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Daily Richmond Whig. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1865-1869, April 13, 1866, Image 2

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RICHMOND WHIG.
FRIDAY MORNING..APRIL 13, 1866.
Advertising.
If any business man in Richmond doubts that the
W hio in the best medium through which to reach
tha Virginia public, we invite him to call at this
office and we will take pleasure, a.* a matter of
business, in exhibiting to him our lists of bona fide
■a been ben in every section of the State.
'•Damn Your Souls, Hake Tobacco."
In 1688 and 1689 twenty.tive huudred pounds
sterling were subscribed by a few wealthy
Virginians and English merchants towards en
dowing a Virginia college. Rev.Jamkh Blair,
a learned and energetic Scotch Episcopal
clergyman, was, in 1691, sent by the Colonial
Assembly to England to solicit a charter from
the Crown. Kimi William, and Mart, hi>
Queen, approved the design, and gave two
thousand pounds out of the quit-rents towards
the contemplated building. Mr. Blaik-wss
referred to the Attorney.General, Sky mock,
who did not cheerfully obey the royal com
mand to issue the charter. In answering his
remonstrances, Mr. Blair spoke of the impor
tance of snch au institution in educating young
men for the ministry, and begged the Attor
ney-General to consider that the people ot
Virginia had souls to be saved as well as the
people of England. “Souls!” exclaimed the
irate Srymoi’r—“Damn your souls! make, to
bacco.”
Notwithstanding Seymour’s violence, the
College charter was issued. It bore date
the 8th of February, in the fourth year of the
reign of William and Mary, corresponding
under the new style with the 19th February,
1693. It was designed as a Seminary for Minis
ters of the Gospel. The Virginia Assembly
provided for its location at “ Middle Planta
tion,” now Williamsburg. The charter pro
videti that it should be named “ The College
of William and Mary.” The royal contribu
tions towards the projected institution were
liberal, both in lands and money. The build,
ing was planned by Sir Christopher Wren.—
Its tirst “commencement exercises” were held
in 1700. Such performances were so novel in
America that “ planters came in coaches,”
and “others in sloops from New York, Penn
sylvania and Maryland” to witness them. In
dians were even attracted by the uucoiuniou
scene. In 1705 the buildiugs, together with the
library and philosophical apparatus, were des
troyed by fire. They were not rebuilt until 1723.
Its funds were increased from time to time by
donations and bequests, as.also by grants made
by the House of Burgesses. Dr. James
Blair was the tirst President of tho College, and
is considered its father. Before the revolution,
the College consisted of a school of Divinity,
one of Philosophy, in which Natural Philoso
phy aud Mathematics were taught; a Grammar
school for instruction in the ancient languages,
and an Indian school. For about seventy years
prior to the Revolution the average number of
students was about sixty. At the beginning of
the Revolution the whole uuiuber was about
seventy. Tho annual income from duties
granted in the charter, aud by the Colony,
from “Boyle’s Charity, aud from funded capital
and scholarships, was nearly tour thousand
pounds sterliug. In 1776 it was the richest
College in North America. By tho Revolution
it lost everything save about two thousand five
hundred dollars in money aud tho then unpro
ductive crown lands. Thirty students and
three professors joined the army during the
Revolution, and, among the great names fur
nished to the common cause, iu the council aud
iu tho field, by this institution are those of
Benjamin Harrison, Carter Braxton, Thom
as Nelson, Ukorue Wtthk, signers of the
Declaration of Independence ; Peyton Ran
dolph, President of the first American Con
gress ; Edmi'md Randolph, Attorney General
aud Secretary of State; John Marshall,
Chief Justice ; Thomas Jeffers*’n and James
Monroe, Presidents of the United States;
Taylor, of Caroline ;the Nelsons, the Bi.ands,
the Paoes, the Harrisons, the Carters, the
Nicholases, the Braxtons, the Bvrwells,
the Lewises, the Lyonses, the Mercers, the
Cockbs, the Boi.linos, the Nicholsons and the
Carrixutons. The pareut Society in this
country of the Phi Beta Kappa was organized
at this College in 1776. In 1781 the exercises
of the College were suspended ; aud the sum
mer before the siege of Yorktown tho buildiugs
were alternately occupied by the British aud
the French and American troops. The Col
lege was much injured and the President’s
house burned, while occupied by the latter.—
This was subsequently rebuilt by the French
l»overnmeni. in iiuu mere was a respcciaoio
number of students. The General Assembly
of Virginia gave to the College the Palace
lands and the houses upon them; a tract
of land near Williamsburg, known as the
“Vineyard,” and a few acres uot far from
Jamestown. The organization of the College
was uow changed, under the influence of
Thomas Jeffbkshn. The Grammar School
and the Professorship of Divinity aud
oriental languages were abolished. A profes
sorship of law and police, oue of anatomy and
chemistry, and oue of modern languages, were
substituted for them. The law of nature and
nations, and the tine arts were added to the
duties of the moral professor, aud natural his
tory to those of the protestor of Mathematics
and Natural Philosophy. In 1788, George
Washington accepted the Chancellorship of
the college. Upon the return of peace the In
stitution rapidly revived, aud uuder the guid
ance of bishop Madison aud his associates,
contributed to its distinguished list of gradu
ates the eminent names of Tyi.er, Tazkweli.,
Giles, Randolph, Leigh, Bibb, Washington,
Preston, Cabell, Croghan, Roane, Taylor,
Lomax, Barbocr, Johnson, Jone:s, Scott,
Crittenden, Rives, and many others whose
names are national aud historic. Since 1835,
the Matriculation books show an annual ave
rage of seveuty-tive students who have had
the benefit of the teachings of Thomas R.
Dew, Judge Tockkr, Bishop Johns, aud other
eminent professors.
On the night ..f the 8th February, 1859, the
college building, library, manuscripts, appa
ratus and interesting antiquities and memo
rials were again destroyed by fire. Within one I
year from its destruction a new building arose,
with ftiruiture, apparatus aud library, aud with
tMuds ample to sustaina full faculty.
In May, 1861, the war commenced, and it
became necessary to suspend the college ex
ercises and close the doors. On the 9th of
September, 1862, the principal building, with
its furniture and apparatus, was burned by
stragglers of the Fifth Regiment of Pennsylva
nia CaVRlry. At later periods of the war all
the remaining houses on the college premises
were either burned, pulled to pieces, or other
wise injured. It will require at least 880,000
to repair these losses aud restore the college to
what it was in 1860. In August, 1865, at a
convocation of the Board of Visitors aud Go
vernor, it was determined to re-open the col
lege at the usual time, to repair some of the
college buildings for recitation rooms, and
to provide other accommodations for stu
dents. This was subsequently done, and
ample temporary arrangements m*de
A grammar school was established, to be
under the care and supervision ot the
Faculty. Nearly slaUenU
attending the academic eaercises m January
Iasi. The Faculty consists of Benjamin S.
Ewell, President; Edwin Taliaferro, A. M.,
Professor of Latin and Latin Literature and
i the Romanic Languages; Edward S. Jotnes,
A. M., Professor of Greek and Greek Litera
ture and German ; * • *, Professor of Moral
Philosophy and Political Economy; Benjamin
S. Ewell, Professor of Chemistry and Natural
Philosophy and Mathematics; Thomas T. L.
Snead, A. M., adjunct Professor of Mathemat
ics; Thomas P. McCaxdush, A. M., Assistant
Professor; Charlfs Morris, Professor of Law;
E. Taliaferro, Librarian ; VP. R. Garrett,
Master of Grammar School.
This venerable institution is endeared to the
people of Virginia in almost every conceivable
manner. It was the parent of learning and the
nursery of patriotism. It was for more than a
century the source whence the youth of Vir
ginia drew their noblest inspirations. There
was not a family of note in the Old Dominion
that did not owe to this College the education
of its sous and those sentiments of honor that
shed a lustre upon Virginia character. From
VPilliam and Mary College emanated those in
fluences that ruled the couucils of the State
aud gave tone to its society. Its antiquity, its
emineut and loug-continued usefulness, the
proud associations connected with it, its long
array of illustrious names, and its signal mis
fortunes, all conspire to commend it to our
affectum* and to entitle it to our sympathy and
support. Whenever the appeal for assistance
comes from that time-honored institution, it
must be met, and generously met. We would
be false to the noble traditions of our State, to
the memories of our ancestors, and to all the
duties of patriotism, if we suflered the ancient
j college of William and Mary to become ex
tinct. Its continuity should be kept up under
every present disadvantage, and as soon as the
circumstances of our now impoverished people
begin to improve, one of their flrst duties will
he to restore that noble old seat of learning to
its pristine diguity aud influence.
Radicalism Cannot be Satisfied.
