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The Daily state journal. [volume] (Alexandria, Va.) 1868-1874, January 29, 1873, Image 3

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WEDNESDAY EVEN'G, JAN. 29, 1873.
Mrs. M. Handy contributes the follow
ing interesting Tobacco Plantation Sketch
to Scribner's Monthly Magazine:
Riding through Routhside Virginia, any
warm, bright winter's day after Christmas,
the stranger may bo" startled to see a dense
column ot smoke rising from the forest
beyond. He anxiously inquires of the
first person he meets —probably a negro—
if the woods are on fire. Cuffee shows his
white teeth in a grin that is half amuse
ment, half contempt, as be answers : "No,
gar. <My' jis burnin a plant-patch."
For this is the first step in tobacco cul
ture. A sunny, sheltered spot on the
southern slope of a hill is selected, one
protected from northern winds by the sur
rounding forest, but open to the
sun in front, and here the hot-bed
for the reception of the seed is
prepared. All growth is felled within the
area needed, huge dead logs are dragged
and heaped on the ground as for a holo
caust, the whole ignited, and the fire kept
up until nothing is left of the immense
wood-heap but circles of smouldering
ashes. These are afterwards plowed in;
the soil fertilized still further, if need be,
is harrowed and prepared as though for a
garden bed, and the small brown seed
sown, from which ia to spring the most
widely used of man's useless luxuries.
Later, when the spring fairly opens, and
the young plants in Ins primitive hot-bed
are large and strong enough to bear trans
planting, the Virginian draws them, as the
New Englander does his cabbages, and
plants them in like manner, in hills from
three to four feet apart each way.
Lucky is ho whose piant-bed has escaped
the fly, tho first enemy of the precious
weed. Its attacks are made upon it in the
first stage of its existence, and are more
fatal, because less easily prevented, than
those of the tobacco worm, that scourge
par excellence of the tobacco crop. Farmers
often lose their entire stock of plants, and
arc forced to send ipiles to beg or buy of a
more fortunate planter.
Freshly cleared land —"new ground,"
as the negroes call it—makes the best tobac
co fields, and on this and the rich lowlands
throughout southside, is raised the staple
known through tho world as James river
tobacco.
On this crop tho planter lavishes his
choicest fertilizers ; for the ranker the
growth, tho longer and larger the leaf, the
greater is the value thereof, though the
manufacturers complain bitterly of the free
use of guano, which they say destroys the
resinous gum on which the value of the
leaf depends.
Once set, the young plant must contend
not only with the ordinary risk of trans
planting, but the cut-worm is now most to
be dreaded. Working underground, it
severs the stem just above the root, and
the first intimation of its presence is the
prone and drooping plant. For this there
is no remedy except to plant and replant,
until the tobacco itself kills tho worm. In
one instance which came under our obser
vation, a single field was replanted six times
before the planter succeeded in getting a
"good stand," as they call it on the plan
tations ; but this was an extreme case.
When the plants are fairly started in
their growth, the planter tops and primes
them, processes performed, the first by
pinching oif the top bud which would else
run to seed; and the second by removing
the lower leaves of each plant, leaving
bare a space of some inches near the
ground, and retaining from six to a dozen
stout, well-formed leaves on each stem,
according to the promise of the soil and
season, and these leaves form the crop.
There is absolutely no rent on a large to
bacco plantation, one step following another
in the cultivation of the troublesome weed
—the last year's crop is rarely shipped to
market before tho seed must be sown for
the next —and planting and replanting,
topping and priming, suckering and worm
ing crowd on each other through all the
summer months. Under the old regime,
when on every plantation were a score or
more of idle negro urchins, the rejected
lower leaves, or primings, formed one of
the mistress' perquisites and were care
fully collectsd by the "house-gang," as her
force was styled, strung on small sharp
sticks like exaggerated meat-skewers, and
cured, first in the sun, alterwards in the
barn, olten placing a pretty penny in her
private purse. Now, when all labor must
De paid for in money, they are not worth
collecting, and, except when some thrifty
freedman has a large family which he
wishes to turn to account, are left to wither
where they fall.
Withal the ground must be rigidly kept
free from grass and weeds, and after the
plants have attained any size this must be
done by hoe; horse and plow would break
and bruise the brittle leaves.
Suckering is performed by removing
every leal-bud which the plant throws
out after the priming, thus retaining its
sap and strength for the development of
the leaves already formed, and this must
be done again and again through the whole
season.
Worming is still more tedious and unre
mitting. In the animal kingdom there are
three creatures, and three only, to whom
tobacco is not poisonous—man, a goat found
among the Andes, and the tobacco-worm.
This last is a long, smooth-skinned worm,
its body formed of successive knots or rings,
furnished each with a pair of legs, large
prominent eyes, and is in color as green as
the leaf upon which it feeds. It is found
only on the under side of the leaves, every
one of which must be carefully lifted and
examined for its presence. Women make
better wormers than men, probably because
they are more patient and painstaking.
When caught the worm is pulled apart be
tween the thumb and finger, for crushing it
in the soft mould of the carefully cultivated
fields is impossible.
As the plant matures the leaves grow
heavy, and thick with gum, droops grace
fully over the plant. Then they ripen, one
by one the plants are cut, some below
the first leaves, with short stout knives—
liythe or reaper is useless here—and hung,
Bads down, on scaffolds, in the open air,
II ready to be taken to the barn.
A Virginia tobacco-barn is totally unlike
ay other building under the sun. Square
3 to the ground plan, its height is usually
mice its width and length, lv the centre
f the bare earthen floor is the trench for
ring ; around tho sides runs a raised plat
irm for placing the leaves in bulk;
nd commencing at a safe distance from tho
re, up to tho top of the tall building,
each beams stretching scross for the re
eption of the tobacco-sticks, thick pine
iths, from which are suspended tho heavy
Safely housed and beyond all danger of
he frost, whose slightest touch is sufficient
o blacken and destroy it, the crop is now
■eady for firing.and through the late autumn
lays blue clouds of smoke hover over and
iround the steep roof 3of the tall tobacco
„rns. A stranger might suppose the
buildiDgs on lire, but not a blaze is within,
the object here, as in bacon-curing, being
tmoke and not fire. For this the old-field
pine is eschewed, and the planter draws on
his stock of oak and hickory trees. Many
use sassafras and sweet gum in preference
to all other woods for thrs purpose, under
the impression that they improve the flavor
When the leaves, fully cured, have taken
the rich brown hue of the tobacco of com-
merce, so unlike the deep green of the
growing plant that a person familiar only
with the one would never recognize the
other as the same plant, the planter must
fold his hands and wait until they are in
condition for what is technically known as
striking, i. c., taking down from rafters on
which they are suspended. Touch the
tobacco when too dry and it crumbles, dis
turb it when too high or damp.and its value
for shipping is materially lessened, while if
handled in too cold weather it becomes
harsh. But there comes a mild damp
spell, and the watchful planter seizing thd
right moment, since tobacco, like time ane
tide, waits for no man, musters all the
force he can command for the work of
stripping and stemming. This done tho
leaves are sorted and tied in bundles, seve
ral being held in the hand, while around the
stalk end of the cluster is wrapped another
leaf, the loose end of which is tucked
through the centur of the bundle. Great
care is taken in this operation not to break
the leaf, and oil or lard is freely used in
the work.
