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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, May 29, 1890, FIRST PART, Image 5

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1890-05-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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A BLIND MAN'S EYES
v
Kesainins Their Lost Sight After a
Period of Nineteen Tears.
A MOST MAUVELODS RECOVERY.
The Arrest of a Civil Engineer Follows a
Koad Dispute.
ALL THE KEWS FKOM XEAEBI TOWN'S
:;PKCXAL TZLEOBAMTO THX DISPATCH. 1
Braddock, May 28. After being totally
Mind for 19 years, there is a possibility of
Prof. A. List,of this place, recovering his
Eight. "When only 7 years of age Mr. List
lost the sight of both eyes by cataracts that
iormed orer them. About a month ago he
went to Philadelphia to have his eyes oper
ated upon by specialists. After the exami
nation, to his astonishment, they informed
him there was no necessity for the operation,
that ere long he would regain his lost sight.
The cataract on the lelt eye is fast disap
pearing, and he can now distineuish the
difference between the heights of persons
seen walking on the street All those that
hare heard of it pronounce it a remarkable
case. Prof. List is a well-known musician of
this place.
FBEIGHT CABS TELESCOPED.
A Bad Wreck on the PencsjlTnnlii Rail
road nt Mobs Side.
tSPrCIAL TELEGUAM TO THE DISPATCH. 1
Braddock, May 2S. A wreck occurred
on the Pennsylvania Railroad at Moss Bide,
just before daylight this morning. The
gravel train stopped at that point, and be
fore a flagman could be sent out, a freight
tram which was following, crashed into it.
The rear car of the gravel train and the
engine and tender of the freight train were
both thrown over on the north track just in
front of the West bound freight train. It
jilunged into them, and the result was dis
astrous. Cars were piled on the top of one
another and some of them were telescoped a
distance of 50 teet from the tracks.
Engineer Smith and Fireman Martin, of
the "West bound train, had a marvelous
escape in view of the fact that the engine
was almost totally demolished. The engine
and tender were tipped over in the ditch,
and both men were thrown from the cab.
VI0LAT0KS OF GAME LAWS.
Warrants Inrd for the Arrest of tin.
sportsman-Like Fishermen.
rsrxciAi. telegram to tiie dispatch.!
Meadttlle, May 28. Illegal fishing
iias become so common in this vicinity that
detectives have been employed to secure
evidence against offenders. Explosives have
been used on nearly every stream and
lake in the county, and thousands
offish have been killed in this way in Con
seaut Lake, which the State has been stock
inc during the past few years. One hundred
thousand young Susquehanna salmon were
placed in the lake this month and over half
of them have already been killed by explo
sives. Seines are drawn and spearing at
sight is also extensively followed.
Warrants have been issued for Otto
Hinkley and Halford Hinkley, Evansbutg;
William Faust, Sadsbury, and Samuel Mc
Millen, Harmonsburg, for illegal fishing.
The former has been arretted. The detec
tives claim to have almost positive evidence
s gainst about a dozen others.
AN EKGIKEEE AREESTED.
A Seanet 10 ihe Township Road DUpote nt
Brinton.
:SPECIAI. TELEOKAJf TO THE DISPjLTCH.1
Bbaddock, May 28. The Westinghouse
people are thought to be responsible for the
attempt to appropriate a portion of the
township road near Brinton station for rail
road purposes. It is believed that there is
a scheme to keep the Turtle Creet Valley
from the track recently purchased by this
concern for a manufacturing site.
Thomas Stewart, WcstingLouse's civil
engineer, has been arrested on a warrant is
sued by 'Sauire Edwards, at the instance of
Supervisor James Bowen. He gave bail in
the sum of $1,000 for his appearance on Fri
day evening. Attorney William Xost will
prosecute the case.
KILLED BY THE CABS.
A WeII-to-Do Citizrn of Conflaenco Meets
Ills Denlli on n Railroad.
SPECIAL TELEOBAM TO THE DtSPATCn.l
TJnioktown, May 28. J. Hicrgin
botham, ot Confluence, was run over by the
9 o'clock express last night near Rockwood
and instantly killed. His body was brought
to town this morning and will be buried
near Merritsville to-morrow.
Mr. Higginbotham was about 45 years of
ace and leaves a wile and several small chil
dren. He was a large man, weighing 400.
pounds. He was in Uniontown yesterday
and drew over $800 out o! the bank, intend
ing to invest it in a house and lot in Con
fluence. He was a well-to-do man, having
accumulated considerable in farms and town
property.
SMALL BLAZE AT FUJDLAY.
A Tea Store and lis Content Consumed by
the Flntnes.
tRPECtAI.TEI.EO BAH TO THE DISPATCH.:
FrxDX.AT, May 28. About 2 o'clock this
morning the warehouse of the Sew Xork
Tea Company was discovered in flames.
One hundred and twenty-six chests of tfea,
a large amount of coffee, spices and bric-a-brac
souvenirs were destroyed. Loss, 53,
200. The fire is suDposed to have been caused
by a gas jet which had been left burning too
high.
THE EBIE B0AD LOSES.
Ml KlrcUner Awarded $7,000 Damages
for an Injuied pine.
rSPICIALTEXEOIU.il TO THE DISPATCH.I
Lima, May 28. The damage suit of Miss
Mary Kirchner against the Lake Erie and
Western Bailroad Company for 510,000
closed to-day by the jury awarding the
plaintiff 57,000. Miss Kirchner was injured
at the crossing near Hume station, and her
spine was so badly affected that she cannot
move herself at all.
FATAL TO H0BSES.
