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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, April 12, 1890, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1890-04-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE GAMBLERS KICK.
Eepresentatives of the Brokers Fight
the Bntterworth Bill.
FINANCIAL TBODBLE PREDICTED
If the Operations in Futures Are Stopped
by Congress.
TH2 SEME AKD THE WOELFS PAIE
"Washis CTOlf, April 11. An interesting
hearing was held to-day by the House Com
mittee on Agriculture on Mr. Butterworth's
bill to prevent dealings in options and
futures. There were present delegations
from the Hew York Produce and Cotton
Exchanges, the Chicago Board of Trade,
ana the New Orleans Cotton Exchange, all
ol them to protest against the passage of
the bill, which has already been recom
mended by the committee.
Murray Kelson, one of the Commissioners
of Cook county, 111., was the first speaker
representing the Chicago Board of Trade.
Mr. Kelson said that the Chicago Board of
Trade, and all exchanges in the country,
were in sympathy with the objects of the
bill as expressed in the first section to
abolish trading in privileges ("puts and
calls") and bucket shop dealings. But to
enforce the provisions against trades made
for future delivery of the goods would be to
force out of business small dealers and con
centrate the trade in the hands of large cap
italists who could afford and were able to
purchase crops and hold them for a rise.
A DISASTER PREDICTED.
These small dealers act largely as agents
for the farmer and buyer both. To stop
sales for future delivery, Mr. Nelson said,
would be to interrupt and disarrange the
entire financial system of the country. The
bankers of the country move its crops and
depend upon the transactions of small deal
ers in country towns for the basis of their
transactions. He proceeded to explain in
detail the operation by which the grain
reached the market from the producer, in
which operation the farmer, the local agent,
the broker in the money center and the
banker were all enraged.
Mr. Kelson repeated that the result of the
bill would be to crush out the small dealers
and place the farmer at the mercy of the
large capitalist, who can buy cash grain;
but they will buy at such a price that they
can hold it until Gabriel blows his horn
without sustaining loss. In answer to a
question by Mr. Allen, of Michigan, Mr.
Kelson said that local banks could not sup
ply and cculd not get sufficient money to
move the croDS of the country, nor conld
the local dealer or agent. It must be sup
plied from the money centers.
A. rEETINEKT QUESTION.
Eeferring to the taxing section, Mr.Kel
son asked why, if the committee believed
the business to be honest, a license was re
quired? Certainly not for the revenue to
be derived. If the business is to be made a
penal offense, why not say so in the first in
btance, and declare it unlawful iu so many
words?
George C. Martin, of the New York Prod
uce Exchange, spoke against the bill. He
Eaid that the farmer never before received
to great per cent of the value of his crops as
now. Twenty years ago the cost of trans
porting a bushel of wheat from Chicago to
'New York by lake and canal was lSi
cents; now the rate is 5 9-10 cents. It may
be asked, continued Mr. Martin, why are
prices now so low, why commissions so re
duced, freights reduced, and the export
trade the largest ever known?
CEOPS TOO LARGE.
In his opinion it was because of the recent
" series of large crops from which had been
accumulated in store 200,000,000 bushels of
corn more than ever before in the history of
the country. The merchant bat suffered
losses along with thefarmer. In 1875 the
commissions on a bushel of corn amounted
to - cents; now the entire crop of the
country was marketed on a commission of
H cent If the bill passes Mr. Martin said
that three-quarters of the export trade of the
country would be proscribed.
J. O. Bloss, of the New York Cotton Ex
change, read an argument against the pass
age of the bill prepared by a committee of
that exchange, prefacing it with a protest
against the bill signed bj the leading bank
ers of New York, in which they state that
the passage of the bill would work great
damage to legitimate trade, and that the
banks find their risks of advance under the
present system of business less than under
the old. From the argument of the com
mittee the following extract is made:
NOT SO VIOLENT.
The effect ol toe trading for future delivery
has been to give the markets of the world a
less violent character: haTe reduced the risks
of merchants and Dankers, and at the same
time have secured to the planters of cotton a
higher ranee of values than was the case be
Jore the existence of the method of trading for
future delivery. No legislation has yet been
able to reculate values of anything, aod as a
striking illustration of this fact may be cited
the law which Tia passed by Congress to pro
hibit public trading in cold. The effect of that
legislation bad for the purpose of reducing
the premium on gold, was to advance the price
from 2 20 to J2 8a. The repeal of the law re
sulted in the immediate decline of the price to
that from which it started.