In a recent article the New York Times,
speaking of the determination of the North to
see tliat justice is done to the negro, uses this
language : “ If the. Southern people were wise
“ they would promptly take the matter in hand
« and settle the question themselves.” Again,
says the Times: “ A true aud satisfactory peace
“ cannot be found until the Union men of the
“ North are satisfled that every vestige of the
“ slave system has been wiped out forever, and
•• mat uvww. •euv>-u- r->
“ or even brutalized, is placed on an equality
“ before the law.”
We scarcely know how to reply to such an
argument, coming, as it does, from a journal
that has latterly manifested friendly sentimeuts
towards the South. We would not be so thank
less as to say aught that could be construed as
a reproach, but we cannot pass over such an
argument from a source that stamps it with
respectability, and gives it influence, without
some reply. If it is the legal duty of the
South to make the negroes, however “ igno
rant, poor or brutalized,” “ equal before tho
law” to the whites, there must be some right
on the part of the North to demand that
it shall be done. By his vote against
the Civil Rights Bill, and by his votes
against those propositions in Congress looking
to the investiture of negroes with suffrage, the
editor of that journal has denied such right on
the part of tho North or of Congress. Does he
expect the Southern people to rebuke him and
place him in tho wrong ? Does he expect the
Southern people, more interested in these sub
jects than a Northern man can possibly be, to
admit what he denies—the right of the North
or of Congress to regulate their domestic inter
nal affairs ? He says we should “settle the
question” so as to satisfy the North. If the
North has no right to settle the question in the
manner indicated, it has no right to demand
that the South shall sosettleit, or to make its so
doing a condition precedent to its re-admission
into the Union. The South neither expects
nor desires to satisfy the Radicals. It would
rather bear the worst they can inflict than sac
rifice its self-respect and its constitutional
rights, as also tho rights of its posterity to
please them. It does desire to comply with
every requirement and wish of the President,
and to satisfy the hottest Union men of the
North, and has “wiped out every vestigo of the
slave system.” It would, no doubt, please, hot
it would not satisfy Scmnek, Stevens and their
fellow-Jacobins, if the South were to consent
to every humiliation and disgrace that they are
eudeavoring to impose upon her. Nothing
short of the complete ostracism and utter ex
termination of tho Southern people will ever
satisfy these malignant spirits. They not only
hate, but they fear Southern men. They feel
that they have sinned against them past all
forgiveness, and they stand in personal as well
as political fear of retribution. To prevent
such consequences, it is their aim to keep
them poor, degraded and disfranchized.
The President is satisfied with tlje South—
the Times sustains the President, and we can
not understand how it can desire the South to
consent to what it and its editor, who is in Cou
gress, opposes—the unconstitutional and op
pressive policy of the Radicals.
Thk Cholera Conference at Constantino
PLE.—A letter troiu Constantinople, ui .narni
12th, in the New York Post, says that the
Cholera Conference is still holding its meetings
there. The proposal of the Conference to es
tablish a quarantine by sea between Mekknh,
and Egypt aud Syria, already greatly alarms
the Porte, which fears a revolt among the pil
grims aud their friends. After a long discus
sion the proposal was carried, and a recommen
dation to the Porte was voted accordingly. It
is believed, however, that this quarantine can
not be carried out, as the closure of the sea
agaiA the pilgrims must result, if not in open
revolt, certainly in a very dangerous ferment,
justly provoked by impossibility of their either
tindiug means of transport back to their homes
by laud, or of procuring food if they remain in
the country till the embargo be removed.—
Famine, it was rightly argued, would thus be
snperadded to pestilence, with the certaiuty of
a general insurrection, from which the Porte
must politically sutler.
The Baltimore Fair.—The Great Southern
Fair held in Baltimore closed yesterday. It
was a great success. It could not have resulted
otherwise, for the generosity, the beauty, the
wealth, and the benevolence of thousands of
people were combined in this noble effort to
relieve the sufferings of the Southern people.
It had also all the aids that business skill and
energy could bestow. The amounts realized,
and the manner of their distribution will be
duly announced.
Bryant and Stratton’s Counting-House
Book-Keeper.—We have the pleasure of ac
knowledging the receipt from Mr. W. H. Sad
ler, Principal of the Baltimore Business Col
lege, of an elegantly gotten up volumo of 375
pages, by H. B. Bryant, H. L>. Stratton and S.
S. Packard, gentlemen of large experience in
commerce, and well known in commercial cir
cles. This volume illustrates the whole sub
ject of counting-house book-keeping, and con
tains a complete exposition of the science of
accounts in its application to the various de
partments of business, including complete sets
"t books in wholesale and retail merchandizing,
farming, settling of estates, forwarding, com
mission, banking, exchange, stock brokerage,
etc., with full explanations and appropriate re
marks on the customs of trade and examples
of the most important business forms in use.
We do not profess to be skated in the science
of book-keeping, or to be able to judge of the
merits of a treatise on that subject. We shall
uot, therefore, undertake to criticise the work
before us. It comes highly recommended , its
authors are persons of commercial reputation
aud it exhibits all the evidences of care, labor
and reflection. It is, indeed, the most elabo
rate treatise on the subject that we remember
ever to have seen. No part of the education
of youth is more important, and none more neg
lected than book-keeping. Every young man
should study it, and make himself master of all
its principles and details. It should bo taught in
every school, male and female. A good book,
keeper can always command a desirable situa
tion in business. Nor is it only useful to those
engaged in mercantile pursuits ; it is of inesti
mable advantage to every man of business.—
Its principles apply to, and its practice include.'
all the diversified transactions of business.
The Fknian Rendezvous.—Campo Bello,
which has the honor of being designated as the
rendezvous of the Fenians, preliminary to the
mysterious something they are going to do in
an island in the Passamaquoddy Bay, about
twenty miles long and four to six wide, and
forms a part of New Brunswick. It has a
population of about six thousand persons, be
sides a small garrison occupying iuconsiderable
works. At Eastport, in Maine, on the opposite
side, is a small Federal garrison in works that
command the Passamaquoddy Bay. The coast
of New Brunswick is exposed to incursions,
and for a long distance can be approached bj
vessels of the largest class. Its numerous
harbors, inlets and islands are favorable foi
operations such as the Fenians are said to con.
template, and it is believed that a few thou
sand men would easily overrun New Bruns,
wick and possess all the desirable points.
The Tennessee Election.—The election ir
Tennessee, which occurred on Saturday last
was a most humiliating defeat for the Radicals,
The bolters in Memphis aud Nashville were re
elected by overwhelming majorities. In Nash
villc, Major Lewis, the bosom fYiend of Andrew
Johuson, received 1,836 votes, while his radi
cal competitor, Judge O’Brien, received oulj
475. In the county precincts the ratio wa.
still greater iu favor of Lewis. In Memphis
out of about 4,000 votes cast, Poston ami
Walker, bolters, received all but 500. Wher
it is remembered that the present franchise
when it was passed, was supposed to exclude
all men of Southern proclivities from the polls
these results must be considered remarkable
The Legislature reassembled Wednesday last
but no quorum being present, it adjourned tc
yesterday.
The Loan Bill, which has passed botl
Houses of Congress, allows the Secretary of the
Treasury to receive any notes or other obliga
tions, issued by the United States in exchange
for aiiv Government bonds authorized to be is.
sued by the act of March 3d, 1865, and also tt
dispose of such bonds to any amount he rnaj
deem necessary, either in the United States
or elsewhere, for lawful money of or other re
presentatives of value issued by the Unitec
States, such proceeds to be applied to the re
tiring of Treasury notes or other Governmenl
obligations, but not more thau ten millions 01
dollars to be retired within six months fron:
this time, or moro than four millions in any
month thereafter.
The Fenians.—During the recent debate4
in the British Parliament on Fenianism, the
Kt. Hon. James Whiteside, on March 22, gave
a history of the progress of the- movement,
both in Ireland and the United States, and
stated that the English Ministry had closely
watched its progress in this country sinco 1859.
It appears from the remarks of Mr. Whiteside
that a British spy made reports upon American
Fenianism to the Ministry in 1859, and that
their spies have since been constantly report
ing its progress. Mr. Whiteside is a Tory mem
ber of the House of Commons, representing the
Dublin University.
Destitution in Georoia.— Governor Jen
kins, of Georgia, has appealed to the capital
ists of that State to respond to the call of the
Legislature by lending money to the State to
relieve the necessities of the poor. He offers
seven per cent, interest, good security and
bonds, to run any length of time the lender
may prefer. Governor Jenkins says a large
portion of the people of Georgia arc suffering
from lack of food, and, unless speedily relieved,
must starve. The State Treasury is empty, and
hence this appeal to such people as have means.
An Extraordinary Domestic Tradition.
