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Staunton vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1860-1896, April 11, 1879, Image 1

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I. a. nmn t.a. mobton
Tbo Staunton Vindicator.
PiUiiM kj - •- - TINSLEY 4 MIM8N
SCBSC RIPTION.
S8 Fbb Annum, Invariably in Adtancb.
Cknltt in tbe City Sets per week, payable to Carrier
-CLUB BATES
W Any one sending us ten new Subscribers and
WO will be entitled to one year’s subscription gratis.
Any one sending fire or more new prepaying subscri
ber, may retain ten per cent, of subscription price
a. a eemmission.
VOL 34.
STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 1879.
NO. 15.
LEVY BROTHERS’
MANUFACTURERS AND RETAIL DEALERS
GRAND BAZAAR
30 Main Street, Staunton, Virginia.
Spring Goods, Daily Arrival:
CASHMERES. SILKS, BUNTINGS, POPLINS
in all designs and shades.
SEE OUR FLOOR OIL CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Percils, Cambrics, Cretons, Calicos,
Large and handsome assortment on display.
SEE OUR FLOOR OIL CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Victoria Lawns, Swiss, Pique. Check Muslin, Marseilles,
all in the greatest abundance and quality.
SEE OUR FLOOR OIL CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Towels, Napkins, Table Covers, Piano Covers,
in considerable variety and very cheap,
SEE OUR FLOOR OIL CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Sheetings, Cottons. Deiiir.% Ducking and Ted Tick,
at a great reduction on former prices.
SEE OUR FLOOR OIL CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A SARD.
Mens’ Wear in Cassimer, Cotonade and Linen,
from Charlottesville, Manchester, Richmond and Belfast.
SEE OUR LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Ladies, Misses, Boys and Mens’ Straw Hats,
in the very latest styles and designs.
SEE OUR LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
LEVY BROTHERS
CALL PARTICULAR ATTENTION
To these superior make of Ladies undergarments, and are prepared to com
pete in finish, design and quality with any house in the United States. With
extensive experience and great facilities in manufacturing—it is impossible to
do any better any where. Every article neatly finished.
Ladies Gowns from 75 cents to §2.00.
“ Chemise “ 45 “ “ $1 50. *
“ Skirts “ 40 “ “ $3.50.
“ Drawers “ 50 “ “ $1.25.
“ Aprons “ 25 “ “ 75.
SEE OUE LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT 25 CENTS A YAED.
OUR GENTS SHIRTS
Speak for themselves, we have sold several hundred dozen in the past three
years and no fault can be found with their fit, style or fi.iish.
SEE OUE LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YARD.
Gents White dress shirts only $ 50.
« “ “ “ “ $ 75.
“ Best “ “ *• “ $1.00.
SEE OUE LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YAED.
Germantowu Wool, Zepher, Shet land Wool and Yarn,
In all colors and in great varieties.
SEE OUE LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YAED.
Hosiery, Gloves, Ties and Ribbons,
Splendid stock always on hand.
SEE OUE LINEN TABLE CLOTH AT ONLY 25 CENTS A YAED.
LEVY BROTHERS’
GRAND DRY GOODS BAZAAR,
Staunton Virginia,
april 4
g TAUNTON WAGON FACTOBY.
W. W. GIBBS,
MANUTACTDR1B 0»
FARM AND SPRING WAGONS
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, &C.
WA JON MAKER’ AND BUILDERS’
MATERIAL
n>«rwr than ever offered befo e in this market.
SendSr prioe lists and circnlars.
W. W. GIBBS.
auzS-lr
G
BEAT REDUCTION
115 JPRlOESj |
OF ALL KINDSJJOF
FURNITURE,
Spring Beds,
UNDERTAKING, &C.,
At
I. M. WILKES,
No. 30 Main Street
*»“Brteeisem on arwiticatio*. «**••
_*SS?
JJEMOVAL!
LIPSCOMB k SOMERVILLE
have moved their stock ot
CHUSI A, GLASSWARE,
HOUSE FURNISHING, &C., *C.,
to the large store Room,
NO. IS WEST MAIN STREET
lormerly occupied by P. B. Huge & Bro., next dooi
to lir. N. Wayt & Bro’s Di ug Store.
They have a large and well assorted stock whict
they will sell cheap lor cash. decA tf
STANDARD
MIXED TEA
HE-NO
CHOP.
BAKER BROS.
GUARANTEE
THIS TEA
PURE
AND FREE
from all
The following are five good rei
sons why He-No Tea should t*
used iu preference to other teas •
1. Being packed In origins
pound and hall-p >und packages
made of Japanese Tea papei, th
strength aud flavor are better rt
tallied.
2. It is a mixture or many flavor!
experience having proved such t
be the tea that gives universal sal
isfaction.
3 The flavor is the natural oni
and that it is unadulterated is th
strongest argument in favor of it
hialthfulness.
4. The leaf not being colored c
polished, improves the drinkin
(pialiiyand ies-on*the cost.
5. It is an uncolored tea, such a
the Chinamen themselves drink.
The name ‘HE-NO ’ and the styl
ADULTE
RATION.
of package are patented, to prc
. ...-•- . ...
teet the importers and the publi
from imitation, and to retain it
reputation.
Wholesale and Retail,
mav!7
BAKER BROS.
w
HEAT! WHEAT!!