During the process this crop is divided In
to various grades of commerce, "long
bright leaf," heading the list, which is
ended by inferior "lugs," tho lowest grade
known to manufacturers. These last are
seldom packed into hogsheads, but aro
sent loose, and sold without the trouble of
prising, in the nearest market town.
Shades imperceptible to a novice, serve
to determine the value of the leaf. As it
varies in color, texture, and length, so fluc
tuates its market price, and at least half
the battle lies in the manner in which the
crop has been handled in curing.
From the mountainous counties of south
western Virginia—Franklin, Henry and
Patrick—comes all the rarest and most
valuable tobacco, "fancy wrappers" often
bringing $100 per 100 pounds, but these
crops are small in proportion to those
raised on the lowlands of the Dan and
James and their tributaries.
This tobacco is much lighter in color,
much softer in texture than the ordinary
staple, and is frequently as soft and as fine
as silk. Some years ago, a bonnet made
of this tobacco was exhibited at the Bor
der agricultural fair, and had somewhat tho
appearance of bro*n silk. Only one such
plant have I ever seen grown in southside,
and that, a bright golden brown and nearly
two feet in length, was carefully preserved
for show on the parlor mantel of tho
planter who raised it.
After tying, the bundles are placed in
bulk, and when again "in order" aro
"prised" or packed into hogsheads—no
smoothly-planed and iron hooped casks, by
the way, but huge pine structures, very
roughly made.
The old machine for prising was a primi
tive affair, the upright beam through which
ran another at right angles, turning slightly
on a pivot, heavily weighted at one end and
used as a lever for compressing the brown
mass into hogsheads. Now, most well-to
do planters own a tobacco straightencr and
screw-press, inventions which materally
lessen the manual labor of preparing tho
crop for market.
Each hogshead is branded with the name
of the owner and thus shipped to his com
mission merchant, when tho hogshead is
"broken" by tearing off a stave, thus ex
posing the strata of the bulk to view. Of
late years some planters have boon guilty
of "nesting," or placing prime leaf around
the outer part of an inferior article in the
centre of the hogshead, and stringent
measures were taken a year or two since
in the Richmond tobacco exchange for the
prevention of such rascality.
UNITED STATES MAILS
YIMOU-.
Postoffice Department, 1
Washington, December 1, 1872. /
PROPOSALS will be received at the Oontrac
Office of this Depa tment until 3 P. M. of Marcl
3. 1873, for conveying the malls of the Unlt«
States from July 1, 1873, to June 31). 1876, la thi
State of VIRCHNIA, on the routes and by thi
schedules of departures and arrivals herein spe
clfled -„ __,
Decisions announced on or before March 20
1873.
[Bidders should examine carefully the laws,
forms, and instructions annexed. Set
laws requiring certified check or draft
with bids of $5,000 and upward.]
VIRGINIA.
4730 From Rock Enon Springs, to Winchester,
16 miles and back, six times a week
fiom Ist June to 30t.h September, and
from Rock Enon Springs to Back Creek
Valley, 8 miles and back, three times a
week from Ist October to 31st May.
Ist June to 30th September.
Leave Rock Enon Springs daily, except
Sunday, at 6 a m ;
Arrive at Winchester by 9 a m;
Leave Winchester daily, except Sunday,
at 3.30 p m ;
Arrive at Kock Enon Springs by 7.30 p m;
Ist Odober to 3lst May.
Leave Rock Enon Springs Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Back (Jreek Valley by 9.3u a tn;
Leave Back Oreek Valley Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday at 10 am ;
Arrive at Rock EnonSprings by 12.30 p m.
4731 From Broadway Depot, by Ooote's Store,
to Dovesville, 17 miles and back, twice
a week.
Leave Broadway Depot Wednesday and
Saturday at 2 p m;
Arrive at foovesville by 7 p m ;
Leave Dovesville Wednesday and Satur
day at 7 a m;
Arrive at Broadway Depot by 12 m.
4732 From Hambaugh's to Front Royal, 8
miles and back, twice a week.
Leave Hambaugh's Wednesday and
Saturday at 10 a m ;
Arrive nt Front Royal by 12.30 p m ;
Leave Front Royal Wednesday and
Saturday at 1 p m ;
Arrive at llanibattgli's by 3.30 p m.
1733 From London to Gum Spring (n. o.), 8
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Loudo-i Saturday at 10 a m ;
Arrive at Gum Spring by 12.30 pm ;
Leave Gum Spring Saturday at 7 30 a m;
Arrive at Loudon by 10 a m.
4734 From Baptist Valley to Knob, 25 miles
and back, once a week.
Leave Baptist Valley Monday at 7 am;
Arrive at Knob by 6 p m ;
Leave Knob Tuesday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Baptist Valley by 6 p m.
1735 Fron Shiloh, by Payne's Store (n. o.),
Rock Springs (n. o.), lo Leeds-own (n.
o ),14 mll-s and back, twice a week.
Leave Stiiloh Tuesday and Saturday at
8 am;
Arrive at Leedstown by 12 m ;
Leave Leedstown Tuesday and Satur
day atlpro;
Arrive at Shiloh by 5 p m.
1730 From Miller's Tavern, by Enterprise (n.
o.), and Mount Zion 'n. o.), to Tappa
hannock, 13 miles and back, once a
week.
Leave Millei's Tavern Wednesday at
8 ami
Arrive at Tappahannock by 12 m ;
Leave Tappahannock Wednesday at 1
pm ;
Arrive at Miller's Tavern by 6 p m.
1737 From Mangohick by Etna Mills, to
Hanover O. H , 8 miles and back, twice
a week.