The following extraordinary domestic tradition is
extracted from a new book which is much talked of
in Europe:
The Duke of Alba, the brother-in-law of Napo
leon III, is a short, little man, who has something
icy about his whole manner. Small and weak, his
face displays an alabaster hue, which gives him a
ghost-like aspect. In Spain the story is current that
the Duke was buried before he was born. When his
mother was enrient with him she was taken so des
perately ill that all the attempts to restore her re
mained fruitless. The Duchess died far from Ma
drid. at a chateau which had alwuys been her favor
ite residence. She was buried in the lamily vault;
and, as it is the custom of the Spanish nobility,
several valuables, among others her rings were put
into the coffin. The treasures which had been left
to oblivion with the Duchess aroused the cupidity ol
some ruffians; they broke into the vault on the night
following the funeral, robbed the dead woman, and
would not leave the coffin till they had plucked a
Hashing diamond from the linger of the corpse.—
The diamond was on the little Huger, and would not
come off'. This gave the body-snatchers the truly
cauuibal idea of cutting the finger. The pain arous
ed the apparently dehd woman: she came to her
senses, sat up in'the coffin, and, by her unexpected
wakening, put the robbers to flight. When they de
parted they forgot to close the vault. The duchess
found sufficient strength to quit her coffin and re
turn to the chateau, where she was at first taken for
a ghost, and a priest was called in to exorcise it,
but as he was unable to banish the spectre, the peo
ple in the chateau gradually began to believe in
her corporal existence. The duchess recovered,
and gave birth to a boy, who has never lost the
deadly palor which he brought into the world with
mm.—isapouon me inira ana nis court, uy a re
tired Diplomatist.
Views of Mr. Stephens.
The Clarksville Tobacco Plant gives the following
as the views of Hon. A. H. Stephens on the prospects
of the country:
A few days siuce we had the pleasure of quite a
lengthy interview with the distinguished gentleman,
then ou his way to Washington to present his cre
dentials as recently elected United States Senator
from the State of Georgia. It would be quite im|>os
sible to give any accurate account of the views that
fell from him in the course of our conversation; and
we will not essay the task. The general impression,
however, made upon us was, that he regarded the
political sky as dark and gloomy in the extreme,
but nevertheless lie seemed content to wait in pa
tience for the developments of the future.
In speaking of the freedraen and the chances of
agricultural prosperity under the new system of free
colored labor, he expressed this remarkable view;
that the labor of the present year, in his opinion,
would be more efficient than in any coming year.
Reckoning upon this subject on philosophical prin
ciples, he says that the lowerraces of mankind, such
as the negro", are wanting in that degree of persever
ance which is essential to success in any aim; that
therefore, in their earliest efforts since they have been
made free, they will display a spasmodic energy and
industry; that in a short year or two they will grow
weary of the task before them, and relapse into com
parative listlessness and inactivity.
His conclusion therefore is, that the large mass,
on acconnt of idleness, will fail to make a living,
and that consequently they will rapidly die out.
Affairs at Fortress Monroe.
Fortress Monroe, Ya., April 10.—Instructions
were received here to-day from Washington, D. C.,
by Colonel A. P. Blunt, the Assistant (juartenuastei
at this post, to charter the steamer Eliza Hancox foi
the purpose of acting as a quarantine steamer dur
ing the coming warm season. The cruising grounds
of the Hancox will be in the vicinity of the Cajte.
of Virginia, and all vessels coming from the Mesl
Indies will be rigidly dealt with. The Eliza Han
cox is admirably fitted for the duties of a quaran
tine vessel, and arrived here but a tew days ago from
the coast of Texas, where her sea-going qualities
during the last winter were subjected to the severest
test The plans for an effective quarantine of all
vessels arnviug from infected ports are being rap
idly matured, and no doubt of their timely and suc
cessful results are entertained by the military and
medical authorities.
Body Rkcoverid.—We understand that the body
of Miss Editha Page, who was drowned some week;
since, in Janies river, near Big Island, was found on
Wednesday last, on Roach’s Island, just above Cole
man’s Falls dam. and about one and a half miles
below where she lost her life. Notwithstanding the
length of time the body had remained in the water,
the features were easily recognizable.
Her friends took charge of the remains, and they
were consigned to the tomb on Thursday.—
Lynchburg Sews.
LyschbvroCity Bonds.—We learned that the
interest which has accrued on the Lynchburg City
Bonds previous and up to the first day of July, 1866,
will be funded into bonds of the city. The interest
which has accrued, from that date to the 1st ol
January. 1866, the city is now prepared to nay in
currency, and the interest which will fall due on
the first of July next, the city will be ready 'to pay
at that time. This will be good news to those who
hold the?bonds.—AVir*.
MARRIED. ~
CLARK_McQBHBE.—On the !9th March, at White
hall Amelia countT, the residence of the bride's mo
ther’br Rer Mr Adkins, Mr. JAMBS B. CLARK, ol
Cumberland county, Mis* PATT 1K E. McOEHEE. »
T iME^Oue hundred barrels No. 1 ROCK
land LIMB, for sale br _ „
ROBERT F. WILLIAMS,
(Of the lata firm of E H Skin her A Co.. Rtfbmond,)
aplst No. 44 Cary street.
%
FROM WASHINGTON.
Washington, April II.
[('oneepondenre of the Baltimore Bnn.]
THE TRIAL OF JEFF DAVIS—THE RADICAL DEMAND j
FOR BLOOD—WHAT CONGRESS WILL DO—THE POL- I
ICY OF THE RADICALS—ROLLING OVER THE I
PRESIDENT.
The l’resideut is besought by every republican
politician who comes to the city, to hang all the
traitors in a row, with Jefferson Davis at the head.—
Every radical, upon his arrival here, rushes to the
White House with the enquiry, “Why don’t you try
Jeff. Davis and hang him!” All the children at
home are represented as crying for the head of the
rebel chief. Th$ President replies to these importu
nities that he is not a public executioner; that there
are some five hundred of the accused, perhaps, some
of whom are now in prison awaiting trial by order
of Congress, or of the United States Courts. Take
them, he says, and hang them if you will, but you
won't make me your Jack Ketch. The United
States Supreme Aourt lias adjourned without making
any attempt to owing Mr. Davis or anybodV else to
trial, though under the act establishing the judicial
system of the United States the court has the power
to order a special session of any circuit court at any
time. Chief Justice Chase cannot now object that |
Virginia is in a state of insurrection, but he and
other members of the court probably believe that
Mr. Davis will be acquitted of the charge of treason
if tried in any State lately in reliellion. Congress,
no doubt, entertains the same opinion.
Congress is now about to be brought, by Mr. Ray
mond's resolution, to a decision upon this subject,
aud if they refuse to take upon themselves the re
sponsibility of action in the matter, it would not be
surprising if the President should order that Jeffer
son Davis and his confederates be paroled or dis
missed. Pains are taken, it will be seen, by the
President’s friends to exonerate him from all the
blame of the delay in bringing Messrs. Davis, C. C.
Clay and others to a trial for treason.
Congress, as it appears from the speeches made
by Republican members at the Indiana demonstra
tion last night, will not terminate the session till
they shall have put it out of the power of the Presi
dent to thwart their policy. So, haviug got him
down, they will stay here, as was declared, to roll
over him. Iota.
THE PRESIDENT AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS RILL.
[Special Despatch to the Public Ledger.]
Washington, April 10.—Several prominent radi
cal Senators who saw the President to-day say that
the effect of the passage of the Civil Rights bill
over the veto has been to modify his antagonism lo
Congress, afid they predict the speedy adoption by
Congress of a plan for the restoration of the late in
surgent States, which will be satisfactory to the
North, and meet the President’s approval.
Mr. Johnson, last evening, said to Senator Trum
bull that he had exercised his constitutional pre
rogative in vetoing the bill, and Congress had exer
cised its prerogative in passing it over his veto, and
he should feel bound by their action.
ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS.
Washington, April 10.—Alexander H. Stephens
proposes to return home to-morrow. He has been
very frank aud cordial witli all who have called
upon him, aud has expressed his sentiments npon
the aspect of a Hairs aud the feeling of the .Southern
people without'any restraint whatever to friend and
opponent alike. Messrs. Wilson, of the Senate, aud
Stevens, of the House, both of whom have held in
terviews with him, could not fail to have been con
vinced of the sincerity of the eminent Georgian and
his •ittai-hincnt to the Union, vet not a word of en
couragement did either give that he or any of tho
Southern members would be allowed to take their
seats. There is a report to-day, however, that a pro
gramme for the “restoration” of the States will be
submitted to Congress by the committee having the
matter in charge during the presept mouth.
THE CASE OF MU. DAVIS.
The evidence which the committee appointed to
day are instructed to procure from the (Government,
and which is sup|>osed to connect Mr. Davis with the
assassination plot, can be given most speedily, as it
is kuown that the Administration has no evidence
of a reliable kind in its possession. Such being the
case, the sub-committee will make an early report
upon the subject, and there the matter will drop.—
As to the enquiry respecting his trial for treason,
asking why he has not bceu tried, Congress has the
answer already.
the temperance movement in congress.