AND OTHER GRAIN WANTED
10,000 Bushels Prime Wheat,
10,000 Bushels Pi ime Corn,
10, 00 bushels Prime Oats,
2,000 Bushels Prime Rye,
Delivered along the line of the C. SO. R. R., am
the Valiev Railroad.
june7-lvcar P. B. SUBLET!.
rJ^'HE UNDERSIGNED WILL HAVE A
LARGE SUPPLY OF
COAL AND LUMBER
constantly on hand, and will be pleased to accon
modate our friends, and the public generally. _
aug24-tl LAHEW & LEWIS.
■yyOOL! WOOL!!
PRIME WOOL WANTED,
f*r which the highest market price will be paic
Twelve ( 2) years’experii nee in this maiket. ha
satislied us that it is to the farmers’ interest to was
is wool well. Oeim>'d see us before selling.
apv2o BAKER BROS
M
tobaccc
S I *..
PUIUIAM
!
NEW FIRM.-We wish to call the
ladies to our new stock of goods, c^re,J" J r"
well selected by MRS. M. E. FAGAN. She
tant attendance upon the business, and will be g. “
o seeh er o d friends at No. 7 North New Streel
Person wiihing fixtures for Sewing Machines cai
p “uppliad there, and also the best plaiter in th
-ET VeUfPfflkEPHERD * CO.
Hand and machine sewed
BOOTS AN© GAITERS,
Custom made *tio ‘.wsyvanted in fit
»ed <juAlUy,fpr,»ale low, at
wtfU '
C.fc. WKLI4UP
TUTTS
PILLS!
INTRODUCED, I860.
1 TORPID LIVER
Ss the fruitful source of many diseases, promi
nent among which are
DYSPEPSIA, SICK-HEADACHE, COSTIVENESS,
DYSENTERY, BILIOUS FEVER, AGUE AND FEVER,
IAUNDICE, PILES, RHEUMATISM, KIDNEY COM
PLAINT, COLIC, ETC.
SYMPTOMS OF A
TORPID LIVER.
Ijom of_Appetite and Nauaaa, the bowril
mb costive, bat aometimea alternate with
looaeneae, Fein in the Bead, aoppmpanlett
ythaDuUaeiifletionlnthebeckceJCtJB^t .
in the right aide and under the ahouldef
blade, follneBa after eating, with a dMn*
clination to exertion of body or mind, Irri*
Lability of temper, Low apirita, Loaa of
memory, with a feeling of having neglected
Lome duty, General wearineaa; Dirmneaa,
Fluttering at the Heart. Dote before the
eyes, YellowSkin, Headache generally
over the right eye, Restlessness at night
with fitful dreams, highly colored Urine*
IF THESE WARNINGS ABE UNHEEDED,
SERIOUS DISEASES WILL SOON BE DEVELOPED.
TUTT’S PILLS
are especially adapted to such
cases, a single dose effects
such a change of feeling aa to
astonish the sufferer.
TUTT’S PILLS
ire compounded from anbstr aces that ore
free from any properties that can Injure
the most delicate organization. They
Search, Cleanse, Parity, aud Invigorate
the entire System. By relieving the en
gorged Liver, they cleanse the blood
from poisonous humors, and thus Impart
health and vitality to the body, causing
the bowels to act naturally, without
which no one can feel well.
A Noted Divine says:
Dr. TUTT:—Dear Sir; For ten years I have been
s martyr to Dyspepsia, Constipation and Piles. Last
Spring your Pills were recommended to me; I used
them (but with little faith). I am now a well man,
have good'appetite, digestion perfect, regular stools,
piles gone, and I have gained forty pounds solid flesh.
They are worth their weight in gold. _ _
s worth their weight in gold.
Rgv. R. I«. SIMPSON, Louisville, Kj
TUTT’S PILLS.
Their first effect is to Increase the Appetite,
and cause the body to Take on Fle.li, thus th.
system is nourished, and by their Tonic Ac.
tion on the Directive Organa, Regular
6u»ols are produced.
DR. J. F. HAYWOOD,
OF NEW YORK, SAYS:
“ Few diseases existthat cannot be relieved by re
Storing the Liver to its normal functions, and for
this purpose no remedy his ever been invented that
),aa ,3 h >ppy an effect as TUTT’S PILLS.”
SOLD EVERYWHERE, PRICE 25 CENTS.
Mice 35 Murray Street, New York.
%r Dr. TUTT’S MANUAL of Valuable Infor
mation and Useful Beceipts " will bemaiied/r«
on application.
TUTT’S HAIR DTE.
Gray Hair or Whiskers changed to a Glossy
Black by a single application of ti.is Dye- It im
parts a Natural C“lor, acts Iasttm aneously, and is,
as Harmless as spring wn ter. Sold by Druggists, at
t by express on receipt of $1.
Office, 35 Murray St., New York.
mai*21- lyr.