Mr. Bloss was followed by J. W.
Labouisse. who with General J. "J. Hazard,
of Bhode Island, and Ii. F. Berje reore
sented the New Orleans Cotton Exchange.
He stated that he fully indorsed Mr. Bloss'
statements, and continned the argument that
the system of contracts for futnre delivery
had greatly reduced the fluctuations in the
price of cotton. In proof of this he referred
to the conditions surrounding the cotton
crop of 1889. That was the largest one ever
raised in the United States 7,600,000 bales.
Yet the fluctuation iu prices amounted to
only 1J cents a pound, and '95 per cent of
the ciop has been already moved.
MONET FOE THE PLANTERS.
The lowest price touched 9J cents was
in ucioDer, ana jsir. JLabouisse expressed
the opinion that had it not been tor the
system of contracts for future delivery, the
planter would have been compelled to take
a cent less at that time. Upon the question
of speculation Mr. Labouisse said that it
the future contract system was wiped out
the exchanges of New York and New Or
leans would cease to exist. There are but
five exchanges in the world where cotton
"futures" are dealt in Liverpool, New
York, New Orleans, Bremen and Havre.
To close out New York and New Orleans
would be to transfer the business to Europe
and build up the exchange there. The
business will go, he said, cotton will be
raised and sold, and if our merchants and
dealers are not allowed to buy and sell the
dealers in Europe will do so.
In the course of his remarks, Mr.
Labouisse asserted that, owing to the peculiar
conditions and necessities of the cotton
trade, the producer could not sell directly
to the consumer, even if he wanted to, be
cause he cannot tell what grade his cotton
will be when gathered. He was illustrating
the modus operandi ot trading by a case in
his own experience, where he had sold to
the agent ot n Havre broker for a French
cotton mill, a large cumber of bales of
cotton.
JUST THAT KIND.
"'"Was the cotton in existence at the time
the trade was made?" asked Chairman
Funston.
"It was not."
"That is exactly the kind of transaction
we are reaching after," responded the Chair
man. The proceedings of the committee were in
terrupted by a yea and nay vote in the
House. As the members left the room they
were engaged in an animated discussion
with the visiting delegations upon the
merits of the lecent failure of Moses Fraley,
the St. Louis broker, who went down under
a' too heavy load of wheat. The committee
men were arguing that that failure was a
justification of the bill, and the visitors en-
ucavurcu m enow inat it was a mere mci-1
5iM feCtfae trade; aad.wat.notitn illattra-'
tion of the general methods or experience of
dealers.
Chairman Funston says that no more
hearings will be had.
PLANS FOETHE FAIR.
The Senate Propose! to HnTe Any Number
of Celebrations The Chicago BUI
as Amended In the
Committee.
Washington, April 11. Just before
the Senate adjourned this afternoon Senator
Hawley reported the World's Fair bill,
with amendments agreed upon by the com
mittee. The first one was to section 5, relat
ing to the acceptance of the site by the
National Commission, with the provision
that the site and buildings shall be deemed
adequate to the purposes of the exposition
and the further proviso, "That said com
mission shall be satisfied that the said cor
poration has an actual bona fide and valid
subscription to its capital stock of at least
55,000,000."
The amendment inserts after the word
"stock," the words "which shall secure the
payment." The following was proposed as
a new section:
Section 8 The President is hereby cm
powered and directed to hold a naval review
in New York harbor in April. 1893, and to ex
tend to foreign nations an invitation to send
ships of war to join the United States navy in
the rendezvous at Hampton Roads, and pro
ceed thence to said review. The President is
further empowered and directed to make Ar
rangements for the unveiling of a statue of
Christopher Columbus at Washington with ap
propriate ceremonies and civic and military
parade, under bis general direction, after said
naval review, and not less than five days be
fore the opening of said Exposition, and to in
vite the attendance thereat ot foreign repre
sentatives. THE DEFEXDAKT WAS DROWSED.
Ills Forfeited Bail Will Now be Relumed to
His Bondsmen.
