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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, May 12, 1890, Image 5

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THE PITTSBUKG DISPATCH, MONDAY. MAT 12,
JSEo
'MID SYLVAN SCENES.
Summer Glories and Perennial
Beanies of Central Park Which
BRUSH OR PEN CAMOT PORTRAY.
Cozy Eetreats for Cooinr Lovers and Comj,
mons for Athletes.
THE GKEAT ANNUAL COACHING PARADE
rCOEr.ESPOXDEN'CK Or THE DISPATCH.
Jf kit Yokk, May 11. After all that has
been written and said about Central Park,
its summer glories and perennial beauty, its
natural attractions, its artificial adornments,
and of the great throng which daily line
its lovely walks and circulate in gilded
equipage its drives, the ordinary mind can
not comprehend or appreciate Central Park
as a whole. As often as I have been in the
park, summer and winter, I daily see new
beauties and new attractions in every de
tail. Central Park is one of the greatest
sights to be seen in New York. It does not
appeal alone to the artistic sense, nor to the
man or woman of one groove, like very
many other attractions of tMs world, bnt it
presents something which every human
being can enjoy who has the sense of sight,
or sound, of color, and is a lover of nature
or of art.
At this season of the year Central Park
blooms out in all its natural magnificence;
with the trees in full leaf, the walks and
drives free as yet from summer dust, the
green velvet sward spreading away to the
right and left over bill and dale, its ser
pentine drives thronged with carriages and
vehicles of every description, its lanes and
seats nlled with prattling children and their
nurses. Ah! it is a lovely eight, and one
which to enjoy thoroughly must be seen
again and again, like some famous land
scape hung upon a gallery wall.
BCTOSD ARTIST OE AUTHOR.
Ko painter could ever do justice to such a
subject. He could only give bits of life and
color here and there. No writer could ade
quately describe the appealing comeliness
ol such a scene. In my travels throughout
the world I have been in many famous
parks. Among them all Central Park, now
almost in the heart of this great metropolis,
is the most delightful. This, I take it, is
from the fact of great natural advantages
presented by a rugged surface, its rolling
swards and alternating forests and lakes.
The landscape artists agree that the most
beautiful natural scenery is that which pre
sents to the eye the sudden surprises in all
or these features and leaves no monotony to
weary the senses.
You can enter Central Park at almost any
of its half-dozen entrances, and see but little
beyond pistol shot Of what is to come
next you know not until a little further ad
vanced appears the unexpected. It may be
a tangled copse, it may be a pellucid pool
lying under tbe darkening shades, it may
be some small mound of jagged rock, or
again some artistic creation in marble or
bronze, or yet again some low cavern into
which the visitor gropes his wandering
way down through the narrow gorge neatly
paveu anu siepnea wiin stone or perhaps
OYir a rising knoll he comes suddenly npon
a lovely sweep ot common whereon flocks
of sheep graze a truly pastoral scene.
CALM CROQUET.
On that common on certain days you will
see perhaps 100 young ladies and young
men, in the bloom of youtbfulness and
beauty, indulging in the not overexciting
pastime of croquet. On other commons on
certain days you will see myriads of young
men and boys in shirt sleeves tossing the
lively ball. Marking these days is the flag
at the mast-head, which informs everybody
01 me privileges inus to ne enjoyed. The
guardians of the park reserve those com
mons on all other days sacred from intrud
ers for the purpose of preserving the sward.
Along the mall, that wide, straight
stretch of walk lined with benches, thou
sands of JTew Yorkers take their eveniug
promenade. On every lovely day through
out trie summer, and especially of mornings
and eveniDgs ot the hot and dusty season,
not a single seat will be found vacant.
Under the bridges which span the gulches
here and there, and amid the delightful
shades of "The Eamble," lovers sit and coo
the hours away, happy in themselves, un
mindful of the world and blind both to na
ture and to art. In the crooked paths which
wind among the hillocks ana crags and
forests of the wilder portion of the upper
park you conit upon them unexpectedly,
and with half apology upon the lips for the
accidental interruption of your presence.
Bnt you know very well that the fair hands
so hastily dropped will be as promptly re
sumed, and that the arm which innocently
rests upon tne back of the seat will presently
fall again and clasp the slender waist from
wnich it has been startled.
GAUDT VEHICLES.
In the early mornings of spring, before
the sun's raj-s have fallen uncomfortably
upon the highway, the serpentine drives are
crowded with the greatest variety of con
veyances that American ingenuity and
American money and taste have been able
to invent. Just now the yellow carts, buck
boards and light wagons of all kinds are
especially prominent. These are driven
mostly by the young bloods of fashion or of
the turf, aud the horseflesh displayed there
in js in many respects superior to that
which can be seen in frout of any other
vehicles. The owners ol these light and
showy wagons, for the most nari. are ownem
of other turnouts, perhaps half a dozen or
more, but they prefer the yellow wagon 3s a
fad of the season. They greatly affect gaudy
harness and other trappings. ' The collar of
the young man's horse is of spotless white,
and the rest of the harness of black and sil
ver or gold. The latest for the yellow
wagon, however, is of russet leather. The
buckboards are decorated with silver orna
ments, and very olten showy tassels or
cocades are sewn upon the harness.
Once in a while you will see the high
English dog-cart ot yellow wood, or perhaDS
a mail-wagon of the' same material. These
are driven tandem, tbongh quite frequently
the heavy English cart horse, verv high and
long of limb and reach, will" make an
equally stritinc oictnre. KnmMimpe tho
young blood with a buckboard drives tan
dem with that machine, but this style is not
considered in good taste.
