cemetery.
YOUNG On Thursday, February 6, 1890. at
11 A. M., at his residence. Six Mile (Ferry) Run,
Pittsburg, Southside, NICHOLAS YOUNG, In
76th year ot his age.
Funeral on Saturday at 2 P. M. .from
Twenty-second street station, Pittsburg, Mc
Keesport and Youghiogbeny Railroad.
ANTHONTC MEYER,
(Snccessor to Meyer, Arnold & Co., Ltm.,)
UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER.
Office and residence, 1134 Penn avesue. Tele
phone connection. mylO-oO-xwrsu
JAMES M. FULLERTOK.
UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER,
No. 6 Seventh Street. "
Telephone 1153.
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TJEPRESENTEU IN PITTSBURO IN 13U
Assets . 9,071,69033.
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Losses adjusted and paid by WILLIAM L
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THE HTTSBTJKG DISPATOH.
SEW ADVERTISEMEXTS.
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LATIMER'S
REDUCTION SALE
-is-
Ml WINTER CLOAKS!
Wool Underwear and Muffs, as well as a
great sale of BLANKETS. We need not
discuss why these goods are on hands in
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make these reductions. (
PRICES WILL -
Move them rapidly, as they are marked
very low. Xou can get a bargain here.
--
I II, LATIMER
138 Federal and 46 South Diamond
Streets, Allegheny, Pa.
5&28.1TWTSU
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All the newest ideas in Face Veilings in
Plain and Spotted Nets. A beautiful line
of BlacK Striped andFigured Dress Drapery
Nets ranging from $1 to $4 per yard.
We will be pleased to send a line of sam
ples of any to out-of-town customers if they
will so indicate to us.
SPECIAL.
We have opened another large lot of those
popular selling styles of Ladies' Corset Cov
ers with "V" and round shaped necks, rang
ing from 25c to $1 CO.
Also a large lot of new fine Hand-Embroidered
Convent-made Undergarments.
Our sale in this department during the
month of January has been so successful and
the lines of goods so highly appreciated by
our lady customers that we will continue
this sale during the month of February, or
at least part of it
All the 25c to $1 goods you will find on
the Center Bibbon Counters, and the finer
goods in the back part of the store.
HORNE & WARD,
41 FIFTH AYE.
fc4
PATBHTS.
O. D. LEVIS, Solicitor of Patents,
SU fifth avenue, above 8mitbfleId,nextLed
efflce.-(No delay.) Established yean,
se350
?vy, -
t. frair
ITODAY
PEBRTTAEY-'?,
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
B.&B.
TO-DAY
BLACK
SURAHS
Five big lots, and they are all
24 inches wide, and they are
not the ordinary kind, but
superb qualities.
24-inch Black Surahs, 70a
24-inch Black Surahs, 85c
24-inch Black Surahs, $1.
24-inch Black Surahs, $1 15
24-inch Black Surahs, $1 25
These Surahs will make a
stir during February.
25 to 30c a yard SAVED
on fine Black Surahs is quite
an item when it is so near
spring, and the time you want
them.
200 pieces NEW INDIA
SILKS; 27-inch ones at 60c
up.
NEW STRIPED WASH
INDIAS, plain and twilled,
that you will be interested in,
75c up; they are superb; some
of them very stylish and dis
tinguished, others are ad
mired for their elegant' sim
plicity, in style and coloring.
These Wash lndias, iasiuon
says, will be in great favor.
ELEGANT
NEW
SPRING
SUITINGS
and
DRESS GOODS,
'Our own direct importations
on sale.
Last season's go at prices
that are clearing the shelves
lively; 50c ones at 25c; you
have never seen such.
40c another lot imported
Dress Goods go at
50, 60 and 75c for elegant
high cost goods; Dress Goods
at this kind of prices makes a
lively dress goods business.
