OCR Interpretation


Staunton vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1860-1896, April 18, 1879, Image 2

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024653/1879-04-18/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

STAUWTON, VA.
FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 18, 1819
TEE DEPARTMENT CLERKS
AROUSED.
To those now middle-aged and grave
gentlemen, resident of the Southern sec
tion of this Union, who in ragged pants
enclosing empty stomachs, stalked about
under various commanders at the handsome
sum of from twelve dollars to six hundred
dollars per month (both amounts being of
equal value in the flimsy paper in which
they were paid), and discharged numerous
revolvers, muskets and cannon in an ef
fort to break up the government, in which
they signally failed, the news that they
will shortly be called on to go through the
same experience will be extremely unwel
come, unless, indeed, the news we receive
from the “Union Army Veterans,” to the
effect that these now Dald-headed but sly
dogs have been surreptitiously anxious
for the same, is correct. Few who notice
them, as they trot patiently behind baby
carriages, or spring with greatly impaired
agility behind store counters, or stop be
hind a plow to wipe the sweat from their
brows, or trudge along in other walks of
life, would ever suspect the fierce love of
war which reigns within their placid
bosoms, but the “Union Veterans” have
found them out, and last week, in the me
tropolis of the nation, exposed them.
It appears that Company A, of'Wash
ington city, turned out last week to wel.
come company something else, from Nor
folk, and that both companies, being only
companies and not regiments or batallions,
carried their company flags and not the
national colors. Company something
else carried the State flag of Virginia, in
which State Norfolk is located. This fact
was immediately noted by that patriotic
body in the national capital known as
“Union Army Veterans,” or “Grand
Army of the Republic,” or names to that
effect, a body of patriots who, having
served their country in the field in capaci
ties varying from a quartermaster to a sut
ler, are now serving it in the capacity of
government clerks at salaries varying from
six hundred to several thousand dollars
ner annum. A meeting of these official
warriors was promptly held, and the re
marks were of a character to stir every
patriots bosom. A gentleman, who oc
cupies a position of great danger in the
Garden Seed and Beet Boot Department.’
denounced the visiting company from Vir
ginia in the handsomest style. He said
that “these infernal rebels had been
whipped at Appomatox Court House b\
men who carried the stars and stripes, and
had slunk ofE like whipped curs: but now
they are coming back and exhibiting rebel
jags instead of the dag of the nation.
While there was undeniable style abou’
this address, the next following it, deliver
ed by the Grand Custodian of the Na
tional Colors of the Treasury Depart
ment quite eclipsed it. To tha1
gentleman’s keen vision we owe
the discovery that the blue flap
borne by the Norfolkians had the inscrip
tion “Sic semper tyrannis,” which thi
Grand Custodian remarked was “a mottc
very dear to the Southern people, especi
ally since Booth had used it at the time hi
assassinated President Lincoln,’’ and re
calling the assassination the speaker be
came much excited and insisted that “in
atead of bearing a flag at the head of theii
column they should have had a pair oi
pants inscribed ‘Pestilence.’5’ A first clast
clerk of the Wind and Bellows Depart
ment, followed with an offer “to be one oi
a party to go upon the streets and hoot
and howl at company A until they wert
driven back to their armory to get a Uni
ted States flag.” A commissioned office!
of the Beef Contract Department hand
somely offered “to join a party to compel
company A to carry a United States flag.’
The Head Clerk of the Fresh Poultry De
partment called the Norfolk company
“those creatures” and said that they had
come to Washington and “flaunted an in
sult in the face of Union men.” He
mended his hold considerably in closing,
by calling the Norfolk soldiers “rebel
whelps.”
This display of affection for the na
tional flag will he gratifying to the country
at large, giving a comforting assurance
that neither pains nor expense will be
spared by the clerks of the Departments
to resent all insults flaunted at it by rebel
whelp*. It is true that the company A
complained of was the first mustered into
service at Washington to defend that city
against the Confederates, and also that not
a half dozen of the young Norfolk soldiers
ever saw an engagement or heard a gin?
fired in the war, but these are small mat
when we consider that the visit was
the occasion of a splendid outburst of
patriotic valor among the government
clerks attesting iheir readiness to marclj
down at once and engage in deadly con
flict the now quiet and middle aged gen
tlemen who composed the late Confederate
armr, and who, we are told, have a sneak
ing preference lurking within their bald
heads for that appalling motto, “Sic semp
per tyrannis.” In the meantime let us
have the chorus from the Pinafore of the
-“Capital
Vm a member of the G. A K.
In w;jr I'm away off far;
But In times of peace
Mv courage will increase,
Si I’m as fierce as a wild ti-gar.
Ihate the South, and damn it too,
Whpnever I find it safG to do.
I never did fight, but I howls when I wants,
And so doray sisters and my cousins and my aunts.
CAorus—And so do his sisters and his cousins and
his aunts.
L,t. Gen. Dick Taylor, a son of Ex-Pres
ident Zachary Taylor, and a brilliant com
mander in the Confederate army, died in
New York last week. Among the pall
hearers were Secretary W. M. Evarts, Ex
Secretary Hamilton Fish, Senator Bayard,
C. O’Connor, Mayor Cooper, and Auguste
Belmont. Samuel J. Tilden, Lt. Gey.
Dorskeimer, Peter Cooper and other dis
tinguished men were at the funeral. Mrs.
Dandridge of Winchester, Va... the surviv
ing sister of Zachary Taylor was the chief
mourner at the funeral.
The hearing of the application to the U.
S. Supreme Court on behalf of the Virginia
Judges arrested by Judge Rives has been
postponed to October in order that a full
bench may be present. In the meantime
sill action against the Judges ceasea until
a decision is given.
Four cf the colored ri oters, who stoned
the Bev. Jno- H. Bussell, a colored mioiSr
ter at Waterford, Loudon county, Va.,
March 27th, for a speech in which he ad
vised them to work more and politic less,
have been arrested and put in jail.
Ex-Goy. Hendricks, of lnd., says posi
-uruy. -7 —y 1
tivelv be Will not be the candidate far
- - J president on the next Democratic
Vice
ticket.
W J Duke (colored), arrested in Eich
mond for stealing $90 from Jpdge Chas. E,
Sinclair at Millbcro depot, on the C. & G.
roadTproved to be the wrong pm.
THE COLORED MAN AS AN
EMIGRANT.