THE TANDEM PARADE.
One day this week there will be a great
parade of tandem outfits. Saturday the
New York Tandem Club holds its spring
drive. There will be or this organization
alone some 10 to 15 tandem teams, and they
will make a gaudy show. It will meet at
the Casino in the morning, thence, driving
through the park, going to Jerome Park
where a lunch will be served. On every
Buch occasion everybody who owns anv
thing that can be driven tandem will turn
out ana add to the pageantry of the scene.
Almost everyday now one of the most
comical sights in the park is the assemblage
of a lot ot fat women who ride tor the pur
pose of reducing flesh. It is not an uncom
mon thine to see a riding-master or escort,
with a half dozen fat ladies gently ambling
along in bis rear.engaged in that world-wide
occupation, the search for health. I think
it is one of the most comical sights lever
saw, and the comicality of it is not lostuDon
those who are the unwilling victims of
obesity. Let the occasional stroller or
bencher dare to laugh, however, and he will
be surely greeted with the indgnant frowns
of the more or less ungraceful horsewoman.
A lady on horseback, like a lady in a bath
ing suit, shows to great advantage when she
has a good figure and to the poorest ad
vantage when she has not. Put a dompv,
fat woman on horseback and she is "a
ridiculous spectacle, and the same is true,
iorthat matter, with regard to fat men. On
the other hand, the slender, willowy or,
to use a more modern term, swelte horse
. v-omen is the rule in Central Park, and
there are plenty of young men to match
and masb, too.
EQUESTRIANISM BECOMING FOPULAB.
Horseback riding in the park within the
last two years has grown to such an extent
that the Park Commissioners have petitioned
the Legislature lor the passage of a law to
widen all of the eqnestrian roads. This
will cost about $500,000. At present bnt
two riders can ride abreast, which makes it
dangerous to life and limb, and is certainly
subversive of pleasure when it comes to
meeting other riders at full tiU. A number
of accidents have occurred when riders have
attempted to pass each other on the same
trace going in dltterent airections. ine
latter part of last month the various riding
clubs of the city had a grand turnout iu the
park to the extent of a couple hundred
horsemen. Over 100 of these were in the
uniforms of their respective clubs. It was a
brilliant spectacle.
One of the other memorable annual occa
sions in Central Park is the parade ot the
Coaching Club. This always brings out an
immense crowd of people of all grades of
society and all ages. It is a better show
than Barnum's circus, this great display of
wealth and fashion. The big yellow coaches
with 10 to 12 well dressed ladies and gentle
men on top can be seen on other days occa
sionally, but the great annual parade is
worth coming many miles to see.
Ciiarles T. Murray.
EAZ0B VEBSTTS SITLLET0.
Bloodthirsty Combat Between Two Italians
In tbe Streets of New York.
New York, May 11. Pasqnale Marres
cola, aged 33 years, Francisco Michael!, the
same age, and three other Italian laborers,
drank and played cards together until mid
night last night in an Italian resort in
James street. Marrescola and Michaeli
then started for home with one of their com
panions. The two men Darned got into a
quarrel, and the third man left them.
A few minutes later Michaeli, with
blood streaming from a terrible gash across
his lace, ran up to a policeman at Roosevelt
and South streets and tell at his ieet from
weakness. Another policeman a short dis
tance aay found Marecoii lying on the
sidewalk senseless and bleeding from sev
eral wonnds in the abdomen. Both were
taken to Chambers Street Hospital, where
it was found that Marecoii was suffering
from five stiletto wounds in the chest and
abdomen. The surgeons say Marecoii will
die. Michaeli was wounded with a razor.
His tace was laid open from the mouth to
the right ear, he had two cuts on the left
arm and one on bis shoulder. He may re
cover. Em) OF A E0MAHCE.
Scnsatlonnl Salt of a Judge' Daughter
Acnlnst tbe Son of a Mayor.
New York, May IL Raymond Carroll
the son of Mayor Carroll, of Rochester, N.
Y., was held to-day for trial in $300 bail on
a charge of assaulting Judith Torey or
Carroll.
Miss Torey is the daughter of the late
Samuel Torey, who was a prominent lawyer
in New Orleans, a Judge of the Supreme
Court of Louisiana and tjnited States Dis
trict Attorney at New Orleans. He died
three years ago in an insane asylum, leav
ing Judith 20,000 as her share of the
estate. In Rochester she and Carroll be
came intimate, and would have married but
for the opposition of his folks, who were
Catholics, while she was a Protestant. They
went to Europe together, aud the girl paid
tbe bills.
Miss Torey avers that during the last 16
months he has spent $15,000 of her money
in gambling. On May 3 Carroll, while on
a spree, struck her, and blackened both her
eves. It was on this charge she had him
arrested.
THE BUND TIGEB ESCAPED.
East Alliance Speak-Enr Proprietor! In
dicted by tbe Grand Jury.
roriCIAL. TELIGKAJC TO TUB DISPATCH.
Youn gstotvn, May IL The grand jury,
which adjourned yesterday, returned in
dictments against a large number of parties
who have been running speak-easies in East
Alliance, located near Alliance, but within
thi county.
The officers visited the locality last night
for the purpose of making arrests, but all
the offenders bad received warning and
skipped. As they each own considerable
property, the officers are quietly awaiting
their return, when they will he captured.