New York, April 1L Olif Fearing,
master of a steam vessel plying between
Kew York and San Domingo, was arrested
in August, 1883, for smuggling cigars. He
was brought before the United States Com
missioner of the district, and after an ex
amination was released on 2,000 bail with
the understanding that, after a trip to San
Domingo, he was to come back and stand
trial on the charge. Months passed and
Fearing did not appear. It was supposed
that he had ran away from his troubles, and
the Commissioner forfeited the bail.
Yesterday a lawyer appeared in the
United States Circuit Court, where Judge
Benedict was sitting, and asked that the
forfeiture of the bond be repealed, as it had
been discovered that the vessel containing
Fearing had never reached San Domingo,
and that the crew had never afterward been
heard of. Seven years had elapsed, and the
District Attorney said that he has no doubt
that the vessel and her crew were lost at
sea. Judge Benedict thought the request a
proper one, and granted the order asked.
ESC0DEAGIKG COHUEECB.
Philadelphia!)! Ask Congress to Grant Sub
sidies lo American Merchant Vessels.
Philadelphia, April 11. A rather
slimly attended meeting was held to-day in
the Board of Trade rooms in response to a
call requesting the attendance of business
men at a meeting in the interest of the
passaco of the bill now before Congress to
encourage American commerce by giving a
subsidy of 30 cents per ton for every thou
sand miles of travel by American vessels,
sail or steam, between American and for
eign ports.
Resolutions were adopted urging the
adoption of the subsidy bill, and providing
for the appointment of a committee of busi
ness men of Philadelphia to present the res
olutions, and "a memorial for a line of
steamers from this port to the west coast of
Africa, to both houses of Congress for their
action during the present session, and to
urge the passage of the bill referred to with
such proper restrictions as will secure the
advantages of the same to our commercial
centers and the country at large."
BRINGING EAILR0ADS TO TIME.
Iowa Legislature Passes a Number of Terr
Important Bills.
Des Moines, April 11. In the House
this morning bills were passed as follows:
To compel railroad companies to change the
names of stations to conform with the names
of incorporated towns or villages at the re
quest of the Railroad Commissioners, and
to connect crossing lines at stations by
means of switches and "Y's;" to authorize
the Commissioners to prescribe the form of
annual reports of railroads; to compel rail
roads to place crossings where highways are
located, and to put in private crossings.
The resolution was adopted providing for
the appointment of a ''Sifting" Committee.
Bills for redistricting the State came up
as a special order. Two were presented,
both calling for 100 lepresentatives and 91
districts, on a basis of 18,500 population.
The Senate this morning adopted the Sift
ing Committee resolution.
IS REUEllBKA.VCE OF LIXC0LX.
Celebrating tbe Twenty-Fifth Anniversary
of the Martyred President's Death.
Springfield, III., April 11. Great
preparations are being made here for an ap
propriate commemoration of the twenty-fifth
anniversary of the death of Abraham Lin
coln on Tuesday next, April 15. It will be
under the auspices of the Grand Army and
Sons of Veterans Posts and the Turners'
Society.
Grand Army men and members of the
North American Turnbund from various
points of the country will be present.
Treasurer Jameson Acquitted.
Cincinnati, April 1L Ex-Treasurer
Martin A. Jameson, of Warren county, O.,
who has been on trial at Lebanon 'for sev
eral days for an indictment which charged
him with embezzling a large amount of the
county funds, was to-day acquitted.
Indigestion
IS not only a distressing complaint, of
itself, but, by causing the blood to
become depraved and the system en
feebled, is the parent of innumerable
maladies. That Ayer's Sarsaparilla
is the best cure for Indigestion, even
when complicated with Liver Complaint,
is proved by the following testimony
from Mrs. Joseph Lake, of Brockwa
Centre, Mich.:
"Liver complaint and indigestion
made my life a burden and came near
ending my existence. For more than
four years I suffered untold agony, was
reduced almost to a skeleton, and hardly
bad strength to drag myself about All
kinds of food distressed me, and only
the most delicate could be digested at
aii. "Within the time mentioned several
physicians treated me without giving re
lief. Nothing that I took seemed to do
any permanent good until I commenced
the use of Ayer's Sarsaparilla, which
has produced wonderful results. Soon
after commencing to take the Sarsapa
rilla I could see an improvement in my
condition. My appetite began to return
and with it came the ability to digest
all the food taken, my strength im
proved each day, and after a few
months of faithful attention to your
directions, I found myself a well
' woman, able to attend to all household
dnties. The medicine has given me a
new lease of life."