The fact of some fifteen hundred colored
men women and children having left their
homes in Louisiana and Mississippi for
Kansas, and now being in much destitu
tion in that state, should arouse the pity
of the whites who have been brought up
with them, however little it may affect the
sympathies of the Inhabitants of those
states who now see them for the first time
coming as immigrants ana unwelcome
ones. The news men, in the exercise of
their ingenuity in speculation, have been
laboring to show that it is a political
movement to carry Republican voters into
doubtful states and thus secure them, but
we greatly question the verity of the
statement. That since the move some
prominent Republicans have formed or
ganizations to encourage it is true, but
we doubt if they knew in advance any
more about it than the employers whom
the blacks left. The fact is that upon this
ignorant class of our people frauds can be
practiced with success that would be trans
parent to the other race. It does not need
ill treatment to make the black an emi
grant if even the most absurd promises of
prosperity are held out to him. There has
never, we believe, been set up any claim
that this class of people in Virginia have
been cruelly treated, killed at the polls and
robbed of their wages, yet it has not been
a year since a wide spread movement was
started in the capital of Virginia for a
colored emigration to Nebraska. Meetings
were held and many enlisted for the exper
iment under most plausible promises.
But the Virginia black man is much the
superior in general intelligence and busi
ness prudence of his brother in the South
ern states, and when he pricked the bubble
to see what it contained, the brilliant hues
vanished and he staid at home. Under
favorable circumstances no true friend of
the black would object to his emigrating
to a new land where slavery has not exist
ed. It would make a man of him, giving
him such manhood as he will not attain in
the old States in generations to come But
it would be gained as all manhood is gain
ed through great suffering. His thriftless
ness, his lack of the love of labor, his want
of ambition, his failure in the little punct
ualities of service, his yet dim comprehen
sion of the value of reliability and the gener
al from handfomouth modeof living which
c laracterizes the majority, though not all
of his race would make his residence
among the hardy, quick, active people of
the Western States a sore season of proba
tion, Those that pulled through it would be
valuable additions to a state; but those
v
majority, would receive tlie most merciless
treatment. No mau who understands
what a blight the institution of slavery
has proved to the white man can doubt
tor a moment that industry, improvement,
treater thrift, great increase of power to
the Southern section of the union would
quickly follow the substitution of white
for black labor, but no man with a touch
of humanity in his heart could see these
helpless people going iu blind droves to a
new country, new people and new cus
toms without being moved by pity. Still
.ess could any man see them deceived as
the emigrants we have named have been
by such a falshood as the following which
was the cause of the recent movement to
Kansas, and which having fallen into the
sands of the St. .Louis “Presbyterian”
‘t makes public:
(Strictly Private.)
ATTENTION COLORED MEN!
Office Colorep Organization Society, J
Topeka, Kan., Feb. 2,1879. s
1 Your brethren and friends throughout the North
(nave observed with painful solicitude the outrages
leaped upon you by your rebel mast&rs, and are do
ing ali they can to alleviate your miseries and pro
vide for your future happiness and prosperity.
President Hayes, by his iniquitous S -uthern policy,
has deserted you, while the Democrats, who now
.iave control of Congress, will seek to re-enslave
you if you remain ip the {South; and to protect you
from their designs, the Colonization Society lias
been organized by the government to provide land
tor each head of a family, which will be given, in
oodies of 100 acres gratuitously. This land is loca
ted n the best portion of Kansas, iu close proximity
to Topeka, and is very productive. Here there is no
distinction in society, ali are on an equality. Leave
the land of oppression and come to free Kansas.
Lycurgus P. Jones,
President.
Show this circular to none but colored men, and
keep itscontenis secret.
The circular, it is alleged, with evidence
to sustain the allegation, was gotten up by
Western railroad men to procure first, the
fare pt the deluded blacks, and then the
purchase of the lands along their route, if
the emigrants had money enough left. The
result has been what might have been ex
pected.—At each town the emigrants stop
at, the citizens meet and provide—not
work for them; not the one hundred and
sixty acres of land, but funds to move
mem away frprn that neighborhood, care
less of where they may finally land or how
much of suffering they may encounter.
The fraud has been a cruel one, and it is
not likely that it can be repeated a second
time after these starving emigrants have
worked their way back to their former
domes, and told their sau stories to their
more fortunate brethren who remained
where they were.
CHEERING NEWS OF REVIVING
INDUSTRIES.
[Special telegram to the Staunton Vindicator ]
Millboro Depot, April nth.—A well,
known gentleman on the train, just from
Philadelphia, says that the purchase of the
(Juinneroont and Eureka Furnaces by the
■'Virginia and Pennsylvania Iron and Coal
Co.,” recently incorporated by Judge Mc
Laughlin, was closed in Philadelphia yes
terday, and the company will at once
commence operations. Their own cars
will take the coke from Quinuemont to
Eureka and carry back ore.
In sixty days one thousand hands will
be at work on the Charleston & Poto
mac li, P, {which crosses the Valley in
Rockingham county), and the rails for
the first one hundred apt} twenty miles
have been bought.
T. C, M.
A Human Skeleton Inside a IIoese.
—A miner in the Black Hills, writing to
a friend, tells of a horrible reminder of the
fearful snow storms, last winter, and of
the perils of those who were caught out
and lost their way on the plain. He says
that recently, while he and two others
were erosiijig the country they came upon
the skeleton of,a horse, with agrinning skull
looking out at them between the ribs of
Urn animal, like a prisoner peeringthrough
the bars .of his cell. The two skeletons
toid the whole story. The man had kill
ed his horse, cut him open, and crawled in
side of him, thinking thus to escape perish
ing of cold, but the flecli of the animal
fime solid, and the man was an isi’ph of a
prisoner- as if he had been shut in' by a wall
of iron. The wolves and carrion birds had
stripped the greater part of the flesh from
both skeletons. The mic^r concludes his
description by saying: It was $ sight I
shall never forget. I can see it whenever
I close my eyes.
The Fincastie “Herald” states that Mr.
IiichjUi'd Overstreet, living in Bedford
county, n,ear the Botetourt line, has sold
during the wither 1,000 bushels of apples.
He now has oft hand several hundred
bushels. One day last week he sold a load
in Lynchburg at $1.60 .per bushel.
Letter from H- H. Riddleberger.
Woodstock. Va.. \
April 12th, '79.)
Zb the Editor of the Vindicator:
Observing in your editorial notice of the
Charlottesville discussion that you sympa
thize with me, and accepting, of course,
;hat your sympathy is sincere, I take the
iberty of expressing my profound acknow-.
edgements.
I am not surprised to observe that I was
‘used up,” ‘'squelched,” “demolished,”
□or am 1 silly enough to expect any other
report from the funding press. I am
rather glad to know that both sides are
satisfied with the results in Albemarle.
Indeed, if future generations were left to
rely upon the telegrams and newspaper re
ports of the war between the Status, a?
they were sent or written from the field
the life puzzle would be, on the one aid.
how we were subjugated at all, aud on tie
other, why they were so long on the roa<
to Richmond. But, dear Vindicatok,
do wish with your permission to corn •
oue misrepresentation, whic >, by tl.e wa
only appears second hand iuyourct luni
I had no occasion to soy. nor did 1. ilia'
had never voted for a ‘'funding bill.” ,
did say that l never was a “per cent, le
adjuster.’ which I explained to mean tha
1 was opposed to the funding bill and lie
broker's bill for many other reasons tliai
their per cent, feaiures; and these othe.
obj. ctions I argued for more than one
half of my time. I did not hear what use
either Messrs. Smith or McMullan made
of this. In my anxiety to get back ti
court I left the meeting for the
evening train, confiding in Senator
Massey’s skill aud courage. But I was too
late for the train aud returned only in
time to hear the last three minutes of Mr
McMullan’s arraignment of me for voting
for a three, six and nine per cent, funding
bill. How any record that I have made
can affect the question is beyond my
ken; and were only the truth told
now I should not care or notice
it. I did vote for such a bill.
