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Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, March 31, 1892, Image 7

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INGERSOLL'SEULOGY
To Walt Whitman, Whom He
Calls the Most Eminent
Man of His Time.
WHEREIN HE WAS GREAT.
The Poet of Nature, of love and of
Humanity of Every Degree.
ABOVE EVERYTHING ELSE A MAN
His Religion Absorbed ill of the Creeds
and Believed in Tone.
SECULAE SERVICES OVER HIS GRAVE
Camdks-, X. J., March 30. Between 11
o'clock this morning and 1 o'clock this
afternoon several thousand people viewed
the body of "Walt Whitman. The "Good
Gray Poet" looked as natural as in life, and
those ot his friends who had not been able
to see him during the last illness were
pleased to see his face as calm and placid as
If he had lain down to sleep.
Among the friends and admirers of the
late poet present were: George "W. Childs,
Julian Hawthorne, Colonel Robert G. In
gersoll, Horace Howard Furness, Dr. Dan
iel G. Brinton, John Burroughs, J. H.
Johnston, Lincoln L. Eyere, J. H. Stod
dart, Francis Howard "Williams, Talcott
"Williams, Dr. R. 31. Buck, Thomas B.
Harned, Horace S. Traubel, Judge Charles
Garrison, H. L. Boosall, Rev. J. H. Clif
ford, Harrison S. Morris, Herbert H. Gild
ers, H. D. Bush, Julius Chambers, Thomas
Eakins, A. G. Cattell and Edmund Clar
enee Stedman.
At 2 o'clock the body was taken to Har
leigh Cemetery, in the outskirts of Camden,
and a public funeral service held. As
Whitman himself had wished, no clergyman
participated in the exerciser
The Simple Programme Carried Oat.
The service was begun with the reading
of the Scriptures and the dead poet's works
by Francis Howard Williams, of Philadel
phia. Addresses were made by Thomas B.
Harned, of Camden; Dr. Daniel G. Brinton,
of Philadelphia, and Dr. E. M. Buck, of
London, Ont., the friend and biographer of
Whitman. Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll
made the concluding address, as follows:
Again we. In the mystery of life, are
brought face to faco with the mystery of
death. A great man a great American the
most eminent citizen of this Kepubllc is
dead before us. And we hare rrtet to pay a
tribute to his creatness and to his worth. 1
know that he needs no words of mine. His
fame is secuie. He laid the foundations of
It deep in the human heart. Ho was, above
all that I have known, thepoet of humanity,
of sympathy: great he was so great that he
rose aboveethe crcatest; and so great that he
stooped to the lowest without conscious
condescension. He never claimed to be
low er or greater than any other of the sons
of men.
He came Into our generation a free, un-ti-ainmeled
spirit, with sympathy for all.
His ami was beneath the form of the sick.
He sympathized with the Imprisoned and
the despised, and even on the brow of crime,
he was great enou-ti to place the kiss of
human sympathy. Oneof the greatest lines
in our literature is his. Speaking of an out
castand the lino Is great enough to do
honor to the greatest genius that has over
lived he said:
Rot until the sun excludes you will I exclude you.
The JI oral Breadth of the Poet.
A charity as wide as the sky! And
wherever there was human suffering,
human misfortune, the sympathy of
Whitman bent above it as the firmament
bends above this earth. He was built on a
broad and splendid plan ample withont ap
pearing to have limitations passing easily
for a brother of mountains and seas and
constellations caring nothing for the little
maps nnd charts that timid pilots hug the
shores with, and giving himself freely, with
the recklessness of genius, to winds and
naves and tides caring for nothing so long
as the stars w ere above him.
And he walked among men. among writ
ers, among verbal varnishers and veneerers,
among litemteuis and tailor, wltn the un
conscious dignity of itn antique god. He
was the poet, also, of that divine democracy
that gives equal lights to all the sons and
daughters ol men. He uttered the great
American voice, uttered a song worthy of
the Groat Kepubllc No man has ever aid
more for the rights of humanity more In
favor of real democracy or real Justice.
He neither scorned nor cringed was
neither tyrant nor slave. He asked only to
stand beneath the great flag of nature, the
blue and the stars. He wus the poet of life.
It was a joy to him simply to breathe. He
loved the clouds. He enjoyed the breath of
morr.ine, the twilight, the wind, the wind
ing streams. lie loved to look at the sea
when the wind and waves burst into the
white-cans of Joy. He loved the fields, the
hills. He was acquainted with trees, with
birds, with all the beautiful objects on the
earth.
The Poet of the Tender Passion.
He was, also, the poet of love. He was not
ashamed of the divine passion that has built
every home in the world that divine passion
that has painted every picture and given us
every real great work of art that divine
passion that has made the world worth liv
ing in and gives some value to human life.
He was the poet of the natural, and taught
men not to be ashamed of that which is
natural.