Ayer's Sarsaparilla,
PKEPAEED ST
Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mas;
Woe$l;ixbottIei,$5 Worth $5 a bottle.
Neetous debility, poor memory, diffi
dence, local weakness, cured by Dr. Miles
Nervine. Samples free at Jos. Fleming &
Son's, Market st.
Marriage IJcenses Granted Yesterday.
Jftme. Bejtdenea.
John Beck. E!H5SJ5
Johanna. Hnlllnr. 1'lttsburK
James F. Kyan KUJS2J?
Ellen Bennett Pittsburg
Samuel F. White Sc0"la,
Annie L.. Potts Mifflin township
Frank Easier. Millvale borough
Mary Loper pittsuurg
John Uelidorr. Ei"!S"S
Hrtdcet A. Curran Pittsburg
August K. Schwelgert Keserve townsnlD
W?y Warner...... AlleKheny
August Browu K!BSUIS
ltosina balier. 1'lttsbure
MARKIED.
LONU-BOTHWELL At the residence ot
Rev. Nevin Woodskle, on Wednesday evening.
Aprils, 1S90. J. L. LONG, of Allegheny,
Lottie E. Bothwkll, of Laurel.
and
DIED.
ADAMS-On Thursday, April 10. 1S90, at 3
P.M., Joseph ADAMS, a member of Cbartiers
Lodge, No. 195 A. O. U. Wn in his 47th jear.
Funeral from his late residence, at the Mans
field Hotel, at Mansfield, Pa., on Sunday.
April 13, at 2 P.M. Friends of the family are
respectfully invited to attend.
St Paul (Minn.) papers please copy.l 2
BROWN On Friday, April 1L 1S90, at 6:30 A.
M., Mart, wife of WiliiamBrown (nee Fickly J,
aged SS years, 11 months and 27 days.
Funeral from her late residence, 2115 Whar
ton street, Soutlnlde, on Sunday at 2 P. M.
Friends ot the family are respectfully invited
to attend. 2
BARGESSER-AtGreentree borough, Wash
ington pike, on Friday. April 11. 1890. at 2:00 A.
M.. Hannah Bakqesseb, aged 71 years.
Funeral from the residence on SUNDAY, at 2
P. M. Friends of the family are respectfully
invited to attend.
BULGER On Friday, April U, 1890, at 4:45
p. m James Bulges, aged SS years.
Funeral from his late residence, corner
Twenty-eighth and Smallman streets, on Mon
day at 8 A. M., to proceed to St. Patrick's
Church, where mass will bo celebrated at 9 A.
M. Friends of the family are respectfully in
vited to attend. 2
BELTZHOOVER On Thursday evening,
April 10, 1S90, at 7 o'clock. Dr. Samuel Beltz
nooVER, in the C9th ear of his age, at the
residence of his niece, Mrs. John J. Brisbin,
corner of Bigham and Sycamore streets, Mt.
Washington.
Funeral 1 o'clock, SUNDAY, April 14.
FRAZIER At the residence of her brother-in-law,
Charles Frazier, Clifton street. P.. F.
W. & C. R. R., Lema, wife of Herman Frazier.
Funeral Sunday, April IS. from Emsworth
station,?., F. W. 4C. R. R., leaving on 1
o'clock p. M. train. Services at Third TJ. P.
Church, Ridge avenue, Allegheny, on SUNDAY
afternoon at 3:15 o'clock. Friends of the
family are respectfully invited to attend.
HARVEY On Thursday. April 10, at 6
o'clock p. m., James Ralph, only child of
"William N. and Mary A, Harvey, aged 3 years
9 months and 4 days.
Funeral from residence, 2722 Quincy street,
Twenty-seventh ward, Southside, Saturday,
at 2 p. m.
HEIDEGER On Wednesday, April 9, 1890.
at 3:30 p. m., William F. Heideqek, aged 23
years.
Funeral willtakeplace fromLowrie's Chapel,
19S Beaver avenue, Allegheny, SUNDAY, at 2-20
p. M. Friends of the family are respectfully
invited to attend.