CABD. _
^ Mrs. C. A Gladke has for several month- been ii
the northei n and eastern ci its, and will n ot retun
for son e two or three weeks. The object of her e*
tended sojourn is to attend the Spring openings of
MILLINERY GOODS,
in Baltimore and New York, in order that she m ay
by h.r person il observation and examination, giv
her customers the benefit of ihe very
LATEST STYLES,
and make selection from
FIRST HANDS
She will remain long enough to be present at th<
Second Openings, which generally occur
about the middle of March. These
are regarded as most impor
tant, as they generally
SETTLE THE STYLES
which are to prevail during the approaching seaso
With the fecili ies she will enjoy, Mrs. G. will b«
able to make selections from the latest
PARIS AND BERLIN
IMPORTATIONS,
’ and the ladies in St'untnn, upon her return, will
' have the advantages of the larger cities presented at
" their door, both as regards
. PRICE AND STYLE.
r
5
S
s
)
Mrs. Gladke’s well known taste will have an am
ple field to iiMuUe itself, and the stock she will
bring back wi h her will be one the equal of which
has never been S'-en in t is section. It will embrace
the latest no ehies and styles of Paris. Berlin and
New Yo;k, and illaffo d a ich v rietv f.oin which
the ladies of Staunton and vicinity can select their
HATS AND BONNETS,
IMPORTED FLOWERS,
BROCADE RIBBONS, &C.,
from t ie cream of European importations,
mail! tf
tJSHOENBDEG & SHAFEK’S
LIVERY
AND
BAGGAGE TRANSFER COMPANY,
New street, near Railroad,
STAUNTON, VA.
All orders for Hacks, Buggies and
Riding Horses, promptly attended to.
Baggage called for or delivered to all
parts of the city, and for all Trains, at
all hours. Day and Night, 20-1
QAREIAGF.S AND BUGGIES.
I wish to inform my friends that I have moved my
Carriage Shop to my new building near the Virginia
Hotel, where I will keep on hand carriages and bug
j gies of evety description. By close attention to bu
j lness and fair dealing, I expect to give entire satis
action. I will pay strict attention to repairing. Give
ne a call before purchasing.
Ianl4-tf J. H. WATER
FREE I
‘oy tue speedy Cure of Seminal Weakness, Lost
f&HjfiOQd G»id all disorders brought on by indi»
*F£#ivQn Qt exufjys, Any Druggist has the ingre
p?, W. JA<IUEU A CO.,
130 ***** piuclonati, O.
apr4 0t
OPIUM
and morphine hsMtfnreff,
The Oriel no I an<1 on1/ obsolete
CURE SendBtunp lor
Opium Entlng, t > \V 3 Squirt^
Wortt4n$Kn, Greene Ce^lnd.
apri M
LOCAL DIRECTORY'
Masonic.—Staunton Lodge No. 13.—J. Ko'vyd
Wayt, Master; James Ker, Sect etary. Meet at their
lodge in Masonic Building the second and last Fri
day nights in each month.
Union Royal Arch Chapter—W, H. H. Lynn, High
Priest; James Ker, Secretary. Meets in Masonic
Hall the second Tuesday night in each month.
Stevenson Commandery—W. H. H. Lynn, Com
mander; James F. Patterson, Recorder. Meets in
Masonic Hall the fourth Monday in each month.
Knights of Honor.—T. C. Morton, Past Dictator;
W. W. Gibbs, Dictator; F. H. Link, Reporter. Meets
every Monday night in Charity Temperance Hall.
Odd Fellows—Staunton Lodge No. 45.—John C.
Smith, Noble Grand ;O.S. Crowder, Secretay. Meets
every Thursday n'ght in Odd Fellows Hall.
Central Encampment No- 24—W. M. Simpson
Chief Patriarch; James W.Blackburn, Scribe. Meet"
second and fourth Tuesday In each month in Odd
Fellows Hall.
Hay Makers.—W. H. H. Lvnn, Grand Sultan; A.
A. Eskridge, Secretary. Meets every Friday nigh
in Fireman's Hall.
Temperance Societies —West Augusta Lodge— A
& Hyde, W.C,T.;,C. D. Hyde, W.IA8, Mgfc
every Saturday night in Bruce’s building.
Mizpah Lodge.—Wm. J. McCawley, Worthy Chief;
John W. Bryan, Secretary. Neets every Thurs
day night in Charity Hail over Wayt's drug store.
Sons of Jonadab—Wm. B. Hyde, Worthy ■ hief:
John M Henkle, Secretary. Meets eve y Tuesday
night in Charity Hall Sons of Temperance.
8ons of Temperance—G. tl. Bunch, Wot thy Patrl
arch; Wm. Fuller. Worthy Secretary.
Juvenile Templars.—J. W. Newton, Superinten
dent^. Herbert Stiff, Secretary. 250 members—no
regular meetings,
Fire Department.—Augusta Fire Company—
Michael Cox. Captain; Thos. J. Crowder, Secretary
Meets fourth Tuesday in every month at Firemen's
HalL
Staunton Hook and Ladder C.mpany.—J. M.
Quarles, Captain; Sandy Wilson, Secretary. Meets
on first Wednesday in each month at their headquar
ters in! he Sn -livan building.
Capt. J. H. Waters, Chief Engineer of Fire De
partment.
Military.—West Augusta Guard—Wm. L. Bnm
gardner, Captain; LewisM. Bumgardner,Secretary
Meets in their armory in the Wayt building every
Monday night. Regular meetings first Monday in
each month
Staunton Artillery—A H. Fultz, Captain; N. M.
Varner, Secretary. Meets at their armory near the
C. & O. Depot every Tuesday night. Regular meeti
ngs second Tuesday in each month.