And if that can be called a funding bill d
may have voted for a half dozen of them.
I think every readjuster of that day did
so. The circumstance were these : That
huge joint finance committee which Speak
er Hanger packed in violation of what we
believed to be every principle of
parliamentary law, and gave a min
ority of the House a majority of the com
mittee, reported two bills. The House,
subsequently to the Speaker's appoint
ment added three memb: rs by eiectionand
1 was one of these. That alone should
suffice to show how I stood ou the ques
tion in the estimation of the anti-funders.
One of these bills was for three, six and
nine per cent, for twelve, ten and twelve
years respectively, reserving to each suc
ceeding legislature full power over the
whole question and declaring in its third
section that no coupons should be receiva
ble for taxes. Fourteen funders on that
/xviwmif fun nm a rfail o n a! lin?’ Kill vooorrn io
ing the funding bill of 1871. paying four
per cent, interest on the debt as funded
and issuing certificates of indebtedness for
the remaining two pei cent, By the one
bill we would at least have been even for
twelve years; for then we owed nothing
but the bonded debt, had a surplus in the
treasury of Si .800,000, and our taxable
values were $30,000,000 more than now.
At the end of the twelve years, the Gener
al Assembly had supreme control and
could have done just as they pleased or as
the condition of the State required. By
the other bill we would have been adding
$600,000 of certificates to our debt each
year and recognizing the funding bill.
Between these two competing propositions
I voted for the first. Need I add that I
have never shed a tear over the ultimate
defeat of both ?
And, by the way, it was during this
struggle that Hon. K. A. Coghill, Gen.
Jas. A. Walker, and such prominent read
justers so forcibly argued that we could
not possibly pay more than three per cent.
I would really like to hear some of these
gentlemen now, when it is proposed to
give us nearly $3,000,000 more of principal
debt, convert it all into gold, exempt the
bonds from taxation—with outstanding
coupons and unpaid appropriations ex
ceeding $1,000,000, assessments reduced
nearly $30,000,000 and a prospect of furth
er and much larger reductions in 1880.
In conclusion of this brief communica
tion of my “profound acknowledgments”
I beg to say that it will suit my conven
ience to be at the May term of Augus a
County Court to satisfyany unsatisfied cu
riosity about the squelching business, if
either of the Charlotiesville gentlemen, or
any other of the Broker’s bill champions,
are spoiling fi>r a tilt. Why worry about
the frogs if it afford fun for the boys':' We
canuot all be happy at once, you know.
If the Broker’s bill should be accepted
then the sooner the “small politicians”
who agitate it are finally “squelched” the
better for the fetate. But wo should cer
tainly know, if possible, whether the peo
ple will accept it. Agitation for either
purpose will result in good. If the people
shall be deceived again, instead of agita
ting it will be earth quaking.
Y ours,
H. H. lilDLEBSRGKK.
We publish Mr. Riddleberger’s explana
uation with pleasure, though we think very
few even of his own party will be satisfied
with it. In the mean time in view of all
the circumstances we would recommend
to Harry’s perusal the following descrip
tion of a meeting similar to the Charlottes
yille one:
A.hner Dean, of Angels, raised a point of order,
when—
A. chunk of old red sandstone struck him iti the
^bdojnen.
He smiled a sort of of sickly smile, and curled up
on the floor,
A.nd the subsequent proceedings interested him no
more.
Delmonico's Dinner!.
ONE THAT COST $20,000, OB $200 A PLATE.
From the New York Times.
The most expensive dinner ever given at
the crumbled shrine of entertainment was
the dinner given by Sir Morton Peto to a
hundred merchants, with a sprinkling of
journalists, about the close of the civil war.
He was regarded as immensely wealthy;
he had vast interests in railways and vari
ous public improvements; was an exemplar
of orthodoxy, attended any number of
churches. prayed long and loud, contribu
ted handsomely to benevolent societies,
was a favorite of evangelical clergymen,
ind was fulsomely eulogized as the model
Christian merchant. After he returned
to England he was arraigned for fraudu
lent transaction on an enormous scale, and
although he escaped prison by certain le
gal technicalities, he was condemned in
public opinion, and forever ruined in re
putation. Sir Morton’s piety was doubt
less a studied hypocrisy, practiced for the
purpose of more readily carrying out his dis
honest gphepaes, and perhaps of eliciting
sympathy when he should be found out.
Ostentatious exprhditiire was one of the
method! be adopted to gain favor in this
country, and he was never more ostenta
tious than.in his order to Delmonioo who
was enjoined to exercise his ingenuity in
making evervthing the very best that mon
ey would buy. Consequently the dinner
was a marvel of skill and art and extrav
agance. The saloon was smothered in the
rarest flowers; the menu was in gilt or em
broidered satin; some of the wine cost $25
a bottle; cleverest musicians were engaged
at fancy prices; Clara jLouise Kellogg had
$1,000 for two songs, and it present besides
of a diamond bracelet. In all probability
such a dinner has never been served in the
republic; it would have delighted Sover
and Francatelli. and had the ancient Greek
Philoxenue, been there he would have a
gaiu wished for the neck of a crpne, that
he might longer enjoy the passage of so
many dainties down his greedy throat.
The total cost was about $20,000 or $200
for each person present.
Among the guests was James Gordon
Bennet, the elder, who very rarely accept
ed invitations, and whose person was so
unfamiliar, despite his universally known
name, that very few persons recognized
h'm. ft was, rye think, his last appear
ance in public; and then he was ill at ease,
greatly bored, and withdrew as early as
leeeilS; courtesy would allow.
There are two sets of candidates running
for the county oftices of Pnufee George
county, Virginia.
Marriage of the Midgets*
THE TWO SMALLEST PEOPLE IN THE
WORLD TO BE MADE MAN AND WIFE.
Gen. Mite and Lucia Zarate, who are
said to be the two smallest people in the
world, ;,nd who are called the “Midgets,”
are to be married a week from to-morrow.
The general, as has been already said, is
only 14 years of age, and his prospective
bride is perhaps 15. Neither of them is
more than 2 feet in height. They have
been on exhibition at Masonic Hall for
some time, and have attracted a great deal
of attention as strange beings whose phy
slciaal condition connot be explained.
Both the General ard his intended bride
have been examined by a number of prom
inent physicians, but medical science l as
failed to give any reasrn for the singular
freak oi nature. The Midgets have been
associate i togei her for some time, audit
is said b i in- parents and attendants that
they are quite unhappy when separated.