HUGHES On Friday, April H, at 12S0 P.
m., George H. Hughes, in the 59th year of
his age.
Funeral from his late residence. 63 Twenty
fifth street, S. S., on SUNDAY. April 13. at 2
p. M. Friends of the family are respectfully
invited to attend. Members of Zeno Lodge, L
O. O. F., and sister lodges are requested to at
tend. 2
KIRSCHNER On April 10. at 9.30 A. M.,
AUGUST H. KIRSCHNER, in his 32d year.
Funeral from the residence of his parents,
William and Johanna Kirschner, No. 16 Lowrie
street, Allegheny, on SUNDAY, April 13. at 2 P.
M. Carriages will leave Herman & Ebbert's
ofiice. No. 213 Ohio street, Allegheny, at 1-20.
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend. Z
MORRO W On Thursday, April 10, 1890, at 5
p. M., Robert Morrow, aced 43 years.
Funeral from his late residence, Ho. 105
Webster avenue.on SUNDAY.at 2 P. M. Friends
of the family are respectfully invited to attend.
3
McNEILLY Friday. April 1L 1E90, at 250,
Marie McNeilly, wife of Moses ilc
Neilly. in her 77th year.
Funeral services from her late residence, 2119
Penn avenue, on Monday afternoon at
2:30. Friends of the family are respectfully
Invited to attend. 2
PASSAVANT In Philadelphia, Pa., on
Thursday, April IP, 1890, Barclay, son of
Walter and Aiattie B. Passavant, of mem
braneous cronp, aged 2 years 1 month and 7
eta vs.
Interment private at Pittsburg, Sunday.
PAGE On Fridav, April 11, 1890, at 11:45
o'clock, Emma Mildred, only child of Fred
erick and Maggie Pago, aged 1 year S months
and 7 days.
Death has claimed our little darling,
Cast his seal upon her brow;
And those eyes that shone so brightly.
Shine in heaven with Jesus now.
Funeral from parents' residence. 2512 Larkins
alley, Southside, on Sunday at 3 p. St.
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend.
SAULT On Thursday, April 10, 1890, at 1
o'clock F. M., Frdderick, son of Sarah and
the late William Sault, aged 22 years.
Funeral services at the late residence, Forbes
street, near Craft avenne, on Sunday next,
tbe 13th inat., at 2 o'clock P. M. Friends of the
family are respectfully invited to attend. 8
S1NNOTT At her late residence. No. 112
Sandusky street, Allegheny, on Friday
morning, at 5:30 o'clock, Elizabeth Sin
Nott, in her 70th year.
Funeral services at St. Peter's Cathedral,
Sherman avenue and Ohio street, Allegheny,
on Monday morning, at 8 o'clock. Inter
ment private. 2
TEETER On Thursday. April 10. 1SD0. at
6:45 P.M., at the residence of his sister. Aire. 1.
N. Richard, No. 1105 Conrad street. East End,
Capt. H. C. Teeter, in the 46th year of his age.
Funeral on Saturday. April 12, at 2 o'clock
p. M., from East Liberty Presbyterian Church,
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend.
Washington, D. C.'papers please copy.
VANCE Thursday, April 10, 1890, at 3 P. ST.,
Augustine Vance, at his residence, Edmund
street, Sixteenth ward, in his 74th year.
Funeral SUNDAY, April 13. Services at St.
Joseph's Church, Pearl street and Liberty
avenue, at 1-20 P. M. Interment private at a
late hour. 2
WELSH On Thursday, April 10, 1890, at 8:45
o'clock p. Jr.. at the residence of her parents.
No. 247 Center avenue, Pittsburg, Annie
Lobetta, daughter of Ann and Michael
Welsh, aged 21 years, 1 month and 13 days.
Funeral from parents' residence, SUNDAY
afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends of the
family are respectfully invited to attend. 2
GEO. A. SMITH,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR,
Cor. Grant and Webster Are.
Allegheny Office, 232 Beaver Avenue.
fe!S5-TTS
JAMES ARCHIBALD & BKO.,
LIVERY AND SALE STABLES,
117, 119 and 136 Third avenue, two doors below
Smithneld st, next door to Central Hotel.