A DESERTED WIFE'S CHARGE
She Claims That Ber Rrcreant Husband I
n Hardened Connteifelter.
rsrKctAX TBLionAM to tub DisrATcn.1
Pennsboro, "VV. Va., May 1L Some
time ago James McGill, of Goff, this
county, deserted his wife and nine children
and has not since been heard of.
A few days ago his wife sent for Justice
John Elder and gave him two sets of molds,
one for making bogus half dollars and the
other for 5-cent pieces, together with a
quantity or the queer coin, and told the
Justice that her husband had been making
the stuff for four years past.
IT LOOKS SIGNIFICANT.
Jndse Boer Obtninlns Options for Large
True In of Timber Land.
'SPECIAL TELEGRAM TO TUB DISPATCH.!
Bedford, May 11. Judge Baer was
taking options on timber land in the vicinity
of Pleasantville last week. He also took a
55,000 option on a large tract of land in
Juniata township. The agreement stipulates
that Judge Baer can take the tracts at the
prices named in the papers at auv time
within 60 days.
Judge Baer 's brother is president of the
new South Penn Railway Company, and
these negotiations, therelore, are regarded as
very significant.
Burned In n Brush Pile.
ESPECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.!
De Haven, Pa., May 11. Mr. and
Mrs. Parks were burning bruh on their
farm at Talecavy yesterday. Thcv left their
2-year-old boy playing around it for a few
minutes, and when they returned they
found the child in the midst of the heap
and burned beyond recognition.
Electric Light for Yonneitown.
rSFECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH. 1
Youngstow-n, May 11. The Youngs
town Electric Light Company which will
soon have an incandescent light plant in
operation here, to-day closed a contract for
the purchase of five dynamos and other
electrical apparatus. It is expected to have
the plant running in 60 days.
Obtained n New Trial.
rSPECI U. TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.
"Wheeling, May 11. In the Braxton
county Circuit Court a new trial has been
awarded Alex Johnson, convicted of murder
in the first degree for the killing of Hugh
McLean.
HORSFORD'S ACID PHOSPHATE
Make Delicious Lemonade.
A teaspoonf ul added to a glass of hot or cold
water, and sweetened to the taste, will be
round refreshing and invigorating.
A Record Breaker.
Our sale of ?7 90 men's suits is a genuine
record smasher. Not only do we sell all
wool black cheviots at this price, but also
siIK mixtures, cassimeres, fancy worsteds
and broad wales. Call tc-dav and take your
choice of the entire lot at ?7 90. These suits
usual! v sell for $15 and $18, bnt we are mak
ing this unparalleled offer to move goods
quickly. P. C. O. C. cor. Grant and Dia
mond its., opp. the Court House.
Ladles' White Wrappen-84 to $20.
Largest and most complete assortment we
have ever shown. 'Find them on first floor
ot cloak department
Jos. Horue & Co.'s
Penn Avuenue Stores.
Baby Carriages,
See our novelty spring. The easiest and
best. No extra charge for them at Har
rison's Toy Store, 123 Federal st, Allegheny.
PEIDE OF THE COAST.
Citizens of Washington State Boast
ful of the Greatness of
THEIR BEAUTIFUL TWIN CITIES.
i
Seattle a Wonderful Example of Western
Thrift and Enterprise.
TAST EFSODECES OP THE EUNSET LAND
ICOKREEPOXDEXCE OP T7IB DISPATCB.I
Seattle, May 6. There is but jne
Seattle. "Would .you see a town in which
development keeps pape with resources, am
bitious projects with'material prosperity a
town which has made greater strides during
the past year than any other north of Cali
fornia and west of the Rocky Mountains?
If so, you must come to "Washington, for
here is the magic city of seven letters and
three syllables fonnd Seattle a town of
varied and exhaustless resources, a place In
which one can find plenty of chances to
make money, and, better still, to spend it.
-fc-ven if the Seattle man dies young in
years, he has lived long. He lives more in
10 minutes than most people do in an hour.
He knows how to live, too. All that is
worth seeing he sees. He is an enterprising
article and as "clear as a hound's tooth."
Tho sign, "power to let," seems written
upon his comprehensive brow.
"Washington is immensely proud of her
twin cities, as they are called, Tacoma and
Seattle. It is difficult to say to which she
yields precedence. Seattle does not depend
upon any one resource (or her future growth
and success. Consequently the young man
who here enters the arena of action cannot
complain of ber lack of adaptability to his
chosen trade, business or profession.
NAMED AFTER A "WOMAN.
The city takes its name from Angeline
Seattle, an early pioneer of feminine prog
ress, and a woman whose wavs were kindlv
and gracious as "the alms deeds which she J
did" bear witness. Many cities in the Mis
sissippi "Vallev have grown into commer
cial fame by Laving centered in them an
immense grain trade. The growth of the
cities of Pennsylvania is chiefly due to .her
vast iron interests. The mine's have given
the towns of Colorado their precedence. In
California all cities of metropolitan impor
tance have sprung up in a few years in re
gions where the fruit industry is the chief
resource and financial reliance.
But Seattle has all of these resources com
bined. She manufactures iron, handles
grain, converts timber into merchantable
lumber, raises fruit for market, develops the
mining of precious metals, exports and im
ports the products of other countries, and
her natural location is such that these are
Dot her only resources. A city like Seattle
that can sustain 50,000 j people and grow
5.000 a year must have facilities for employ
ment at once varied and almost limitless.
It has been said that the future of the new
State of "Washington lies in China, Japan
and Corea. Here youth and age meet lace
to face.