He was not only the poet of love, not only
the poet of democracy, not only the poet of
the Great Republic lie was the poet of the
human race everywhere. He was not con
fined to the li-iiits of this country, but his
sympathy went out o-er the seas to all the
nations of the cat th. He stretched his hand
and he felt himself the equal of nil kings and
of all princes; he utteied more supremo
words than any writer of our century, auU,
possibly ot almost any other.
He was, above all things, a man. And
above genius, above all the snow-capped
peaks o: intelligence, above all of art, rises
the true man greater than all. He was a
rue man, and he walked among hisfellow
nien in such. He as, also, as lias been said.
the poet of death. He accepted all life and
ueain. 'uju nu jumiucu aii. lie nau tne
courage to meet it, and was great enough
and splendid enough to harmonize all and
to accept all there is or life as a divine
melody.
You know better than I what his life has
been. But let me say one thing. Knowing,
as he did, what others can know and what
they cannot, he accepted and absorbed all
theories, all creed", all religions, and be
lieved in none. His philosophy n as a sky
that embraced all clouds and accounted for
all clouds. He had a philosophy and a re
ligion or his own brondcr, as he believed,
and as I believe, than others. He accepted
all, he absorbed all, and he was above all.
A Perfectly Candid Interpreter.
He was true absolutely to himself. He had
frankness, courage, and he was as candid as
light. Ho was willing that all the sons of
men should be absolutely acquainted with
his heart and brain. Ho bad nothing to con
ceal. Frank, candid, pure, fcercne, noble.
And for years and years he was maligned
and slandered, simply because he had candor
of nature. He will bo understood yet, and
that for which ho was condemned that is,
his irankness, his candor, will add to the
glory and the greatness of his tame. He
wrote a liturgy for humanity. Ho wrote a
gi cat and splendid psahn of life. And he
gave to us the gospel of humanity the
greatest gospel that can be preached the
gospel of humanity.
lie was not afraid to speak his thoughts:
neither was he afraid to die. For many
vears be and death lived near neighbors.
He was alwavs willing and ready to meet
and greet this thing called 'death; and lor
many months he sat in the deepening twi
light waiting for the night waiting for the
light. In his brain, were "the blessed mem
ories of the d.iy, and in his heart were
mingled the dawn and dusk of life, he was
not afraid.
Cheeriul everv moment, the laughing
nymphs of day oid not desert him. They
remained that they might clasp the hand of
the veiled and f ilent sisters of the night
when thev should come. And when they
did come," Walt Whitman stretched his
hands to both; on one sido, the nymphs
or day; on the other the silent sisters of the
night. And so, hand In hand, between
smiles and tears, he reached his Journey's
end. From the frontier of life, lrom the
Western nave-kissed shore he sent us mes
sages of content and hope. And those mes
sages seem now like strains of muslo blown
by the mystio trumpeter from death's pale
realm.
Keasons for Gratitude to Whitman.
To-day we give baok to Mother Nature, to
clasp and kiss, one of the bravest, sweetest
souls that ever lived in human clay charit
able as the air, generous as nature, negli
gent of all except to do and say what he be
lieved he should do and should say.
And I, to-day, thank him, not only for yon
but for my self, for all the brave words he
has utterod. I thank him to-day for all the
brave words he has uttered. I thank him to
day for all the great and splendid words he
has said In favor of liberty, in favor of man
nnd woman, in favor of motherhood, in
favor of fathers, in favor of children. And I
thank him for the brave words be has said
on the subject of death. Since he has lived
death is less fearful than ho was before, and
thousands and millions will walk down into
the dark valley of the shadow holding Walt
Whitman by the hand, long after we are
dead. The brave words he has spoken will
sound like trumpets to the dying. And so I
lay this poor wreath upon this great man's
tomb. 1 loved him living, and I love him
still.
There were wreaths and other floral tokens
from E. C Stedman, Thomas Bailey and
Mr. and Mrs. Fairchilds, of Boston; David
Lezenski, of San Francisco, while Dr. John
son and Mr. Wallace, of Bolton. England,
cabled an order for a handsome wreath.
With Mr. Stedman's wreath came a verse of
poetry:
Stars cover the hilltops
Where your dnst shall lie
Even as we sav goodhy,
Goodby, old Waltl
FINDLAY'S FURIOUS FIEND
DEALS DEATH BLOWS TO HIS DAUGH
TERS AND rOKMERWIFE.
His Whole Lire a History of Cruelty and
Crime, of Which This Last Is a Bloody
Culmination The Perpetrator in the
Soldiers' Home.
FnJDliAY, March 30. Special The
bloodiest tragedy in the history of the city
occurred here this morning, in the attempt
of Joseph Lytle to murder his wife and two
daughters with a hatchet which he had
sharpened especially for this purpose. Lytic
is an old soldier, whose wife obtained a
divorce some time ago on the ground of
cruelty. He went to the Soldiers' Home at
Dayton, but returned Sunday night and
Dayton, but returned bunday night and
tried to get his wife to live with him again.
Chit TATTi!tf a1 Yitt, in elm. f fna Tinticn A
few days. His grown daughters were bitter
ly opposed to this move, and this Lytle re
sentcd, and threatened to kill the girls if his
plans were interfered with.