Stonewall Brigade Band.—Prof. A. J. Turner, Con
ductor; E. M. Cushing, President; W H. Barkman
Secretary. Meets Tuesday and Friday nights every
week.
Religious—Young Men’s Christian Association
H.M Mcllhany, Piesident; J. E. Guy Secretary
Meets at their rooms in City Hall for all devotiona
exercises every Sunday evening at 3K P. M. Direc
tory meetings at the call of the President. Library
open every evening from 5 to 9 P. M.
_
CHAMBfiB SOtNB.
She arose from her untroubled sleep.
And put away her soft brown hair,
And in a tone as low and deep
As lore’s first whisper breathed a prayer—
Her snow-white hands t 'aether pressed,
Her blue eyes she tered in ihe lid.
The folded linen on h r b < a-t
Just swel iug with the charms it hid;
And from her long and flowing dress
Escaped a bare a d slende foot,
Whose shape upon the earth did press
Like a new snowflake, white and “mute,"
And there from slumber, pure and warm,
Like a young spirit fresh from heaven,
Sue bowed h r slight and graceful form,
And humbly prayed to be forgiven.
O, God! if souls unsoiled as these
Need daily mercy from thy throne—
If she upon her bended knees—
Our loveliest and our purest one—
She, wi;h a face so clear and bright
We deem her some stray child of light—
If she, with those sof, eyes of t. ars,
Day after day in her first years,
Must kneel and pray for g< ace from thee—
u hat far, far deeper need have we?
How hardly, il she win not heartn,
Will our wild errois be fo g ven?
POLLY PLMBBOKE’S BABY.
“Dear me,” said Polly Pembroke, “whai
a noise and confusionl 1 am sure I should
ge crazy if I lived in the city.”
Polly Pembroke was a farmer’s daugh
ter, who had come down to New York tc
buy tne material for the first silk dress she
had ever owned—a real deep blue, to be
trimmed with velvet of a darker shade.
And Polly’s golden head was dizzy witL
the thunder of omnibus wheels, and the
rattle and rush of elevated railways, and
the succession of brilliant things in cb«
shop windows—and Polly sat holding on
to her parcels iu the great echoing depot,
ano wondering why everybody was in such
a hurry.
Por the express train was just going out,
and Polly and Miss Jones, the village
dressmaker, who had come with her to
help select the important dress, were
obliged to wait fifteen minutes for the
way train, which condescended to stop a
“Whip-poor-Will Glen,” where Poll)
lived.
She was a pretty little primrose of a
maiden, with large, wistful eyes, lovely
yellow hair, and cheeks as pink as a daisy,
while Miss Jones, who sat beside her, was
straight and stiff and upright and wrinkled
as became a single woman of sixty.
And just as Polly was wondering if
there was no end to the stream of hu
manity flowing through the wide open de
pot gate, a tall, handsome gentleman, with
a daik complexion and deep Spanish eyes,
came in with a little babe in his arms.
“Stewardess,” said he to a respectable
looking quadroon, with a scarlet silk hand
kerchief twisted around her head, who
was dusting the window-sash, “I am go
ing out in the Chicago express, and 1 have
forgotten a message that must be tele
graphed to my place o. business at once;
will you be good enough to take this child
a minute, until—”
But the stewardess l astily drew back.
“Uo, sah, ef you p,eas said she, “I
beard o’ many cases w»ere 'srectable wo
men was left wid strange cuildren on
their hands yist dis-a-way!”
Instinctively, Polly Pembroke held out
her arms.
“Let me take the baby, sir,” said she,
coloring all over with pretty eagerness.
“I’ll hold it for you.—Children are always
good with me.”
The stranger doffed his hat courteously.
“I am infinitely obliged to yon,” he
said, “and I’ll trouble you no longer than
I can help.”
“Polly! Polly! are you going mad?”
whispered Miss Jones, pulling the sleeve
of the giil’6 dress.
But Polly paid no heed to her.
“•Suppose that gentleman shouldn’t come
back?” cried Miss Jones, elevating both
bands.
Will,” said J’oJly, gently rpcklng
the little mite on frer knee. “Qb, look,
MiWjJpues! Isjr’t it pretty? I declare it’s
laughing!”
“Pretty!” groaned Mis* es, ro oug
her whitey-blue eyes sky wad.—“folly
Pembroke, I do believe you’ve taken leave
of your senses! There is the tell; the
gates are closed!”
“What of it? said Polly.
“The Chicago express has gone!”
“Well,” said Polly, “what of that?”
“Child, don’t you comprehend? Your
fine gentleman was going in the Chicago
express,” cried Miss Jones.
“I suppose he has missed the train,” said
Polly, quietly.
“Not he!” sniffed Miss Jones.—“He
has slunk quietly in b;, another way, and
is laughing in his sleeve at you and your
folly this very moment.”
“Nonsense!” said Polly.
But she looked a little disturbed, never
theless, and glanced rather anxiously at
the door through which the tall gentle
man with the Spanish eyes had disap
peared. —
“Come,” said Miss Jones, jumping up
briskly, and gathering her parcels in her
nand. “There’s the bell for our train.”
“But I can’t go and leave the child,”
cried Polly.
“Humph!” snorted Miss Jones, “Are
you going to stay here all night with it?”