In the Senate, this afternoon, Mr. Wilson intro
duced a resolution to prohibit the sale of spirituous
liquors in the Capitol building, saying that during
the last few years employees of the Capitol had been
taxed to keep members of Congress in whiskey.—
Mr, Clark spoke of disgraceful scenes about the
building lately, and said he had known little boys
employed as pages to be sent home drunk. Mr.
McDougall announced himself “in favor of wine,
whiskey and war.” The resolution was passed
Messrs.'MePougall and Pavis only voting against it.
PERSONAL.
J. Harmer Gilmer, of Richmond, counsel for Dick
Turner, (former keeper of Libby prison, who has been
incarcerated thereiu for a year past,) is in town, en
deavoring to obtain the release of his client.
TERRIBLE CRIME.
A Family of Seven Person* Murdered—Particulars
or the Tragedy
Philadelphia, April 11.—The most Horrible trag
edyever known to haveoccnred in this city came to
light this afternoon. An entire family, consisting
of Christopher Peering, aged 3H: his wile, aged 3ti :
Miss Kealing, a lady cousin, aged 45, and hi* four
children, named James, aged 8: Thomas, aged 5;
Annie, aged 4, and tlmma, aged 14 months, were
found brutally murdered upon their premises, on
June’s lane, near the Point House road, in the First
Ward. All the persons named had their throats cut
and their heads horribly mangled. The murder is
supposed to have been committed on Saturday, ns
Mr. Peering was last seeen ou the morning flr that
day. The mother and her four chidreu were found
in one corner of the barn, covered with dirt and
hay. The father and Miss Kealing were found lying
close to the outside of the barn, and like the others,
covered with dirt and hay. The discovery of the
murder was not made till about 2 o’ clock this morn
ing. Tho bodies were in a partially decomposed
state, showing evidently that several days had
elajised since the perpetration of the atrocious deed.
Mr. Peering was a cattle dealer, and greatly re
spected by his neighbors. His residence is in the
suburbs of the city, where houses are some distance
apart, which accounts for the affair not being dis
covered before. It is coulideiitly believed that
the person who committed the horrible deed is
a young German about twenty-live year* of age,
who has been in the employ of Mr. Peering for
several weeks past. He has not been seen about the
place since Friday.
The instrument used in murdering the family was
a very sharp axe, subsequently found in the bouse.
Witli this he struck them in the head, and afterward
cut their throats. A small boy, about fourteen years
of age, who was employed by Mr. Peering, is also
missing. He is also siqqiosed to have been mur
dered, and Ids body thrown down a well on tlieprem
ises, or into one of the many ditches which abound
in the neighborhood. Further developments will
he made to-morrow. The murderer has not beeu
captured up to the time of the present writing. The
horrible affair has created great commotion through
out the entire city.
LATER FROM EUROPE.
Arrival oT the Steamer Pereire—Head Centre Ste
ven* a Pn»*eiiL'er—Militnrj Movements on ilie
Cvuiiueiit—Preparation* for \A ar.
New York, April 11.—The steamer Pereire
linu appirutl It. i<4 untint SitAvmiu ia a rvia.
senger.
The Pereire brings Paris papers to the evening
of the 30th, from which we obtain the following
lute news:
Provincial correspondence of Merlin to tlio 28th
says in view of the danger to Prussia from the con
centration of Austrian troops, it is supposed orders
will be given which will enable Prussia to success
fully resist any attack.
A dispatch from Odelberg of the 28th says a pow
der train, consisting of six wugons. passed by
Giweicziu, Silesia, recently, destined for t'racovia.
and that numerous bodies of troops from Hungary
have arrived at Leinburg,
A Berlin telegram says measures touching Sile
sia were taken at a meeting at Consel on the 20th
ult.
A dispatch from Vienna on the 28th ult., protests
against the statements of the Prussian journals, and
says there has been no rendezvous of an army corps,
no purchase of horses, and no levy of troops on the
part of Austria.
The Imperial Government has omitted to take
measures which are justified by the language of the
Prussian sheets, for it would not needlessly increase
the burdens of fiuanee.
A telegram from Beyrout states that the Turkish
troops evacuated La Montague on the 28th of
March, with a view to the pacification of the coun
try. _ _
A Corpse Stolen and Recovered.—About a
a month ago, a lady named Davis died in Carthage.
(111.) of a disease of the arm. The body was buried
and the next day it was ascertained that the grave
had been robbed and the corpse carried off. On
Wednesday the body was returned in a new coffin,
and left uuburied inside of the enclosure where it
had been originally interred. Upon examination
the body .was fotind to be frozen hard and covered
with a thin coating of ice. The diseased limb bad
been cut in several directions, and the flesh neatly
restored to its place. The body was rapped in a
sheet. During the week Mr. Davis received a letter
without any signature, post-marked at Hannibal,
Mo., in which the writer statesthat, Vicing a surgeon,
and learning that the deceased had died of a very un
usual and complicate disease, he had deemed it of
sufficient interest to the cause of medical science
to justify the disinterment of the body, and an ex
amination into the cause of the disease. The writer
says that having made the examination, he had
caused the body to be returned, and apologizes for
not interring it. on the ground that the earth was
frozen so hard as to forbid it.
During the last fifty years the luckiest family in all
Europe has been that of Cobnrg. Prince Leopold
of Saxe-Cobttrg. whose income was only three hun
dred pounds a year, married the Princess Charlotte,
heiress of the British throne, in 1816: dropped into a
pension of fifty thousand pounds for life, on her
death in 1817:" was chosen King of Greece in 1830,
but declined the empty honor: became King of Bel
gium in 1831, and reigned for twenty-five years,
with great success. His sister, a poor widow, though
•• a born princess," married one «f the English royal
• dukes, and their only surviving child now occupies
the British throne, "while her granddaughter will
some day lie yueen 0f Prussia. Another of the
Coburg family married a daughter of Louis Philippe
of France. Vet another is father of the present
King of Portugal. Leopold's eldest son married an
Austrain archduchess, and his only daughter is Em
pre«of Mexico.
PERUVIAN GUANO.—Genuine N". 1
PERUVIAN GUANO, direct from the Agent of the
Peruvian Government, for sale, to arrive, bv
ROBERT F. WILLIAMS,
*pl3f___No. 44 Cary street.
WEDDING, RECEPTION AND VLS
ITIN’G CARDS engraved or printed to order.
Note Paper, Letter Paper and Envelopes stamped
with initials in fashionable style.
WOODHOUSE & PARHAM,
apl3t Booksellers and Stationers, Governor St.
JOHN H. M< CUE, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
LOVINGSTON, Nelson ceunty, Virginia, will prac
tice in the Courts of Nelson, Amherst, Albemarle coun
ties, and the city of Lynchburg. mhl3-c«m
FENIAN WAR MOVEMENTS.
Tlie situation in Cnnadn and Maine—Armed Men
ot* the Frontier— British Vessel* and Troop* on
the Alert—Convention at Eastport—Affairs at
Cauipo-Brllo. Ac.
Eastport. Maine, April 11.—This place is crowd
ed with Fenians, and the Fenian Convention is in
session here. Communication between St, John
and other towns was destroyed on the night of the
9th. The inhabitants of the other side of the border
arc flocking into Eastport for safety. The Fenian
war vessels were not allowed to go outof the harbor.
They are armed with 90-pounders and howitzers.
The British war ship Pleiades, with the British
Consul at Eastport, went to St. Andrews on Monday,
but has been ordered to Carapo-Bello Island. Two
other English vessels were reported to have arrived
there. The garrison at Campo-Bello has been in
creased by volunteers from Woodstock. Fredericton
and elsewhere, and they are now engaged in throw
ing up breastworks.
The examination of the Fenian prisonera was
conducted with closed doors, the press being exclu
ded. The prisoners were remanded until Tuesday
next.
LATEST PRO* EASTPORT.
Eastport, Me., April 11.—The Fenians are quiet
to-day. The British steamer tlosini has sailed for
St. Andrews. Steamer Pleiades lies off Campo Bello
Islands.
The Fenians have hired the Town Hall for three
days for the purpose of holding meetings. To-night
there is an open session.
Another large British steamer is anchored off
Campo Bello, with a large force of men ashore at
work. A number of Fenians left last night on a
sailing vessel secretly. A large steamer, with the
American flag flying and private signals, has just
gone up the river towards St. Andrews.
[THIRD DISPATCH.]
The excitement continues. The Fenian public
convention is in session. British war steamers are
continually arriving and patrolling the harbor and
St. Croix river. Fifty Fenians have left in a schoon
er. destination unknown. A suspicions steamer,
showing American colors, has passed into St. Croix
river. There are Fenian arrivals constantly.