Last night, after a wrangle, the old man
went to bed, but arose at 0 o'clock this
morning and got a hatchet, which, be now
confesses, he sharpened for the bloody deed,
and attacked his daughter Delia as she came
into the room, splitting her skull and mu
tilating her head horribly. The eldest
daughter, Emma, came to her sister's rescue
and met the same fate, being frightfully in
jured, but yet alive. The mother came into
the room, crying:
"Joe, you won't kill me?" To which the
murderer replied:
"Mother, I will have to do you with the
rest," and inflicted six ghastly wounds in
her head, which will prove fatal.
Although the women yet live, Lytle is in
jail. The ieeling against him is intense,
and it will take but little persuasion for a
mob to break into the jail and lvnch the
fiend. Large crowds are upon the street
and about the jail, and Findlay mav have a
hanging before morning. Lytle is one of
the most desperate men this county ever
produced, and has served one term in the
penitentiary for inhumanly treating a
child. His whole life has been one long
story of fiendish cruelty to his family and
all with whom he came in contact. The
youngest daughter cannot possibly live un
til morning, but Emma, the oldest daugh
ter, will possibly survive. Lytle, while a
drinking man, was perfectly sober when he
committed the deed. He is as calm and
self-possessed in his cell as if he had done
nothing wrong, freely talking, however, of
his bloody work, and confessing that he
came home from the Soldiers' Home on pur
pose to kill his daughters, whom he blames
with being the cause of his wife obtaining
her divorce.
NOT RUN BY PITTSBURGERS.
An Officer of the Indian Rights Associa
tion Writes a Stinging Letter to Senator
"Wolcott Why the Ute Removal from
Colorado Is Opposed.
Philadelphia, March 30. Herbert
Welsh, Corresponding Secretary of the
Indian Bights Association, to-day sent to
Washington a letter addressed to Senator
E. O. Wolcott, of Colorado, replyinsr to cer
tain strictures upon the Indian Bights Asso
ciation. Mr. Welsh puts it:
You have made an open attack upon the
Indian Rights Association and C. C. Painter,
its Washington agent, iu regard to the pro
posed removal of the Ute Indians lrom their
present reservation in Colorado to a pro
posed larcelv sterile and inaccessible reser
vation in Utah. The public nature of your
assault demands an equally public response.
It is reported that you charged that "The
Indian Rights Association had been organ
ized for high and noble purposes, but had
been deceived and misguided by its paid
agent in the interest of the Pittsburg Cattle
Company, and that the agent was now lobby
ing in an unholy cause."
In response, permit me, on behalf of this
association, to say we have known C C.
Painter, whom you have chosen to insult,
for ten years, and that his character for
sound Judgment, integrity and courage is
unimpeachable. It Is true that he is a "paid
agent" of the Indian Rights Association, In
precisely the same sense that vou aro a
paid agent" of tho people of Colorado.
That cither he or this association is working
in the interest of the Pittsburg Cattle Com
pany Is lalse. The Indian Rights Associa
tion is, indeed, working to prevent the re
moval of the Ute Indians from theirpresent
lands in Colorado, for reasons that have
already been forcibly stated, not only by
this association, but by certain of your own
constituents resident in Denver, whose
character and position are such that you
will hardly dare to insult them as you have
done.
In stating his reasons why the TJtes
should not be removed, Mr. Welsh says it
would remove them from civilized sur
roundings; would cause needless expense,
and would be special class legislation.
PROPOSED PEOPLE'S CHURCH.
A Topeka Minister Has a New Plan for
Religion In Politics.
Topeka. Kan., March 30. Special
Kev. W. G. Todd, for two years pastor of a
Unitarian church in this city, has issued a
call for a mass meeting Sunday afternoon to
organize the People's Church. To-day Mr.
Todd appeared before the People's Party
Central Committee, and attempted to inter
est these politicians in his scheme. He was
informed that as a central committee nothing
could be done, but as individuals they
wished him godspeed. The city pastors
have always fought the People's party for
its alleged socialistic and un-American ten
dencies. It is Mr. Todd's idea to organize
in the larger towns People's churches, at
which laboring men can assemble and dis
cuss what he terms "moral and political
questions." Many of the Peoples party
politicians here have been attending his
meetings, as he preaches political sermons
almost exclusively.
Rev. Mr. Todd came to this city from
Massachusetts, and to-day stated that life on
the frontier had shown him the injustice of
the social and political conditions which
apply in the East
The World's Fair Building Bond.
Harp.I8BUkg, March 30. The contract
and bond of Nesbit & Coder, of this city,
who will erect the Pennsylvania building
at Chicago have been approved by the Gov
ernor and Attorney General. The bond is
lor $50,000, with the City Trust Surety and
Safe Deposit Company of Philadelphia as
suretv.
THE PrTTSBTJBG-
BORROWE LET IT GO.
The Correspondence in Beference to
That Famous Unfought Dnel
WAS NOT SOLD BY SECOND FOX.