THE NEWEST CIVILIZATION
of the entire world looks over the Pacific at
the oldest Here the picturesque Asiatic
uoonoos wiin tne uupicturesque, but wide
awake American. Into the heart of the
sunset land the people of Washington look
for their fnture riches. The Asiatic coast
imports annually over $300,000,000 of goods.
The greater part of this trade gets into En
gland; but Seattle people claim that most of
this wealth will eventually come to Ameri
can shores. Natural laws will drift the traffic
to the Pacific coast, as distance saved is in
favor of the Americans. It is this outlook
which makes Seattle sanguine of great
future success.
Since the fire of June 6 Seattle has seemed
to be endowed with new life and vigor. I
am told that $10,000,000 at the lowest repre
sent tire cost of buildings now constructed.
Like Chicago, fire has no power seemingly
to kill Seattle it but kindles, but inspires.
Three miles of costly buildings bave
recently been erected. Seattle is the
center of a great wheat field which
produces annually over 20,000,000 bushels
of wheat. The city is truly the commercial
center of "Washington. A $2,500,000 iron
and steel plant has lately been added to the
city's important manufacturing interests.
Her resources iu coal, soapstone, lime and
building stone, marble, slate as well as gold,
silver and copper are unsurpassed in the
"West There can be no limit to growth
when there is no limit to resource.
WASHINGTON'S RIG FORESTS.
It will not be lone before "Western "Wash
ington will become known as the country of
crops. It has been said that there is suf
ficient timber growing to support the people
of "Washington for at least a century. Such
enormous trees one has never before seen in
this section of tbe world. It is no uncom
mon thing for lumbermen to ship beams 200
feet in length. They generally have to be
shortened, however, owing to difficulty in
transportation. There are several vessels
in Puget Sound, as long as 130 feet built of
timbers which run from stem to stem, not
one of them spliced. Spars and masts are
manufactured fh Seattle and sent to foreign
countries to North Africa, Spain and South
America.
Last summer during the forest fires
enough timber was burnt off "Western
"Washington, in the vicinity of Seattle, to
pay off more than the national debt. Yet
in this vast lumber district, its loss was not
even felt There are nearly 30,000.000
acres of timber land in "Western Washing
ton, and the sawing and shipping of lumber
naturally finds its center in this busy and
unconquerable city. Idle hands here must
necessarily he the fault of idle brains. En
thusiasm helps enthusiasm.
Cities, lite people, prove an inspiration
to each other. One bit of individual influ
ence Jgoes further than we think; ever cir
cling and widening, Seattle feels the fire of
Tacoma. Tacoma catches the glow of Seat
tle. The latter being a larger town has
donbtless a more distinctive perhaps enter
prisingcharacter. The twin cities, how
ever, are rivals in the best sense of tne word
each seeking to prove its Americanism by
its push, thoroughness and dauntless cour
age. How weli each succeeds, the events of
the present tell. H. M. Spalding.
In the Spring
Nearly everybody needs a good medicine. The
impurities which have accumulated in tho
blood during the cold months must be ex
pelled, or when the mild days come, and tho
effect of bracing air Is lost, the body is liable to
be overcome by debility or some serions dis
ease. The remarkable success achieved by
Hood's Sarsapanlla, and the many words of
praise it has received, make it worthy your
confidence. It is the "ideal spring Medicine."
"Last Bpringl was completely fageed out
My strength left me and I felt sick and miser
able all tbe time, so that I could hardly attend
to my business. Hood's Sarsapanlla cured me.
There is nothing like it." R. C. BKaoLi; Ed
itor Enterprise, Belleville, Mich.
Hood's
Sarsapanlla
Sold by all druggists, $1; six for $5. Prepared
only by C. L HOOD fc OO., Lowell, Mass.
100 Doses One Dollar
UMMUUVUUUUVUrVUIWt
vifiinuuigii suuGua
" BEST & COES FARTHEST."!
The pnreat, most eoluble th oWofnal co-
"co. Invented, patented and mule InBol
J lind. Delicate, etimuUting, nutations, much
l peiter jor tao nerves tain ies ana oonee.
'Ait lor van Houtens, take no other. 61
A Record Breaker.
Our sale of $7 90 men's suits is a genuine
record smasher. Not only do we sell all
wool black cheviots at this price, but alio
silt mixtures, cassimeres, fancy worsteds
aud broad wales. Call to-day and take your
choice of the entire lot at $7 90. These suits
usually sell for $15 and $18, but we aTe mak.
ing this unparalleled offer to move goods
quickly. P. O. C. C, cor. Grant and Dia
mond sts., opp. the Court House.
DIED.
ADAMS At Irwin, Pa., on Sunday, May H.
ISSW, Maei I., wife of Joseph M. Adams, in the
41st year of her age.
Funeral services at Irwin on Tuesday, May
13, at 2 p. m. Interment private at a later hour.
BAILEY-At Braddock. Pa.. May 10. 1890.
Charles Bailey; born February 15, 1851, in
Berlin, Prussia.
Burial MAY 12 at 2 O'clock t rqm his late resi
dence. Fourth street, Braddock. 2
BRAGG On Saturday, May 10, at 11:45 P. X.,
Nora Louisa, wife of William Bragg, in her
SSth year.
Funeral from residence of her husband,
Main street, Mansfield, on Tuesday, May 13,
at 2 o'clock p. m. Friends of the family re
spectfully invited to attend.
BURKE On Sunday May IL 1890. at 2 A. M.,
Mary, daughter of Michael and Mary Burke,
aged 8 months.