Leave Mangohick Tuesday and Friday
at ] o a m ;
Arrive at Hanover C H, by 12.30 p m;
Leave Hanover O. H., Thursday and
Friday at 1 p m ;
Arrive at Mangohick by 3.30 p m.
4738 From Suffolk, by Nurneysville and Holy
Neck toSomerton, 18 miles and back,
twice a week.
Leave Suffolk Tuesday and Saturday at
12 m;
Arrive at Somerton by 4pm;
Leave Si-merton Tuesday and Saturday
at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Sufijlk by 11 a ra.
4730 From Pattonsville, by Cedar Point, to
Sneedsville (n. o.J, 30 miles and back,
once a week.
Leave Pattoniville Friday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Sneedsville by 6pm;
Leave Sneedsville Saturday at 7 a m;
Arrive at Pattonsville by 0 pm.
4740 From Nottoway O. H., by St. Mark's
Church (n. o.), and Marshall's Store
(n. o.), to O ive Branch (n. o.), 17
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Nottoway C. H., Thursday at
7am;
Arrive at Olive Branch by 12 m ;
Leave olive Branch Thursday at Ipm;
Arrive at Nottoway by 6 p m.
4741 From Thaxton's, by Coonsville (n. o.)
and Sandy Ford (n. o.), to Stewarts
ville, (n. o.), 16 miles and batk, once a
week.
Leave Thaxton's Tuesday and Saturday
at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Stewartsville by 12 m ;
Leave Stewartsville Tuesday and Satur
day at 1 p m;
Arrive at Thaxton's by 6 p m.
4742 From Wolf Trap to Omega, 5 miles and
back, twice a week.
Leave Wolf Trap Wednesday and Satur
day at 9 15 am;
Arrive at Omega by 11 am;
Leave Omega Wednesday and Saturday
at 7.30 a m;
Arrive at Wolf Trap by 9 a ra.
4743 From Laurel Grove to Oartersburgh, 11
miles and back, twice a week.
Laurel Grove Wednesday and
Saturday at 8 am;
Arrive at Oartersburgh by 12 m ;
Leave Oartersburgh Wednesday and
Saturday at Ipm;
Arrive at Laurel Grove by 5 p m.
4744 From Summeifleld, by Spring Valley, to
Stephens' Creek, 9 miles and back,
twice a week.
Leave Summerfield Tuesday and Satur
day at 4 p m ;
Arrive at Stephens' Greek by 7 p m ;
Leave Stephens' Creek Tuesday and
Saturday at 12 m ;
Arrive at Suminertleld by 3 p m.
4745 From Danville, by Hall's Cross Roads
and Spring Garden, to Rieeville, 30
miles and back, twice a weeK.
Leave Danville Wednesday and Satur
day at 7 a ra;
Arrive at Kiceviile by 6 p m ;
Leave Rieeville Tuesday and Friday at
7am;
Arrive at Danville by 6 p m.
4740 From Independence, by Long's Gap,
Clem's Branch, and Flat Ridge, to
Rye Valley, 30 miles and back, once a
week.
Leave Independence Monday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Rye Valley by 6 p m ;
Leave Rye Valley Tuesday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Independence by 6 p m.
4747 From Martin's Station to Drapersville.
Bidders to state distance and propose
schedule,
4748 From Rural Retreat (Mt. Airy Depot) to
Black Lick (Davis Mills) In. o.) 6 miles
and back,
Leave Rural Retreat Wednesday and
Saturday at 4 p m ;
Arrive at Black Lick by 6.30 p ra ;
Leave Black Lick Wednesday and Sat
urday at 1 p m ;
Arrive at Rural Retreat by 2 30 p ra.
4749 From Blacksburgb, by Price's Fork (n.
o), to Cowan's Mills (n. o.), 11 miles
and back, once a week.
Leave Blacksburgh Saturday at 8 a m ;
Arrive at Cowan's Mills by U.3u a m ;
Leave Cowan's Mills Saturday at 12 m ;
Arrive at Blacksburgb by 3.30 p m.
4750 From Vickers to Price's Fork (n. o ), 6
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Vickers Saturday at 6 p ra ;
Arrive at Price's Fork by 7 p m ;
Leave Price's Fork Saturday at 3 p m ;
I Arrive at Vickers b, 6 p m.
4751 From Gladesville (n. o.) to Grundy, 60
miles and back, once a week.
Leave Gladesville Wednesday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Orundy Thursday by 7pm;
Leave Grundy Monday at 7 a ra ;
Arrive at Gladesville Tuesday by 7 p m.
4752 From Lynclibnrgh, by Blgbee's Shop, to
Perrow's Store, 16 miles and back,
three times a week.
Leave Lynclibuig Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday at 2 p m ;
Arrive at Perrow's Siore by 7 p m ;
Leave Perrow's Store Tuesday, Thurs
day, and aturday at 7a m ;
c Arrive at Lynclibuig by 12 m.
475S From Forksville, by S'-uth Hill, Lorn
hardy Grove, Union Level, (n. <• I, and
i. Stony Cross, to Boydton, 20 miles and
■ „,,. r#irlr«rill« TiiMihv and -I'urd-i V
Leave roroviiie luesaay ana ..niuru-j
--am ;
Arrive tit Forksvllle by 4 p m.
FORM OF PROPOSAL, GUARANTEE, AND
CERTIFICATE.
Proposal.
The undersigned , whoso post
office address Is county of . State
of — , proposes to convey the mails of the
United States, from July 1, 1873, to June 31,
1-76, on route No , between and ,
under the advertisement of the Postmaster Gen
eral, dated December 1, 1872, "with celerity,
certainty, and security" (law of June 8, 1872),
for tho annual sura of — dollars.
This proposal is made with full knmoledge of the
distance of the route, the Wright of the mail to he
carried, and all other particulars in reference to
the route and service ; and. also, after careful ex
amination, of the luws and instructions attached
to advertisement of mail service ; and of the pro
visions contained <n the act of Congress of June
8, 1872.
Dated , Didder.
Guarantee.
The undersigned, residing at , State of
, undertake that, If the foregoing bid for
carrying the mall on route No. be accepted
by the Poßtmaster General, the bidder will,
prior to the Ist June, 187S, enter into the required
obligation, or contract, to perform the service
proposed, with good and sufficient sureties.
7Vu'» tee do, understanding distinctly the obliga
tions and liabilities assumed by guarantors.
Dated
Certificate.