Their de ire to marry, though seemingly
preposterous, has been understood by those
immediately concerned with them. Ob
jections have been made by their parents
without effect, and these objections have
finally bteu,overcome through the persist
ent solicitations of the little | eople them
selves. The marriage, will take place be
fore the "Midgets” depart for Europe on
an exhibi tion tour, which will be in about
two weeks.
Seno ila Zarate, small as she is, cannot
■peak English, but she can understand
everything said to her in that language.
She was asked last evening if it was ti ue
that she was about to marry the General.
She said it was, and the few inches of fem
inity jnrnped up and down in glad antici
pation of the happy event.
“When willl it occur?” it was asked.
“On Sunday,” she replied.
At this point the Lilliputian General
came up and he was questioned concern
ing his matrimonial intentions.
“1 am going to get married on Satur
day.” lie said.
The Senorita became wild in an instant,
but Mr. Uffner, their manager, soothed
them, and their respective fathers took
them away from the public gaze for a few
minutes, and probably spanked them as
they deserved. When the small senorita
was permitted to return she was asked
what in all probability her wedding cos
tume would be. She replied in fluent
Spanish that she would wear a dress of
white sat in, with pearl trimmings and dia
mond ornaments. This costume is one of
the favorite ones of the little lady and she
proposes to celebrate the great event of
life in it. -
It is, perhaps, needless to say that the
bridegroom will be attired in the conven
tional costume of the ball-room. It takes
about a yard of clotn to make a dress suit
for the General. The bridesmaids and
grooms have not yet been selected.
It seems that the marriage is one of con
venience as well as supposed affection.
The dwarfs, Delonging to different fami
lies, are liable to be separated at any mo
ment. It is thought best, therefore, to
bind them by ties that cannot be broken
by show managers or disagreeing parents.
Gen. Mite is twice the weight of his pros
pective bride.
The preparations for the wedding are
going steadily forward. The bride is to
wear a white satin dress studded with
seed pearls. Small as her form is, it is es
timated that the bridal dress contains no
less than 1,000 pearls. The bridegroom is
to wear his full dress suit, excepting that
his vest of black cloth will be replaced by
a white vest.
Miss Zarate belongs to the Episcopal
Church, while Gen. Mite’s family are Ro
man Catholics, and it was on the question
of religion that the families differed. This
difference was finally settled.
Highland Items.—The Highland “Ke
corder” of Friday furnishes the following
items :
The Debt Settlement.—Hon. Harmon Hi
ner, member of the last House, is out in
an able letter to the people urging the
value of the recent settlement of the debt
question. About submitting the bill to
the people he says :
The history of the State does not furnish
an example of the submission of a general
law to the people for its ratification, and
there is the most abundant authority to
the point that any act. of the legislature
that depended for its validity as a law upon
the vc te of the people, would be unconsti
tutional and void. The people are sick
and tired of the agitation of this whole
subject, and wished the legislature, which
they elected for the purpose, to decide it
finally and forever. The idea of submit
ting a financial question, and the rights of
our people, to the votes of 80,000 negroes,
principally in East Virginia, is preposter
ous and absurd. The men who proposed
thus to submit the law to the people knew
that it was not right so to do. but they
wanted a chance of agitating the question
still farther, and take their chances to run
into office upon it. Every negro in the
House of Delegates voted to submit the
bill to the people. Their reasons were ob
vious.
The maple sugar camps will soon be bro
ken up, the sugar season, which has not
been a good one, being about over.
Bid on Land.—A portion of the Sterrett
(former Sitlington) farm, was put up at
auction Monday but withdrawn at $85 per
acre.
Personal —Miss Nannie Henderson of
Augusta, assistant at the Oakland High
School, will remain another session. A
daughter of Mr. David Rexrode was
thrown from a horse and her arm was
broken. Hattie, a little daughter of Mr.
Jacob N- Hull, had her left hand almost
severed from her arm Friday by an acci
dental blow from an axe in the hands of a
little boy.
Dr. Carver's Most Wonderful
t eat.—Dr. S. W. Carver, the American
marksman, is surprising the crack shots
in England with hi3 feats with the rifle.
At a recent exhibition he broke 89 out of
100 glass balls with a Winchester rifle, in
spite of a high wind and driving snow. He
then broke 50 glass balls in 1 m. 57s. Plac
ing ten glass balls on the ground, he fired
a bullet into the turf immediately beneath
the glass balls; the missile tearing up the
soil,'threw the balls into the air, and they
were broken as they arose. The Doctor’s
greatest feat was preformed for a wager of
£100, in which the American wagered that
he would hit an apple held upon the end of
a penknife, by his colored attendant rid
ing on horseback at a full gallop, at a dis
tance of thirty yards. A large apple was
procured and stuck on the end of a prun
ing knife. The jockey mounted a horse
and held the target with his left haud as
far as possible behind his body. The start
was made about 100 yards away, and when
fhe rider came within range, riding at a
furious gallop, the Doctor fired. The first
attempt was a failure, and the odds of £10
to £2 were bet against Carver, The second
time he struck the apple, knocking it into
half a dozen pieces. He won neatly £400,
and his backers reaped a fine harvest.
Anecdote or Ben. Butler.—Ben.
Butler was called on by a person who
wanted to have a talk with him.
“Mr. Butler1” said he, “one of my neigh
bor's cows jumped my garden gate last
night find pomoletely destroyed my flower
beds. The gate' was of pbe height required
by law, and was closed. Ifofv I wish to
know whether 1 can obtain damages?”
“Most assuredly,” replied the widow’s
friend,
d Well, Mr Butler, how much?”
“Oh! about ten dollars."
“But, Mr. Butler,” triumphantly, “the
cow was yours.” .
“Ah!” sam Mi. Butler, thoughtfully'
ant] he looked unutterable things out of
his bad pye- fphefl he turned to bis desk,
scratched off a few }i»e$ Op £ piece qf pa
per and handed it to his yjsitdi'. It v/as m
the form of an account, and read as fol
F. Butler to Mr.-, dr: To
damagfJB paused by cow, $10; by legal ad
vice Cr., *16; balance due me. $5.”
' “Sfr/:———, said Mr- Butler, softly,
“you needn’t hurry abode the payment;”
— Washington Capitol,
Tramps As Husbands
EXPERIENCE OF WIDOWS WHO HAVE
MABKIED WANDERING VAGABONDS.
Within a few months and within a ra
dius of nine miles from Westfield three or
four widows comfortably well off have
married chaps that came tramping along.