A Dlieaio Resembling La Grippe
Has
Made lis Appearance.
tSFECIAL TELEOBAX TO THE DISPATCII.1
Lima, May 28. A disease resembling la
grippe has broken out among the horses in
' several localities in this county and in many
cases it speedily terminates in pneumonia
and proves fatal.
In the eastern portion of the county the
farmers have lost many valuable animals.
Beckle Kilmer's Bodr Found.
SPECIAL TILEPEAJf TO THE XuaPATCO.1
Pittstos, May 28. The mystery sur
rounding the disappearance or Beckie Kil
mer, a middle-aged woman of Moosic, who
jumped from a Delaware and Hudson car
window on Tuesday last, has been cleared
up. Her dead body was found yesterday
lying face downward in the Lackawanna
river, near the upper end of Everhart's
Island.
A Slackness of Orders.
; rrctAL teleorah to the sispatcim
Easx Liverpool, May 28. The potters
of this place generally are complaining of
the slackness of orders. Most ot them have
their warerooms filled with stock In antici-
'jiation of the usual summer trade, and the
feeling now hnioog them is that some will
have to shut down entirely unless business
begins to pick up shortly.
EXPECTS TO PB0VE AH ALIBL
Freeman Denies Ilia Cnilt and Snyi He
Didn't Know Ml Donclass- ,
ISrECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE DISPATCH.'
McKeesport, May 28. Charles Free
man, the peddler, who is charged with the
murder of Miss Margaret Douelass, asserts
that he can prove an alibi. He stated to
Officer Dowden last night while being taken
to Pittsburg that he can bring witnesses
from this place, all of whom were customers
of his, to prove his whereabouts during
every hour of the time he was in this city
on the day of the murder.
He savs that he was in this city and at
Keynoldton on the day of the murder; that
he was in no portion o'f the city off of Mar
ket street Irom the Monongahela river to
Eleventh avenne, and can prove where he
ate his dinner on Market street Ho says
also that he never "carried a revolver in his
life; does not know where Mis Douglass
lived nor did he know her.
TO OPPOSE WABBEJTS FAVORITE.
A. Flnmmcr, of Vcnanco, Likely to Ran
Againat Congressman Walson.
rSPEClAL TELEGRAM TO TEE DIBPATCILl
Oil. Cut, May 28. The political situa
tion in the Twenty-seventh Congressional
district bids fair to become complicated for
the Bepublicans by the candidacy of A.
Plummer, of Franklin, who is a direct de
scendant of Arnold Plummer, the Gibraltar
of the Democracy of Northwestern Pcnnsyl
vaniajbr years.
It is now almost a foregone conclusion
that the gentleman named will be a candi
date against Colonel Watson, as he urged
not only by the Democrats, but by a number
of stalwart Bepublicans.
Looking After Ills Fence.
rSFECIAL TELEGRAM TO THE ZUSPATCIM
TJniontow-x, May 28. Colonel Tom St.
Pauley, the Democratic war horse of
Waynesburg, arrived in town this evening
and is in conference with Colonel Searight
in regard to the State Senatorial nomina
tion for this district.
A Big Gnshcr at Belmont.
rsrrciAL telegram to the dispatch.
Belmont. W. Va., May 28. Island
Ko. 2 of the Two Bros. Oil Company, came
in this moraine. It is thought it will be a
700 barrell well.
Condensed News From Three 6tates.
Tin: General Synod ot tbe!Reformed Chnrch
of the United States, Is In session at Lebanon.
A Buti.ee dispatch states that Vesley Web
ber's Brinton well No. 1 is a gusher, good for
200 to 300 barrels.
Mb. and Mrs. Emaxuel Scntrarz. of Jil Ill
wood, were poisoned by eating canned corn.
They will recover.
The Washington Connty Commissioners
have appropriated 1700 to assist in the prosecu
tion of the Uonch murderers.
The Washington Borough Council, has de
cided to submit the question as to whether the
streets of the town shall be paved or not, to the
voters.
The coal diggers at the Standard Mill bank
have struck at Wheeling, for the Columbus
scale. Four of the peddling furnaces at the
Standard are off in consequence.
Geneva College commencement exercises,
at Beaver Falls, are in progress. Monday even
ing an address before the llterarv societies was
given by Rev. J. T. ilcCrory, of Pittsburg.
Three hundred men and boys were given
employment at AshUnd yesterday, by the
starting of the Readine Company's tunnel
colliery. All Reading collieries will now work
nine hours a day.
Negotiations are in progress with a view
of prevailing on the Depauw Glass Works, of
New Albany. Ind., to locate a plant at Pollocks,
the new town being built in Lancaster town
ship, above Reynoldtown.
The Skean and Engle families, of Potts
town, have Instituted legal proceedings to re
cover 2.600 acres of land in the vicinity of
French Creek and St. Marys, Chester county,
which they value at 511,000,000.
THE one hundred and forty-third annual
convention of the Evangelical Lutheran
Ministerium ot Pennsylvania and adjacent
States, meet to-day in Bethlehem. This large
and important religious body will consist of
abont 800 clergymen and lay delegates. The
session will continue one week.
STABBED IN HIS STUDIO.
An Iowa Artist Murdered, and Robbed by
Unknown Parties.
Des Moines, May 28. ProF. G. W.
Southwaite, an artist, formerly connected
with Callahan College, was found at his
studio fatally stabbed. His pockets had been
rifled and the contents ot his trunk were
scattered about, indicating that the deed
was done for robbery. The crime is com
pletely enshrouded in mystery.
Not Identified ns flines.
A son of Joseph Hines, of Allegheny,
said yesterday that the photograph of his
father had not been positively identified as
that of the man who was found in the Ohio
river on May 17. Mr. Hines was a painter
and his family are in very comfortable cir
cumstances. Delighted People.