The undersigned, postmaster at , State
of , certifies, under nis oath of officb,
that he Is acquainted with the above guarantors,
and knows them to be men of property. and able
to make good their guarantee; and that bidder
and guarantors are above the ago of 21 years.
Bids of $5,000 and upward must be accom
panied by a certified check, or draft, on some
solvtnt national batik, equal to 6 per centum on
the present annual pay on the route; or in case
of new service, not less than 5 per centum of
one year's pay proposed in bid. — (Section 253,
Act of June 8, 1872.)
The Postmaster must not sign tho certificate
until the sum of the bid Is Inserted and lhe bid
and guarantee signed by all the partlos, and
dated.
OATH REQUIRED BY SECTION 246 OF AN
ACT OF CONGRESS, APPROVED JUNE
8, 1872, TO BE AFFIXED TO EA( :H BIU
FOR CARRYING THE MAIL, AND T-1
BE TAKfc-N BEFORE AN OFFICER
QUALIFIED TO ADMINISTER OATHS.
I, —— ——, of , bidder for conveying
the mall on route No. , from —,
do swear that I have the ability pecuniarily to
fulfill my obligation as such bidder; that the
bid is made in good faith, and with the intention
to enter into contract and perform the i ervice In
case said bid shall be accepted ; and that the
signatures of the guarantors thereto are genuine,
and that I believe the said guarantors t-» be
pecuniarily responsible for and able to pay all
damages the United States shall suffer by retnon
of my falling to perform ray obligations as such
bidder.
Sworn to and subscribed before me , for
the of , this day of ——, A.
D. 187 , and in testimony thereof I hereunto
subscribe my name and affix my oHlclal seal the
day and year aforesaid.
[SEAL.]
Noib.—When the oath is taken before a justice
of the peace, tho certificate of the clerk of a
court of record should be added, under his seal
of office, that the person who administered the
oath is a duly qualified jußtice of the peace.
INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS AND POST
MASTERS :
Containing also conditions to be incor
porated in the contracts to the extent the
Department may deem proper.
1. Seven minutes are allowed to each inter
mediate office, when not otherwise specified, for
assortiug the malls.
2. On routes where the mode of conveyance
admits of it, the special agents of the Post Office
Department, also post office blanks, mail bags,
locks aiid keys, are to be conveyed without extra
charge.
3. "Waybills" or receipts prepared by post
masters, or other agents of the Department, will
accompany the malls, specifying the number
and destination of the several bags, to be ex
amined by the postmasters, to Insure regularity
in the delivery of bags, aDd pouches.
4. No pay will be made for trips not per
formed ; and for each of such omissions, if the
failure be occasioned by the fault of the contrac
tor or carrier, three times the pay ef the trip
will be deducted. For arrivals so far behind
time as to break connection with depending
mails, and not sufficiently excused, one-fourth of
the compensation for the trip if subject to for
feiture For repeated delinquencies of the kind
herein specified, enlarged penalties, proportioned
to the nature thereof, and the importance of the
mail, may be made.
6. For leaving behind or throwing off the mails,
or any portion of them, for the admission of
Sssengers, or for being concerned in setting up
running an express conveying intelligence in
vance of the mail, a quarter's pay may be
deducted.
6. Fines will be imposed, unless the delinquen
cy be promptly and satisfactorily explained by
certificates of postmasters or the affidavits of
other credible poisons, for falling to arrive In
contract time; for neglecting to take tho mail
from, or deliver it into, a post office ; for suffer
ing it to be wet, Injured, destroyed, robbed, or
lost; and for refusing, aftax demand, to convey
the mall as frequently as the contractor runs, or
Is concerned in running, a coach, car, or steam
boat on a route.
7. The Postmaster General may annul the
contract lor repeated failures to run agreeably
to contract; for violating the post office la ws, or
disobeying the instructions of the Department;
for refusing to discharge a carrier when required
by the Department to do so ; for running an ex
press as afortsaid ; or for transporting persons
oi packages conveying mailable matter out of
the mail.
S. The Postmaster General may order an in
crease of service on a route by allowing there
for a pro rata increase on the contract pay. He
may change schedules of departures and arri
vals in all cases, and particularly to make them
conform to connections with railroads, without
increase of pay, provided the running time be
not abridged. The Postmaster General may
also discontinue or curtail the service, in whole
or in part, in order to place on the route superior
sf rvlce, or whenever the public interests, in his
judgment, shall require such discontinuance or
curtailment for any other cause; he allowing as
full Indemnity to couti actor one month's extra
pay on the amount of service dispensed with,
and a pro rata compensation for tho amount of
service retained and continued.
9. Payments will be made by collections from,
or drafts on, postmasters or otherwise, alter the
expiration of each quarter—say in November,
1 February, May,'and August provided that re
quired evidence of service has been received.
10. The distances given are believed to be sub
stantially correct; but no increased pay will be
allowed should they be greater thin advertised,
if the points to be supplied are c< rrectly stated.
Bidders must inform themselves on this point, and
also in reference to the weight of the mail, the
condition of hills, roads, streams, _c, and all
toll-bridges, turnpikes, plank-roads, ferries, or
obstructions of any kind by which expense may
bo incurred. No claim tor additional pay, based
on such ground, can be considered; nor lor alleg
ed mistakes or misapprehension as to the degr c
of service; nor for Bridges destroyed, ferries dis
continued, or other obstructions causing or In
creasing distance or expense occurring during
the contract term. Offices established after this
adverti emeut is issued, and also during the con
tract term, are to be visited without extra pay, if
the distance be not increased.
11. Bidders are cautioned to mail their propo
sals In time to reach the Department by the day
and hour named (3 p m., March 3,1875). for bids
received after time willnst be considered in com
petition with bids, of reasonable amount, re
celved in time. Neither can bids be considered
which are without the guarantee required by
law, and a certificate of the sufficiency of such
guarantee, and tho oath of the bidder according
to section 246, act of June 8, 1872.
12 Udders should first propose for service
strictly according to the advertisement, nnd
then, if they desire, separately tor different serv
!ice- and if the regular bid be the lowest ollered
for the advertised service, the other propositions
mar be considered.
13 There should be but ono route bid for in a
proposal. Consolidated or combination bids
("pr i-oslng one sum for two or more rentes")
cannot be considered.
14. The route, the service, tue yearly pay, the
I name and residence ol the bidder (that v his
nsniltJO-t-oUlce addrofS', and the name of each
member of a firm, wheie a company offers,
the J'epartraent, to write out in full the sum of
their bids, and to retain copies of them,
Altered bids should not be submitied; nor
should bid* once submitted be wltndrawn. No
withdrawal ot a bidder or guarantor will be
allowed unless the withdrawal i* received twen
ty-fourhours previous to the time fixed for open-
tag 'he proposals.
