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Lexington gazette. (Lexington, Va.) 1871-1962, August 07, 1912, Image 7

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024716/1912-08-07/ed-1/seq-7/

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Positive Proof
Should Convince the Greatest Skep?
tic in 1?exingtou.
Because it's the evidence of a Lex
ln^t.ni ?!?_?_.
Testimony easily lnvi>stlgated.
Tho Btrongest endorse?tent of merit.
The best proof. Kemi lt;
H. A. Deaver, .1 eft creon Ht., Lex?
iugtou, Va., says: "While I didn't
use Doau's Kidney Pills myself, I
eau recommend them. A member ot
my family was troubled almost all tbe
time by backache and was hardly able
i<> de. anything. Wheu 1 saw Doan's
Kidney Pills advertised, 1 got a box
at B. H. Worrell's Drugstore. They
were used carefully and oue box great?
ly relieved tho dreadful aching. Her
back was aatreiiKtlieu id and her health
in proved." (.Stateiueut glveu Jauuaiy
Wt, ISM.)
Oue of our representatives called on
Mi.,Deav r ou the l.tb of March. 1912.
and be said: " "lt pleases me to con?
ti rm my previous eudursemeut ol
Doau's Klduey Pills. 1 shall always
be strong for them."
For sale by all dealers. Price 50 cent*
Foster-Mllburu <*<?., Uuffalo. New York
sole ii?' nt s for the U uited States.
Reiueiuber tile name?Doau's?aud
take no ot?ar.
fl & ^yNorflk &Westem
SCHRDULK IN KKK lt CT. MAY mt, 191'.
LEAVK BUENA VISTA
2.20 p.m.?For Bristol and lutermed
ate statious. Pullman sleeper aud Din
lu_ Oar to Uoaujka'. Parlor car Koau
oke to Bristol. Couuects at Koauoke
with St. Louis Express for all point
xVest. Pullman Sleeper Roanoke t<
ty'duiubiis, and Cincinnati Cafe Car.
?.:_'?> a.m.?Kor Koauoki9, lilueflek
"ocaliuulae, Nortou, Wlustou-Saleii
'Jharlotte, Welch aud iiit.'iin.'.iii.i
Stations. r*ull_itu Sleeper to yary aui
Wiustou Salo?, Jtf, C. Cafe Diuiui
Car to Gary cou nee ts^Ht Roanoke wltl
Memphis ttepMCts- tor Chultaucioga
Nashville, Meuipliis.
1.57 p.m.? For Hagerstown, Phil*
delphla, .Nev.; Ve.ik. Pullman Sleepei
vu* ila.fois.iwii tor Harlinmu"g. I'll11*
d'.I .unit and ><<?* .otk. Dinna; Car t
adagaratewn.
.*.:.U pm.--For Hi.gerstowti.Pliilit'le
nina med Nev." York^Pulliuau Sleeper t
New York, ('afc Uar.
Kales, ti'lie tallies aud *,lnfonuatio
ch.-ci fully furnished upou applioatlo
to Agent N. A W. Ky.
W B. I.EV1L-,
Weu. Pass. A|(t. W. Ck SAUNDER
Roanoke, Va. Asst. Weu'l. Pass. Ak
J au. 13'09
Baltimore & Ohi<
GREATLY Lt-DUCED
CONVENTION FARES
...TO...
Atlantic City.
Hal Minore, Md.
Chicago, III.
Cleveland, O.
K .nsas oily, Mo.
Mliti'ieapinis, Minn.
Piiiiadclpiiia, Pa.
St. Ixjiiis, Ko,
St. Paul, Minn.
Toledo. O.
Washington, D. C.
mod many points on the Pe?il
Coast.
For further details apply to ney
est Baltimore aud & Ohio tick
agent.
Electric
Bitters
Succeed when everything else tails
In nervous proatration and female]
weaknesses they are the supremf
remedy, aa thousands have testified
FOR KIDNEY, LIVER AND
STOMACH TROUBLE
it ia tha best medicine ever sol.
over a druggist'a counter.
HOLLI STEFVS
-ocky Mountain Tea Nugge
A Busy Medicine tor Bus* Peopl*.
Brings Golden Health and Hen. nea Via?
A amt?? tor c.iiHilpation, In.li..-.- Uon.L
ai... ?;;.'.:?..?. tronbiea, Pimple*. Bcse_a, lin.
Bl.reKl,Hail..rcath,Kin^'sisti Bowels, B?ad?
Sll.lIljtOkla.-tia. ItsUo.ky fall.ee.lt;.in 1.'.' ill
let form. ?if. rents a box. (.'.'miine niael.