During the past few weeks, the music
warerooms of Mellor & Hoene, 77 Fifth ave.
have been crowded all day long with visi
tors to see the wonderful rcolian. Unbounded
admiration and praise is freely expressed
all round, many well-known Pittsburgers
securing tcolians for their homes. This in
strument has already been introduced in
New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and other
principal cities, and will, beyond all doubt
soon become popular here. '
Few people have any idea what this in
strument is, many resting under erroneous
impressions and imaginary suppositions.
The seolian is an instrument which every
musically cultivated family should have as
any member of the household can produce
upon it, with little practice, the highest
class of music accurately, and at the same
time with the most beautiful changes of
tempo and tone coloring.
Indorsements of this musical wonder have
been received from the best musical experts,
including Mr. Anton Seidl.of the Metropol
itan Opera House, New York, who is very
enthusiastic in its praise.
Visitors to see this instrument on exhibi
tion at Mellor & Hoene's are politely re
ceived. Store Closed All Day To-Morrow.
Come to-day for your shopping and our
millinery and silk bargain".
JOS. HOBNE & CO.'S
Penn Avenue Stores.
Mohaib Umise. 42-in wide, all the most
desirable colorings, including beige and
gray, reduced from ?1 25 to 51 a yd.
mssu Hugus & Hackh.
94-K. 8. Giles 96.
Xew hats, bonnets, flowers, ostrich tips,
birds, etc., to-day.
Allegheny Millinekt House.
But your hats, wraps and gloves to-day.
Closed all day on Friday Decoration Day.
Campbell & Dick, Fifth avenue.
Allegheny Slillinerr House.
Our stores will be closed to-morrow, Dee
oration Day. E. S. Giles. Allegheny.
Storo Closed All Day ToOIorrow.
Come to-day for your shopping and our
millinery and silk bargains.
Jos. Hobne & Co.'s
Penn Avenue Stores.
OutSand ends on our silk counter, printed
InjlitS, wash silks, fancy surahs, etc., from
60c to 65s a yd. to close, worth reeularlv 85c
to 51 25. Hugus & Hacks.
TTSSU
i'arniol and Umbrella Bargains
To-day be sure to see them store closed
to-morroTf, Decoration Day.
Jos. Hoene & Co.'s.
Penn Avenue Store.
THE
SHEWED AS A FEEAK.
A reposition to Exhibit Him at the
Lee Monument Unveiling
AROUSES THE COLONEL'S WRATH.
Another Conflict Between the North and
South Inevitable.
WEI HE WILL K0T TISIT EICHHOJiD
IsrCCIAI. TELEORAH TO TITS DISPATCH. 1
New Tobk, May 28. Colonel EUiott F.
Shepard received this letter to-day from Mr.
D. C. Bichardeon, a lawyer and former
Police Justice of Richmond, Va.:
Sib We have heretofore been of the opinion
that the Constitution our fathers made guar
anteed citizens of the several States the enjoy
ment of life and liberty, but your recent edi
torial breathes of threatening! and slaughter,
and we quake and tremble. We have thought
that in pursuit of happiness we would receive
the protection of this great Government, bnt
in seeking to promote onr happiness the all
potent Matt and Express interposes Its stern
command to prevent us. We hoped the
favor would have been granted to do
honor to the memory of our loved ones,
bnt the editorial dictator prohibits us from
doing so. We therefore ask that you will re
lent in your wrath, fold the ensanguined gar
ment, realize that the war is over, allow the
holiest emotions of unity to And a place in your
bosom and permit us, the citizens ot a common
country, to obey the promptings of loving
hearts, and do honor to the memory of a great
and cood man Robert E. Lee. If this fat or
should be granted us we cordially invite you to
be present, and to show our gratitnde, we
promise yon all the notoriety yon seek by pub
licly exhibiting yon before 500,000 of our peonlo
as me only man in cms country wno ever con
ceived the thought that our sincere desire to
honor our dead meant disloyalty to the Union.
A CALL ON THE COLONEL.
The letter was prompted, or course, by
some of the articles that have appeared re
cently in the Mail and Express on the sub
ject ot carrying Confederate flags at the un
veiling of the statue to General Robert .
Lee. Colonel Shepard was seated in his
sanctum in Park Bow, this afternoon, when
a reporter of The Dispatch called. His
silkhat was tilted back on his head and he
was gazing longingly into a tureen of con
somme that a clerk had just placed on his
desk. He offered some bread and crackers
to the reporter, but regretted that he had no
knife to butter them, nor any spoon to get at
the soup with.
"I am almost famished," he said, as he
seized at a piece of bread, "and I guess
fingers were made before knives, so here
goes." The reappearance of the clerk with
a knife and spoon saved the Colonel the
necessity of demonstrating his democratic
spirit.
"I don't think anybody wants to go down
to Bicbmond in its present condition," he
said between spoontuls, "but I've said all
that I care to in answer to this letter in the
Mail and Express of to-night."
The reporter thereupon went out and
bought a copy of the Colonel's paper. This
is what the Colonel says: r
A FAETICULAB VISIIOE.
The conditions on which the gentleman to
whom the foregoing letter is addressed, by a
former police justice of Bicbmond. would visit
the capital ot Virginia, would be the burial of
the statue ot General Robert E. Lee In the
same grave as his perishing form, and the final
entombment of all the Confederate insignia,
flags, colors, badges, tunes, buttons, epaulettes,
swords, cannon, songs, muskets, commissions,
histories, records and paraphernalia of every
kind. He warns the celebrants of secessionist
glories that it is just as true now as it was in
1S60, when Abraham Lincoln first pronounced
the solemn warning that "A house divided
against itself cannot stand."