“But what shall I do?” said Polly, be
ginning to be a little bewildered and
frightened. “Perhaps, Miss Jones, we had
better wait until the next train.”
“And not get home untill 9 o’clock at
night!” croaked Miss Jones.
“I don’t see what else we can do.”
But the trains came and went, and still
no one appeared to claim the baby.
Miss Jones grew desperate.
“Polly Pembroke,” said she. “I’ve no
patience with you for getting us into this
scrape. What do you suppose is to be th«
end it all?”
Polly rose quietly.
“I am going to take the child home witt
us,” said Polly.
JTUliyi
“I am!” reiterated the girl. “Poor littli
helpless innocent! what else can we do?’
* -Let it be sent to the House of Refuge
or to the poor-bouse, or some such placet’
screamed Hiss Joues.
“With those eyes?” said Polly, looking
down into the tender, pleading orbs
‘‘Never! It will be all right, I am quin
sure, Miss Jones. All this is only a mis
take. Stewardess,” to the suspiiioui
quadroon, who bad taken c; re to keep at:
safe dis ance all the while, “here is my ad
cress. Give it to the gentleman when hi
comes back.”
“Yes,” said the woman pursing up hei
lips: “But it’s my private ’pinion as no
body won’t see hide nor hair of hin
again.”
So Polly Pembroke brought home, noi
only a blue silk dress, buta dark-: yed bab;
into the bargain.
“Child,” said Deacon Pembroke, “]
can’t blame you for doing a charitable ac
l ion, but I am afraid you’ve taken a ter
rible charge upon yourself.”
“Don’t fret, father—don’t fret,” sail
Mrs. Pembroke, who was a cheery littli
body with an invincible habit of lookim
on the sunny side of everything. “H
seems a nice, healthy child enough, and 1
d; re say it will soon be called for. Besidei
don’t the Good Book say that ‘wboevei
gives one of the Lord’s little ones even <
cup of cold water, in His name, shall not
be without a reward ?”
. And so the days passed by, and the
weeks, and even Polly Pembroke, tbi
most trusting of mortals, began to tbinl
that she had been the victim of a conspi
racy, and that she was destined to beai
(he whole responsibility of this littli
nameless life.
"Mother,” said she, wistfully, “I maj
keep her, mayn’t I—if I’ll give up going ti
visit cousin Sue, in Boston, and not as!
father for a new cloak this winter? Anc
we’ll take summer boarders next season
and 111 raise poultry, and she shall be n<
expense to you, mother, indeed!”
“Well, well child,” said Mrs. Pembroke
with a moisture in her eyes, “have youi
own way.”
“you’d a deal better send it to one n!
che public institution!,” said Miss Jones
severely.
“Our little Rosebud?” said Polly, show
ering soft kisses on its velvet cheeks. “Oh.
never, never, Miss Jones 1”
“You was a big fool to begin with, an:i
I don'tsee but what you mean to be a fool
all the way through,” said Mias Jones.
She had come to bring Miss Pembroke'*
fail hat home—a venerable Leghorn,
trimmed with drab satin hows—and when
she was gone, Folly happened to pick up
the New 1 ork daily paper whieh had been
wrapped around it.
“Mother,” cried she, springing breath
lessly to her feet, “just listen to this adver
tisement!”
“ ‘If the young lady who took charge ol
an infant in the —— depot on the after
noon of Saturday, July 30, 1875, will sen
uer address to Messrs Kobel & Ltdgi r.
No. — Broadway, she will confer an ines
oimable favor,”
“Mother,” said Polly, “what does it
mean?”
“It means you,” said Mrs. Pembroke.
“Shall I answer it?” said Polly.
“Of course.” said Mrs. Pembroke.
“But suppose they want .0 taks Ro e
bud away from me?” faltered Polly.
“My dear, we must accept our fate as
Providence metes it out to us,” said the
old lady.
so Polly wrote her little note, and by
the next train the tall gent ernau with the
Spanish eyes arrived at Whip-poor-Will
Glen.
“Do you think me a heartless wretch?”
said he to Polly, with his voice choked
with emotion. “But I am not. When I
went out pf the depot that day pay foot
slipped in crossing the street, and f fell
under a horse’s feet. They carried me in
sensible to the hospital, and I lay there for
weeks in the delirium of brain fever, caus
ed by wy injuries, Top moment I return*
ed to cpnspiuuspess 1 made every inquiry’
but could hear nothing of yon.”
“I gave my address to the itewerdess,”
said Polly.
“But the stewardess had gone away. A
strange woman occupied her position who
remembered nothing of the circurpatapoes,
and for a while J actually believed that
pay motherless l*ttle treasure was lost for
eyer. How cap I ever thank you, Mis*
Pembroke, for all you have been tp my
little lsaura?”
I bo the tiny Rosebud was carried away,
| but her father brought her back several
times to see the adopted mother whom she
loved so devotedly.
‘‘Folly,’' said ,he, cneday, “Isaura is
happierwjth you than anywhere else.”
“Is she?” said Polly.
For by this, time they had become great
friends, and she had lost all her awe of the
stately gentleman.
“Ahd ib ia a singular coincidence,” he
added, v^h a ?ini|e, “that I am also.”
lAt, this Folly colored radiantly.