Each bid must be guaranteed by two respon
sible persons. The bid and guarantee should be
signed plainly with the full name of each per
son.
The Postmaster Oeneral reserves the right to
reject any bid which may be deemed extrava
gant ; andal-o to disregard the bids of tailing
contractors and bidders. (Act of June 8,1872,
section 249.)
16 The bid should bo sealed, superscribed
"Mail Proposals, State of -," addressed
''Second Assistant Postmaster (general, Con
tract Office/* and sent by mail, not by or to an
agon t. ji ids of ♦fl,ooo per annum an d
upward must bo accompanied by a cer
tified check or draft on some solvent
national bank, equal to 6 per cent, of the
amount, (see law of Congress of .Tune 8, 1872.)
17. The contracts are to be executed and returned
to the Department by or before the \st day of June,
1*7.1, otherwise the, accepted bidder will be consid
ered as having failed, and the Postmaster General
may proceed to contract for the service with other
parties, according to law.
Transfers of c ntiacts, or of interests in con
tracts are lorbidden by law, and conseiiusn tly
cannot be allowed. Neither can bids, or inter
ests in bids* be transferred or assigned to other
parties. Bidders will therefore take notice that
they will bo expected to perform the service
awarded to them through tho whole contract
term.
18 Section 240 of the act of Juno 8,1872, pro
vides that contracts for the transportation oi
the mail shall be "awarded to the lowest bidder
tendering sufficient guarantees for faithful per
formance, without other reference to the mode
of such transportation than may be necessary to
provide for the duo celerity, certainty and secu
rity thereof." Under this law bidsthat piopose
to transport the mails with "celerity, certainty,
and security," having btan decided to be the only
legal bids, a\ c construed as providing /or the en*
tire mail, however large, and .whatever may be the
mode of conveyance necessary to insure its "ce
lerity, certainty, and security," and haoe the pref
erence over all others, and no others are consid
ered, except for steamboat routes.
19. A modification of a bid In any of its essen
tial term.3 is tantamount to a new bid, and can
not be received, so as to interfere with regular
competition. Making anew bid, with guarantee
and certificate, Is the only way to modify a pre
vious bid.
2- 1 . Postmasters are to be careful not to certify
to the sufficiency of guarantors without knowing
that they are persons of sufficient responsibility.
(See section 247, act of June 8,1872 ) They must
notsign the certificate until the sum of tho bid is
inserted* and the bid and guarantee are signed
by the bidder and (two) guarantors; a disregard
of this instruction by postmasters will subject them
to immediate removal, and to severe penalties.
Postmasters are aiso liable to dismissal from
office for acting as agents of contractor? or bid
ders, with or without compensation, in any busi
ness, matter, or thing, relating to the mail ser
vice. Theyare the trusted agents of the Depart
mont, and cannot consistently act in both capa
cities
21. All bidders, guarantors, and sureties arc
distinctly notified that on a failure to enter into
or perform the contracts for the service proposed
for in tho accepted bids, their legal liabilities will
be enforced against them.
22 Present contractors, and persons known
al the Department, must, equally with others,
procure gurantors and certificates of their suffi
ciency substantially m the forms above pre
scribed. The certificate of sufficiency must be
signed by a postmaster.
JNO. A J. CRESWELI.,
ja 13—6w Postmaster Oeneral.
4 96
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNI
TED STATES for the Eastern District of Vir
ginia.
In the matter of Abram Young, bank
rupt—in bankruptcy.
To Whom it May Concern—The undersigned,
J. Mortimer Kilgour, of Loudoun co., Va. and
Johns. Fowler, of Alexandria county Virginia,
hereby give notice of their appointment as assig
nei s of the estate of Abram Young, of Loudoun
county in said district, who was, on the 4th day
of Dec, 1872, adjudged a bankrupt on his own
petition by the District Court of said District.
Dated Alexandria. thelSihday of Jan'y. 187 S.
J. MOKTIMER KILGOUR,
lOHNS. FuWLER,
ja2l—T3w Assignees
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE CM
TED STATES for the Eastern District ot
Virginia.
In the matter of W. 11. Stephenson, bank
rupt- in bankruptcy.
At Norfolk, on the 14th day of January, 1873.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Please to take notice hereby, that a petition
has been, to wit: on the 14th day of January,
1573. filed in said District court by W H. Stephen
son, of Isle of Wight co. in said district, who has
been heretofore duly declared bankrupt nnder
act of Congress entitled 'An act to establish a
uniform system of bankruplcy throughout the
United States," approved March 2d, 18U7, for a
discharge and certificate thereof, from all his
debts and other claims provable under said act,
and that tho 2tth day of January, A. D. 1573, at
11 o'clock A. __, before Benj. B. Foster, one of
the registers of said court in bankruptcy, at his
office, No 26 Bank street, Norfolk, in said dis
trict is the time and place assigned for tho hear
ing of the same; when and where you may at
tend and show cause, if any you have, why the
prayer of the said petition should not be gran-
CHARLES T. BARRY,
Clerk.
cd.
ja!6—Th2w
IN THK DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES for the Eastern District
of Virginia.
In tho matter of A. 11. Qrandy, bank
rupt—in bankruptcy.
At Norfolk, on the 14th day of January,
1873.
Tl) WHOM IT MAY CONCERN :
Please to take notice hereby that a petition has
been, to wit: on the 14th day of January, 1873,
filed in said District court by A. H. Grandy,
of Princess Anne county, in said district, who
has been here'.ofore duly declared bankrupt
under act of Congress entitled "An act to estab
lish a uniform system of bar iruptcy throughout
the United States," approved March 2d, 1867,
for a discharge and certificate thereof, from all
his debts aud other claims provable under said
act, and that the 25th day of January, A. D.
1673, at 11 o'clock A. M., before Benj. B. Foster,
one of the registers of said court in bankruptcy,
at his office, No. 26 Bank street, Norfolk, in said
district is the time and place assigned lor the
hearing of the same ; when and where you may
attend and show cause, if any you have, why the
prayer of the said petition should not be
granted.
CHARLES T. BARRY,
4377
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNI
TED STATES for the Eastern District of Vir-
In the matter of Z. Taylor Briggs, individ
ually and as one of the ilrm of Wm. H. Briggs
_ Bros , bankrupt—in bankruptcy.