The people of Virginia then paid no atten
tion to the warning. Tho result was a bloody
war, entire victory all along the lines for the
union ot tne wnoie house, and a subsequent
rekindling of the principles of discord by tho
minority "white ruling classes" in that portion
of the house inhabited by tbem. These princi
ples will cither burn on till they produce
another civil war, or will be extinguished. The
first opportunity to stamn out these flames of
di.cord is afforded to the rebels themselves.
But if they refnse the opportunity and fan
tbem still higher they need not be surprised to
find a million patriots marching to Dut out the
lire. The glorious Union will be preserved at
all costs and every hazard. And the only flag
that can wave within it is the glorious Stars
and Stripes. And there is going to be unity of
loyalty thronghout the whole length and
breadth of the Union. The
PATBIOTISM OF THE COUNTBY
is no longer to be deceived by such specious
and deceptive arguments as are advanced by
Mr. Richardson. The country sees the old
rebel element organized, solidified and defiant
in the rush of so many rebels to glorify the de
feated traitor Lee, and the dishonored, pollut
ing Confederate rag. It is one of the many ways
used by the statesmen of the Southeast to "fire
the Southern heart," to prevent the spread of
patriotic Republican sentiments, to hold their
hosts together till tbey will, if they can, elect a
Democratic president and then make him per
form the same treasonable rolo as did Presi
dent Buchanan, and sell the country to the
Southeastern white ruling class; when, goodby
to the Constitution of the United States, to
equality of political rights, to freedom and
everything for which the war for tho Union
was fought.
To foresee these evils is t;o be warned against
them. To destroy them in the germ is to pre
vent the bloody catastrophes that will follow
their living. The way to destroy them in tho
germ is to do those things indicated aboro
which will make Richmond a place which can
be visited with self-respect and dehgnt by a pa
triot.
CONVICTED 0 FIVE COUNTS.
Claassen, the Bank Wrecker, Found Guilty
nnd Asks for a Now Trial.
New Yobk. May 28. The jury in the
case of President Claassen filed into the
court room this evening after a trial of sev
eral days with a verdict of guilty on five
counts of the indictment, which formed the
principal charges against him as the Presi
dent of the Sixth National Bank. Claassen
did not betray any signs of emotion, and
immediately his counsel gave notice that he
would formally make a motion for a new
trial and a stay of judgment within the
three days' limit prescribed by law. The
jury was then discharged and the prisoner
remanded into the custody of the United
States Marshal.
Mrs. Claassen, the wife of the convicted
bank: President, was in an adjoining room
when the jury filed into court. When ap
prised of the verdict against her husband
she fainted, but after considerable effort she
was restored. Claassen was taken to the
Ludlow Street Jail.
THE WOMEN SHUT OUT.
The World's Fnlr Cannot Kecocnlze the
Women's Organizations.
Chicago, May 28. The World's Fair
Executive Committee took action to-day on
the question of the Woman's Department of
the Exposition to the extent of declaring
that the committee could not officially
recognize either the Woman's Auxiliary
Association or the Isabella Association.
The reason of this declaration, the com
mittee gave out, was that the law creating
the World's Fair at Chicago made it the
specific duty of the National Commissioners
to select a Board of Managers and defines
their number and duties. Therefore, the
Executive Committee cannot, they say,
recognize either of the present women's or
ganizations as part of the World's Fair
organization.
MISUSING THE TWATTr
A Yonns; Man Tried Before the United States
Conn and Acquitted.
Cincinnati, May 28. At the United
States Court in Covington, Ky., this after
noon before Jndge Sage and a jury, Charles
L. Hartzfeld, ot Newport, Ky., was tried on
the charge of misusing the mails in adver
tising his process for redacing the metal
aluminum.
After hearing testimony for the Govern
ment and without hearing one witness for,
the defense, Judge Sage instrncted the jury'
to bring in a verdict of not guilty, which
they dAa without leaving their seats.
PITTSBURG- DISPATCH,
A MORE PERFECT UNION,
The Butchers Tnke Measures to Strengthen
Their National Association.
EFKCtAI. TZIEGRAM TO TIM DISPATCH.l
Cincinnati, May 28. The second day's
session, of the convention of the Butchers'
National Protective Association was a short
one, ending at 2 o'clock with a barbecue by
the local union. A communication was
received from the Butchers' Association of
England, Scotland and Ireland, advising
co-oceration between the two organizations.
It was placed on file. The matter of
appointing an organizer, whose duty it
should be to travel all over the country
organizing branches of the association, was
the most important one discussed. The
resolution provided for a sum sufficient to
pay traYeling expenses and salary of an
organizer, the amount to be raised by assess
ing the local branches. There was some
opposition to this, and the matter was finally
lelt to a committee, who will arrange the
amount to be raised and decide upon the
means of raising it.
If the original motion finally does prevail,
Chris Brokate, Secretary of the National
Association, will undoubtedly be the man
chosen. He has been six years on theSt
Louis meat inspecting department; and isa
man well posted and greatly interested in
the association. To-night a "huge barbecue
is in progress at the Highland House. There
is no regular programme, but everybody is
having a good time. Pittsburgers had their
inning yesterday.
OPIUM SMUGGLES ABBESTED.
A Brakemnn Captured for Breaking the
Cnstoms lintr.
Pobtland, Obe., May 28. The customs
officials last night seized 310 five-tael' cans
of opium, valued at 2,000,in a Chinese wash
house. The United States inspectors who
had been watching for smuggled opium, saw
a man take the drug into the wash-house
and arrested him.
He gave the name of John Mays, a
brak'eman, and confessed that the opium
was bought in Victoria, B. C, a few days
ago and smuggled into the United States.
The customs authorities claim they have
positive Droof that a number of the North
ern Pacific employes together with several
Chinese are smuggling a large amount of
opium into this city.