Funeral will take place from her parents' resi
dence. No. 5163 Dresden alley, on Monday,
May 12. at 2 p. m. Friends of the family are
respectfully invited to attend.
CURTIN On Snnday, at 5 A. w., Florence
Mary, oldest daughter of John and Annie
Curtln, aged 6 years and 10 months.
Funeral from the residence of her parents,
Brighton avenue, near New Brighton road, on
Monday, at 2.30 p. w. Friends of tho family
invited to attend.
CHAPIN-On Saturday. Mav 10. 1890. at 9
p. M., A. B. Chapin in the 24th year of his
age.
Funeral from the residence ot his father-in-law.David
Speer,81 Magnolia street,Allegheny,
on Tuesday, May 13, at 2 p. m. Friends of the
family are respectfully invited to attend.
CHARLES On Saturday. May 10, 1890, at
12:45T. m.. Maria Chablks.
Funeral services will be held at the family
residence, No. 34 Stockton avenue, Allegheny
City, on Monday, May 12, at 2 p. m. Inter
ment private at a later hour. 2
DOWNEY On Sunday at 2:15 P. X.. Wil
liak G. Downey, at his residence. No. 132
Twenty-fifth street, Soutbside, in the 26th year
of his age.
Funeral on Tuesday morning at 830. Ser
vices at Holy Cross Church at 9 A. M. Friends
of the family are respectfully invited to attend.
DELLENBACH On Friday. May 9. 1890, at
11:40 p. m.. at his residence, 163 Third street
Allegheny, Christian Dellenbach, in the
76lh year of his ace.
Funeral on TUESDAY afternoon, at 2
o'clock, from Voeghtly's Chnrch, Ohio street,
Allegheny. Friends of the family are respect
fully invited to attend. , 3
HASTINGS On Snnday. May 11. 1890. at
8:15 p M.. Habrietta Hastinos. daughter of
David and Harrietta Hastings, aged 19 years.
Funeral services, from the residence of her
parents. No. 142 James street Allegheny, on
Tuesday, 13th Inst, at2 p. n. Friends of the
family are respectfully invited to attend. 2
HODGSON On Sunday, May 11, 1890, at 4:30
P. M., Brown Hodgson, aged 43 years.
Funeral from the residence of his brother,
William Hodgson, Jones avenne and Thirty
eighth street on -.Tuesday, May 13, at 2 p. si.
Friends of tbe family and members of Sons of
St. George and Foresters are respectfully in
vited to attend. 2
LINDSAY On Fndav, May 9, 1890, at U p.
M., Margaret, relict of William Lindsay.
Funeral services on Monday afternoon,
at 2.30 o'clock, at her late residence, Stanton
avenue, near Euclid avenue. Interment pri
vate. 2
MOORE On Sunday, May IL 1890, at 730 P.
K Stephen, Moore, aged 20 years.
Funeral will take placo from the residence
of his parents. Mrs. Johahaa Croocker, Forty
flfth and Calvin streets, on Tuesday, May
13, at 830 A. u. Friends of tbe family are re
spectfully invited to attend. No carriages. 2
MYERS-On, Sunday, May IL 1890. Mrs.
Margaret H." Myers, relict ot tbe late Dr.
Jobu J. Myers.
Funeral services at the residence of Dr. L. H.
Harris, North Hlland avenne, Wednesday,
May 14, at 2 o'clock P. H. 3
KING At the residence of James McGrew,
Observatory Hill, on Sunday, May 11, 1890, at
1030 p. m.. Rev. Joseph King, in the 59th year
of bis age.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
OMMERT-On Saturday.May 10.1890,at 9 A. M.
Anna Katherina. mother of Henry andJohn
Ommert aged 79 years, 8 months and 8 days.
Funeral Monday at 2 p. if., from residence
of sou, Henry Ommert, 1614 Penn avenue.
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend. 2
ROTROCK On Sunday morning. May IL
1890, at 7:10 o'clock, Mrs. Susan A. Rotrock,
aged 8S years.
Funeral services will be held at the residence
of her son-in-law, A. H. Weaver, Sparta street,
Thirtj-sixth ward, Tuesday. May 13, 1890, at 2
o'clock p. if. Interment private.
Salem and Canton, Ohio, papers please copy.
STEWART At 4 o'clock p. it., on Saturday,
May 10, 1S90, LOGY G. SUEPAItD, wife of John
B. Stewart.
Funeral services on Tuesdat, at 2 o'clock
p. M.. at her late residence, 179 Forty-fifth
street. Interment private at a later hour. 2
STEWART On Saturday. May 10, 1S90, at 9
A. M., Mary H., widow of Thomas H. Stewart
and sister of H. K. and William Samnle.
Funeral services at her late1 residence, 17
Buena Vista street, Allegheny City, on Mon
day, May 12, at 2:30 r. m. Interment private.
WELSH On Snnday May 11, 1890, at 6 A M.,
Micuael, son of Mary and the late Michael
Welsh, aged S months.
Funeral will take place from tbe residence of
his mother. Plum alley, near Forty-eighth
street, on Monday, May 12, 1890, at 4 p. M.
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
o attend.
ANTHONY MEYER.
(Successor to Meter, Arnold it Co.. Lira.,)
UNDERTAKER AND EMBALMER.
Office and residence, 1131 Penn avenue. Tele
phone connection. myll.l40-MWFSa
FLORAL EFflBLEMS.
ORCHIDS AND ROSES OF RARE BEAUTY.