, What was the end of this! Can any one
guess? 1
“Perhaps if 1,’d taken the baby home and
made a fuss ovpr it the rich geutleman
]yopbf haye.fb&iried me!” said Miss Jones,
whenshe was cutt ing the white silk for the
Wpddiugidress. “l tnought Polly Pembroke
was a fool then, but I've seen cause to
change my mind since.”
' ' • -.
Kentucky Caves.
Recent exploration of several caves in
Kentucky have le-ulte 1 in the discovery
of important and interesting relics of abo
riginal life and conclusively established
the fact that they were used at least as
temporary residences or places of shelter.
Salt cave, especially, reveals a new phase
of American arci seology. This cave ap
proaches the mammoth cave in the size of
its avenues and chambers. Throughout
one of the principal passages, for several
miles, were to be traced ancient fireplaces
both for hearths and lights. The former
were indicated by circular arrangement s
of flat stones and the presence of ashes,
charocal and calcined bones; for the lat
ter purpose small piles of stones bad been
made with a hole in the center of the pile
to receive the bundle of dried fagots, per
haps smeared with grease, which were to
oe ugmea.
Bundles of these faggots, tied up with
twisted bark, were found in several places
in the cave; and cane reeds, probably of
the same character as those found in the
, Mammoth. Short aud Grand avenue caves
weie also very abundant. Penetrating
three miles from the eistrance into Salt
cave, a chamber was entered where the
dust of unnumbered years b y thick upon
the rocky floor. Here no human bones
, were found; there is every indication that
particular cave • were us. d exclusively as
places of sepulture, while other caves, as
i .n this case, served as places of habitation;
but in the dry soil were countless imprints
. of the sandaled feet of the former race
. which dwelt in these subterranean homer >
and all about lay the evidences of theb
workmanship.
Here some of their grass woven sandals,
worn th ougli at the heel and on the ball
of the foot, had been cast aside; there lay
i discarded mantle of cloth made of the
shreds of bar*, dyed in dark and ligi.t
stripes, and showing where it had once
been neatly mended, w ide on every side
were augments of bark cloth, packages
of ba.k thrtad prepared for weaving, torn
bits of fringe or tassel, dishes cut from
gourds, arrow heads of flint, pretty shells»
bored undoubtedly for use as ornaments,
and (ther relics of the aboriginal house
hold. Uareful examination of the whole
warrants the opinion that this was an ag
ricultural people; that they first used the
caves only as a place of burial, wrapping
the body, with the knees drawn up to the
chin, mummy fashion, in blankets of bark,
and laying it away in the innermost
depths of these caves with the objects ol
its earthly affection, its weapons, and per
naps some food placed near it, but that af
.erward, possibly under the pressure of
that invasion of a more savage people from
the North which seems to have caused the
extermination of the earliest^ inhabitants
of the sourthern valleys, they resorted to
the caves for secrecy and safety until
compelled to abandon the country alto
gether, The use of braided grass iu the
manufacture of sandals and other articles
jf clothing, and, indeed, all the remains
indicate an antiquity far greater than any
thing we know of the red Indians inhabit
ing that region at the time of its settle
ment by the whites.
A Glass Mountain and Road.—Mr.
P. W. .Norris, the Superintendent of the
Fellowstoue National Park, on a recent
visit to the capital gave a lecture on some
jf the natural curiosities of the region over
which he presides ami is engaged in ex
jloring. Among these may ha mentioned
as the most novel a mountain of obsidian
or volcanic glass, and a road made from
tnis material.
Near the foot of Beaver Lake the ex
plorers discovered this mountain of glass,
which there rises in hasalt-likecolumns and
countless huge masses many hundreds of
feet high from a hissing hot spring form
ing the margin of the lake, thus forming
a barrier where it was very desirable that
a wagon toad should he, as the glass bar
ricade sloped for some 300 feet high at an
angle of 46 degrees to the lake, and its
glistening surface was therefore impassa
ole, there being neither Indian nor game
track over it. To make the road, huge
tires were made against the glass to thor
oughly heat and ex pand it, and then by
dashing cold water from the lake against
the heated glass suddenly cool the latttr,
causing large fragments to break from the
mass, which were afterward broken up by
sledges and picks, but not without sevrt
lacerations of the hands and faces of the
party, into smaller fragments, with which
a wagon road one quarter of a mile long
was constructed, about midway along the
slope, thus making, it is believed, the only
road of native glass upon the continent.—
iScientiflo American.
The greatest pleasure of life is love; the
greatest treasure is coiuentment; the
greatest possession is health; the greatest
ease is sleep, and the'greatest medicine is
a true friend.
Friends do not grow on every bush,
though lovers may, and when ope puds a
good, trqq friend, oqy oqglit to value him
—pot feel ashamed ot it either.
Beware of prejudices; they like
rats, and men’s minds are like traps, f’re
.udiceg creeps in easily, bqt it is doubtful
Ijfthey eyerget oat.
A Menagerie In Winter Quarters.
A reporter of the Philadelphia “Press”
has obtained from the keeper of a menage
rie that is winterins in that city some in
teresting information in^regard to the care
of wild animals. “For the past winter,”
said the keeper, “we have been giving the
lions from fifteen to twenty pounds of raw
beef once a day; occasionally mutton is
given instead. When travelling this
amount is i ireased seven or eight pounds.