Colonel Ochiltree Explains How It All Came
to Ee Printed.
IT WAS BOUND TO LEAK OCT SOON
fBT CABLE TO TBS DISPATCH.
London; March SO. Copyright. The
only information that has been obtained in
London about the Drayton-Borrowe aflair
since the arrival of the Majeitio last week
has been through the medium of the Paris
Herald. If the statements of that journal
are correct, Borrowe and Milbank are en
deavoring to make it appear that Edward
Fox, who was Borrowe's other second in the
duel that did not occur, had given the cor
respondence for publication without author
itation. Fox cabled Borrowe several days
ago asking if he had made any such state
ment, and has as yet received no reply.
In justice to Fox it is necessary that The
Dispatch correspondent should say that
Borrowe called with Fox upon The Dis
patch correspondent the day before the
Majestic sailed, and in the smoking room of
the Hotel Victoria Borrowe authorized Fox
to give The Dispatch the correspondence
for publication so soon as it became appa
rent that the story ot the quarrel was likely
to appear in any newspaper in England,
France or America.
By Colonel Tom Ochiltree's Advice.
The period of publication, Borrowe told
The Dispatch correspondent, in Fox's
presence he (Borrowe) would leave entirely
to the judgment of Fox and Colonel Thomas
Ochiltree. It was Colonel Ochiltree who
introduced Fox and Borrowe, soon after the
latter's arrival- in England, and it was at
the Colonel's request that Fox acted for
Borrowe.
.Borrowe s reason tor wishing the corres
pondence published, if the story of the duel
got into the newspapers, was simply to pro
tect nimselt lrom Drayton s charge ot cow-
a That some.story of the affair would
800n get into print was inevitable. Both
YTiAn 4alt.jl oliAnf If nnAt.lv .TWowfnn Atrn
men talked about it openly. -Drayton even
mentioned it at the St James Club to a
correspondent of an American newspaper,
and all ot Borrowe's. friends had read the
correspondence and talked of the matter in
public places without reserve, and when it
was known that both men had sailed on the
Majestic gossip about them naturally be
came more active, and on Thursday a news
agency in London received an item from
Paris to the effect that Drayton was about
to bring suit for divorce against his wife,
and relating briefly the story of the trip to
Paris lor the purpose of a duel of Borrowe
and Drayton.
Bonnd to Get Into Print.
The same day The Dispatch correspond
ent received a query from New York about
the affair, and Colonel Ochiltree and others
of Borrowe's friends were swept down upon
by the newspaper reporters. Fox and
Ochiltree met that afternoon and agreed
that the time for the publication of the
correspondence had arrived, and the letters
were handed over to The Dispatch corre
spondent, after Fox had carefully expunged
all allusions in them to Mrs. Drayton, par
ticularly that one contained in Aurelian
Scholl's note.
Neither Fox nor Ochiltree are responsible
for anything in The Dispatch's story of
the affair, with the exception of the corre
spondence. The remainder was common
talk among nearly all the Americans in
London and Paris. The principal marvel of
it all is that the story was kept out of print
so long.
I asked Colonel Ochiltree to-day what
was his understanding of the arrangement
between Borrowe and Fox about the publi
cation of the correspondence with regard to
the duel.
"My understanding was," sad Colonel
Ochiltree, "that Fox was to publish the
correspondence when he and I agreed that
the story was about to become public. I do
not think I ever heard Milbank acquiese in
this understanding. However, the state
ments that I understand have been made iu
some New York newspapers, that I had a
pecnuiary interest in the publication of the
correspondence are too absurd to deny."
The Colonel's Gallantry Crops Out.
Colonel Ochiltree went on to say: "I
was called into this matter at one stage by
the counsel of Mrs. Drayton to act in an
advisory capacity. I sought in every way
to shield her name lrom the publicity at
tending the proposed meeting between her
husband and Borrowe. My advice to her,
both by letter and conversation, was to
seek the protection ot her lather and
mother, and upon her telling me of certain
admonitions in her mother's letters, I
begged her to obey them. I sympathize
sincerely with her in her disconsolate con
dition and terrible surroundings. I am
bound to say that she behaved in the most
prudent and proper fashion during the
time I was cognizant or her residence in
London."
According to the Paris Herald, the New
York World has published an interview
with Edward Fox, in which he is made to
say that Milbank and Borrowe practically
edited The Dispatch's story, as published,
before leaving London. Fox wishes it to be
distinctly understood that he made no such
statement
"A reporter of the TTorW came to me at
Knebwortb, where I was visiting a friend,"
said Fox, "and asked me two questions, to
both of which I replied that I had absolutely
nothing to say."