[fourth dispatch.]
Two large English war ships are here now, with
steam up constantly, port holes open and everything
ready. The Americans are wild, and consider it a
challenge. American veterans are joining the cir
cles of Fenians. Both the English vessels are on the
wrong track. Deserters from the British troops are
joining the circles, and active recruiting of volun
teers is going on.
SHIPPING NEWS.
MOVEMENTS OF OCEAN STEAMERS.
TO DEPART.
STEAMSHIPS. LEAVE FOR DATE.
FOR EUROPE.
Atlantic.New York_Bremen.April 12
Fulton.New York....Havre.April 14
Bavaria.New York_Hamburg.April 14
City of Paris.New York... .Liverpool.April 14
Bavaria.New York_Hamburg.April 14
Belgian.Portland.Liverpool.April 14
Scotland.New York.... Liverpool.April 14
FOR HAVANA, ASPINWALL, &c.
Santing-d'Coba..New York_Oreytown.April 20
Corsica.New York....Nassau, Jtc.April 21
North America ..New York....Rio Janeiro,Ac.April 28
Knn rises.5:32 I Moon rises. 4:27
Sun sets.6:28 | High tide.2:38
POUT OF RICHMOND, April 12, 1866.
ARRIVKD.
Schooner Mary Turner, Accnmac, corn, A. Millspaugh
& Co.
Schooner Rough and Ready, Moore, F.astern Shore,
grain, A. Millspaugh.
Steamer M. Martin, Haloes, Norfolk, merchandise
and passengers, Haskins St Bridgford.
Steamer Alexander, Hettrich, Philadelphia mer
chandise and passengers, W. P. Porter.
Schooner Mary Clarke, Amesbury, New York, lime,
Bridgford St Myers.
BAIf.BD.
Steamer John Sylvester. Post, Norfolk, merchandise
and passengers, C. J. Towbridge.
Schooner G. B. Smith, Booker, New York, via York
river to load, A. Millspaugh St Co.
Schooner Readington, Gregory, Baltimore, light.
MISCEL1.AXEOU8.
Arrived in Liverpool, 26th ultimo, the Welkin, Blan
chard, from Richmond.
AMUSEMENTS.
■^TKW RICHMOND THEATRE.
8. B. DUFFIELD.Maxaobr.
BENEFIT OF MI8S MARY MITCHELL.
Mr. J.W. ALBAUGH WILL APPEAR.
FRIDAY EVENING, Al’RlI. 1.3, 1866,
First time in this city of the Great Domestic Drama,
WAITING FOR THE VERDICT,
Martha Rosebladc.Miss MARY MITCHELL
Jasper Roseblade.Mr, J. W. ALBAUGH
Wearing of the Green,” (Great Fenian 8ong),
Mr. DUFFIELD
To conclude with a
DUEL IN THE DARK.
nplS-lt
STATEMENT OF THE BANK OF VIK
O GIN1A AND BRANCHES (exclusive of Branch at
Charleston), April 1st, 1866:
Outstanding debt.6 379,684 68
Confederate States stocks and bonds.3,216,119 30
Confederate States treasury notes und cer
tificates . 4,18l,16o S3
Heal estate, as it stands charged on the
hooks of the branches. n,059,U2 00
Stocks and Bonds—State of
Virginia six per cent, cou
pon bonds (new). 6 72,000 00
Monroe county bond. 6,into no
White 8nlphur Springs coun
ty bond. 4,462 09
Midlothian Company stock—
six shares. 600 00
Farm're and Mechanics’ Bank,
Georgetown, 34 shares. 850 00
City of Lynchburg coupon
bond. 36,000 00
Bonds in Lynchburg payable
ill coin. 4,999 60
North Carolina State note
(new). 100 00
- 124,601 59
Stale of Virginia treasury notes. 5,843 00
Coin.. . 107,098 45
Notes payable In national currency. 14,116 66
National currency. 28,657 96
Notes of other Gunks. 18,040 On
Due front other Banks In Branches. 46,091 02
33.266.804 71
Capital slock. 32,651,260 on
Circulation. 789,423 50
Due to depositors. 4,152,354 97
Due to other Banks from Branches. 142,341 68
Surplus, which includes any balance that
niav be due from Richmond to other
Banks. 531,434 66
38.266.804 71
. • JAMES CASK1E, President.
M. L. orERRAST, Acting Cashier.
The coin belonging to the Bank, which was recover
ed from the robbers in Georgia, and afterwards taken
to Washington, D. C., has not yet beon restored.
it is supposed lliat a sufficient amount will bn real
ized at the Branches, in notes of the Bank or the equiv
alent from debts considered to be good and yot unpaid,
to settle all claims on them, to be met by the payment
of like currency.
AVAILABLE ASSETS.
Coin on hand.$167,098 45
Lynchburg bonds payable in
coin. 4,999 60
- 162,097 95
National currency on hand. 2s,557 90
Notes payable in national cur
rency.'.. 14,116 66
Real estate, estimated certainly
to bring. 65,OOn on
City of Lynchburg coupon
bonds, $36,000, estimated..., 25,000 00
Midlothian Company, six shares 450 00
123,124 62
White Sulphur Springs Compa
ny coupon bond for $4,452 09,
included in debts secured by
deed of truRt on the property,
value uncertain.
Certillcate to Norfolk Branch for
31 shares stock of the Far
mers and Mechanics’ Bank,
Georgetown, I). C., on which
$25 per share have been paid,
value uncertain.
Value In coin of $123,124 62 . 94,711 .4
$256,809 19
LIABILITIES.
Circulating Notes of Bank, as
estimated, and Branches, as
reported.1. 759,423 60
Notes of other Banks of Vir
ginia on hand $1S,040, estima
ted to redeem. 10,000 00
779,423 50
Due for deposits and balances to
Banks standing now as on 1st
July, 1561, placed on same
footing as notes of the Bank,
amount cannot be accurately
ascertained, owing to the de
struction of books by Are,
but it is estimated may not
exceed. 100,000 00
879,623 50
To be paid in coin at 25 cents per dollar
$579,423 50 . 219 863 87
Add for $21,364, on which only 16 ets. per
dollar In coin have been paid. 1,923 00
/ 221.778 87
Surplus, out of which expenses of agen
cies at Bank and Branches, in winding
up the business and all other expenses,
must be paid. 35,030 32
$266,809 19
JA3ILS CASKIE, President.
M. L. Gkerraxt, Acting Cashier.
State ok Viroixia—f'ity of Richmond, to-wit:
This day personally appeared before me, E. J. War
ren. a Notary Public for the city aforesaid, JAMES !
CASKIE, President, and M L. UUERRANT, Acting j
Cashier, who severally made oath that the preceding I
statements of the condition of the Bank of Virginia are
substantially correct, to the best of their knowledge,
and belief.
As witness my hand, this 12th day of April, 1666.
EDWARD j. Warren,
ap!3-lw _Notary Public.
PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUMS.—A beautiful
I assortment of Photographic Albums, from the j
cheapest to the most elegant.
Also, Photographic Portraits of popular Confederate
Generals, at only ten cents each. For sale by
WO0DH00SE k PARHAM.
apl3f Booksellers and Stationers, Governor St.
NrOTICK.—Application will be made for the
renewal of script for ten shares stock of the Rich- |
mond and Danville Railroad Company, standing in the
. auie of John T. Clark, which has been lost.
«pl3-law2m _LANCASTER k CO. '
OLD DOMINION NAILS.—One thousand
kegs “Old Dominion’ NAILH, assorted sties, for
sale by ROBERT F. WILLIAMS,
»pl3f No. 44 Cary street.
I
TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
Proceeding* of Congret*.
Washington, April 12.
SxNATg.—The Senate concurred in the House
amendments, and passed the bill to re-imburse the
State of Missouri for certain war expenses.
Mr. Stewart presented a joint resolution, which
was referred to the Reconstruction Committee, pro
!>oaing an amendment to the Constitution prohibit
ing any distinction on account of color, prohibiting
the payment of the rebel debt and providing that
when any one of the eleven seceded States shall
comply with these conditions, it shall be entitled to
representation.
Several Senators delivered eulogies on the late
Senator Foot
House.—The nouse passed Senate bill authorizing
the President to transfer a gunboat to the Liberian
Government. The Senate joint resolution protest
ing against the pardon of criminals by foreign go
vernments. on condition of their emigrating hither,
was agreed to. In the House testimonialsof respect
to the memory of the late Senator Foot were also
presented.
From Canada.
Toronto, April 12.—Preparations to meet the
anticipated raids actively continue. The Cabinet
meets daily. The proceedings are kept from the
public prints. The statement that President Johnson
is going to issue a proclamation in reference to the
Fenian movement was received with much satisfac
tion.