Carnages for funerals,?! Carriages for operas,
parties, ic, at the lowest rates. All new car
nages. Telephone communication. myl-11-TTS
-pEPRESENTEU IN PITTSBURG IN liU
ASSET . E)J071,69633.
Insurance Co. of North America.
Losses adjusted and paid by WILLIAM L
JONES. 84 Fourth avenue. ia20e2-D
WESTERN INSURANCE CO.
OF FiriSBURG.
Assets J418.501S7
NO. 411 WOOD STREET.
ALEXANDER NIM1CK, President.
JOHN B. JACKSON. Vice President.
fe22-2G-TTS WM. P. HERBERT. Secretary.
TEETH.
H p AND I1C. FULL
gum. Elegant sets. Fine
nllings a specialty. Vitalized
air Sue. UK. PHILt.lfs. Km
Penn aye., nukes or repairs sets while you
watt.
Open SundaTS. mh3-143
THE AMERICAN FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY,
, Philadelphia.
Total Assets, January L 1S87. . 52,301,858 66
jjj na.xiua dsjjjsjjnx, Jig'ts.
QO FOURTH AVE., Pittsburg, Pa. , -
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. AUfiK.iisisjl.r.'l-3. new AurtitTISEMESra.
LEADS MILL nANZIGER remember!- 1
-bhh USSSLa R o R t0.)ay CLOSES THE WEEK 1
--ja--- 1 Ifas'V jB
$20,00,
We sold several hundred of
our last season's $20 Chamber
Suite, which was then con
ceded to be the best for the
money ever sold m Pittsburg.
This engraving ' is a fac
simile of our new $20 Cham
ber Suite, in antique oak fin
ish, which we now introduce to
surpass the other in value.
ITS STRONG POINTS.
We have made the toilet
larger and heavier every way
(jj inches high by 42 wide);
made the washstand larger
and added to it a splasher
back; made the bedstead (54
inches wide) more massive
throughout, and the foot
board with a heavier cap and
posts. Note the large beveled
mirror in landscape shape
the hand-rubbed and polished
finish the generous size and
weight of all the pieces, and
their handsome proportions.
Neither the maker nor our
selves can make much out of
it. But then it is one of the
triumphs of successful trade.
We distribute a large quantity
of goods at the closest possi
ble margin of profit We buy
the. largest possible value in a
big deal for cash, and then
turn it over quickly to our
customers, bringing the maker
and consumer closer together.
Low prices, elega?it designs
and reliable workmanship
characterize our large and
ge?ieral assortment of furni
ture for
Parlor, Library, Hall,
CHAMBER, DINNG ROOM,
Office, Etc.
0. McCLINTOCK
& CO.,
Furniture, Carpets, Curtains,
Beddinp,
33 FIFTH AVE.
ap!2-TTS
MM NETS.
We have in stock the largest and choicest
assortment of Black Drapery Nets ever shown
in this city, ranging from $1 to So 50 per ard.
Every ono who looks at them is delighted with
tue selection 01 patterns tu.it wo have to show.
FLOUNCINQa
Also Black Chantilly, Hand-rnn and Mar
quise Flouncines, new and beautiful patterns.
Rich and elegant novelties in Paris Colored
Embroidered and Applique Trimmings in com
binations and effects to trim all the new shades
of dress goods.
NEAT NARROW EDGINGS,
in Silk and Tinsel, for finishing.
Gold and Black Passementeries, latest nov
elties. SILK FRINGES.
Black and colored silk fringes in all widths, in
great variety of styles.
All our Trimmings are shown by samples,
and when you select what you want, the piece
that you buy will be as perfect and fresh as
the day it was made. This is very much better
than where the pieces of trimmine are shown
and handled, thus rendering them soiled, and
half their beauty gone beforeyou gettne goods.
WHAT YOU BUY FROM US IS PERFECT.
Be sure and visit our Trimming Department.
All kinds of Linings and Dressmakers' find
ings, every article requisite for trimming and
finishing a dress.
HORNE & WARD,
41 FIFTH A VENUE.
apll-t
The Dispatch Business Office
HAS BEEN REMOVED
To corner Smithfield and Diamond
streets.
mb.9-117
MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANT8
INS. CO., 417 Wood st, Pittsburg, Pa.