Harry Wood Belotte, a young Virginian
who was Fox's host, and who was present
during the conversation between Fox and
the TVbrW reporter, substantiates Fox's
statement
MURDERED BY A BARTENDER,
A'Saloonkeeper Killed by a Man Whom He
Considered Dishonest
New York, March 30. Special Will
iam Myer, a young German bartender, shot
snd killed his employer, Stephen G. Rock
efeller, shortly after 1:30 o'clock this after
noon, in the latter's barroom, at 209 West
street Myer, who had been discharged
about an hour before, came in and walked
up to the bar. A discussion began about a
recommendation. Rockefeller broke out
with an oath, "You Dutch loafer, get out of
here." Myer was somewhat stupid with
drink, and began in a clumsy wav to
protest Rockefeller came from behind the
bar and pushed Myer into the street. A
moment later Myer returned. Rockefeller
took hold of him again and pushed him out
the door. Half a minute later Myer reap
peared in the doorway, and pointing a big
revolver- at Rockefeller, who was standing
in the middle of the room, he fired.
Rockefeller clapped his hand to his side
with a yell of pain, and another pistol shot
rang out in the doorway. As Mver rushed
out and started on a run toward Harrison
street, Rockefeller struggled to the door,
groaning, and cried "murder." He died
shortly afterward.
TAYL0B MEETS HIS WIFE NO. 12.
The Pennsylvania Bigamist Identified by
the latest of His Victims.
New Yokk, March 30. Special' The
twelfth wife of James Taylor appeared at
the Tombs Court this morning to identify
her husband. Wife No. 12 was Miss Hatta
Gwynn before she married James Taylor,
who was then Frank Brown, on December
10, 1891. December 3 a smooth-faced, bald
headed, one-armed man came to the board
ing house which she kept in Boston, and
said he owned large cattle ranches near Los
Angeles; He gave his name as Colonel
DISPATCH, THUESDAY
Frank Brown. December 3 Colonel Frank
Brown began to woo Miss Hatta Gwynn.
December 10 he won her.
When Justice Duffy asked if that was not
very quick work, Mrs. Taylor-Brown
blushed and answered: "But, Your Honor,
he was so ardent," Colonel and Mrs. Brown
left Boston December 11 to visit Mrs.
Brown's mother, Mrs. Gwynn, who lives at
Freepoit, Me. In Freeport Colonel Brown
made inquiries about Mrs. Gwynn's prop
erty. When he learned that it was in trust
he at once took Mrs. Brown back to Boston.
December 17 he disappeared. Taylor was
brought up from the prison and identified
as Brown. Taylor squirmed and answered:
"I never saw you, woman." "Oh," cried
Miss Gwvnn, "the wretch! I'll faint unless
he goes.'" "Go ahead and faint," said
Taylor.
DINKELSPIEL'S EXPLOITS.
THE AMERICAN INSURANCE
GCIXS LONDONERS.
SHARK
A Pittsburg Man Also Badly Bitten The
Former New York Life Insurance Agent
Repeats the Game He So Successfully
Worked In Detroit.
London, March 30. William Dinkel
spiel, formerly an agent of the New York
Life Insurance Company, who gained con
siderable notoriety at Detroit in connection
with his.insurance methods, and who started
in business here, has failed with liabilities
amounting to 5135,000. His assets are not
worthSlO. At a meeting held by the creditors
Dinkelspiel ascribed his insolvency to his
heavy expenses, the exorbitant interest he
was compelled to pay and to bis losses at
betting and other forms of gambling. An
official receiver was appointed. The debtor
came to England in 1890 without capital.
Dinkelspiel stated that he was tne agent
of a large company. He had an office in
Queen Victoria street, but this gives no
sign of his business beyond the lettering in
the door, which reads: "William Dinkel
spiel, Agent" Baron von Stern, M. P. for
the Stowmarket division of Suffolk, is
among the creditors. He has a ckim of
4,000 against Dinkelspiel.
Colonel Tulley, proprietor of the Insur
ance Review, .told a press representative to
day that he had followed Dinkelspiel's
career in America, and also since he had
come to "work the racket" here. Dinkel
spiel succeeded in doing a very large busi
ness in .England, and probably has got the
New York Life office into about as much
trouble here as in America. It is under
stood that large premiums had to be re
turned on his business by the London man
ager, after Dinkelspiel had drawn his com
mission, for which the manager was re
sponsible. ,
The creditors, besides Baron Stern, In
clude Colonel North, the nitrate king, $10,
000; Sir William Farmer, 59,030; Fisher
Smith, London manager, $15,000; S. Mac
Leay, London, 532,500; J. S. Brown, Pitts
burg, ?2,063; Peter Dollar, livery stable
keeper, $375; International Fur Stores, $375:
Redlern, tailor, $175; Madame Schwabe,
court dressmaker, $2,400. Dinkelspiel's
method was to get some provincial man to
insure as a decoy duck, on a promise of in
surance tor nothing if he allowed his name
to be used. Dinkelspiel lived in the West
End in luxury. Most of the claims against
the estate are legitimate. He owes rent for
his office. There is no more room for men
like Dinkelspiel, as the Equitable, the Mu
tual and the New York Lile companies have,
entered into an arrangement to make their
existence impossible.
UNCLE SAM'S PROTECTION
Extended Over the Argentine, According to
an English Correspondent, With a Wild
Theory In His Head Brazil Thrown
Over for Her Southern Neighbor.