A hyena, when not on the road is allowed
twelve pounds a day, which is increased
five pounds when travelling. Leopard»)
pumas and jaguars are given three pounds
Elephants subsist principally on hay,
about half a ton ot-r day, more or 1- ss. In
fact they eat all the time aim »t, only stop
ping to play. Well, sir, those ten ele
phants there will get together and play
a half day at a time witrout stopping.
Ko#1oek at Uieif eysa and ivory. Isn’t
there some resemblance to a human being
laughing? What differ mt expressions an
imals havel Look at that elephant. Do
what you please with him, he wouldn’t
harm you; while that leopard, to your
right there, would fight as long as life
lasts.
“Does this noise continue during the
night ?”
"Well, no, not the whole night through.
As soon as dark comes the hyenas com
mence pacing up and down their cages, in
quest of food; his regular time, you know,
in his native jungle. Then the elephant
begins; the lion answers him, another lion
roars back; the panther takes it up; then
the sea lion joins with its peculiar cross
between sound an i shriek; and now comes
the monkeys, and the macaw and cockatoo
with an occasional neigh of a horse i nd
bark of a dog make a noise that is at times
deafening, but not altogether unpleasant.
Finally nothing is left of the hubbub save
the occasional chirp of a bird, when all of
a sudden the elephant will wake the echoes
and the whole gang take up the chorus.”
Found Him Out in Time.—A young
lady was addressed by a man, who, thousn
agreeable to her, was disliked by her
father, who would not consent to their
union, and so determined to elope. The
night was fixed, the hour came, he placed
the ladder to the window and in a few
minutes she was in his arms.
They mounted a double horse, and were
soon some distance from the house. After
some time the lady broke the silence by
saying: “Well, you see what proof I have
given you of my affections: I hope you
will make me a good husband.” He was
a surly fellow and gruffly answered: “Per
haps I may and perhaps not.” She made
no reply, but after a silence of some
minutes she suddenly exclaimed: “Oh!
what t hall w e doV I have left my money
behind me in my room!” “Then,” said
he, “we must go bacit and fetch it.”
They were soon again at the house, the
ladder was again placed, the lady remount
ed, while the ill natured lover remained be
low. But she delayed to come, and so he
gently called • “Are you coming ?” When
she looked out of the window and said :
“Perhaps I may and perhaps not,” and
then shut down the window, ana left him
to retuin on the double horse alone.—Ex
Rats Sucking a Horse’s Blood_A
prominent horse-dealer of this city told us
the following story this morning about the
fancy his rats (as he calls them) have for
a change of diet: He keeps a horse, and
noticed lately it showed symptoms of lame
ness in his fore legs. He examined him
carefully, but could not discover thecause.
On going to the stable one day, he, before
entering looked through the window; then
to his astonishment, he counted eleven
rats stuck on his horse’s legs stucking his
blood. He waited, expecting every mo
ment that the horse would shake them off.
Instead of doing this he remained motion
Iesa and seemed to enjoy the strange visi
tors. A rap on the window sent the rats
scurrying off. On examination of the
horse’s legs be found twenty-two little
holes, from eleven of which the blood was
flowing. The horse was removed to an
other stable and soon recovered from the
sores, but strange to say his appetite has
almost failed him. He refuses oats, and
as a consequence has fallen off in flesh, so
much so that now he is almost useless.—
Montreal [O’an.] Post.
The Hottest Spot on Earth.—One
of the hottest regions on the earth is along
the Persion Gulf, where little or no rain
falls. At Bahrin the arid shore has no
fresh water, vet a comparatively numer
ous population contrive to live there,
thanks to copious springs which break
forth from the bottom of the sea. The
fresh water is got by diving. The diver
sitting in his boat, winds a great goat
skin bag around his left arm, the hand
grasping its mouth; then takes in his right
hand a heavy stone to which is attached a
strong line and thus equipped he plunges in
and quickly reaches the bottom. Instant
ly opening the bag over the strong jet of
water, he springs up the ascending cur
rent, at the same time closing the bag, and
is helped aboard. The stone is then haul
ed up, and the diver taking breath, plun
ges again. The source of the copious sub
marine springs Is thought to be in the
green hills of Osman, some five or six hun
dred miles distant.
A Telegraphic Pen.—A new inven
tion of a real practical character, not a
mere pmdo post futurum invention like ma
ny we have heard of lately, has just been
made by Mr, E A. C’owper, the well known
mechanical engineer, It is a real tele
graphic writing machine. The writer in
London moves his pen, and simultaneous
ly at Brighton another pen is used as
though by a phantom hand, in precisely
similar curves and motions, The writer
writes in London, the ink marks in Brigh
ton. We have seen this instrument at
work, and it» marvels are quite as start
ling as those of the telephone. The pen at
the receiving end hag all, the appearance
of being guided by a spirit hand. Tl\ > ap
paratus is shortly to be made public before
the Society of Telegraph Engineers,'—
Nature,
Only actions give life thought; only
moderation gives it a charm.
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Obituaries, announcements of candidates for office
communications callingupon, advocating or opi-csin
candidates, and ail communications or notices ii per
sonal or private character, or intended or calculated
to promote any private enterprise or interest, will be
charged for as advertisements.
*9- Special notices 20 cents per line for every' in.
sertion.
FAEM AND FIBESIDE.