AFBAH) OF HYDE0PH0BIA.
A Texas Jndge, Bitten by a Dog", Under
Treatment for Rabies.
New Yoek, May 28. Probate Judge
Masterson, of Brazonia, Brazona county,
Tex., was bitten several days ago by a dog
supposed to be suffering from hydrophobia.
Judge Masterson arrived in this city Tues
day morning, and at once sent a cablegram
to M. Pasteur, Paris, as follows:
Bitten seven days. Shall I come to yon or be
treated by Dr. Glbier. Answer Grand Central
Hotel. H.'Mastebson.
The Judge soon had a reply from M.
Pasteur, reading, "Be treated by Dr.
Gibier," and he is now under that physi
cian's treatment at the New York Pasteur
Institute.
TOM BOWEN'S LUCKY STREAK.
It Is of Solid Gold, nnd Fully an Inch In
Thickness.
Denveb, May 28. A report reached
here this afternoon from Alamosa that a
wonderfully rich strike has been made in the
Golconda mine, which is owned by.ex-Ssna-tor
Tom Bowen. Ore has been taken Irom
the mine through which runs a solid streak
of gold an inch thicE.
Ten days ago a pocket was opened from
which 5200,000 has been taken. The strike
has created the greatest excitement in the
southern part of the State.
A Railroader Killed.
Bowxesbtjbg, W. Va., May 28. This
morning while Henry Mays and a man
named Geiger were raising a car by means
of a jack in the railroad yards at this point,
the screw slipped and the car fell, killing
Geiger instantly and fatally wounding
Mays.
A Fall of Con I Kills a Child.
New Yoke, May 28. To-day 400 tons of
coal fell through the storage bins at 601
First avenue. Two children were buried
beneath the coal. May Cleveland, aged 5,
was killed. A boy of 10 was badly injured.
Ron Over bv the Car.
Chablesxown, W. Va., May 28. W.
H. Johnston, a coal miner aged 37, was ran
over by a train of six cars at Campbell's
creek to-day and killed.
Mnrrlneo Licenses Granted Yesterday.
Km- Residence.
(Jonnlialos; Homestead
I Maria liolas Homestead
(D. it. Sliantz Duquesnc
i Emma Zollar Allegheny
j FranzTJscnicnik Tom's Run
illiria Kekan loui's Uun
5 John "W. Campbell McKeesport
I Elizabeth Stoop McKeesport
(Joseph Hoebler , 1'ittsbure
( Ile;lnia btehling Plttsbur?
( E. H. Will. 1'ittsbure
(Julia Beech Pittsburg
J George U. Berwick McKeesport
I Alice G. Gould McKeesport
(John J. Kigfflns Homestead
j Annie Ramsey Homestead
I James Fox Pittsburg
1 Ma?glc Meixner Pittsburg
5 James Connors Allegheny
( Annie West Allegheny
J Henry Itlngelholtz Pittsburg
) busanna Adam Penn township
( Mlchac.1 Beretzln Homestead
( Susanna Holtovlck Homestead
(Thomas Toole Pittsburg
1 Bridget Powers Hoboken
John Conway Pittsburg
( Bridget Moran Pittsburg
J George J. Elchler. Jr Allegheny
i Catharine LoUnk Allegheny
Samuel Fry 'Wllkinsburg
I icosa U. Kllncensmlth Wliklimhnn-
( William Gibson Pittsburg 1
f J.UA t ji. dinner. ... ......(....xltlSOUrg
( John Buckieldner Pittsburg
(Katharine Werllng Pittsburg
J Hernhard Leister Allegheny
(Thcressa Lngelslepen Allegheny
I George II. Vcrbeck , Homestead
(Emily Uullock Pittsburg
IKarlSeger Pittsburg
I Peironllta Wehrle Pittsburg
Chester J. Church Pittsburg
( Henrietta King ...Pittsburg
IS a complaint from which, many suffer
and few are entirely free. Its cause
is indigestion and a sluggish liver, the
cure for which-is readily found in the
use of Ayer's Pills.
" I have found that for sick headache,
caused by a disordered condition of the
stomach, Ayer's Pills are the most re
liable remedy." Samuel C. Bradburn,
Worthington, Mass.
"After tho use of Ayer's Pills for
many years, in my practice and family,
I am justified in saying that they are an
excellent cathartic and liver medicine
sustaining all the claims made for them."
W. A. Westfall, M. D., V. P. Austin
& N. W. Bailway Co., Burnet, Texas.
"Ayer's Pills are the best medicine
known to me for regulating the bowels,
and for all diseases caused by a dis
ordered stomach and liver. I suffered
for over three years from headache, In
digestion, and constipation. I had no
appetite and was weak and nervous
most of the time. By using threo boxes
of Aver's Pills, and at the same time
dieting myself, I was completely cured."
Philip Lockwood, Topeka, Kansas.
" I was troubleofor years with indi
gestion, constipation, and headache. A
few boxes of Ayer's Pills, used In small
daily doses, restored me to' health.
They are prompt and effective." W.H.
Strout, Meadville, Pa.
Ayer's Pills5
rnzpABXD st
Dr. J. C. Ayer it Co., Lowell, Mass.
Bold by all Dm jjUU and Dealt rs In Medicine.
Sick Headache
THURSDAY, MAY 29,
EULL TIME FOE 20,000 MEff.
Joyinl News for the Miners of the Inckn
wanna and Wyoming; yalleys.