A. M. & JT. B. MURDOCH,
CI ft SMITHFIELD ST.
"Iv Telephono 429. no20-MWF
LOVELY FLOWERS.
The choicest cut flowers at lowest prices.
Also bedding out plants, roses, etc, in great
variety. Telephone 239.
JOHNB. A. MURDOCH,
my6-MWF 503 SMITHFIELD ST.
pEPRESENTED IN PITTSBTJRQ IN 1SCI
ASSETS . 89.071,69833.
Insurance Co. of JTortli America.
Losses adjusted and paid by WILLIAM L
JONES. 84 Fourth avenue. ia20-s2-D
SUMMER
MILLINERY OPENING.
French Pattern Bonnets,
Hats,
Mourning Millinery,
' ONE DAY ONLY,
THURSDAY, MAY
15,
AT
O'REILLY'S,
No. 407 Market Street,
ALL ARE INVITED.
NO CARDS.
myll-115-UTusq
TEETH. 1
17 AND tie.
FULL
from. Elegant sets.
fine
fillings a specialty. Tltaltied
air 60c. DB. rHILMrs, 80O
Penn ave., maker or
wait.
Open BnndaTi.
repairs sets while you
mhS-lia
KIW ADVERTISEMENTS.
WEDDING PRESENTS.
We are not boasting, bnt stating facts when
we tell you we bave the nicest assortment of
goods in the city suitable for WEDDING
PRESENTS. Come and see what we can
show you in Solid Hilvor articles. Fine Mantel
and Cabinet Ornaments, Piano and Banquet
Lamps, Onyx Top Tables, Fine Brass Cabinets,
Onyx Pedestals, Marble Figures, Fine Plates,
Cups and Saucers, Rich Cnt Glassware, etc
We feel sure you will find something suited to
your taste.
WATTLES & SHEAFER,
JEWELERS,
37 FIFTH AVENUE.
-AT-
LATIMER'S
CARPET
SUCCESS.
70 EOLLS
iiisra-iRiEiLsr 55c
Per yard, that was purchased of
hard-up manu acturers at very '
much below price, and you may
benefit bw our large SPOT
CASH deal.
179 STYLES
LACE CURTAINS
AT $1, $1 50 AND $2
Per pair that makes ready
money buyers plentiful here.
T. M. LATIMER,
138 and 140 Federal,
45 and 46 South Diamond, .
Allegheny.
my9-57-MWP
H0RNE &WARD,
41 FIFTH AVE.
SOMETHING FOR THE
BABIES.
In this class of goods wo show the largest
variety of grades in both Shirts and Stockings
of any house in the city. We have them from
the lowest price to the finest.
Our lowest price is a Gauze Shirt, all sizes, 16
to 22. in both long and short sleeves, at 20c each.
Better grades of Qanze Shirts, both long and
short sleeves, prices 26c for size 18, advancing
6c each size.
Same grade as the above In Wrappers, long
and short sleeves, 35c for size 16, advancing 5c
each size.
Infants' Oossamer-Weieht Shirts. lonr nnd
short sleeves, SOc for 16, advancing 5c each size.
Infants' Gossamer-Weight Shirts, full regu
lar made, long and short sleeves, SOc for size 16,
advancing 5c each size.
Infants' Cashmere Wrappers, tine rib, light
weight, 50c for small size, rise 5c a size.
Infants' fine-ribbea Cashmere Wrappers, 70c
for first size, advancing 10c each size.
Very fine lirrhtweirh: Cashmere Wranners.
long sleeves. bOc for small size, rising 5c a size.
Infants' line-ribbed Cashmere Wrappers, 80c
for first size, advancing 10c each site.
Fine lightweight silk and wool Wrappers,
long sleeves, at 90c, 81 and 81 10, according to
size.
Infants' ribbed pure silk Shirts, low neck and
no sleeves. High neck, ribbed arm, and hieh
neck long sleeves; prices range from 81 to 81 00
each, according to size and style.
INFANTS' HOSIERY.
This means everything In Cotton, Lisle, Cash
mere and Bilk, in socks length and long
lengths, and as our assortment is so very large
we will only mention some of the leading num
bers. Infants' Cotton Socks, In White and Onyx
Black.
Infants' Hose, in White and Onyx Black
Cotton.
Infants' long Stockings in black cotton, plain,
lUht. medium and heavy-weights, prices 20c to
50c, according to quality and weight.
Infants' fine-ribbed cotton Hose, sizes 4 to 6,
prices 35c to SOc.
imams' plain l.isio Hose, onyx black.
Infants'
;' Uashmere Socks, at 25c a nair. black.
size 4 to hii.
Infants' Cashmere Socks, verv Ann in whltn
and blacE. 40c to SOc a pair, according to size.
Infants' long Hose, plain and ribbed tops, at
35c and 40c a pair.
Fine summer weight y. Cashmere Hose,
blaik, Bizes i)4 to 6, prices 40c to 50c, according
to size.
Fine lightweight fi Cashmere Hose, white,
sizes 4 to 6, prices 40c to SOc a pair.
Infants' black spun Silk Socks and Hose.
Infants' black spun silk long Stockings.
Infants' whito silk Hose, fine ribbed, very
pretty, 81 a pair, all sizes, 4 to 5
m111,5110661 Puro wlk in "Eht colors,
50, (2 75.
HOEHE k WARD, -
41 FIFTH AVENUE.
. mj6-D
Grand Double Opening
-07-
MILLINERY,
CLOAKS and WRAPS,
-OS-
Wednesday and Thursday,
May 14 and 15.