Montreal, April 12.—The greatest activity pre
vails in all the Canadian cities to keep out the
cholera. Precautionary sanitary measures have been
taken in anticipation of its approach.
Jirw York Markets.
New York, April 12.—Gold 127fl
LECTURES.
Medical college of Virginia.—
CLINICAL LECTURES will bo delivered at HOW
ARD'S GROVE HOSPITAL, by the Professors of the
College, every TUESDAY and FRIDAY, from twelve
to two o'clock.
Medical Students and members of the medical profes
sion admitted without charge.
L. S. JOYNB8, M. D.,
mhSO-dteSw Dean of the Faculty.
J^ITERARY KNTERTAINMENT.
Mr. SAMUEL A EATON,
OP RICHMOND,
Respectfully announces that be will have the honor
to deliver his
POEM OF LABOR
At the Mato Street Church (near Broad street), on
Friday evening, April 13, 18C6, at S o’clock. Proceeds
to be' applied to the pnrehase of books for the library
of the
MACHINISTS’ UNION, No. 3, Ya.
Tickets, Fifty cents,
To be had at the Richmond Musical Exchange and at the
Bookstores ami Druggists generally. uplo-4t
MEETINGS.
NOT! CEc—The ANNUAL MEETING of
the STOCKHOLDERS of the
NEW CREEK COMPANY
Will be held at their office, No. :ill Walnut stre t,
Philadelphia,on MONDAY', the nth day of April next,
at 12 o’clock, M. STANLEY C. HYLTON,
mhlO—lin Secretary.
IX)R B A LT I MOR E, S A V ANN AII m mn
‘ and BOSTON. pamnQ^]
POWHATAN STEAMBOAT COMPANY.
SEMI-WEEKLY LINE.
Leaves Richmond every WEDNESDAY' and SUN
DAY.
Leaves Baltimore every WEDNESDAY and SATUR
DAY.
The steamer
STATE OK MARYLAND,
Captain Thomas Travers, will leave here at 6 o’clock,
A. M., SUNDAY, the 15th insl.
Freight received Friday and up to 5 o’clock, P. M ,
Saturday.
This steamer has splendid saloons, staterooms and
passenger acaommodations.
Passage (meals included)
For freight or passage, apply to
DAVID Ji WILLIAM CURRIE,
Office at Charles T. Wortham k Co.’s,
ap!3-2t Fifteenth street.
rpiIE BALTIMORE AND IIA
JL VANA S. S. COMPANY.
ALEX. BROWN * SONS,
General Agents.
FOR HAVANA AND NEW ORLEANS.
CARRYING THE U. S. MAIL.
The first-class Steamships of this Line will sail as
follows:
“CUBA,” 1,100 tons,
WILLIAM ROLLINS, ('omniandor,
On SATURDAY, April 21st.
"LIBERTY,” 1,250 tons,
WILLIAM J. STAFFORD. Commander,
on SATURDAY,-.
From Brown’s Wharf, F. P., at 4 o’clock P. M. pre
cisely on the days announced.
For freight or passage, having unsurpassed accom
modations, apply t«
HENRY M. WARFIELD & CO., Agents,
No. 16 Spear’s Wharf.
N. B.—No hills of lading hut those ot the Company
will be signed. Permits for freight must be procured
from this office. No freight received or bills of lading
signed on day of sailing. Freight forwarded to ns will
be shipped to New Orleans and Havana by the steam
ships of this Company free of all charges, except dray
age and wharfage, and bills of lading issued on recep
lion of the goods in Haiti.re. apLt-ly
IjUlR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.—The £»
line British Schooner LUCY' ANN, Woodroe.^tffet
master. Capacity l,5oO to 2,000 barrels. For”*™®"
terms apply to
apl2-lw FRENCH k CRENSHAW.
I?OR HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA.— £&
' The British brig STARLIGHT, Captain J.
Scott, now in the Dock, will he despatched itume-“®®*'
diately to the above port. For freight, applv to
CA.SKIR & BROTHERS,
apl3-lw Seventh and Franklin streets.
j|.u.p..... t.u.r....7!e.
These instruments are entirely new, both in princi
ple and action, from ALL OTHERS—LIGHT, CLEAN
and EASY—Nt) PRESSURE on the BACK-INWARD
and UPWARD MOTION; CUKES the most obstinate
Cases of Rupture. Pamphlets free. Sold at wholesale
and retail.
WHITE'S PATENT LEVER TRUSS COMPANY,
Sole Proprietors,
No. 6u9 Broadway, NEW YORK.
apl3-eodCm ___
oaa BARRELS WHISKEY,all grades
UU loo barrels Braudy and Gin, all grades
20 J casks fourth proof Brandy
2 puncheons Holland Gin
2 “ Scotch Whiskey
2.’i casks Port, Sherry and Madeira Wine'
26 barrels New England Rum
H>0 bags Java and Rio Coffee
50 hbds. Baron Sides, Breasts and Shoulders
20 tierces Hants
25 barrels Leaf lard
loo “ Nos. 1 and 3 Mackerel
4o.) “ Extra, Super and Fine Flour
25 •* Champagne Cider
100 boxes prime Factory Cheese
300 dozen Buckets and Brooms
200 boxes Soap and Candles, all kinds
100 barrels Porto Rico and New Orleans Mo
lasses
25 barrels Golden Syrup
lfio “ Crushed, Powdered, Rellned and
Brown Sugars
20o che-ts and caddies Gunpowder, Japan and
Black Teas
1,000 reams Wrapping Paper
Starch, Indigo
Fig Blue, Matches
Pepper, Cloves, Spice
Sifters, Twine
Tacks, Vinegar, Ac.
For sale by
WILLIAM TAYLOR A SON,
apl2-Ct Nos. 9 and 11 East Main street.
1 EMPLOYMENT OFFICE FOR FREEDMEN.
LJ We have opened an office on Fifth street, between
Broad and Grace, in Richmond, for the purpose of se
curing EMPLOYMENT FOR FREEDMEN, and furnishing
Farmers and others with such class of labor as they
may need.
Railroad contractors, farmers, manufacturers and citi
zens wanting Freedmen as laborers for any purpose,
can leave their names with us, aud we will secure the
hands wanted.
Freedmen desiring employment can bavetheirnames
registered in books kept in oar office, and we will se
cure them places and attend to the making of contracts.
feli7-dAc2m QEOROB E. TAYLOR A CO.
QEORGE 1*. HUGHES,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
•©"Address Columbia, Fluvanna County, Virginia.
Practices in FLUVANNA, GOOCHLAND and LOUISA.
[mb20-dAc2ui*]
I LEATHERS.—Western Live Geese FEA
THERS for sale, on consignment, by
JOHNN. GORDON A SON,
apl3f Fourteenth street, near Exchange Hotel.
YJOWDER, POWDER.—Dupont’s Sporting
X and Blasting POWDER, for sale at rednced rates,
by E. A 8. WORTHAM A CO.,
apl0-e<»d2w __ Agents.
KAA BUSHELS BRAN, BROWN STL’ FF
*XV/V7 and SHIPSTUFF. REEVE A MAYO,
aplof Franklin street, between Sth and 9th. _
WHITE SHIRTS made to order when pre
fer*ed. Also, a large supply, cf very fine ijual
ity and style, always on hand at 112 Main street.
apl2f WM. IRA SMITH
NUTS7NUTS7~NUTS.—Princes* or Paper
Shell, Bordo, Farragona, Inca and Sicily AL- ,
MONDS ; new crop Walnuts, PECANS, Brazil Nuts, Fil
berts, for sale at reduced price* by
LOUIS J. BOSSIEUX,
apHf No. $0 Mnin street.
CLOVER SEED, CLOVER SEED l
100 bushels Clover Seed
apllf A. Y. 8T0KES A CO.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
JCp* A GENTLEMAN RETtrRNTNG TO
Europe will take charge for the furtherance there of
any flnt-claee undertaking or financial project connect
ed with the Southern Stale*. Flrat-claaa Southern ref
erence.
Address, with full details, V. D. W , cafe of Box
4,903, PoetofflCe, New York. BplS-lt*
{CPE. H. CHESTERMAN,
Bank Street, Third Door prom Nieth,
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA,
la prepared, with nnequaled facilities, to repair and
erect MILLS in the country. Will furnish plans and
drawings on the most liberal terms.