Scraktos, Pa., May 2S. The Delaware,
iacka wanna and Western Company to-day
posted notices at all its collieries in the Lacka
wanna and Wyoming Valleys, directine the
men to work on full time. This is thevfirst
time that such an order has been Issued in over
a year. The workmen ot the company in this
valley who suffored untold hardships during
the months of February and March, and whose
distress was relieved bv public relief stores, re
gard the notice as a forerunner ot a very lively
summer season In the mines. It is believed
that there will be a general resumption ol all
mining operations that have for months passed
been makine scarcely half time. The company
employs 20,000 men.
BEADING TO BEACH CANADA
Corbln's Elmlrn-Comiloa Branch Goldff to
the St. Loula.
Wateetown, N. Y., May 28. At, a meeting
this evening the citizens of this place pledged
themselves to pay one-half the cost of a pre
liminary survey for aproposed extension of the
Elmira, Cortland and Northern Railroad from
Camden, N. Y., to the St. Lawrence river;
Austin Corbin, of the Beading system, to pay
tho other half.
The plan is one for the construction of a rail
road that will be a competing line for the
Borne, Watertown and Ogdensbnrg Kailroad,
and an outlet to the Eastern States and Canada
for Lehigh Valley coal, the Lackawanna coal
apparently having the advantage in that field.
Work will be begun on the survey at once.
Entertainment and Banquet.
(SPECIAL TELECUAM TO TUB DISPATOn.!
McKeespokt, May 28. The annual enter
tainment and banquet of the McKeesport
High School Alumni Association was held in
Hahn Hall to-night, and both the menu and
entertainment was far in advance ot that of
past years. The attendance was very large.
The graduating class, the School Board,
teachers, ministers and representatives being
present The table was laid Dy Mr. Kennedy,
of Pittsburg. ,
Fits, spasms, St. Vitus dance, nervous
ness and hysteria are soon cured by Dr
Miles' Nervine. Free samples at Jos.
Fleming & Son's, Market st.
B. tfcB.
Men's outing shirts and Windsor scarf;
Gordon sashes, to-dav. Closed to-morrow.
Boogs & Buhl.
Fans Fans Fans Fans.
All sorts and at all prices greatest vari
ety. Jos. Hokne & Co.'s
Penn Avenue Stores.
- . m w
MARRIED.
EISENBERG BABR May 25. at the resi
dence of the bride's parents, by Bev. T. M,
Griffith, Mr. Samuel W. Eisenbebo, of Con
Bhohockcn, Pa. (now of Pittsburg), to Miss
Mabia A i3Ar.n, of Mechanicsville, Pa.
DIED.
BECKFELD On Tuesday, May 27, at 10
o'clock a. si., Mrs. S. B. Beckfeld, in the
70fh year of her age.
Funeral services at her late residence, on
Spring Hill, Allegheny, on Thursday. May
2D, at 3 o'clock p. ir. -The friends ol the family
are respectfully invited to attend. 2
CHOFFAT On Wednesday. May 28, at Ik,
M.. Josephine, wife of Joseph Choffat, in her
43th year.
Funeral on FniDAY HORNING at 8:30 o'clock
from her late residence. No. 1 Pine alley, Al
legheny City. High Mass of requiem at St.
Joseph's B. C. Church at 9 A. M.
Friends of the family are respectfully invited
to attend. 2
COLLINS On Tuesday, May 27. at 520 p at,
at the residence of his brother-in-law, George
Story, Salisbury street. Twenty-seventh ward,
John A. Collins, the beloved husband of
Ada Kay, in the 30th year of his age.
Fnneral services at St. Paul's Cathedral on
Thursday morning: at 9 o'clock. 2
KANE-On Tuesday. May 27. 1890, at 6
o'clock p. M., Mary Fahy, wife of John H.
Kane, in her 30th year.
Funeral from her late residence. No. 203 Bed
ford avenue, on Thursday horning at 8:30
o'clock. High mass of requiem at St. Bridget's
Church, Enoch street, at 9 A. v. Friends of
the family are respectfully invited to attend.
S
M'GINNIS-Fannie S.. daughter nf Wm.
R. and Emma L. McGinnis, aged 4 months.
Funeral from parents' residence, No. 1704
Sidney street, Sonthside, Thursday after
noon, May 29, at 2 o'clock. 2
PIERCE On Wednesday, May 28, 1890. at
S a. it., Harry Pierce, aged 2S years, at
No. 8 Grant street, Pittsburg.
Philadelphia papers please copy.
SNYDER-On Tuesday. May 27, 1890, at
Homestead, Charles Snyder, aged 43 years
3 months and 21 days.
Funeral from family residence. 2120 Penn
avenue, on Thursday, May 29, at 2 p, it. 2
JAMES ARCHIBALD 4HRO..
LIVERY AND SALE STABLES,
93 and 93 Second avenue, between Wood and
Smithfield streets.
Carriaees for funerals, S3. Carriages for
operas,parties,etc.,at the lowest rates. All new
carriages. Telephone communication.
m6-S0TTS
pEPKESENTEIJ IN PITTSBURG IN 1SU
Asset - . S9j071,690"n.
Insurance Co. of North America.
Losses adjusted and paid by WDLLIAJI h
J01ES. 84 Fourth avenue. ia20-s2-D
WESTERN INSURANCE CO.
OF PITTSBURG.
Assets 5443,50187
NO. 411 WOOD STREET.
ALEXANDER NIM1CK. President
JOHN B. JACKSON. Vice President
fc22-2G-TTS WM. P. HERBERT. Secretary.