The new OMBRE CASH
MERE, French Satines, An
derson's celebrated Scotch
Zephyrs, side borders, Scotch
clans novelties, all there in
Zephyr Ginghams and their
finest, and hundreds 01 pieces
to select from, makes it worth
while to look here.
Then the 15 and 20c
ZEPHYRS,
and the great 4-4
ZEPHYR GINGHAMS '
at 25c, that will make Ander
son's look out for their laurels;
all these at the center coun
ters in Dress Goods and Silk
Room.
NEW
FRENCH
CHALLIS.
Exquisite, 100 pieces for
choice.
About 50 pieces of Freres
Koechlin's all-wool French
Challis; 50c ones at 25c; last
year's patterns explains it.
Now visit these
DRESS GOODS
and
SILK ROOMS
and see the above advertised
items; we know you will be
pleased; don't buy any unless
you want to; if you do you'll
save money, and we will high
ly appreciate the patronage.
And please remember, we
don't expect you to give us
the preference unless it is to
your interest so to do.
Boggs&Buhl,
115,117.119.121
Federal Street, JJlegheny
ef
TZt?i
1890.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
DANZIGER'S
THE MONEY SAVING STORES
FOR THE PEOPLE.
--
r-lltLlfJIIIjlhY Ortyllili
-OT-
New Spring Cloaks,
Wraps, Jackets, Capes,
Silk Waists, Jerseys,
Children's Suits.
We are showing early
spring styles of these goods,
and are daily receiving addi
tions to our mammoth stock.
We have eclipsed all our pre
vious efforts for this spring.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
The balance of our winter
stock of Plush Garments,
Ladies' and Misses' Newmar
kets, Ladies' Jackets, etc., we
will sell at 50 per cent less
than any other house in the
city.
Ladies' Aprons.
Another lot of those grand
24c and 49c Aprons placed
on sale to-day.
Muslin Underwear.
Our Muslin Underwear de
partment now booming and
brimful of attractive bargains.
See the Corset Covers we
offer at 15c.
See the Chemises we offer
at 25c.
See the Night Gowns we
offer at 59c. -
See the Skirts -Hemstitched
ruffle) we offer at
99c-
DANZIGER'S
POPULAR STORES,
Sixth Street and Penn Ave.
fe7
To-Day, Friday, February 7,
WE SHALL OFFER
PRIDE OF THE WEST
MUSLIN
-AT-
10c a yard.
1
Usual price i2c. For one day
only.
FLEISHMAN & CO.,
PITTSBURG, PA.
Hail orders receive prompt attention.
ie7-D
THE NELLIE BLY
HAT.
The above cut represents our new
Hat named in honor of the Pitts
burg globe-trotter. Aside from its
name, it is one of the most sensi
ble, stylish and comfortable Hats
we have ever introduced. Can be
worn either for dress or traveling.
KNOX'S SPRING HATS
will be on sale v Saturday, February
8.
PAULSON BROS.
441 WOOD STREET.
ie5-jnvr.
STOEAGKE.
PENNSYLVANIA STORAGE CO,
3), 40 and 11 Water n., cor. Wesr.
Facilities for storing all kinds of merchandise
in large or email quantities.
Separate and crlTate apartments for house
bold goods.
XelepaonoMM, ftMMnnr
S'Sfi' V9f7SOFSi Jf JILTS'
Wf
V
NEW ADTERTISEMENTS.
SPECIAL SPECIAL.
A PLAIN STATEMENT.
Our stock of OVERCOATS is
still too large and in preference to
carrying them until next season we
will make this extraordinary offer:
UNTIL FEBRUARY 15 YOU
MAY TAKE YOUR CHOICE OF
mmcuis
-AT-
30 PER CENT OFF
The regular marked price this is a
money-losing venture to us, but we
are determined to convert all sur
plus stock.
Until February 15 only Overcoat
prices will be as follows:
$ s Overcoats for $ 3 50.
$10 Overcoats for $ 7 00.
$15 Overcoats for gio 50.
20 Overcoats for $14 00.
And other prices at the same rate.