Fleishman & Co.,
PITTSBURG, PA.
Millinery No Charge for Trimming,
mvl2
Established 1832.
BROOM. CORN. '
Broom Manufacturers Supplies
PEANUTS.
ROBERT DICKEY & CO,
71 WATER 8T. AND SB FIRST AV&
Telephone 183. f e23-3K-KW
NEW ADVERTISEMENT.
If YOU would be well and suitably at-
r tired in garments fine, yet moderate
iu price, call on
eoty
nfotfa&r
POR
YOUR SPRING AND SUMMER SUIT.
Our Repntation
is Established
for
Tasty Workmanship
and Novel Ideas
2,000 styles to choose from.
M JL SUITS
Brislit yK from
Patterns. "TIM if $20.
313 SMITHFIELD'ST., Pittsburg.
Excellent mail order facilities; sample',
fashion sheet and self-measure rules
mailed on application. my8-MTb
OUTING
GARMENTS.
The marvelous in
crease in all kinds of
athletic sports in this
country brings with it
continued improve
ment in the garments
worn in the field, and
instead of-the ill-fitting
garments, unattractive
patterns of seasons
past, we are showing
Coats, Trousers and
Shirts in the softest
fabrics, perfect fitting,
in artistic and quiet
patterns and at prices even lower than
was paid for inferior goods years
ago. Below we give a few prices:
Blazers, Imported English Flannel,
in all the club colors $3 50
Excellent Flannel Shirts ISO
Imported Flannel Caps SOc
Fine English Flannel Trousers S 00
All-Silk Belts 60c
All-Silk Sashes 1 50
Entire Suit, comprising Coat, Trous
ers. Shirt, Belt and Cap of best ma
terial, in any color..... 15 00
In addition we carry the finest
line of Men's Summer Neglige
Shirts, in India Gauze, Cheviot,
Spun Silk and Ceylon, at much
lower prices than the same goods
are sold in New York.
Ladies' Imported Sailor Hats
from the world-renowned houses of
Knox, New York, White & Heath,
of London.
Also, Ladies' Blazers in all shades.
PAULSON BROS.
441 Wood Street.
my7-jnvir
A Big Drive.
We have just received an
invoice from our home store
pf the finest line of trouser
ings we ever had, and we
shall make them to order at
$7 50. $7 50. $7 50.
The same goods are owned
by the fine tailors at $6 50
per yard.
We invite the attention of
dressy men to this remarkable
sale of trousers. The regular
price for these goods is $12
and $15 per pair, but to make
a quick turn we put the whole
line to $7$0.
.Bear in mind, the goods are
the finest "and most stylish
imported fabrics to be had,
and at the popular price of
$7 50 they hould make our
store famous
. In addition to our large
stock of Men's and Boys'
Clothing, we keep constantly
on hand the finest goods that
are used in making to order.
Will you call and see our
Trouser exhibit to-day?
Wanamaker
& Brown,
Sixth street and Penn ayenue,
mylO-D
MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS
INS. CO., 17 Wood St. PittabnrB. Pa.
tal r-50.000 00
A'setf, January 1,189a 370,214 70
Directors Charles W. Datcholor, President;
John W. Chaifani. Vice President: A. E. W.
fainter, Robert La, M. W. Watson, John Wil
son, Joseph Walton, Wm. G. Park, A. M. Br
ers, lames J. Donnej, George E. Painter, John
Thompson. Wm, T. Ad&Tr, 8ecretaryi James
Little, Assistant Secxetvr August Amnion,
ucnerai xutent ja-. wo
P.
HEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
B. & B.
A RED LETTER DAY.
In the Silk Department was
Saturday.
Notwithstanding the rain
over two thousand yards of that
extraordinary bargain purchase
of India Silks were sold. No
wonder that customers instead
of one, buy four and five
dresses each, as they did Sat
urday. This extraordinary and
fortunate purchase, large as it
was over S,ooo yards at the
rate they sold, the first day
they were placed on our Silk
Counters, cannot last but a few
days. Think of it ! best qual
. ity Canton and Shanghai Silk,
sold on these counters this
season at $i 50 and $x 25 a
yafd, going at the unprece
dented low price of 75c and
50c. It's the bargain of a life
time. MOHAIRS.
For a stylish, durable and
handsome costume, no dress
fabric of the season so well
embodies all these qualities as
the now so-popular Mohairs.
A sacrifice auction purchase
enables us to offer extraordin
ary values this week.
54-inch Mohairs, brown, gray
and blue mixed, regular one
dollar quality, at 60c a yard.
A phenomenal bargain.
36-inch Mohairs, wide and
narrow stripes, sixty different
styles, retailed everywhere at
50c a yard, selling here this
week at 25c. Value such as this
has never been offered before.
40-inch Mohairs, light grays
and brown mixed, 35c a yard,
just half their value.
36-inch plain dark colored
Mohairs, and a few choice
shades of gray. This week's
price, 25c a yard.
One lot of real English Mo
hairs, 6 inches wide, all the
choice new colors, 35c.
Boggs&Buhl,
Allegheny.
mjl2
THE DISPATCH
BUSINESS OFFICE
HAS BEEN REMOVED
To corner Smitnfleld and Diamond sts.
mh9-U7
IKI IE IE
FURNITURE!
FURNITURE!
FURNITURE!
FURNITURE!
FURNITURE!
CASH
HOUSE.
jshe
923-925 IFHOSHSr AYE.