One of these husbands is now in jail for
threatening the lives of his wife and moth
er-in-law. His favorite form of amuse
ment was to place the women folks in
chairs side by side, and, after poking a loa
ded gun into their faces, to fire it off at a
target just above their heads. Five weeks
ago a respectable and well-connected wo
man in this town, whose husband died less
than two years ago, leaving her a nice lit
tle home and $2,000 in cash, fell in love
with a young tramp who came to her door,
and though 20 years his senior she married
him. Since then her house has been a ren
dezvous for nearly all the tramps who
come along and apparently the good news
is being widely spread among the fraterni
ty. A few days ago the woman appeared
with abadly-bruised face and damaged eyes
and her friends had her tramp husband ar
rested for the assault. The trial was most
a ludicrous affair, for while the wife admit
ted that ‘'Johnnie” not only was the cause
of her disfigurement but had soundly
thrashed her at least twice a week during
their brief honeymoon, she declared that
she loved him dearly and that he only whip
ped her when he was mad because she
wouldn’t at first asking give him money
or buy him a horse and carriage. The
man said he didn’t think he had thrashed
bis wife above once a week and that he
loved her dearly. Upon this followed a
very dramatic scene, the woman rushing
into her husband’s arms and mingling
her tears and kisses with his ditto and
both fell on their knees before
Judge Lewis to beg his mercy.
Judge Lewis told them: ‘T want no such
nonsense here” and fined the man $5,85
which the woman paid, and a few minutes
later they were seen lovingly riding to
ward their peaceful home.
New Advertisements.
J AM NOW RECEIVING MY
SPRING GOODS,
and can show a very handsome line of
BUNTINGS,
Plain and Checked, in all shades.
FANCY DRESS GOODS,
in great variety.
MY NOTION STOCK
is full and complete, embracing all the
LATEST NOVELTIES OF THE SEASON.
I propose to offer special inducements to
CASH BUYERS.
and repectfully invite my friends and the public to
call and see my Goods and Prices before purchasing
elsewhere.
CHAS. L. COOKE.
P. S.—My FIVE CENT COUNTER is the wonder
of the day. Be sure to call and get some of the
wonderful Bargains before they are all sold. SGTNo
goods charged from this counter.
aprl8-3t
gPRING GOODS!
W. H. WELLER
Is now offering Goods at prices lower than ever be
fore known, having just returned from New York,
Philadelphia, and Baltimore wiili the
LARGEST STOCK
he has ever had the pleasure to offer. He has made
BLACK SILKS
—and—
BLACK GOODS
a specialty for some years past, and feels assured
no finer stock can be found to select from or at
prices more attractive to the buyer. He has also se
cured the agency of •
Mme. DEMOREST’S
RELIABLE PATTERNS,
and is prepared to furnish all patterns in her
Portfolio at
NEW YORK PRICES.
Earnestly desiring to serve the people well, (and
with increased facilities for business, having just
completed an extensive addition to his room), he
cordially invites them all to visit his Store, whether
they wish to buy or
“ONLY SEE THE FASHIONS.”
^ORDERS .Si
filled with great, cave and promptness. He does a
large business through the mail.
aprl8
Bargains in dry Goods. &cm &c.—Arriving
every day this week a large and attractive
stock of
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS,
AND SHOES
which will be offered at prices nevtr before named
in Staunton. The bulk of these goods were bought
at New York Bankrupt sales at prices that will ena
ble me to sell them at less than cost of manufacture.
I am determined to sell this stock at the very closest
margin. So if you want to save money do not fail to
call at once and examine these bargains at
BELL’S
DRY GOODS STORE,
On Auqusta Street.
(Timberlake & Bell’s old stand.)
Look at our all linen Damask at 25c. worth 40c.
Dress Goods at 8, 10,12)4 15 and 20c., worth 25 per
cent more.
All wool Black Cashmeres at49e. These goods sell
for 60c everywhere.
Piques 7,8,0 and lflc. for host.
Ladles all Linen Hem-stitched Handkerchiefs 15c.
worth 25c.; Handkerchiefs at 5c Gents Hose 5c.
A good corset for 25c.
The best 4-4 heavy Brown Cotton at 7c.
A good heavy Brown Cotton at 5c.
Bleach Cotton 5.6,7 and 8c. As al
__ all cotton goods
have advanced it will pay you to buy these goods at
less than old prices.
Best Turkey Bed Knitting Cotton at 22)4;. per
hank.
Ball Knitting Cotton at 5c.
Best Knitting Cotton in hauks warranted full
weight, 25c. lb
Excellent Toilet Soaps at 15e per doz.
Will sell a splendid Toilet Soap at 25c per doz.,
sold on all 5 cent counters at 5 cents a cake.
A full line of Towels and Napkins at panic prices.
All styles and grades of Floor oil Cloths.
A splendid ladies sewed Morocco Shoe at *1,00.
The best city made shoe at *1.25; regular price
*2.50.
Children Shoes at 25e,
Ladies French Kid Slippers, warranted, at *1,25.
Men’s Brogans, best, at *1,25 and $1,50.
I am agent for the celebrated "Pearl” White
Dress Shirt, the best shirt made at only *1,00. Will
give *! ,00 for any that doss not give pe; feet satisfac
tion.
An excellent Dress Shirt (laundried) only 75c.
White Quilts only 47Mc.
. ,
A heavy Quilt 75c and . .
I cordial'v invite the people of this city and coun
ty to examine this immense stock and convince
themse’vesthat they can save money by making
their purchases at the low price cash house of
GEO. It. BELL,
Augusta St.
Mr K. M. Timberlake is with me and will take
pleasure in showing customers through the stock.
No trouble to show goods.
aprlS G. R. B.
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE.
J Staunton, April, 12th 1879.
Johu M. Ryan, &c.,
vs. •
John F. Hix et als.
in pursuance of a decree en
-red on i he 1st day of April, 1879, in the foregoing
tuse °now pending in the Circuit Court of Augusts
mnt’y, Tfiave pied upon the '
10j/t day of May, next,
S ii1 dead, then his heirs; or any credi.
rtles 10 llU'-t OUll—diiu t.Tjyvoirtii.y uunu r.
If living; if dead, then his heirs; or any e?edi
5 of said'fohn F- B'j^are hCTeby norliled to ap:
ie* noUde,
ipri8 4t
JOBS M- KINNEY,
Commissioner.
New Advertisements.
/■COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE,
Staunton, April 17th, 1879.
In the chancery causes of Coffman’s guardian
&c., vs • McChesney, and Kinney’s administrator vs.
McCliesney now pending in the Circuit Court of
Augusta, all persons, parties, plaintiff’s and defend
ants, and all lien creditors of Wm. S. McChesney
and of John McChesney, dec’d., are hereby no
tified that in pursuance of a decree rendered in said
tauses by said court on the 1st of April, 1879,1 shall
at my office,in Staunton, on
Wednesday, the 21st day of May, 1879,
proceed to take skate and settle an account show
me:
1st. The surplus remaining after satisfying the
vendors liens upon the parcels of real estate be
I longing to Wm. S. McChesney in the proceedings
• mentioned, and the commuted cash value of the
contingent dower interest of Mrs. W. S. McChesney
in said surplus,
2nd. The real estate belonging to the estate of Dr.