Capital. $250,000 00
Asset?, January 1, 1890. 370.2U 70
Directors Charles W. Batchelor, President;
John W. Cnaifant. Vice President: A E. W.
Painter. Robert Lea, 51. W. Watson, John Wil
son, Joseph Wajton, Wm. G. Park, A M. By
ers, James J. Donnel, George E. Fainter, John
Thompson. Wm. T. Adair, Secretary; James
Little, Assistant Secretary; August Ammoa.
ALWAYS THE CHEAPEST.
Placed on Sale To-day and
Until All Are Sold,
THOUSAND
Misses' and Children's
Gauze Vests
At the following startling
LOW PRICES:
Size No, 1 6 at 7c each.
Size No. 18 at gc each,'
Size No. 20 at 10c each.
Size No. 22 at itc each.
Size No. 24 at 14c each.
Size No. 26 at 18c each.
Size No. 28 at 23c each.
Size No. 30 at 24c each.
Size No. 32 at 24c each.
Size No. 34 at 29c each.
In addition to the above great
bargains, you'll find in our Ladies'
Knit Underwear Department 89
dozen Ladies' Fast Black Swiss
Ribbed Vests, usually sold at other
houses at 50c,
OUR PRICE
19c EACH
DANZIGEE'S,
Sixth St. and Penn Ave,,
Pittsburg, Pa.
SPRING TRADE.
1890.
LADI6'
fm SH0&
In Ladies' fine Shoes for spring
trade we have just received new
lines of "Grisan" French Kid,
Lille Kid and Curacoa Kid
Button Shoes, hand sewed, hand
turned and machine sewed,
flexible soles; made either on
the New York, Common Sense
or Opera last All widths from
AAA to E always in stock; per
fect fit assured. Our line of
Ladies' Lille Kid hand turned
Button Shoes at $4 and $$ are
extra value for the price.
Misses' and Children's Shoes in
all styles and grades, Patent
Leather tipped or plain toe.
WAGNER'S,
401 WOOD STREET,
Cor. Fourth Avenue Pittsburg, Pa.
aplWB-TT3
' THE FAMOUS
I. C. CORSETS
To be closed ont at the following
- REDUCED PRICES:
Tbe 51 75 Quality at II 00.
The S2 25 Quality at $1 50.
The S2 50 Qualitv at $1 75.
The $3 00 Quality at $2 25.
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY.
Fleishman &Co.
PITTSBURG, PA. '
.,Hotel and RestaurantjSupplies.
B.&B.
TO-DAY
$12 50
PARIS
ROBES
at
7 50.
These are choice goods we
just bought at a great loss to
the importer.
Paris Robes, new and ele
gant, opened to-day, at $18,
I20; 30 and 40, exclusive
styles.
40-inch Silk Warp Cashmeres,
good colors, 75c; the greatest
bargain of the year; were manu
factured to retail at $1 25.
New Dress Goods and Suit
ings, Silks and Novelties; large
and choice collections at prices
that make new friends and cus
tomers everyday; choice goods
and at prices that save you
money are good reasons for
this large and growing business.
100 pieces new and elegant
Unshrinkable Flannels at 35c;
new colors, new styles and
qualities that usually retail at
40c and 50c 35c here is the
price. Such beautiful Flannels
for Ladies', Misses' and Chil
dren's Dresses in such color
combinations are not found in
every flannel department.
Boggs&Buhl,
Allegheny.
aplO-80
The Notch
We Touch.
We are selling the choicest
Spring Suits to-day that we
ever manufactured. They are
not only well-made. The de
signs are far above the or
dinary for looks. The adver
tisements may direct you to
our store, but it'll be the
beauty of the Suits, as well as
the prices, that'll draw your
money.
Luxury or just comfort and
good style. These are the
items to settle about your
Spring Oversack. You'll find
the right price among ours.
Make sure of getting one that
fits as if it was tailor-made.
You'll get it without much
hunting.
You're going about with
open eyes for Spring Clothing.
That's the secret of our in
creasing trade.
Wanamaker
& ROWN
Sixth street and Penn avenue.
Do you prefer tailoring-to-order?
Nearly 1,000 styles
of goods.
apll-D
THE
- DISPATCH
BUSINESS OFFICE
Has been removed to corner Smith-
field and Diamond sts.
mh9-117
GRATEFUL. COMFORTING.