London, March 31. The Times corre
spondent at Buenos Ayres telegraphs as
follows:
An indiscreet notice In the press, the ori
gin of which has been traced to one of the
Ministry, stated that .Admiral Walker was
the bearer of happy proposals which insured
the settlement ' of1 questions between
the Argentine Republic and the
United States. This was supported by
subsequent post-prandial speeches of the
American Minister, the Secretary of the
legation and the American officers here.
Official denial led me closely to investigate
the affair. As a result. I have come to the
conclusion that the Argentine declaration,
that reciprocity with the United States has
been declined, was only half the truth,
At first the Argentine Government de
clined to hold their wni ships at the disposal
of the United States, but the Government
has now accepted the principle of Admiral
Walker's uenerons offer of United States
protection in case the Argentine Republic be
comes involvd In boundary question with
Chile and Brazil, nnd of nrotectlon asrainat
Iorelgn interference If the Argentine Repub
lic attempts to cancel her European obliga
tions. Biazll, desiring to rescind the reci
procity treaty which has obtained, as the
Brazilians declare, under promises which
have not been fulfilled,hasnow been thrown
over by the United States.
Chile might, perhaps, be attacked through
the Argentine Republic, while funds will be
advanced to Peru to enable her to pay Chile
the Tacna-Arica indemnity, the considera
tion for this being the excellent and
easily defensible port of Chlmbote, which
Is to be held ready as a United States
naval station. This is part of Secretary
Blaine's ambitious programme to destioy
European influence In the South Atlantic
and Pacific in order to seenre a good card
for the Presidental election.
TWO TOWNS TURNED CBAZY.
A Reported Discovery of a Eons Lost Mine
Makes Many Feverish.
Los Angeles, March 30. Special A
silver discovery near Lordsburg, a little
town half way between here and San Ber
nardino, has turned both towns crazy. If
the stories of prospectors are not exagge
rated, then Creede itself won't be in it with
this new silver bonanza town. It seems
that Jared Wincup, an old miner, first
struck rich silver ore in the foothill's back
of Lordsburg, last week. Two days ago he
came in with specimens that assayed $1,800
to the ton. J. H. Millzouer, a commercial
drummer, saw the specimens and followed
the old prospector to his bonanza. He un
covered a lead which he declares is richer
than any ore he ever saw in Colorado. He
staked off a claim, and to-day many pros
pectors staffed tor the new camp.
The hanging wall of the lode is quartzite,.
and the foot wall is granite. What makes
the story of this strike plausible is that in
the mountain canons, where Wincup dis
covered this silver ledge, there has been a
tradition for 30 years ot a silver mine that
was lost after its discovery by a man named
Hentz, one of the Mormons who settled in
San Bernardino. The original discoverer
died before he could guide anyone back to
the treasure in the hills, and, though sev
eral men lost their lives in a search for it,
it was never found. It is thought Wincup
stumbled on this lost bonanza.
AMERICAN TIN IN NEW YORK,
The First Carc From California Arrives by
Way of the Isthmus.
New York, March 30. Special The
first cargo of American tin ever shipped
from the West, consisting of 331 pigs, or
20,000 pounds, arrived to-day on the steam
ship Newport,, from Colon. It is from the
Temascal mines, In Contra Costa county,
Cal., which have been in operation about
three months. It was loaded on a steam
ship at San Juan, transported to Panama,
sent across the Isthmus in a car, and re
shipped at Colon.
About 3,000 tons of Welsh tin arrived at
Baltimore the other day, on the twin-screw
freighter Massachusetts.
Hair a Million Damages Wanted..
Ottawa, Ont., March 30. Between 30
and 40 claims of the British Columbia seal
ers for damages aggregating $500,000 have
been forwarded to the Department of Marine
at Ottawa in compliance with the proclama
tion requesting claims for compensation for
loss occasioned by the expulsion of sealers
from the Bering sea under the modus Vivendi.
MARCH " 31. 189a
A CASE OF CONSCIENCE.
Why Frederick Coudert Changed His Kin a
About Judge Mavrard He Thinks the
Sending Back of Returns Is Crime
Hesitation of a Judge.
Albany, N. Y., March 30. The Joint
Judiciary Committee continued investi
gating the charges against Judge Maynard
this afternoon. Mr. Ridgeway conducted
the examination of witnesses.
The first witness called was Frederick R.
Coudert, President of the Manhattan Club
of New York, ex-President of the New
York City Bar Association, and at present a
member of the association. He was one of
the signers of the report of the Association's
Committee, reflecting on Maynard.
Going into the Dntchess county returns
matter, witness said he thonght the sending
back of returns a crime. He bad reached
this conclusion after examining the evi
dence. He had made up his mind. Until
after he had read Judge Maynard's letters
he had hopedJMr. Maynard "would gay he
had not done what he was charged with
doing, or that he had not done it without re
flection. Mr. Coudert said he was President of the
Manhattan Club, and had at the Hill recep
tion on January 26 congratulated the as
semblage that the Senate was Democratic.