TEETH. I
A.ND I1C. FULL
cum. Elegant sets. Klne
flIUnes aspcclilty. Vitalized
air 6Uc. lilt. I'HILMPS. 80o
I'cnn
wait.
ave.,
makes or repairs sets while you
Upcn Sundays
mha-143
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
THE &NGL0MANIACS,
A NOVEL OF NEW YORK SOCIETY LIFE,
BEGINS IN THE
JUNE CENTURY,
AND WILL RUN THROUGH FOUR NUM
BERS. THE AUTHOR, WHO IS EVI
DENTLY FAMILIAR WITH THE LIFE
AND CHARACTER DEPICTED, CHOOSES
TO REMAIN UNKNOWN. IT IS CLEVERLY
ILLUSTRATED BY DANA GIBSON.
The contents of the Jone Centory include
a hijhiy suggestive and important paper on
Loudon Polytechnics and People's
Palaces, by the author of the recent Glas
gow article, illustrated by Pennell and others.
An Artist's Letters from Japan,
written and illustrated by John La Farge.
Track Athletics in America, by
Walter Camp, with drawings from instan
taneous' photographs.
The Women ot tho French Salons,
illustrated by portraits of leaders of famous
coteries of the irth centuiy.
What's the MOWSP Giving figures
of prices paid by joumalsfor special dis
patches, paper, composition, etc Also
"Topic" on "Journalists and Newsmon
gers. Two Complete Stories, "Mire Mar
chette," by Arlo Bates, and "Trusty, No.
49," a tale of the Arkansas convict camps,
by Octave Thanet, with sketches by Kemble.
The Antobiosraphy of Joseph Jef
ferson and Mrs. Barr's serial, '' Friend
Olivia," are continued. In addition to
other articles, poems "id the usual depart
ments the number contains several pages o f
" Memoranda on the L.ue ol .Lincoln, wittt
full-page illustration from a photograph,
showing appearance of stage and proscen
ium boxes of Ford's Theater on the night
alter the President's assassination, and
COMPARATIVE
ave
rcry timely article,
by Edward Atkln-
ertti. bwrinc rlirertlv
TAXATION
upon the present tariff debates.
Thb Jdnb Century, for sale by dealers gen
erally, contains 160 pages and more tard 70
" "- - a 4
luusuaits, .rncc, 35 cents.
t THfi OENTTJBY CO.,
33 East 17th Street, New York.
4.-V
ny29.75
1890.
NEW ADVERTTSEMEKTS.
LEADS THEM ALL.
20 OO.
Another carload
has been received
by ,our Furniture
Department.
We are confident this three-piece
Chamber Suite gives greater value
at the price than any suite yet
offered Neither the maker nor our
selves can make much out of it.
But our aim is to distribute a large
quantity of goods on the closest
possible margin of profit. We buy
in large quantities the greatest pos
sible value for cash, and then turn
it over quickly to our customers,
bringing the maker and consumer
together with a bare living profit
between.
Low prices, elegant designs
and reliable workmanship
characterize our large and
ge7ieral assortment of House
hold Furniture.
I Mliitek 4 k,
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
CURTAINS, BEDDING,
33 FIFTH AVENUE.
my22-ThS
UMBRELLAS
AND
PARASOLS.
We have a very choice line
24-inch Umbrellas that can
be used for rainjor sun. These
goods are the newest in .the
market,and all the best colors
Black, Blue, Brown and
Cardinal and the stocks are
the finest natural wood with
silver.
Special bargain in 24-inch
Umbrellas. We have a lot
that we offer at a special bar
gain this week. They are in
all colors, suitable for rain or
shine, and have not before
been offered for less than $5;
will sell them at $3 each.
They are all pure silk, fine
natural wood sticks and very
stylish. Don't fail to see
these.
In 26-inch Umbrellas we
have a very choice line of
black, natural wood and silver
handles, and all prices from
the lowest to the highest
In 28-inch for gentlemen
we have a very fine line of
best quality of Windsor, with
silver and wood handles, and
these are new patterns and
range in price' from $5 to $10
each. x Then we have a special
good line of Gloria, with imi
tation silver on wood handles,
at $3 each. These are special
good value.
PARASOLS.
We have still a good line of
Parasols in all qualities and
prices. We have a special
line of striped at $2 50 each,
the very best value offered at
this price. In Black Nett and
Black Lace Parasols we have
a large stock and very best
qualities. In Children's Par
asols we have them all sizes,
colors and prices.
Don't fail to visit the Um
brella and Parasol Depart
ment when convenient and
see these goods.
HORNE & WARD,
41 FIFTH AVE.
myZ7-D
TEETH, $5, $8, $10.
Gold flllincs from tl up. Amalgara, 50c;
Eilver, 75c; white alloy, 51.
Gold Crowns a specialty.
J)R. J. M. McCLABEW,
Corner SmithOeld and Fourth avenue.
jeZt-TTSn
Bllil
I j-1 'If"' 1 43 C9
HfiEEi
THE DISPATCH
BUSINESS OFFICE
HAS BEEN BEHOVED
Xo comer Hmltnfleld. and Diamond it. '
-j smj-117
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS-
B.&B.
ALL-SILK
CREPE DE CHINES.
Large and important offering of
this handsome summer dress fabric
at $1 and $1 25 in exquisite shades
for street and evening dresses.
New 25-inch imported Black
Surahs at 75c. New York stores
call them Grenadine Surahs on ac
count of their light weight; they
are very lustrous, free from dress
ing and give special service.
27-inch Plain Black and Cream
India Silks, 75c; a great bargain
lot we bought, as good as general
market value at $1.
Plain Black
Twilled Indias,
New and very desirable
for summer.
New Rich Black Silk Striped
Hemstitched Grenadines.
New double width Black Silk
Grenadines
with colored Polka Spots. Double
width plains to match. Rich goods
at $1 50.
54-inch Mohair Glace Bril
liantines, 60c and 90c. Greatest
bargains of the season.
50-inch Mohair Striped Glorias,
50c These are remarkable; in
tended import retail price for this
season was $1 25.