Some memorable bargains also in
Men's, Boys' and Children's
SUITS, PANTS,
HATS, CAPS
AND
UNDERWEAR.
Strassburger & Joseph
Tailors, ClotMers ana Hatters,
161, 163 Federal St., Allegheny.
feZ-wrstJ
BUILDING TO LET.
FIXTURES FOR SALE.
WONDERFUL BARGAINS
-nr-Onyx
Top Tables, Rich Out Glass,
Brio-a-Brao, Table Lamps, Floor
Extension Lamps, Hanging Lamps
and Hall Lights, Dinner, Tea and
Chamber Sets, Gas Fixtures,
Bronzes and Clocks, China, Glass
and Queensware, Sconces, Easels,
Flacques and Pedestals at prices
that must olose them oat quickly.
THE J. P. SMITH
Lamp, Glass & China Coi,
935 Penn Avenue.
Bet. Ninth and Tenth Streets.
fe2-WF
THE MERCANTILE AGENCY
R. e. Dun & Co.,
Germania Bank Bulldinfr. 423 Wood street, cor
ner of Diamond, Pittsburg. Pa.
This establishment supplies all necessary
information as to the standing; responsibility,
etc., of business men throughout North Amer
ica. It is the oldest and by far the most com
plete and extensive system ever organized for
the accommodation of Banking and Mercantile
interests and the General Promotion and Pro
tection of Trade.
Debts Collected and Legal Bosiness Attended
to throughout the North American Continent.
PHOTOGRAPHER, 16 SIXTH STREET.
A fine, large crayon portrait S3 EO; see them
before ordering elsewhere. Cabinets, fl and
XI H) per dozen. PROMPT DELIVERS.
oclb-85-MWJ'3n
, "4T f ;,5f
RELIABLE CATERERS .
GOODS Our full quota TO THE
AT of spring goods "WANTS
HONEST are now open for OF THE
PRICES. . Inspection. PUBLIC.
Specialties in
, Parlor and Bed-
room Furniture a
feature.
We" are still making
a heavy drive in our
Anyaeleotionsmade rnr ni n OTA Mil $1 50 and 83 SOBlan
now will be oheerfully IHL ULU olMNU kets; a good'eal of
held for future deliv- wool for very little
ery. Some speoial fea- 307 WOOD ST., money. Our Turco
tures in Carpets can man Portieres and
he seen at our ware- Unnnflr flrno S, Pfl &e J313
rooms, particularly in nODDuL DlUSlCx tOl have be,en reduced In
Moquettea uujjjjuiuiuui. WUi prioo to lesg than one
Some very nice Caal, Credit h!f; m 1" ?"
goods for the money. a8n- Cre(Ut left. Great bargains
they. You should not
miss them.
Odd Dressers,
Beds,Washstand3
Chairs and Rook-
era. Odd pieces '
of Parlor Suits, .
odd Laoe Our-
PIONEERS tains. Window FAMOUS
OF Shades and odd FOR
LOW m things generally, FAIR
PRICES at odd prloes. DEALING.
F V?
HEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
YOU CAN'T
be a shrewd and economical
purchaser, if you buy any
thing in the line of
FURNITURE,
CARPETS,
CURTAINS,
HOUSE FURNISHING
GOODS,
CLOAKS, or CLOTHING,
before having learned the
goods and prices to be found
KEECH'S
Largest, Most Popular and Reliable
CASH and CREDIT HOUSE
IN THE STATE.
923 and 925 Fenn avenue,
Near Nihth Btmzx.
Open Saturdays till 10 v. til.
JaS-srwr
FINE GOODS
AT PBICE8 THAT WILL PLEASE YOTJ.
BEAUTIFUL PIANO LAMPS.
The Handsomest
CHAMBER SETS
in the city.