He attributed the result to the fearlessness
of Senator Hill. He expressed his opinion
at that time. He had changed it after
examining th evidence.
Judge jjeflly asked Mr. Coudert what he
had discovered since January 26 to make
him change his mind. When Mr. Coudert
began to answer, Judge Beilly stopped
him, but General Husted renewed the ques
tion. Mr. Coudert said that he had
discovered that Judge Maynard had, without
authority of law, removed publio records
and had given them to Mr. Evans, who had
no more right to them than he (the witness)
had. He had discovered that this was not
an act of inadvertance or of professional
zeal, but a deliberate act, after a conference
in which it had been determined that the
returns should never reach the State Board
of Canvassers.
The cose went over until to-morrow.
CHOICE PROPERTIES.
For
Three Days
Only.
Beautiful Housa and Stable, Lawn,, Trees, Etc.
LOT 120x120.
NEAR STANTON AND N. HIGHLAND.
PRICE, $12,500.
House stands In center of lot. Great bar
gain. Apply to.
KELLY & ROGERS,
6216 Perm ave., East End,
Or to
Dlll31-98
J. M. WILKINSON,
8 Wood st.
TO LET.
17 Sheffield St., Allegheny.
327 Western av., Allegheny, 8 room house,
just put In nice order; $30 a month.
Farm at Coal Creek: of about 100 acres,
nice farm house; $300 a year.
Farm at West Liberty of about SO acres
$200 a year.
Farm at S wissvale of about 20 acres; $200 a
year.
Store and dwelling, 141 Beaver av., Alle
gbeny, with stable on rear of lot; $26 month
FOR SALE.
71 Steuben St., West End, city, frame house,
7 rooms.'
263 Franklin st, Allegheny, 8 room brick
house; nice location and very reasonable.
For information concerning the above
properties apply to
FIDELITY TITLE AND TRUST CO.,
121 and 123 Fourth av., Pittsburg.
mh8-55-Trs
LOTS. LOTS.
Tenth ward, Allegheny, B. A Elliott plan.
To bona flde builaeri we will offer as an in
ducement for the next SO days some of the
choicest lots away down in price.
M. F. HIPPLE & CO.,
96 FOURTH AVE.,
or J. K. EWING, on premises.
mh3l-59-Thssu
Choice Offices For Rent
In the fireproof
HAMILTON BUILDING.
Fireproof vaults and every convenience.
RATES VERY MODERATE.
Call at office,
91 and 93 Fifth av., City. mh23-D
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY.
Wanted.
TRAVELING- trunk; state size and price. Ad
dress Trunk, Dispatch office.
AT LATIMER'S.
k
Clasps the figure closely,
but yields to every movement
the Ball's corset. There's
a perfect fit and perfect free
dom. Coils of tiny wire springs
in the sides give you both.
It's the corset for comfort.
But, if it doesn't suit you, after
wearing it for two or three
weeks, bring it back and get
your money.
j cggg.
T. M. LATIMER,
138 and 140 Federal Street
45 AND 43 S. DIAMOND.
ALLEGHENY, PA..
CHOICE PROPERTIES.
FOR SALE,
192x530 FEET.
Suitable For
MANUFACTURING SITE
STORAGE WAREHOUSE,
In Twelfth Ward. Pittsburgh with Mdinra
from Allegheny Valley and Junction Rail
roads, and fronting on river. PLANS AND
PARTICULARS AT OFFICE OF
DAVID SHAW & CO.,
mh22-93-TTS 1H2 FOURTH AVENUE.
CHOICE OFFICES
For rent in the
NEW GERMANIA SAVINGS BANK BUILDING,
Wood and Diamond streets.
Well lighted, most centrally located, all
the most modern conveniences and latest
improvements.
Possession positively given April 1, 1391
Inquire at
GERMANIA SAVINGS BANK,
NO. 7 SIXTH AVENUE.
OOl-46-TTS
FOR RENT.
3 Cloice 6-StoTTWarebooK,
MERCANTILE BLOCK,
On New Grant St., near Union station, Sev
enth ave. and Liberty st,
And adjoining the new Bindley Hardware
Company and C D. and P. Telephone Ex
change buildings, each floor 20x95, with pri
vate office, vault, elevator; steam heat fur
nished. BLACK & BAIED,
mh.2-99
95 FOURTH AVE.
FOR SALE.
CHOICE BUSINESS" PROPERTY,
LIBERTY AND SECOND STS.
Size of lot 113x100x100 feet, with substantial
S-story brick building.
Switch from P. R. R. See
W. A.HERRON & SONS,
No. SO Fourth Avenue.
mh29-SO-TO
To Let
FRONT OFFICE.
Two large offices, second floor; also one
large and one small on first floor No. 99
Fourth avenue.
Cheap rents to good tenants.
BLACK & BAIRD,
mh30-64 95 FOURTH AV.
PURCHASERS
TOR
RESIDENCE PROPERTIES,
BUSINESS PROPERTIES,
MANUFACTURING SITES,
COAL LANDS,
Call on or address
DAVID SHAW & CO.,
Real Estate and Financial ents,
no20-82-Th
152 FOURTH AVE.
EDUCATIONAL.