At Richmond, on the 2.d day of January,
1873.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN :
Please to take notice hereby, that a petition
has been to-wit: on the 16th day of Jan'y, A. D.
1873, filed in said District Court, by Z. Taylor
Briggs, of Richmond city in said district,
who has been heretofore duly declared bankrupt I
under the act of Congress entitled "An act to
establish a unitorm system of bankruptcy
hroughout the United States," approved March
2d, 1567, for a discharge and certificate thereof
from all his debts and other claims provable un
deneaid act, and that the 20th day of February, A
D. 1873, at 10 o'clock A.M., before W. W.Forbes,
one of the registers of said court in bank
ruptcy, at his office in Richmond, in said dis
trict, "is the time and place assigned for the hear
ing of the same, when and where you may at
tend and show cause, if any you have, why the
prayer of the said petition should not be granted.
You are also hereby notified, that the second
and third meetiugs of the creditors of said bank
rupt will be held at the same time and place.
W W. FORBES,
Register in Bankruptcy for the
ja 2'*— Th2w 3d Cong'l Dist. of Va.
.-T-. ASSIGNEE'S SALE. «Q*
In compliance with a decree of the District
Court of the United states for the Eastern Dis
trict of Virginia, in the matter of Wm. J. Lind
sey bankrupt, dated December 21, 1873 I will
sell at auction, free from liens, at Yorktown,
Virginia,
THURSDAY, «ih DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1673,
at 12 o'clock M., in iront of the U. S. Court
hon.-e, 118 ACRES, with impioveinents, on
Poquasin river, in York County.
ALSO 4)4 ACRES OF LAND, held as tenant
by courtesy, near Yorktown.
TERMS OF SALE—One third cash, balance
on a i redit of six and twelve months, purchaser
to give notes, with approved security, for de
ferred payments and the title retained by the
assignee until said notes
ja 9—2aw3w Assignee.
y &NB SALt. ££g
Will bo sold lo the highest bidder, at the
Courthouse of the County of Brunswick, on
THE 26th DAY OF JANUARY, 1673,
a tract of Laud, lying in the County ol Bruns
wick, supposed to contain MO ACRES, belonging
to the estate of O. H. Meade, bankrupt, on
which said Meade resides
TERMS—On» thud cash: balance on credit
of six and twelve months, interest lrom date and
I title retained E. R. TURNBULL,
de 31— 2aw3w Assignee.
_■. E. WILL PAY POR 6 COPIES OF THE
$I*o WEEKLY STATE JOURNAL for one
year.
M UK 111 llt 11. IMPI.HIIMV
T^TOTICE.
The firm oT Walt _ Knight having been dis
solved on t c Ist Oct ber. 1572, flismi Call,
(my son-in-law) Is now an equal partner with
me under the style of WATT - HAI.f. in the
maiiulacinre of the CELEBrfATED WATT
PLOW; the Cuff Brace Flow, tIEdHOE
WATT'S OWN INVENTION, and agricultural
Implements generally.
I have, within the past eighteen months,
made great Improvement, in the WATT PLOW,
nnd can, wi h greater confidence than ever,
recommend It to the farming community eve j.
whore. GEORGE WATT.
THE
WATT PLOW,
EVER TRIUMPHANT ; AND THE
CUFF BRACE PLOW,
of all sizes, from one to four horses.
WHEAT DRILLS, very superior; HAR
ROWS. CULTIVATORS, and all kinds O!
FARMINct IMPI.KMENTS for sale on tho
best terms.
Send for circulars.
je 26-d,sw4w9m WATT & CALL.
HOTELS RESTAURANTS.
•t. JAMM HOTEL,
RE-OPENED ON THE
EUROPEAN PLAN,
CORNER pBNNfITI.FA-11-A AVEyrB AKD SIXTH STB.,
WA>HINGTON, IX C.
This Hotel has been closed since April last
and has, during the past summer, undergone the
most thorough renovation. It has been re
furnished with elegaut Walnut Marble-Top Fur
niture, Spring Beds, Velvet and Hruseels Car
pets throughout.
The furniture and appointments have been
manufactured to order exprtssly tor this House, l
and are equal in style and durability to any I
European Hotel in the country. The rooms are
arranged en suite and single, and will be rented
from $1.00 to $5 00 per day (including private
parlors.)
A spacious Ladies' and Gentleman's Dining- :
Room, Gentleman's Restaurant, Lunch and Re
freshment Saloons are conveniently arranged,
where all meals will be served a la carte.
A liberal discount will be made to those desir
ing to remain by the week or month.
WOODBURY & DUREN,
no 27—3 m Proprietors.
THE IMPERIAL HOTEL,
(Latk Jbnhess House,)
JAMES SYKES, PROPRIETOR,
FRONTING PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, BETWEEN THIR
TEENTH and Fourteenth Streets,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Thankful to the public for generous patronage
in the past, the Proprietor asks his old friends
and patsons to test the accommodations of bis .
present establishment, which he promises shall
be found at least equal to the best in Washing j
ton. ____ _ i
TITRS. A. <:. U. 1.1-. j
FIRST-CLASS HOARDING HOUSE j
No. 1325 F Street, ,
Nearly opposite Ebbitt House, I
au IB—tf WASHINGTON. I>. C. J
BUIUiLAII.PR.OOF "-AFES.
CHAMPION
FTRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF SAFES
(with drt piluno,)
Awarded the Prize Medals at World's Fall ,
London, World's Fair, New York
Exposition Universolle, Paris. ,
FARREL, HERRING _ CO., \
No. 807 (formerly «29) Chestnut street, PhUa
HARVEY GILLAM,
CHAS. MATTHEWS
GEO. MYERS,
807 Chestnut Street, Phila.
HERRING FARREL _ SHERMAN, N. V
HERRING _ CO., Chicago.
HERRING, FARREL _ CO., New Orleans
The Mammoth Safe purchased by the Fidelity
Safe Deposit Company was made by
FARREL, HERRING - Co
More than 80,000 Herring's Safes have been
and are now In use, and over
SIX HUNDRED
have passed through accidental fires, preserving
their contents hi some instances where many
others failed.
Second-hand Safes, of our own and oilier
makes, having been received In part pay for the
Improved Herring's Patent Champion, for sa
at low prices. no 20—ly
IRON MANUFACTURERS.
VARIETY IRON WORKS,
ESTABLISHED 186-.