Hoi?ISTK't Daua Co.l-tJT M frill.-. Wis.
?SOLDEN NUGGETS FOB SALLOW PEO
Foley
Pills
?What They Will Do for Yo
They will cure your backac
?trengthen your kidneys, c
rect urinary irregularities, bi
up the worn out tissues, i
eliminate the excess uric a
that causes rheumatism. F
vent Bright's Disease and I
bates, and restore health i
strength. Ro'uae substitu
B. H. SORRELL.
Don't Scold YourWi
if ah* stands half th* forenoon tal
with her neighbors over tha I
fanes. Sha is merely getting tha n
Havs the Home Paper sent to
regularly and har hunger for nawa
ba satisfied. Then she'll have di
??adv on tim* and your hunger wi
?Kiah*?
Onlooker
7AeDM
I
AV hat though the e^hlneas mllllor
atarve?
Play balli
-What though the Tarka Italians oau-vs
Play ball!
What though aomsbody tinda the pola.
Some plutocrat ls In tha hole.
Or barona booat the price of cool?
Play ball!
What though the TecMyltes go daft
hall!
What though they gst the goat of Taft
Play ball!
Who earea about the angry sound
When Wilson kicks Clark's dog arotin*
Tho players scamper o'er the ground?
Play ball!
Porgvt about the aouthern flood?
Piny ball!
?sen crop's froated in the bud
Play ball!
Potatoes nre one plunk per peek.
The railroads have an awful wrack.
And Lorimer?they whacked hla neck-.
1 Uv ball!
The Japs have lande?*. on our coast?
Play ball!
The kaiser glvea aims ona a roast?
Play ball!
Come on, you aouthpaw! Flap jro
wing!
Line up. you batsmen! Oat lt?sing!
There'a nothing elae worth anything?
Play ball!
Let all th* heathen nations rags
Play ball!
They can't get on the sporting page
Play boll!
Tion't ask me how I plan to vote?
L. t nie -rot wild-rye,1. lnu.rae of throi
Tin* Mass*******! on, I'd have you note?
Play ball!
IT;
he,
?or
iild
and
cid
?re?
na,
and
tea.
Kind Words.
Many of us go about the wor
roaming hither and yon, seeking <
portunltles to speak kind words. >
stop men who are elevating ten-t
safes to the top floors of 20-stc
buildings and murmur hearten!
words to them about the dignity
toll. We lean over the edge of a
foot trench and spellbind a man w
a shovelful of dirt poised in his wei
hands?spellbind him with a few w
chosen remarks about tho klnglln.
of labor. We halt the worn bagga
man who Ir trying to carry a nundi
and fifty pound trunk up a narre
crooked stairway and assure him t'
nil effort has Its reward and that
sight of him ls scattering sunsh
amidst the clouds of our existence. '
peer into the kitchen where the ce
has burned her fingers in hot 1
and is also bewilderedly trying to
ure out how she cnn get all the dis
washed before midnight, and we ch
to her about the inspiration fait!
effort ls to us.
And all the time, if we could o
grasp the truth, we are talking to e
selves.
But, on_ the other hand, if
weren't dispensing kind words
would be giving good advice or 1
ing folks how to do their work
ferently, so maybe it ls all for
best.
Qood Suggestion.
"One of the copies of the first
tion of Pee's poems has Just Bold
$1,300," announced the sage of
boardinghouse.
"Well, my goodness," commei
the bright young lady, who gat o
site, "if I were one of these aut
I should not issue any first edltloni
til I had made all I could out of
rest of my writings."
ife
king
bael.
ews.
her
An I for lt.
The reporter turned in a story a'
tho decorations for a wedding,
which he wrote:
"The scene was one of great' bli
"Ah," observed the critical city
tor, "I see you have an "1" for bein
And the new reporter had chest
largement during that day.
Merely a Day Dream.
Rev. Preachem?I see that the
aese hare to pay $100 apleoe foi
serroon-i they have destroyed.
Mrs. Preachem?Yes, and I ret
ber when t urged you to accent a
?rtl i to Peking.
wier
? ?? 1 ^/A^~<^^iS7U^^
R S. BRUCE. President. TELKPHONE 75 T. S. BOSWELL Treasure
WM. R. KENNEDY. Vice-President E. S. SHIELDS, Secretary.
Rockbridge Realty Corporation
OFFICE: FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, MAIN ST.
LEXINGTON - - - - VIRGINIA
Desirable Farms and Town Property for sale. Located in Lexington,
VsVr Rockbridge and other Counties.