CURRY UNIVERSITY
KINDERGARTEN TRAINING CLASS
For teachers, organized April 4. Also,
special normal classes. Address
PRESIDENT H. M. ROWE.
mh26-124-D
BOOKKEEPING BT THE VOUCHER AND
other modern systems, penmanship and
arithmetic thorouRly taught at the Park
Instttnte, 204 North av., Allegheny, Pa. New
rapid phonosranhy and typewriting.
LEVI LUDDEN, A. 1L, Principal.
Ja2fl-rrs
INSTALLMENT
MORTGAGES.
Money loaned on mortgages payable
at periods to suit the borrower.
FIDELITY TITLE AND TRUST
COMPANY,
121 and 123 Fourth Avenue.
de3I-43-Th
CAREFUL
DRESSERS
Should examine our perfect
fitting and beautiful fresh stock
of Spring Jackets and Ladies'
Waists. Don't think of pur
chasing before seeing us and
hearing the special low prices.
We have all the successful
1
styles and guarantee you the
LOWEST PRICES .
IN THE
COUNTRY.
mh!8-TTS
CHOICE PBOPEBTIES.
FIRST FLOOR,
79
FOURTH AVE.
The offices of this company are now at
the above address, and we will be elad to
have you call for maps, plans or other in
formation regarding
KENSINGTON,
The new manufacturing city on the Alle
gheny Valley Eailroad,
18 MILES FROM PITTSBURG.
Whose population now numbers over 2,000
people, and within whose borders there
have been erected since June 10, 1891, more
than 600 HOUSES, SHOPS AND STOEEa
There will be needed to accommodate the
1,800 Additional Workmen who
will be employed during the year 1892 ia
the GREAT
Now being built by the Chambers Glass Co. ;
the EOLLING MILL which will be built
during April and 3Iay by the Pittsburg Re
duction Co.; the Great FLINT GLASS
WORKS of the Excelsior Flint Glass Co.,
now being completed, and at the other
FACTORIES NOW IN OPERATION,
which are TO BE ENLARGED to double
their present size and capacity,
Dwelling Houses,
Boarding Houses,
Stores, Shops.
Brick houses, frame houses, houses of all
kinds and sizes are needed at
KENSINGTON.
So come to our NEW OFFICES AT 79
FOURTH AVE., GET FREE TRANS
PORTATION, VISIT KENSINGTON, be
convinced that from its location, its accessi
bility 28 TRAINS DAILY, its present
outlook, there is
No Better Place to Invest
Yoursavines than at KENSINGTON. It
will pav you to BUY A LOT AND BUILD
A HOUSE TO RENT. You can rent to
good tenants soon as contract for house is
given out and cellar dug. Plenty of work
now for first-class carpenters, painters and
paper hangers.
COME TO NEW OFFICES,
79 Fourth Avenue,
And get full particulars about
KENSINGTON.
If you cannot come, write for informa
tion, plans, etc., to
79 Fourth Ave., Pittsburgr, Pa.
mh29-8-TTS
11ESORT HOTELS.
HOTEL BATES
AND CIBCCI.AKS
Hay Be Obtained at THE DISPATCH'S
Business Office, Smlthfleld and Diamond.
mhlS
Atlantic City.
THE VICTORIA,
Ocean End, South Carolina avenue. Open
all the year. AL WILLIAMS.
mh2!W9-TThssu
THE IRVINGTON,
On the Beach. Improved by the addition of
music and billiard halls. Elevator, Sun
parlors. Filtered'water. Service nrst-olass.
mh2Wl-D CHAMBEKS 4 HOOPES.
THE CHALFONTE,
ATLANTIC CITY.
Directly on the Beach. Sea water baths In
house. Opens January 30, 1892.
Jtt5-M-D & ROBERTS A SONS.
THE HOTEL STICKNEY,
Atlantic City, N. J., one hundred feet from
ocean, Kentucky ave.: steam heated, elec
tric bell, sun parlors, etc. $2 to 52 50 per day?
9 to 13 per week. L. V. STICKNEY.
mhl-38-D
THE ROSSMORE
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
Location unsurpassed. Steam heat. All
conveniences.
mh27-192 MRS. JOHN P. DOYLE.
HOTEL WELLINGTON.
Ocean end of Kentucicy avenue,
Atlantic City. N. J.
M. A. 4 H. S. MILNOB.
Circulars at Dispatch office. rahM-TS
J. O. FLOWER,
JDejcLtaJ. Office
437 IBPCSf VAB.
J7-55IT1
TAiinRiNn.
Correct Winter Suitings and Overcoatings
H. & C V. AHT.KB3,
Merchant xuora.
S0 Smlthfleld st
no25-43TTAS
M.MAY, SONS & CO.
FINE DYEING AND CLEANING.
K Sixth ave, Pittsburg, Fa..
Telephone 2063. mhlS-S&Tra

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