What the Birds Accomplish.—The
swallow, swift, and nigiithawk are the
guardians of the atmosphere; they check
the increase of inaeeis that would other,
wiso overload it. Woodpeckers, croopers
and chickadees, etc., are the guardians of
the trunks of trees. Warblers and fly
catchers protect the foliage. Black birds,
thrushes, erews and larks protect the sur
face of the soil; snipe and woodcock the
soil under the surface. Each tribe has its
respective duties to preform in the economy
of nature; and it is an undoubted fact, if
the birds were all swept from the earth,
man could not live upon it, vegetation
would wither and die, insects would be
come so numerous that no living ti>aug
could withstand their attacks. The whole
sale destruction occasioned by grasshop
pers which have lately devastated the West,
is undoubtedly caused by the thinning
out of the birds, such as grouse, piairie
hens etc., which feed upon them. The
great and inestimable good done to the
farmer, gardener and florist br birds is ouly
becoming known by sad experience. Spare
the birds and save your fruit. The iiitle
corn and fruit taken by them is more loan
compensated by the vast quantities of nox
ious insects destroyed. The long persteu.
ted crow has been found by actual experi
ment to do far more good by the vast
quantity of grubs and insects he devours
than the little harm he does in a few gr< ius
of corn he pulls up. He is one of the far
mer's best friends.—Farmer's Advocate.
How to Eat Milk.—There are many
who say, “I like milk, but milk does not
like me”—that is, it does not agree with
them. The reason for this is, that the
milk coagulates in the stomach in too firm
a curd to be easily digested. But many
who cannot drink milk, find no difficulty
in digesting a bowl of baked apples and
milk. Upon this hint the experiment has
been successfully tried, by a| physician of
large experience telling his patients w lio
could not digest milk, to use apple sacce
as a concomitant, taking a spoonful of
bread, crackers or pudding and milk. The
apple prevents the formation of a so.id
mass in the stomach, and its juice also aids
digestion, so that no distress or sense of
heaviness follows, after the meal thus ta
ken. This information is given for the
benefit of all readers, and we think it will
be worthy of trial, though perhaps not
successful in every case.
An Important Hint to Farmers.—
An intelligent farmer who is a very close
observer and a successful corn farmer,
says that he always smokes his seed com.
After selecting the seed he hangs it in his
smoke-house and smokes it well. Some
times the corn is quite black. The result
of this treatment is that the com is not
liable to rot before it sprouts and insects
do not disturb it. Where he used smoked
corn there is no necessity of replanting.
He has tested this experiment for a num
ber of years and has always been success
ful. Last year he ran out of smoked corn
while planting one field and used a small
quantity of corn that was not smoked On
the portion where the unsmoked corn was
he was compelled to replant the greater
part.
Hickory-nut Cake.—Ona cupful of
butter, two cupfuls of sugar, four eggs,
three quarters of a cupful of milk, half
teaspoon fuls soda, one teaspoonful cream
tartar, four cupfuls flour, half pound hiok
ry-nuts slightly broken. Beat the butter
and sugar; add the milk, in which you
have dissolved the soda; then add the yolk
of the eggs, well beaten; then the flour,
with cream tartar well mixed with it; then
the whites of eggs beaten stiff, and finally
the nuts. Bake in a moderate oven, and
ice it when done.
To Heal Scratches, Etc.—Borax
water will instantly remove all stains from
the hands and heal all scratches a id
chafes. To make it, pnt some crude
borax into a bottle, filled with water.
When the borax is dissolved add more to
the water uotil it can absorb no more, and
a residuum remains at the bottom of the
bottle. It is very cleansing and very
healthy. By its use the hands will be kept
in an excellent condition, smooth,soft and
white.
To Glaze a Boiled Ham.—First
brush a cold boiled ham, previously re
lieved of its skin, all over with beaten egg.
Next spread over this evenly, to the depth
of a quarter of an inch, a paste made as
follows: To a cup of powdered crackers,
add rich milk in sufficient quantity to
make a thick paste; salt and work in a
teaspoonful of melted butter. Having
spread this evenly over the ham as already
directed, set to brown in a moderately hot
oveu.
Doughnuts.—On© pint of mils, warrn_
ed with i of a pound of shortening (half
butter, half lard) i pound of sugar, one
half spoonful of salt, or less, one egg, a
little nutmeg, two tablespoons of yeast ;
mix rather thin and cover with a light or
small pillow. If mixed in the afternoon
it should be light enough to boil during
the next morning.
To Cuke a Felon.—Take out a por
tion of the inside of a lemon, and thrust
tbe„ finger into it. Or take the skin of the
inside of a fresh egg and bind it on with
the moisture of the white of the egg next
to the finger, and it will draw the small
globule that causes the sore to the surface
As it dries make new applications.
Tea Biscuit.—One pint of sour milk
or buttermilk, one teaspoonful of soda dis
solved in a very little hot water, two tea
Bpoonfuls melted butter, flour enough to
make a soft dough, but stiff enough to
handle; mix, roll, and cut out rapidly,
with as little handling as possible ; bake
in a quick oven.
Wash foe the Removal op
Fki ckles.—Barley water, made thick,
two fluid ounces: distilled water of bean
flowers, two fluid ounces; of wine two
fluid ounces. The skin is to be washed
frequently with this preparation.
Lard and gunpowder will cure frost bites

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