4-4 French Satines I2c and
15c.
The desirable bargain is the 25
cent French Satines all new and
handsome as Indias.
Ginghams! Ginghams!
Choice Clan Tartan styles, 15c
Finest and choicest goods ever
shown at or near any such price.
Hundreds pieces 4-4 Scotch
Zephyrs at 25c
Large and choicest collection
Anderson's Scotch Zephyrs and
Novelties.
Freres Koechlin's new Striped
Organdies, 20c; general price, 35c.
27-inch India Silks, 50c, 75c, j?ij
worth all buyers' attention.
Fans! Fans! Parasolsl Parasols!
Silk Umbrellas!
Artistic Mountings!
At prices that will pay you to in
vestigate, and thousands for selec
tion. BOGGS & BUHL,
ALLEGHENY.
my26
DANZIGEE'S.
m
1
juIiOi)
Attending the great sale of the
Pennsylvania Cloak Co.'s entire
stock was greater than we imagined.
We still hare a few choice plnms
left, and although the sale, as a
"special sale," has closed, we will
offer the balance dnring this week
at "one-third the price of the
original cost to manufacture."
Just stop to think for one mo
ment of an infant's cloak that
costs say 3 00 to manufacture,
and sold by the retail siores for
i 50 (for the manufacturer must
have his profit as well as the re
tailer), will cnt yon only 75 cents.
It is their loss, not ours, and you
are the gainer.
INFANTS'
LONG CLOAKS,
$1 24, 81 49, 51 74, SI 09, J2 24,
12 49, J2 74. ?2 90, J3 24, ?3 49,
worth three times the money.
Children's Walking Coats in
every style, color or shade, at
prices that can never be equaled,
and mind you, no cotton trash, but
made of strictly all-wool fine Cash
mere. Also one lot of Infants' short,
fancy Flannel Coats, just the thing
for now, made in latest style and
very stylish.
To those who missed the sale last
week, we would say, COME AKY
DAY THIS WEEK and you will
certainly find SOMETHING to
suit yon and at prices that are
IIHIS TIE CHPEST,
DANZIGEE'S,
Sixth St. and Penn Ave., .
Pittsburg, Pa.
my2fl
ARTIFICIAL ICE.
BRUCE CRYSTAL ICE CO,
The finest ice In this market. Manufactured
fjotn dtttnisd wate. i
, fsupioatowu. - ; - n7U
5EW ADVERTISEME5T3.
"And now the young man's fancy lightly turns
to thoughts of suits.
As the frayed out bottoms of his trousers barely
cover his shiny hoots."
We received a visit from a spring poet yester
day as we were In the midst of preparing a
newspaper announcement: the above is a por
tion of his fancy; the balance, including the
poet, has disappeared.
So, Almost Have Our Chances to
Keep Up With the
RUSH OF ORDERS
Within the Past Few Weeka
We Claim to Have the Largest
and Best Selected Line of
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
WOOLENS
in Pittsburg.
SUITS TO OBDEBPROM 820 OO.
TROUSEBS PBOM 85 OO.
wo&s.
(Ifctfcu&r
313 SMITHFIELD BT
myl9-HTh ,
Pittsburg.
SPECIALTIES
FOR DECORATION DAY I
Flags ! Flags ! Flags ! Flags I
Red, White and Blue Ribhons.
Badges ! Badges I Badges t
Badges !
Spring Neckwear for Gentle
men. Spring Neckwear for Ladies.
Spring Neckwear for Children.
Baby Carriages.
Babies' Complete Outfits.
Fans 1 Fans ! Fans ! Fans !
Our stores will close at noon
on Decoration Day.
Fleishman & Co.,
PITTSBURG, PA.
Millinery No charge for trimming.
my23
Fancy Prices. s
We shall sell more clothing
of our make this season than
last. We expect to do still
better next season.
We expect to do it by sell
ing the best goods manu
factured. (Neither pathetic appeals
nor stump speeches will an
swer our purpose.)
They cost more to make.
From substantial to the very
finest cloth trimmings, work
manship we pay more.
There'sf no other way to get
honesty in clothing.
The other stores seem to
think we are gaining business
by cheapness. No. It's by
the best goods at quick and
just prices.
Wanamaker
& Brown,
Sixth street and Penn aYense.
The very best making of
clothing to order. Every day
an increasing business. More
styles of goods than you'll
give time to see.
my29.s
KUTABLISBED 1S7U
BLACK GEtf
JOB Till
KIDNEYS
Is a relief and sure enre for
the Urinary Organs, Qrarel
and Chronic Catarrh, of th
Bladder.
The Swiss Siomioh BiHsri
are a snre enre for Dyspepsia,
TjTAr Hnmnlaint &nd BTerv
Trade MAsxspecies of Indigestion.
Wild Chorry Tonic, the most popnlar prepar
ation for cure of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis and
Lung Troubles.
Either of the abore, SI per bottle. or$S for 15.
If yonr druggist does not handle these goods
write to WiL F. ZOEIXER. Sole Mil.,
0C8-71-TTS Fl.tsburg; Pa.
JAS. MNEIL & BRO,
f
B0TLER3,
PLATE AND
WORK.
SHEET IRON
BOXES.
SHEET-IBOlf
ANNEALTSa
PATENT
With an Increased capacity and hydraulic
machinery we are prepared to furnish all work
In our line cheaper and better than by the old
methods. Repairing and general machine
work. Twenty-ninth street and Allegheny Vai.
ey Railroad. fe6-lrr
Brass Bedsteads!
FOR THE TRADE ONLY.
The Adams & Westlake Co.,
MANUFACTURERS,
, k CHICAGO,. tjiMVrni
4
iVT-JC . 'if. ... . . , . -
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