EPPS'S OOCOA.
BREAKFAST.
"By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws
which govern the operations ot digestion and
nutrition, and by a careful application of the
tine properties of well-selected Cocoa, Mr. Epps
baa provided our breakfast tables with a deli
cately flavored beverage which may save us
many heavy doctors' bills. It is by the judicious
nse of such articles or diet that a constitution
may be gradually built up until strong enough
to resist every tendencv to disease. Hundreds
of subtle maladies are floating around us ready
to attack wherever there Is a weak point. We
may escape many a fatal shaft by keeping our.
selves well fortified with pnre blood and a prop
erly nourished frame." Civil Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk. Sold
only in half-pound tins, by Grocers, labeled
thmr tamer eppr l-.n nnmoHumthifl
i ?r.r't --z t zr . . --'i-x-xj r-
GUSKTS
Cnt : Sirii : m
AN ABSOLUTE
Bargain Picnic for Stylish Dressers.
We are now in the midst of the Greatest, Grandest ,
and most Interesting
BAJRGhAIN SALE
SPRINGS SUITS
That Ever Dawned in Oar City.
Suits for Men, Suits for Boys, Suits
for Children.
In Every Style,
ALL AT
Grasp the
Don't wait until the week has passed don't delay till your every
neighbor's comely appearance inspires your envy and regrets, but while
the opportunity invites you wisely seize upon the chance to save good
money while you can. We are this week showing
MEN'S ELEGANT SPRING DRESS SUITS,
In all the fashionable materials, cut in the most attractive styles, and
the trimmings, making and finish all as though just from the hands of
the most fashionable merchant tailors. Fine Dress Suits without a
compare in the city we are offering at 15, J5i8, 22, $25 and S30, such
as the modest Merchant Tailor would ask 25 to $50 for.
FOR THOSE OF HUMBLER MEANS
We are only asking $6, $8, 10 and S12 for the best made, most stylish
and serviceable suits that could be desired. Something that not only
looks well, but wears well, and proves amply worth every cent of the
price asked.
BUSINESS AND WORKINGMEN
Will find this week's sale a special money saving opportunity for secur
ing good, sound serviceable suits, and should not fail to bring round
their sons and secure equal advantages from fitting them out for tha
Spring in the most stylish manner.
Our Boys' and Children's Department
Is ABSOLUTELY OVERFLOWING with the nobbiest styles in juvenile
suits ever witnessed in society. Parents remember that as you buy so
you save, and that you are on the road to riches when you can get the
lowest prices on good, genuine and reliable goods.
We are showing by far
The Largest Stock of
In the City and among them
DEALERS CAN'T DUPLICATE.
In Boys' and Children's Spring
CAPTIVATING LINES IN THE
find our prices duplicated.
Our Furnishing Department,
Never was more attractive nev r so crowded with the latest novelties)
known to society whether it be
FINE SHIRTS, FASHIONABLE NECKWEAR.
LIGHTWEIGHT UNDERWEAR, GLOVES,
SELECTED HOSIERY, COLLARS AND CUFFS, OR
BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS IN KERCHIEFS,
We can fit you out to a King's taste, while
IN ELEGANT SPRING FOOTWEAR!
Both Ladies and Gentlemen will find in our immense stock a larger
choice, better fits and lower prices than submitted by any other store ia
the trade. Our Children's Department is specially replete and inviting
this' spring, and meeting with an enormous trade.
OOO0OOOO0
GTTSZKII?
The Merchants Who Suit All Classes,
300 to 400 MARKET ST.
SWe shall give away FREE to
day a very interesting Puzzle Uame
furnishes heaps of fun for the young
Storc open Saturday evening
OP 6 H
m
OFQ-
Make and Material.
I
Opportunity!
Spring Hats and Caps ,1
COUNTLESS STYLES OTHER
Headgear WE HAVE THE MOST
MARKET, and nowhere can you
every purchaser at our House to
called, "RUN-A-WA Y PIGS." It '
folk.
till xz o'clock.
s
m
". .
ueneroiA&enifvui a . , , ia-a2-:awa
.unemiw, riong.on.,n2iaao. , ttam-Ttua

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