APPLIED ZOOLOGY
W. M. LAIRD'S;
As the MAMMOTH, in pre-hlstorio times, exceeded in bulk all
other fdrms of contemporary life, so in present times LAIRD'S
MAMMOTH SHOE STORES surpass all competitors in num
ber, quantity and quality of goods, but especially in th3 mar
velous bargains .presented at all times.
As the ALLIGATOR is the most formidable among saurinna
swarming in American "waters, so do Shoes, atLAIBD'S,.made
from Alligator hides, defy wear and water as perfectly as when
it was originally fastened upon the back of his Gaitership.
Attention is called next to the largest Marsupial, the Austra
lian KANGAROO, famous for his jumping abilities. Shoes from
this kind of hide are especially adapted for Spring-wear.
The distinguished member of the genus capricornus com
monly known as DONGOLA GOAT, furnishes fine, soft skins
for lady tourists; Shoes especially adapted for scaling moun
tains and high peaks.
In this business, as in others, the most useful are the common,
everyday domestic animals, suoh as Porkers, Veal Calves, Oows
and Horses, who furnish from their much enduring hides the
most substantial, reliable, pliable and all-round wearing foot
gear for people of all ages and feet of all sizes.
The difference between seeing ourious and interesting objects
at Museums and these wonders of APPLIED ZOOLOGY AT
LAIRD'S is, that it costs you money at the former, while you
can save much money by visiting the latter.
"W 2VL. TjJlXTIJD.
New.Retal Shoe Store,
433 Wood street.
Wholesale House,
615 Wood fltroet.
NEW ADTEaTIBEaiBNTS.
"ALWAYS THE CHEAPEST"
TO KNOW
The 'newest' fashiqns in Millinery, yon
should visit "Danzteer's" Popular Show Rooms.
In Hat and Bonnet styles we manage to keen
ahead of all competition. Onr bats are the de
light of the ladies. Thare's the character and
the tone of artist worlc in every one. Yet, lnx
nrions as they are. their cost is reasonable.
STYLISH STRAW SHAPES, different
from what yon have thrust at yon in other
stores. Charming shapes in dainty light Lace
Straws: handsome Van Dyke and Toscan
Braid Hats; Tnrbans. Bonnets and Toques.
Flower Sprays and Wreaths, and the latest
novelties in Braids, Nets, Laces and Ornaments;
Ribbons in the richest colorings; Two-Tone
Ribbons, Plaids, Tri-Colors, Velvet and all
sorts of Fancy Ribbons.
LADIES' BLAZERS, BLOUSES
AND SHIRT WAISTS!
The lareest selection of Blazers shown In
either citv can be fonnd In onr Cloak Depart
ment Fancy Striped Flannel Blazers, high
shoulders, only II 14, with Blouses to match.
French Flannel Blazers in Stripes, Checks,
Plaids and Polka Dots, from $2 99 to ML Fine
Broadcloth and Cbevoit Blazers, with Gilt or
Silver Edgings, cord fastenings. S3 39 to J8 49.
We also show the new Combination Jersey
Blouse In Stripes, Black and White, Blna and
White and Red and Blue, made with fuil
Sleeves, large Cuffs and deep Sailor Collars.
These are a decided novelty and are shown
only by ns. price t2 99 and 53 24. In the Shirts
we show the "Estella Clayton." with two Col
lars and Cuffs, that are detachable, in White.
roisauois ana Btnpes; also the "Langtry"
Shirt, with entirely Embroidered Bosom. In
fact, onr selection In this line is beyond all
competition prices range from SI 49 to (2 24.
LACE AND CLOTH CAPES!
Fine Lace Capes, 13 24. Finer ones at (5 and
still finer at $10. "Redfern" Cloth Capes, with
Yoke and Pinked Edges in the new shades of
Green, Heliotrope and Plum color Broad
cloths, only $3 39; Triple layer, high shoulders
and Combination Capes, 31 49 to $12.
CONTINUED :
Monday you're again invited to take a plate of
Ice Cream, at our expense, and every day there
after till Saturday night. Object is to demon
strate by our own personal experience that Ice
Cream can be made by the Triple Motion
"White Mountain Freezer" much easier, far
superior, and with less cost than by any other
freezer made. The Beaters of these freezers
are made of Malleable Iron, plated with pure
Block Tin, not Zinc. (Never put anything in
the human stomach prepared in vessels coated
with Galvanized Iron or Zinc, by the way).
Tho White Mountain Freezers come In 11
sizes. AH bave a simultaneous motion, thereby
mixing the cream thoroughly ana evenly. The
Tuns are of White Cedar, prepared in a man
ner that enables js to fully warrant everyone
from falling apart or breaking in any way.
Feel at perfect liberty to take a plate of this
cream. The favor will be to us and the manu
facturers of the Freezers, if yoa do.
Ice Cream House Furnishing Department
(Basement).
SPECIAL Ladies' Draping Forms, 49c each.
DANZIGER'S,
SIXTH STREET AND PENN
AVENUE,
mjll
THE DISPATCH
BUSINESS OFFICE
HAS BEEN REMOVED TO CORNER
SMITHFIELD AND DIAMOND STS.
mh9J17
OBI'
CASH
-ASD-
CIEIEIDXT
lECOTTSIEL
CARPETS!
CARPETS!
CARPETS!
CARPETS!
CARPETS!
s
BCH'S
ap29-arwr
Enlarged Mammoth Bargain Shoo
Stores, Nos. 400, 408 and 410
Market street.
-'
I
m

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