John McChesney. dec’d, the fee simple and annual
rental value thereof and the present state of the
title thereto:
3rd. The liens binding said real estate of Dr. John
McChesney dee’d., together with the order of priori
ty thereof, and further, which if any of said liens
will be paid by the fund arising f 1 om the sales of tiie
Wm. S McChesney's properties, and
4th. Any other matters deemed pertinent by
commissioner or required by any party in interest
to be stated, at which time and place you are re
quired to attend.
Echols. B. & C. atty’s. J. W. GRBEN SMITH,
OPTICIANS AND JEWELERS,
WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY
SILVER AND PLATED-WARE.
MICROSCOPES, OPERA GLASSES &C.
Manufacture of School Medals,
aprl8 It
Commissioner.
ESTABLISHED 1800.
T SADTLER & SONS,
A SPECIALTY.
jun81y.
212 Baltimore Street,
BALTIMORE.
. HENKY S, HUTZLEK, A. LOUIS HUTZLER,
HUTZLER BROTHERS,
NO. 525 BROAD STREET. RICHMOND, VA.,
Have just opened a New Store and keep a New and Complete stock ot
NOTIONS, FANCY GOODS, HOSIERY, HANDKERCHIEFS. GLOVES,
CORSETS, BUTTONS, TRIMMINGS, ZEPHYRS, YARNS, EMBROIDERY
SILKS, CANVASSES, EMBROIDERIES. FRINGES, JEWELRY, &C„ &C.
We warrant all goods as represented and have but
OM B PRICE.
I and hope by Fair Dealing and Low Prices to secure the patronage of the readers of the Vindicator
■ Orders receive prompt attention and satisfaction is guaranteed. ONE PRICE.
Mrs. F. IIUTZLER’S FASHIONABLE MILLINERY,
No. 525 Broad street, Richmond, Va.,
The Largest Stock in the State and at the Lowest Prices. Hats, Bonnets,-Flowers, Ribbons, Silks, Laces
&c., &c. Orders solicited. aprill8
Announcements.
To the Voters of Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate for re
election to the office of County Treasure a
aprl9 tde SAMUEL RAUL.
TO THE VOTERS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY.-I
respectfully announce myself a candidate
for re-election to the office of Commonwealth's
Attorney for.Augusta county, and solicit your
votes at the polls.
JAS. BUMGARDNER, Jr,
apr!8-tde
TO THE VOTERS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY'.—I
respectfu'ly announce myself a candidate for
election to the office of Commonwealth's attor
ney for Augusta county, and solicit your votes at
the polls,
MEADE F. YVHITE.
aprl8-tde
TO THE VOTERS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY.—I
respectfully announce myself a candidate
for reelection fo the office of Commissioner of the
Revenue for Middle River District.
If it will be your pleasure to elect, me I shall cer
tainly be verv grateful, as I have no trade and am
no longer physically able to labor. I refer you to
county and State officers.
Respectfully,
marl4 J. ALEX KERR.
To the Voters of Augusta County:
I HEREBY announce myself a Candidate for re
election to the office of Commissioner of the
Revenue for North River District, Augusta County,
Virginia.
mar2S-tde* WILLIAM A. VIGAR.
To the Voters of Augusta County:
IN answer to the Card of “Many Voters,” publish
ed in the Vindicator of March 21st, I hereby
announce myself a Candidate for the office of Com
missioner of the Revenue for ltiverheads Dis
trict, Augusta county.
mar28-tde* J. FRANK WILSON.
To the Voters of Augusta County:
IN answer to a call of “Many Voters” I hereby an
nounce myself a Candidate for re-election to
the office of Commissioner of the Revenue for
Riverlieads District,
mar28 tde Geo. F. LIGHTNER.
To the Voters of Augusta Cohnty.
I RESPECTFULLY' announce myself a can di
date for re-election to the office of Commis
sioner of the Revenue for South River District,
My circumstances will not permit me to canvass
the County, and see the voters in person; but be
lieving that my county will he ever ready to bestow
their suffrages upon old and tried public servants,
who have been found capable, honest and faithful.
I respectfully appeal to you for support in the ap
proaching election.
mar2S tde G. W. SUTLER.
to the voters of Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself as a candidate for re
election to the office of High Sheriff of Au
gusta county. Referring to my record in office as to
my qualification, I am
Respectfully,
mar2S tde A. B. LIGHTNER.
To the Voters of Augusta County.
I RESPECTFULLY announce myself a candidate
forelection to the office of Commissioner of
Revenue in Pastures District,
marrl tde Wm. J. EURITT.
To the Voters of Augusta county.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate lor the
office Of COMMISSIONER OF THE REVENUE fol'
Pastures District, Augusta county, Va.
Respectfully,
niar21 tde J. HATCH STOVER.
To the Voters of. Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate for the
office of Commissioner of the Revenue,
for Beverley Manor District, Augusta county.
Respectfully.
mar21 tde* SAMUEL C. W LSON.
To the Voters of Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate for the
office of Commissioner of the Revenue
in Noitli River District, Augusta countv.
mar21 tde* P. H. WHEELER*
To the Voters of Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate for re^
election to the office < f Commissioner of
the Revenue tof Pastures District, Augusta county
Ya.
Itiar21 tileit D. F, HOOVER.
To the voters of Augusta County.
RESPONDING to the call of “many voters" pub
lishedinthe Vindicator of March 7ih,«I
hereby announce myself a candidate for the office of
High Shuiiff of Augusta county. Election to be
held the 4th Thursday in May.
Respectfully,
marlltde* J. J. LAREW.
To the Voters of Augusta County.
I HEREBY announce myself a candidate for the
office of Commissioner of the Revenue
for North River district Augusta county, Va.
Respectfully,
marU tde ROBERT OQYNER, Jr.
To the Voters qf Augusta County.
MR. JOHN M. KINNEY having'declined being a
candiilae forfe-election, I announce myself
a candidate for the office ol COMmissionor of the
Revenue for Bevefley Manor District—and if elec
ted will givq ilia business strict personal attention,
V ery Respectfully,
inar“-tde ‘ 4, l{. lUoFA.RLA.ND.
To the Voters of Augusta.County.
RESPECTFUL^Y^aiinounce myself a candidate
XiviiBi r-tir uiiMi .luuouuvo injrooni camuaaie
for the office of Commissioner op the Reve
nue for. the District of North River, flection ft
held the '4th Thursday m May.
mar7-tde* " S, G. BYERS.
..
XT'Ctlt BENY-—The Storehouse at Deerfield, Au
1 gusta County, Va., possession given at once.
This is a first class country stand. Rent mode',aie.
Apply to
J. M-. HARRIS,
Deerfield,
aprll-2t Augusta Co., Va,
STAUNTON, VA.,
Warehouse on C. & O. R. R.,
Office near C. & O. Depot.
DEALERS IN
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,
AND MACHINERY.