JAMES I). BROWNE, MANUFACTURER OF
IKON AND WIRE RAILING,
GRATING, VERANDAHS, FIRE-PROOF
VAULT DOORS,
FLOWER VASES AND STANDS, SETTEES.
Together with every description of iron work
for BUILDING and ORNAMENTAL purposes
9(Ki amd 907 Bank Stbebt,
fe 7—<l _wl y RICHMON D. VA.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
"Vri-W IMBM-Hi_L_f AN_T„_.TAIL ~
BOOT AND SHOE HOUSE,
No. 1119 Main Street, Richmond, Va.,
has just been opened by G. S. LEATHER
BURY, and has on hand a complete assortment
of BOOTS, SHOES, TRUNKS and BAGS, and
is receiving direct from the manufactures
daily ; and you will do well to call and give
him a look before purchasing.
ja2s—dsw_w3m
SEWING MACHINES.
WHERE IS ONLY ONE REAL RELIA
BLE SEWING MACHINE, AND THAT IS
SOLD AT THE
WILLCOX & GIBBS
OFFICE,
18 Ninth Street, Richmond, Va.
no 19—d_wty
BANKS.
FREEDMAN'S SAVINGS AND
TRUST COMPANY,
CHARTERED BY CONGRESS 1886.
Tenth Street, between Main and Bans
Streets.
DEPOSITS OF FIVE CENTS AND UPWARDS
RECEIVED.
INTEREST COMPOUNDED TO JULY AND
JANUARY
at the rate of six per cent, per annum.
WB~ Open daily from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M., and on
SATURDAYS from 9 A M. to 8 P M
SA i u_-_- a (JHARLES SPENCER,
mh so—tf Cashier
rTSEFUL FACTS WORTH KNOWING !
THURSTON'S IVORY PEARL TOOTH-POW
DER will keep the teeth clean, sound, and
white. Price 26 and 60 centfl per bottle.
THOMPSON'S POMADE UPTIME will cleanse
soften, beautify, and strengthen the hair.
Price 26 and 60 cents per bottle.
JOUVEN'S INODOROUS KID GLOVE
CLEANER will restore soiled gloves to their
Pristine beauty and usefulness. Price 26 eeuus
per bottle.
SHERMAN'S COUGH LOZENGES will give
immediate relief, and certainly cure a cough.
Price 26 cents per box.
SHERMAN'S WORM LOZENGES will expel
all worms, and are pleasant to the taste.
Price 26 cent- per box
WELLS' MACHINE-SPREAD STRENGTH
ENING PLASTERS, whenever a plaster is
needed, are unrivaled. Price 20, 26, and 30
cents each.
CHINESE TOOTH-ACHE DROPS will Instant
ly relieve this most distressing malady, trice
26 cents per bottle.
REXFORD S MEDICATED GINGER-BREAD
NUTS FOR WORMS are re:ulily eaten by
children, and are efficacious. I'tice 26 cent*
per hix.
AU for sale by _
Wholesale Agents,
Ja 80— diwly No. 102 Fulton street. N. X.
SCR IB HER' 3 M ONTHLY.
A SERIAL STOKY liV Dr. HOLLAND.
NEW BTORY I.V SAKE Hi'EM.
AE'INU s'l'ußi HdiH H XT HAR^E.
lIRLLLIANT ARRAY OK < ONTini.rTt >RS.
CIiAUh.VChCnuK ON KURMTURE
AM) I»E< OHATION.
ft. H. HTOUDARU ON AUTHORS.
EXTRAORDINARY TIfDCCGHIGKTS TO
IM SUBSCRIBERS!
WW Pa»es loifi.do! _tc* t &c.
The Publishers of AoftTana'l Mo-tthlt, in
their ProvpanUta jtuM l_wmd< preu_j»a for the en*
nu.iiK yeai a more brilliant airay of contribu-
Es, and *n increase in the varh-iy and beauty
us illustrations, aire ad y\ conceded by tho
tics to be * finer than any which have hiihtr'»
appeared in any Am'rictni Magazine."
In*. Holland, 'he Kdito , will wilie the serial
*tory of thenar, which win be autobiographical
in form, and v. ill be Musi rated by Miss Hallock-
It is entitled ARTHUR Hi-NNIOASTEE, and
will deal with some of the most difficult pro*
blems of Amerfaaa Life. It will be cuinmenced
in the November number.
There will b> a new story by Raxe Holm.
THEONK LKOQKhDANOLRS.
Hkkt R&J.TS, the best writer of short stories
now living, will o!.tnbutp:icharacteristic story,
entitled fHK EPIO OK FIDDEKTOWN, which.
will be illustrated by sheppard.
R H. .Stoi>d»rd will write a MTiet of enter
taining papers about Auihois, tlieir Pergonal
(Characteristics, Home Life, families. Friends.
Whims, a d Ways. A series ol PORTRAITS
OF LIVING AMERICAN WRITERS, l* al.o
promised.
Ui.ARExcK Cook will write about FURNITURE
AND THE DECORATION OF AMERICAN
HoMES. pipers will be eminently prac
tical as well as artistic, and will be illustrated
with dPMKus and skSuAkW by numerous artists
in addition to those which "the writer himself
will iurnish.
Among those who will contribute are :
Hans Anders-en Hryant, BashneU, Eggleston,
Froude, Hißginson, Rishop Huntington, Rrete
Harte, John Hay, H. U. JVlacdunald, Mitchell.
Miss Phelps, Stedman, Stockton, Stoddard,
t>lia Thaxter, Warner, Wilkinson, Mrs. Whit
ney, besides a host of others.
The emorlil control and direction of the
Magazine will remain in the hands of Dr. Hol
land, who willcontimie to write "THETOPICS
OF THE TIME," which the New York ImU -
pendent says "are more widely quoted than any
similar paper* in any American Magazine."
Watson Uit.dkk " will write "THE OLD
CAHINET ;" as hitherto. Prof. John O. Dra
per conducts the department of "NATURE
AND SCIENCE." Tl:e departments of 'HOME
AND SOCIETY" and "CULTURE AND PRO
GUESS," will •D(&fe the contribution-- of more
than a score or pens on both sides of the Atlan
tic. The Watchman and Reflector says : "Scrib
ner's Monthly for September is better than
usual, which indicates a needless waste of edi
torial brains and Publisher's money, for the
Magazine was good enough before !" And yet
the Publishers promise to make it still better for
the coming year ! !