CHINA, DMNER
-Asm-
TEA SETS
at prices that will Indues you to buy at
once. "We inyite all to visit onr Sales
rooms, 211 WOOD STREET,
Opposite St Charles, and
102 and 104 THIRD AVE,
and see onr Stock.
laS-TTTSa
STEAMERS AND EXCURSIONS.
ORDUEUTSCHER LLOYD & 8. CU.
Established 1857. Fast Line of Express
Steamers from NEW YORK for80TJTHAMP
TON, LONDON and BREMEN. The fine
steamers SAALE. TRAVE. ALLER. EIDER.
EMS. FULDA, WERRA. ELBE and LAHN of
5,500 tons and 6,000 to 8,600 horsepower, leaves
NEW YORK on WEDNESDAYS and SAT
URDAYS for SOUTHAMPTON and Bremen.
TIME
From NEW YORK to SOUTHAMP
TON, Tie days. From SOUTHAMPTON to
BREMEN, 2iorS0 hours. From SOUTHAMP
TON to LONDON, by Southwestern Railway
Co., 2 boars. Trains every hour of the sum
mer season. Railway carriages for London
await passengers Southampton Docks on arri
val Express steamers .from New Yorkv These
steamers are well-known for their speed, com
fort, and excellent cuisine.
OELRICHS tc CO., 2 Bowline Green. New
York. MAX SCHAMBERQ fc CO.,
527 Smitbfield street,
al8-72-D Agents for Pittsburgh
ANCHOR LINE.
United Stales Msil Steamers.
Sail eyerr SATURDAY from
NEW YORK TO GLASGOW.
Catling at MOVILLE, (Londonderry.)
Cabin passage to Glasgow, Liverpool or London
derry, ftf and S3S. Round trio, fX and flOO.
Second-class. S30. Steerage, 9.
MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE.
Best route to Algiers and coast ol Morocco,
NEW YORK TO GIBRALTAR AND NAPLES
H. S. BOLIVIA, BATUBDATf, KBBHUAKY St.
Cabin passage. fSO to S10O.
Drafts on Great Britain. Ireland or Italy,
and letters of credit at foTorobln rates.
Apply to HENIJKBSON BROTHERS, M. Y or
J. ,OfcCOKMlCK.639snd 401 Smith Held it. ;A.U.
SCORER A SUM, 413 Smlthfield St., Wtuburg; W.
HEiLfLE; Jr., 1SJ i'ederal St.. Allegheny.
OC22-1TWT
-m-HITfi STAB Ll &-
TOE QOEENSTOWN AND LIVERPOOL.
Boyal aid United States Mall Steamers.
GermanlcFeb.n.lIam, "Celtic, Men. , 9:90am
Britannic, Feb. 19. Sam Britannic, Mcb.ia.3pm
'Adriatic, Feb. is, 11:30am Germanic, Mcb. 2S, 10 am
Teutonic. Mch. 5. 3 p m iTentonlc, Apl. 2, t p m
From White Star doer, footer West Tenth it.
Second cabin on these steamers. Saloon rates,
tsoandnpward. Second cabin. $35 and upward,
according to steamer and location or oertn. Ex
cursion tickets on fsYormble terms. Steerage. Ku.
White star drafts payable on demsnd in all tbe
principal banks throughout Great Britain. Ap
ply to JOHN J. MCCOKM1CK, 639 and 401 Smltb
neld St.. Pittsburg, or J. BKUCS UMAX. Gen
eral Agent, 41 Broadway. Mew York. ja22-D
STATE LINE
To Glasgow, Belfast, Dublin
and Liverpool.
FROM NEW YORK EVERY THURSDAX
Cabin passage S35 to SSO. according to locatlom
ot stateroom. Excursion S65 to J90.
Steerage to and from Europe at Lowest Bates.
State of California1 building.
AUslU. BALDWIN x CO., ueneral Agents,
M Broadway, 24ewYorc
J. J. McCORMICK. Agent
639 and 401 Smithfiold St. Plttsbarg, Pa.
OCS4-D
ftT-irm
B. P. WALLACE k CO.

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