Farm Engines, with self-propelling attachment;
Eclipse Agricultural Engines:
Stationary engines of all sizes;
Friction Freed Circular Saw Mills;
Best Belt and Vibrator Threshing Machines
With Clover Huller attachment;
The Celebrated McCormick Mowers,
Reapers and Binders;
Latest improved Wheat Drills;
Celebrated 1st premium Hay Rakes;
Unequaled Wheat and Seed Fan Mills;
The Lightning Mower and Reaper
Wood or Iron Working Machinery,
GUM AND LEATHER BELTING, GUM
Brass Fittings, Steam Guages and Whistles
Repairs for Machines and Implements
of all Kinds.
49" Repairing of Steam Engines a Specialty, “ffi*
i®* Call and see us or write us before ordering
Knife Grinder,
AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
AND HEMP PACKINGS,
elsewhere.
mar 7
THE WOKl D IS FULL OF
CHEilE* SEW11© MACHINES,
MADE IN A CIIEA1:> MANNER TO SELL TO CHEAP PEOPLE.
When you go to buy Hour or sugar you don’t expect to buy the best grades as cheap as you can the lower grades. So it is with
SEWING MACHINES. If you want a good article you must expect to pay a reasonable cost.
I CAN SELL YOU THE
THE DAVIS OR DOMESTIC,
as cheap as you bcan buy a ftrst-ci.«ss machine in the United States.
CALL AND EXAMINE THEM at
MS. W. JVEWTOJTS.
api'iM 9m
COMMISSIONERS’ SALE OF REAL
estate in augusta county.
By virtue ol a decree of the Circui
Court of Augusta county rendered a' &~Sg3s^mk
the March term, 1873, in the chancery 2
causes therein pending of Crowbar- f*'
ger et al, vs. Shields et al, and Crow - sStkJSSStMtr
Darger's trustees vs Reiser et al, we. the under
signed, will proceed to sell at public auction in f ton
of the Court House in the city of Staunton on
Saturday, May the 3rd, 1879,
small tract of land lately owned by George W.
Crowbarger, dec'd, situated m the eastern part of
said county adjoining the lands of Mrs. Nancy A.
Crowbarger, Glen and others, and containing 23 A.,
R.. and 1 P.
The said laud is more fullydescribed in the deed
of partition between Geo. W. Crowbarger. Nancy
A. Crowbarger, Geo. F. Reiser and Susan J.. his
wife, John S. Crowbarger and Rachel E. Crowbar
ger, dated March ltltn, 1875 and of record in the
Clerk's office of Augusta County in U- B 92, p 27o.
rt has upon it a stable, a large factory building and
a young orchard.
TEBMS:-^Cash in hand sufficient to pay costs ol
the suit of Crowbarger’s trustee vs. Reiser et al, and
expenses of sale, and the balance on a credit of one,
two and three years from dav of sa'e. payable in
equal installments, the purchaser executing bonds
for said deferred instalments with approved perso
nal security bearing ini erest from date, and the title
be retained as ultimate security
J M. GUAKI.ES.
1 JAMES BUMi.ARDNER,
aprll-tt Commissioners.
J
OHN W. TODD,
FAMILY GROCERIES AND FEED,
Mo. 26, M. Augusta St.,
Choice Teas, Java, Laguyra and Rio Coffees, Gran
ulated and Yellow Sugars, Molasses and Syrups,
Family, Extra and Super Flour, Fresh Bol
ted Corn Meal, Roe Herrings and Mack
erel, Canned Tomatoes, Sic., Sic. Also
BALED HAY, MILL FEED,
CORN AND OATS.
«■ GOODS DELIVERED FREE."®#
aprll-3m
JOHN IV. TODD.
2d N. Augusta St.
VIRGIN [A.—Tn the clerics office or the Circuit
Court for Augusta county.
April 3rd, 1879.
John George, Ex’r of Justus George, dee'd, Pl’ff.
against
A. J. Grove, Dorothy Alexander and John IV.
Alexander, Def’s
In Chancery.
The object of this suit is to enforce the vendor’s
lien upon a tract o£ land purchased by A. J. Grove.
01 John VV. and Dorothy Alexander, and upon
which there was a vendor’s lien when sold by them
in favor of John George, Ex’r of Justus George,
deceased.
The defendant, A. J. Grove, not having entered his
appearance, and it appearing by affidavit tiled that
he is a non-resident of this State: It is ordered that
he do appear here within one month a fter due pub
lication of this notice, and do what is necessary to
protect his interest. Teste—
Tucker& Tucker, p. q. J. N. EVAN,
aprl 4t Clerk.
COMMISSIONEK’S OFFICE.
Staunton, Va., April 10,1879.
C. E. Mason,
vs.
Brown & al.
All parties interested in the fore
going cause, now pending in the Circuit Court of
Augusta county, take notice! that I will proceed, at
my office In Staunton, on the
Stli day of May next,
:o state the following account, viz.: an account o
lurchase money due from J. Q. A. Nadenhousch
md Harrison Thomas, his surety, on the bonds given
iy them as purchasers of the American Hotel, which
recount is directed to be stated by an order of said
Court in said cause, entered April 2nd, 1S79. At which
time and place you are required to attend witeout
further notice,
JOHN M KINNEY,
aprlllt Commissioner,
A
NEW SUPPLY OF
BIBLES AND TESTAMENTS,
All sires binding and priees, large prints.
GOSPEL HYMNS !
(Moody and Sankey) Nos. 1,2 and 3.
HUNTEE & CO., Booksellers,
ap rll Si« union, va,
HI Li ECH AND PA BLOB 0BGANS1.
J ' Trice from *5Q fo $1,000 .
GOLD MEDAL
or ‘‘valuable improvements and for superior power
rid volume of tone. Catalogues free.
aprll
HUNTTEK & CO., Booksellers,
Staunton, Yu,
10E SALE.
I offer for Sale, pjivateiy, my
wni Vyi iniles from t'Lhersvilie
>ep(it, on C. & O. ¥,. ito&L
CONTAINING TO ACEES.
7 antes clear, vest in timber. 20 acres well set in
r,T:ss._ The dwelling is new and conveniently ar
tinged, containing 8 rooms wp h basement. Well of
ell.
xcellent water in the yard. This property is in a
ood neighborhood convenient to churches, schools,
epot, Post office Ste. Will sell a bargain. Title, all
ight. For particulars &c., Address me at Staunton
'a. ApHH’fh, 1879.
iiJWl W. H. WULEE.
fTYEEE’S CHAMOMILE BITTEH3, for Dyspep
L sia. Sick and Nervaps Headache, Coustipa
on of the Bowels &c
ff, E. TYEEE. Druggist,
Ml
uatn Street, Staunton, Va
,1
JJARTH & OBERDORFER ^ ^ MSortment at
NECK TIES,
in the city.
aprll *__
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell the best
UNLAUNDRIED SHIRTS FOR 75 CENTS.
aprl ____
gARTH sToBERDORFER sell linen
COLLARS, STANDING, $1 A DOZ.
aprll ___
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell the hesi
LINEN COLLARS FOR 15 CENTS,
aprll ___
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell all
WOOL SUITS FOR $7.
aprll ___
gARTH & OBERDOEFER sell
12 WHITE NECK TIES
for twenty-live cents.
aprll _
Barth &oberdorfer .