May be seen at his ofllce from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M., or
may be addressed through Post Office, Box 1,111.
apl2-lw
5CP ETTENGER & EDMOND,
Established in October, 18W>,
Manufacturers oi
Portable and Stationary
ENGINES and SAW MILLS,
MILL WORK,
CASTINGS of all kinds,
TOBACCO FIXTURES and
RAILROAD WORK,
Cart street (below Fifteenth),
declfi—dts _RICHMOND, Va. _
From the army hospital—the bloody battle-field—the
mansion of the rich and the humble abode of the
poor---from the office and the sacred desk---from the
mountain top, distant valleys and far-otf islands of the
ocean—from every nook and corner of the clvilited
world—Is pouring in the evidence of the astonishing
effects of DRAKE’S PLANTATION BITTERS. Thou
sands npon thousands of letters like the following may
be seen at our office :
REBDMBDKr, Win., Sept. 16, 1963.
* * * I have been in the army hospitals for
fourteen months—speechless and nearly dead. At Al
ton, Illinois, they gave me a bottje of Plantation Hit
ters. * * Three bottles restored my speech and
cured me. * * C. A. FLAUTE.
South Warsaw, Ohio, July 59,1863.
* * * One young man, who had been -ick and not
out of the house for two years with Scrofula and Ery
sipelas, after paying the doctors over 4160 without
benefit, has been cured by ten bottles of your Bitters.
EDWARD WOUNALL.
The following is from the Manager of the Union
Home School for the Children of Volunteers
Havkmetek Mansion, Fiftt-sevknth street, >
New York, August 4, 1S63. 5
Dr. Drake: Your wonderful Plantation Bitters have
been given to sotno of our little children suffering ftrom
weakness and weak lungs, with most happy effect.
One little girl in particular, with pains in her bead,
loss of appetite, and daily wasting consumption, on
whom all medical skill had been exhausted, has been
entirely restored. We commenced with but a tea
spoonful of Bitters a day. Her appetite and strength
rapidly increased, and she Is now well. * •
Respectfully, Mrs. 0. M. DEVOE.
* * * I owe much to you, for I verily believe
the Plantation Bitters have saved my life.
I),... m ii u'lOfirtvro
Madrid, New York.
* * * * The Plantation Bittera have
cared me of Liver Complaint, of which I was laid up
prostrate, and had to abandon my business.
H. B. KINGSLEY,
Cleveland, Ohio.
* » * I have given the Plantation Bittera to
hundreds of our disabled soldiers with the most aston
ishing effect. G. W. D. ANDREWS,
Superintendent 8oldiers’ Home,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Plantation Bittbrs make the weak strong, the
angnid brilliant, and are exhausted nature's great re
storer. They are composed of the celebrated Calisaya
Bark, Wintergreen, Sassafras, Roots, Herbs, etc., all
preserved in perfectly pure St. Croix Rum.
S. T.—1860.—X.
Persons of sedentary habits troubled with weak
ness, lassitude, palpitation of the heart, lack of appe
tite, distress after eating, torpid liver, constipation, etc,,
deserve to suffer if they will not try them.
They are recommended by the highest medical au
thorities, and are warranted to prodnce an immediate
beneficial effect. They are exceedingly agreeable,
perfectly pure and harmless.
Any person refilling bottles, or offering to sell Plan
tation Bitters in bulk, by the gallon, or in any man
ner except as above, is a swindler and impostor, with
whom wii shall deal as the law directs.
Sold by all respectable dealers throughout the habit
able globe.
P. H. DRAKE k CO., New York.
mylS—eodlySdp
^ID FOR THE WIDOWS ANDORPHANS.
In view of the fact that my publications aro having a
very great sale thronghout the Southern States, by
which sale I, of course, am benefited—and in view of
the present general sutfering throughout the country,
I deem it only a fitting return that I should contribute
liberallv—as I do most cheerfully—of my receipts to
such Southern charitable enterprises as promise to be
most efliclent. I have therefore the pleasure of stating
that for the region of pocr months from and after this
date (March 15, 1866) I shall contribute
FIFTEEN PER CENT. OF ALL THE PROFIT
On the sale of
the following valuable list of books,
To the
“WIDOWS AND ORPHAN8' RELIEF ASSOCIATIONS’
of the several states.
All canvasser* will, therefore, aid the suffering and
unprotected, while at the same time advancing their
own Interests.
C. B. RICHARDSON. Publisher.
AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY TOWN
TO sbi.i. the following
VALUABLE SOUTHERN HISTORIES.
I.
SOUTHERN HISTORY OF THE WAR.
BV
E. A. POLLARD, Editor Richmond Examiner.
Two VoU., Svo., about 675 pages each. M 50 per Vol.
WITH 20 SPLENDID STEEL PORTRAITS.
This is the only complete and authentic history of
the Southern side published, extending, a* it does, from
the beginning of the war to the final surrender of the
Confederate armies.
Mr. Pollard’s prominent position in the Confederacy
has enabled him to prepare a work nnequaled in accu
racy and interest, and which is everywhere acknow
ledged to be the
STANDARD SOUTHERN HISTORY.
It should find a place in every library.
II.
SOUTHERN GENERALS:
THEIR LIVES AND CAMPAIGNS.
BY
Caftaix w. PARKER 8NOW.
WITH IT SPLENDID STEEL PORTRAITS.
One Vol., Svo., 600 page*. W.
Containing Biographies of the distinguished Southern
Generals, with full and graphic account* of the various
campaign* in which they were engaged. It is a most
important and interesting volume, and ha* been pre
pared with the utmost care and thoroughness.
III.
LIFE, SERVICES AND CAMPAIGNS
op
STONEWALL JACKSON.
By a Viroisiax.
One Vol. I2mo, 325page*. $1 60.
WITH AUTHENTIC PORTRAITS OF
JACKSON, and his snecessor EWELL, on Steel.
This is the only authentie history of this distinguish
ed Leader which has been written. It has been pre
pared from official reports,contemporary narratives and
personal acquaintance, and is complete and full.
IV.
WOMEN OF THE SOUTH,
DISTINGUISHED IN LITERATURE.
• One Vol., Svo, 611 pages. ♦3 50.
ILLUSTRATED WITH SPLENDID PORTRAITS ON
STEEL, FROM LIFE, OF
Mur. OCTAVIA WALTON Lb VERT,
Mies MARIA J. McINTOSH,
Mrs. ROSA VERTNER JOHNSON,
Mb*. ANNA CORA RITCHIE,
Mies AUGUSTA J. EVANS,
Ma*. L. VIRGINIA FRENCH,
MARION HARLAND,
And containing full biographical sketches and specimen
extracts from the most celebrated writing* In prose and
verse, of
THIRTY-FIVE DISTINGUISHED LITERARY "Wo
MEN OP THE SOUTH.”
All the above work* are having an immense saleand
agent* are doing splendidly everywhere. Many are
making from ♦lO to ^15 a day.
We want an agent In every tewn In the Southern
State*. Returned soldiers, ladies, teachers and other*
will And thi* mi’ll profltable employment.
Exclusive territory given, and liberal inducement*
offered to canvasser*
For full particular*, addre**
C. B. RICHARDSON, Publisher
MO Broadway, jfew York.
I
I
1
J. W. STRONG, i
Southwest corner Fifth and Franklin .treats,
General Agent for Virginia.
mh9-clm
i
Having been appointed General Agent for the State <
0 \ Irglnia for the above justly celebrated Southern
Vorks, I will want good, enterprising agents iu every r
onnty to canvas* for the sale of said works, for which
1 liberal per centage w.ll be allowed and exclusive B
gency gtven. For further particulars call and see or n
iddres* the subscriber, at southwest corner of Fifth b
ind Franklin streets, Richmond, Virginia. fi
J. W. STRONG, B
rahU-clm* General Agent for Virginia. 1
I • ■; ; •
la
SPECIAL HOTICES.
ICP* RfCTTMOND ALE'ANeTpORTErT'
— <1
The undersigned have jaat commenced brewing
ALE AND PORTER,
at Buchanan 8pring, at the head of Clay street, where
the manufacture of these articles will be continued
until their
NEW BREWERY,
now in course of erection, near the eite of SteArn* 4
Brummel's distillery, below Rocketts, is completed.
They guarantee an article In every reepect equal to
and cheaper than the beet Imported from any quarter
outside the 8tate, whether home or foreign.
All orders sent through the post-oMce will be
punctually attended to.
_feb«-:tm BETZ, YUENOLINO 4 BEYER.
}CP PAINTING ! PAINTIG ! !
L. L. MONTAGUE 4 SON.
HOUSE, SIGN AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTERS,
TENTH STREET, •
BETWEEN MAIN AND CARY,
Will be pleased to receive orders from their friends
and the public generally, lor work of all kinds Intheir
line.
They are prepared to do HOUSE PAINTING, GLAZ
ING, GRAINING, 4c.,in the very best style. Call and
leave your orders. Our terms shall be reasonable, and
we guarantee to do the beat of work.
SIGNS furnished at short notice.
■nh'W-tf l. L. MONTAGUE 4 SON.