The subscriptiou price is $(.00 a year, with
■peat*] ra'es to clergymen, teachers, and post
molten The following
EXTRAORDINARY INDUCEMENTS,
are offered to new subscribers :
Fur S.'i.ati the Publishers will send, or any
Bookseller or Newsdealer will supply, the Mag
?tine for one year, and twelv«- numbers of Vols.
Land IV., containing the beginulng of Mrs.
lijihant'- Serial. 'At Hi- Gate ;" fors7.Ah, the
Magazine for one year, and'he 24 bat k numbers
from the beginning ; forslo.so, the Magazine for
one yeur, and ihe 24 back numbers bound (4v015.)
charges on bound fols paid This will give
nearly 6 Wm pages of the choicest readii.g, with
the finest tllustratims for $10. .H), or nearly AOO
page* for a dollar ! and will enable every sub
scriber to obtain the series X rum the first.
Sp CiaJ terms to Dealers. Clergymen, and
Tea* hers. SCR IB NEB & < 0,.
no 7 fli4 Rtoadway, N. Y.
SOUTHER.N PLAfiTiJI AND
EARMEK.
STTBSORLFTION M PER ANNUM.
A FIRST-RATE AD VII.TISINO MEDIUM.
This old and well-csuioli.-iieii journal ha* re
cently, changed hands, and will be conducted
with renewed vigor. It will number among its
contributors some ot the ARLEST WRITERS
IN THE COUNTRY upon all su-bjects kindred
to agriculture. The difterent departments of tho
journal—Agricultural, Horticultural, Mechani
cal, Household, &c.—will each be conducted with
a view to make it the most
VALUABLE AGRICULTURAL JOURNAL
IN THIS COUNTRY.
Every farmer should take it, and no one who
who has recently moved into the State can afford
to be without it, as It contains the experience of
the IBCSt practical and successful farmers and
planters.
As an advertising medium it has nosuperiorin
the South, having a huge circulation amongst
the most substantial farmers and business men.
Insurance companies, bankers, machinist*, ferti
lizing companies, nurserymen, seedmen, com
mission merchants, _.l\, who wish to reach the
best class of people in the country, will find it to
their interest to advertise in this journal.
It will be mailed to subscribers on the first day
of each month at $2 per annum in advance.
Specimen copies will be sent on applieaiion.
All business communication.' to be addressed
JOHN W. RISON,
Editor and Proprietor.
Office No. 2 Columbian Block, corner of Thir
teenth and Qar? streets. Cc e—tf
f*KOFf'>S_O%AL.
L. 11. Chandler. Ai.fkkk Mojito it
CHANDLER & MORTON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Corsek Bank MS Tknth Strfbts,
RICHMOND, VA.
oc 23—d&swtf
I. H SHIELD-,
(LaTE OF CHANIILtR, MOKTOH _ SIUEI.D3,)
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Xarsliall Hall, Corner Ttnth and Bank Streets
I Richmond, Va.
Practices in the United Sillies Courts.
Particular attention given vi cases arising un
der Hie United States Revenue Laws, and Rank
ruptcy.
Attorneys outside of the city can nave tneir
Bankrupt cases here attends- to promptly, and
carefully looked after, by corresponding with me,
thereby saving them the c-peu.se of visiting the
cl t v ' nc 23—<isw_w tB
WINE* A»D LIQUORS*
I> i: ■is ;> * co.,
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS
AND RECTIFIERS,
Have on hand a full assortment of MOUNTAIN
and RYE WHISKIES, Foreign and Domestic
GINS, BRANDIES and WINES.
1313 CARY STREET, RICHMOND, VA.
Bel7—<l_wly
4632
IMIIS IS TO «IVE BOTiCE—That on the
11th day of Jan., A. D., 1873, a warrant in
bankruptcy was Issued out of the Dis :rict court
of the United States for the Eastern District of
Virginia, against the estateof llabney A. Hudson,
of Mecklenbttg county anil Stale of Va., who
has been adjudged a bankrupt on his own peti
tion : That the payment ot any debts, and tllß
delivery of any property belonging to said bank
rupt, to him or for his use, and the transferor
any property by liim, are forbidden by law ;—
Ihat. a meeting of the creditors of said bankrupt
to prove tneir debis and choose one or more as
signees of his estaie, will be held at a Court of
baukiiipley, to be hidden at the Register's
office, Richmond Virginia, before W. W. Forbes,
Esq., l-.egisier, on the Mh day of Feb'y, A. D.
at 1U o'clock A. M _
* ' DAVID B. PARKER,
.ja 18—Th2w U. S. Marshal.
""" b.i7
IS THE DISTRICT COURT OK THE UNI
TED STATES for the Eastern District ol Vir
'ln the matter «f William H. Harriss, bank
rupt—in bankruptcy.
At Richmond, on the 15th day of January,
A D . 1573.
I'll WHOM IT MAY CONCERN I
Please to take uuiiee hereby, that a petition
has been, to vit: on the JSth day of January,
A D 1573 filed iv said District O.rt, b
William H. Harriss, of M- c»lenb..rgco'ty in sail
District, who has been heretofore duly declare
Bankrupt undei the Acl of Congress entitled
"An Act to establish a uniform system ot bank
Itcy throughout the II niled States,' approveei
rob. Id, 16U7, for a di-chaige and certifioat
•cot from all his debts and other cia.m
vable under said *ot. and that the Dth day
February, A. D, 1673, at. i» o'clock A M
jre A. "W Forbes, one of ihe Registers o
1 court in bankruptcy, at his office in Rich
nd in said district, is the time and plac
ign'ed for tiie hearing of the same, whe
I where you may attend and show cause,
t you have, why th,- prayer of the said pet
i should not be granted.
'ou are also hereby notified, that the secoiu
nnd third meetings of ihe creditors of the sail
bankrupt will be held atylie, an
1 Register lußaiikruptcy
j : , |.i_W3w for the 3.1 I'.oig'l llist.of Va.
TP. fU- UISTRICT UO-RT O* THE Vtt
1 TED STATES for the Eastern District
Virginia. _ . ,
In the matter of E. P. Rubers, bankrupt
i se"-H<r' l Vhe general meeUM of the creditors
olT.ul tanto-p! -HI be held at Nonok tn
aaiddifiri t. ou toe Wth <_y oi -I """>• 18 ''i
U 7/o'c'o.k Vl„ at ih« o-lice ot Benj,niin B.
Foster L>q, one of the legisiers in baukrui.tcy
in said i.istnct, for the purposes named in the
27th section of the bankruptcy act of March 2d,
27th sec ion _ WALSTON,
jaJO-Miw Assignee.

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