Have the best assortment
OF TRUNKS,
at the lowest prices.
aprll
Barth & oberdorfer sen
Taylor Celebrated
MACKINAW HATS.
aprll
Barth and oberdorfer
Have the best line of
BOYS’, YOUTHS’, AND
aprll
CHILDREN’S SUITS,
At the lowest price in the eity.
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell
aprll
GAUZE SHIRTS
from H cents up.
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell the best
PAPER COLLARS
at 19 cents a box.
aprll
B
ARTH & OBERDORFER,
sell three pair genuine
BRITISH SOCKS FOR 50 CEJNTS.
aprll
B
ART H & OBERDORFER
sell the best
SILK HANDKERCHIEF FOR 50 CTS
aprll
J>ARTH & OBERDORFER sell
MEN'S SUITS FROM $3 TO $20.75
according to the times.
aprll
gARTH & OBERDORFER sell
WHITE DRESS SHIRTS for 50 CTS.
aprll
gARTH & OBERDO RFER sell good
PAPER COLLARS 9 CTS., A BOX,
aprll
Barth & oberdorfer
Have the largest line of
PIQUE AND DUCK VESTS,
from the celebrated factory of Hammer-slough Bros,
a prll
^TTENTION M1LLLER3!
VALUABLE MERCHANT MILL PROPERTY
FOR RENT.
Possession Given lsf of May.
I wish to rent my new and very desirable mer
chant Mill, situated on North River, in the town of
Mt. Crawiord, Rockingham county, Va., containing
three pairs of Burrs, one line Chopper and Corn
Crusher, with extensive bolting capacity and power
of turning out for y-live barrels flour per day. And
is within 1J4 miles from Mt. Crawford station of
Valley railroad.
Comfortable Miller’s house, good garden, stable,
Ac., all of which I will let on reasonable terms, for
other particulars and price apply to or address the
und. rsigned,
April 11th 1879.
aprll tf
Mt. Crawford
GEORGE KISER,
, Rockingham co., Va.
PUBLIC SALE.
I will sell at auction in front of
the court house in Staunton, on
Saturday, the 26th dmy of April, 1879
w-Vi1: Vi Acre Lots, which were formerly owned by*
William Howell, aud were by him conveyed to Mrs.
Annie Aman.and by her to the undersigned, as
J rustee. Said lots lie on the South eide of the Park
ersburg Turnpike, a littie bevond the Cemetery.—
They are a portion of i he lots laid off by W. J. Shu
mate, and are designated on the plat of said lots as
Isos. 1 and 2 and 5 and 9. On one of them there is a
comfortable dwelling house, and on another a stable,
lhe others are unimproved.
THE TERMS OF SALE of the lots w ill he cash
in hand sumoient to pay the costs of sale, and the
residue in tnree equal annual payments, bearing in
mteiest from date of sale. Bonds, with .security,
wui be required of the purchaser, and liens reserved
on the lots as ultimate security,
, JOHN BUMGARDNEK,
apr4 4ti Trustee.
/COMMISSIONERS’ SALE OF A VALUABLE
FARM IN AUGUSTA CO’JNTY
Pursuant to a decree of the Circuit
Court of Augusta county rendered at
its March Term. 1879in the Chancery
causes therein pending of Crcwbar
§er et al vs. Shields ei a!, and Crow
arger’s trustees vs. Reiser et al, we, theTilidershrVr
ed, w‘11 proceed to sell at public auction in front
of the Court House, in the city of Staunton on 1 *
Saturday, May the 3rd, 1879,
the tract of land acquired by Geo, W. Crowbareer
deceased, under the will of h» father and owncd8bv
said Crowbarger, at the tint*. of his death, situ ted
in the upper part of said county, on South River ad
joining the lands of John, A- Shields, David Mack
wood and others and containing 1l6 acres acK_
Tliis tract of land is of the best quality, and is con
Jittered one of the most desirable arms ! j ™'
that section ot the county. It has a dwellin?
house upon it and a water power which mav bl
made very useful in running machinery y
, TERMS OF SALE:—Cash in hand sufficient tn
pay costs of suit of Crowbarger et al vs shield* pt
al and expenses of sale and toe balance on a credit
of one, two and three years from day of sole
ble in equal installments, Hie purchaser executing
bonds for said deterred hWta'hnems with anprovmf
IheUtlelo^ie retained lln”i!“terest fronl da<b an‘l
the title to be retained as ultimate security.
J. M. QUAR1 ES.
„ .. THOS. C. ELDli’t
aprll It_ Coiniui-.sii
/COMMISSIONERS’ SALE OF LOTS u;
\ MrDIUS3R00K:.
In pursuance of decrees entered in.
the cause of Coffman’s Guardians y 5,
McChesney, pending in the Circuit
Lourt of Augusta county, on the his?
clay of March and on the 1st day of —
Apr]!,,1879, the undersigned tVhirflissinm^?!f!JoiT?T
seed in front of the Couft House in StauMou o,/
Wednesday, the Ilk dnjy.of May, 1879
lominencing at LJ M., to. offer at
lie highestbidder, tlie following lea'l esla^e n'o” to
ng to \V. S. McChesney: * estal 6 beI»ng
Ist. Lot No. 5 and part of lot No. 3 in Mid,imi„.„ ,
ipou which is situated a large store hduseebl'??^’
iroperty will be ottered at the upset bidllf lim =hla
IC ottered at tlie upset hid of * 85 and tli-halill
hegpurchaser will bear interest from January 2athv
3rd. The undivided U interest of said McChcsr
u a lot con taming % of an am e, lyitv- east of
ilebroftk, on’the Staunton and Brownsbuiir ,Alld'
qke, formerly owned by Christian Hess < 8 tur*<
djopung Elijah Hogshead, and owned io‘lSeas*d’'
(■ A, McChesney, and the heirs of John /> 'Stly
TER MS OF SALE:—Cash in hand W'K
f suit and sale, the residue upon (■ie<1itC.J“y °“sto
,lid three years from day oi sale, iti “(\tw,°'
nents. with intere-t from said dav exrlnt Jn!tU1~
rovided, the purchaser to execute bonds win,bove'
roved personal security for tb» deferredn.,! 1 ,h ap‘
nd the title retained as ultimate security pal “'cuts..
A. H. FULTZ,
R. p, BEi L,
ROBERT CRAIG,
aprll td8 ' BTOmAC«k^ers..
SECOND-HASH
SCHOOL BOOKS!
A large stock at one-half, to one-third l9sstln«iv
ew. at 1 u
OLIVER’S BOOK STORE,
ji Cornor Main and New Streets,
aptll> Stauutou, Vo„

xml | txt