SC7* PURCELL, LADD & CO.,
DRUGGISTS,
Having recommenced buginess In their uew house on
the site of their old stand,
Corner op Main and Thirteenth streets,
RICHMOND, VA.,
Are prepared to offer their nsual inducements to pur
chasers.
They are now receiving, and have in store a large
and well selected stock of DRUGS, MEDICINE8,
CHEMICALS, PAINTS, OILS, WINDOW GLASS,
FRENCH POLISHED PLATE and ORNAMENTED
GLASS, INDIGO, MADDER and OTHER DYES, R< CK
BRIDGK ALUM WATER, and a general assortment of
articles in their line, which they offer on most favora
ble terms.
Particular and prompt attention to packing and for
warding orders.
PURCELL, LADD 4 CO, Druggists,
122 Slain street, corner of Thirteenth,
in hi—If ___Ric!imohd, Va.
Bamkiko Hoi-se op Wm. B. Isaacs 4 Co. >
20th March, 1SS6. ’ $
50* NOTICE..—We are prepared to igguo
VIRGINIA REGISTER BONDS in sums of ONE HUN
DRED DOLLARS and its tnnitiple for the cocxteksion
ed notes of (be
Bank op 8cottsvillk,
Bank op Old Domin^tx,
_ Moxticello Bank. mhOO-lm
ICr* WE WOULD CALL THE ATTENTION
of the citizens of this Stale and others to the nee of
BAKER’S PREMIUM BITTERS,
Which all the druggists of the city of Richmond, Vir
ginia, admit to he one of the most popular medicines
erer before the pnbiic for the cure of Dyspepsia, Ner
von* Headache, Colic, Pains, Dysentery and Bowel
Complaints. In weak and debilitated females there is
nothing to equal the ready mode that It has In strength
ening the whole system, and if any medicine ever de
served the title of a “ human comforter,” It should be
BAKER'S CELEBRATED PREMIUM BITTERS. Since
the introduction of these Bitters, which has been abowt
fifteen years, the proprietor has received, tu and about
the city of Richmond, over one thousand certificates,
where it has made permanent cures in the above-named
diseases. Should you once become acquainted with its
superior virtues in various complaints, yon would
never be without it in your families.
To be had of all permanent Druggists In Virginia;
also of CANBV, OILPIN A CO., Baltimore, Marylan
Orders promptly filled by addressing
E. BAKER, Proprietor,
_ "‘hat Richmond, Vi.
5CPA HUES T I) E (J A V—PERFUM ED
Breath, Sound and Healthy Onms, Pearly While Teeth.
Relief and freedom from Toothache can be obtained
by using DOWDEN’S DENTAL FLUID. Recommended
by Dentists and Physicians everywhere a* superior to
the injurious compounds in use. Price 50 cent*. For
sale by all Drnggists.
Recommended by Drs. Pleasants, Woodward, Sleel,.
Hudson, Ac., Ac., of Richmond.
Jan2-3m PEYTON JOHNSTON A BRO.
•C?H ALL’S VEGET A BLE SICILI AN H AIR
REXEWEK has proved itself to be the moat perfect pre*
paration for the hair ever otTered to the public.
U is a vegetable compound, and contains no Injm loot*
properties whatever.
IT WILL RESTORE GRAY HAIR To ITS ORIGIN AL
COLOR.
It will keep the hair from failing out.
It cleanses the scalp and makes the hair soft, lustrooo
And silken.
It is .splendid hair dressing.
No person, old or yonng, should hill to use It.
IT IS RECOMMENDED AND USED BY THE FIRST
MEDICAL AUTHORITY.
UTAsk for Hall’s Vegetable Sicilian Hair Reuewer,
and take no other.
R P. HALL A CO.
Nashua, N. H. Proprietors.
Foreale by all druggists. nov2I-tna
JO* DYSPEPSIA.—What everybody r ayg
must be true. We have heard Dr. Strickland * Tonl8
spoken of so frequently by those who have her n b _
fitted by It, that at last we are compelled v y
known to tlie pnbiic that we really believe it effect* a
cure In every case ; therefore, we say to th „ \
.affertna with Dyspepsia or Nervon* De’ollu ,
-heir druggists aid get a bottle of Dr 6(r’lckl*nd.,
Tonic.
—----- - oct&l ly
;cp I HI) BAD CASES OF pn,j.;s CURED
BY DR. STRICKLAND’S PlLB F.EMEDY-Mr Glass
of Janesville, Wisconsin, write* for (h„ b#n„t o( ^
who suffer with the Piles, that b, ba, b„en tronbl9(|
for eight years with an aggr „„„ of p„M Md
hi, brother was discharged f ,om ,Il9 army „ ,DCUlabl.
(he being quite paralyzed Vi,b the Piles,. Both the.,
distressing case, were cur,j wlth ,# of
Strickland’s Pile Renvedy. The recommendation of
these gentlemen, beeld . the daily testimonial, received
by Dr. Strickland, ought to convince those suffering
that the most egg. aTaied cbroolc U|M of p„M
cored by Dr. 8trtrckUnd., p,,9 Remedy ,( h >o,,
Druggists everyw here. eo30-ly
CTA SUPERIOR REMEDY.—We mm.
sc.ent.oue.y recommend to those suffering f.omanls
t reusingeongh, Dr. Strickland', MellUnoa* Cough Bal
►am. It give, relief almost Instantaneous, and Is with
al not disagreeable to the taate. There la no doubt bat
the MelllUuou* Cough Balaam la one of the best pier.
rations !n n.a, and Is alt that It. proprietor claims for
it. We hare tried it during the past week, and found
relief from a most distressing cough. It la prepare I by
Dr. Strickland, No. 139 Sycamore st., Cincinnati Ohio,
and for sale by Droggists. oct.30 ly
icy BATCHELOR'S HAIR DYE.—The orL.
ginat and best In the world ! The only true and per
fect Hair Dye. Harmless, Reliable and Instantaneous.
Produces immediately a splendid Black or Natura
Brown, without injuring the hair or skin. RenieJiee
the ill effects of had dye. Sold by all Druggists. Thu
genuine Is signed William A. Batchelor. Also,
REGENERATING EXTRACT OP MILLE-FLEUKJI.
Per Restoring and Beautifying the Hair,
CHARLES BATCHELOR,
. »»H"tf_ _ New York.
Ity SPECIAL NOTICE !
JOHN W. BISON,
(Successor to Joseph Laidley,)
APOTHECARY AND DKUOO gT
Corner of Main and Third street*
RICHMOND, VA.,
Has la store a large stock ef Drugs, V .. .
Staffs, Oils and Paints, to which we \ . ,1°'*'
orlte the special
attention of Country Merchants and .. ,
. , jM all other. In want
of such articles,
___ oct 16- tf
ICyTO OUR FRIENDS 'vNU THE PUBLIC.
ANOTHER igKW 8T0CR.
W’‘r'T^K *•*"««•* from the manatse
tare re, two hundred ca„, of
B^fSi SHOES ASD TRU
laltible for r Ha f.11 4
Hock is eiir> . u * d nt*r ,r»<l«. Among oor
[.rated Nr 0^*“ h°',dred P»lr" of F Dane A Co'seel*.
S8urtc?rnRoGANs’,hnb*,tnih9
'actnrer. t ic W “*U,>r Dftn« * Co. the be-t menu
Brnel r * World- W« »»*• been selling (he.,
roKan. for over twenty y„r,, and th,y
n.l« »t -faction. ask aU ln wanl of good
>r Boots to give os a call.
°at20"lf PUTNEY A WATT*.
Icy BILLIARD TEMPLE.
A RESTAURANT COUNTER
Ann be kept at the Billiard Temple, commencing THIS
Sitarday) AFTERNOON.
JgP.1.-.1!_JOW & GRISWOLD.
icy ROYAL HAVANA LOTTERY OF CU
BA, conducted by the Spanish Government. >360,000'
n Gold drawn every 17 days. PrUes ca.hed a)(d ’ia.
ormation fhrnlshed. The higheat rate, paid for Doub
oons, and all kinds of Gold and 8tlver.
TAYLOR a CO., Bankets,
Jan31eod6m No. 10 Wa„ w. y.
cy HILL’S UAlirDYETsircENTS^-BlAck
r Brown, Instantaneous. Best, cheapest, durable, r«
lable. DEPOT—NO. 6« JOHN STREET, NEW YORK.
Sold by all Drag and Patent Medicine Stores eve y
fhere. mh5 ly
rO BUILDERS.—I wish to contract with a
competent Builder for the erection of a Dwelling
°use, or wood, on the farm of Blair Park, ln Albe
larle county, Virginia. Plans and specification, may
e seen by application to Mr. Tuttle, Manager, on the
irm, and written proposals must be addreseed to JA8
LACK, corner of Ninth and Leigh streets, Richmond
he right of rejecting all bid, U reserved. aplQ-<St*

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