HISTORIC LEXINGTON: A center ol education and culture, seat of Washington aDd Lee
University and the Virginia Military Institute. The one enjoys the unique distinction uf having
been endowed by George Washington aud administered by Robert K. I.ee; the other, often called
tbe "West Point of tho South," is rich iu the memories of "Stonewall" Jackson. Excellent High
School, four strong Bcsnks, live white and two colored Churches, two Railroads, a population of
4,000, including nearly 1,000 young men at the ?wo institutions. Nearly 1.200 feet above sea-level,
healthful and invigorating climate, average summer temperature 12 degrees, low cost of living, un
the National Highway from New York to Atlanta.l
ROCKBRIDGE COUNTY: Situated in a picturesque valley between tiie Alleghany and
Blue Ridge Mountains, being a portion of the famed Shenajdoah Valley of Virginia, and about one
hundred and fifty miles from Washington City. Good farming lands, stock raisin,-, blue grass,
fine frait, excellent springs. Thrifty people, flourishing schools, numerous churches, good mails,
equable climate, attractive summer resorts, including Natural liridge, Rockbridge Alum Springs.
Goshen Pass, Rockbridge Baths and Wilson's Springs.
All properties listed with us are widely advertised without cost to owner, whether we
make sale or not.
We are in touch witlt leading Real Estate firms in all parts of the State, and
If we haven't what you desi-.e. write to us and we will supply your wants.
Deeds written free of charge for all property sold by us.
Farms $850 to $20,000
Residences $500 to $ 10,000
Lots $110 to $1,600
Business Properties.Stocks of He rc li andi se. Tim?
ber Tracts, Flouring Hills, Bearing Orchards
GOOD IN SCHOOL GARDENS
ld.
ll i
A'.
on
-ry
l-l
of
ia
Uh
irv
oil
?M
W
.-i'd
nv,
Iud
111.'
in.'
Wo
.ok
ard
Ag?
nes
drp
iful
>n1y
Dur
we
we
tell
dlf
t_e
edi?
tor
the
ited
pp?
hora
i un
the
bont
In
tty."
-11
jty."
t en
Chi*
? old
nem
. emil
Aside From Everything Else, They
Bring Teachers and Parents In
Closer Communication.
Where school children have been
given seeds and plants to take home
no way haa been found to ascertain re?
sults except to visit the homes. Luck?
ily the work provides an excuse and
warrant for thia, for there la some?
thing at home that belongs to the
school.
Usually teachers and pupils do not
meet under circumstances favorable
to closer and more friendly relations
?the reverse ls usually the case, and
the parent calls at the school. Now
the teacher calla to Inspect the gar?
den, an acquaint!*?ce results, with a
talk on gardening, simple but neces?
sary directions are given for garden
work, and all concerned,feel better.
The Distome and the Pearl.
In the opinion of many experts
pearls are the product of decay. The
free pearls found In the common
pearl-bearing mollusk are little tombs
surrounding the bodies of the marine
worms known as distoraes.
In the month of August certain
mollusks are found tbat have num?
erous small reddish-yellow points in
the spot where pearls usually form
Then begins the imprisonment of the
creature. In the first stages the sur
face of the distome ls sprinkled witt
tiny grains of carbonate of lime
These granulations grow and take th<
form of crystala which end by form
ing a calcareous deposit around th<
creature's body.
Chane* for an Inventor.
Our scheme of civilization will no
be perfect until somebody Invents I
bureau which will set Hat on the ilooi
bo that collar buttons cannot roll ut
der lt.
A Guaranteed Cure For Piles
Itching, Hlind, Bleeding, Portru.iin
Files. Druggist are authorized to n
fund money If PA8- OINTMKN
fails to cure in ?> to 14 days.
Mistletoe.
1 Wby ls mistletoe always hung In
light place? Because its presence
not necessury in lin- (lurk.
Dr. Falliney's Teething Syrup co
forms tn tlio Pure Pood ami Drntr I .a
Knoll butti." -iiHrauteed. Sample fr.
8trik?a.
"Never strike a man larger tbi
yourself." "Better still, never striUe
mun who la short."? Life.
Fables don't mind cold or taitf co
if kept well wlcli Dr. Fahrney's T*et
I ins Svr p. Wet lt anywhere. Saiu[
I frew.
?*fie7pt
-tv-*
the Horse
article is more useful
al>out Hie stable titan .Mica
Axle Grease. .Put a little on
the *pi*tulles before you ''hook
> it-will help the horse, and
t<i ing the load home quicker.
MICA AXLE
GREASE
MB**** writ?better than any
lur prease. Coals the aile
uh a hard, stnootii surface of
-nvdered u.ica which reduces
friceiOB. Ask the dealer for
Mica Avie Grease.
ST*Ut*MM Ul tOMPUtt
Un., ihi-iisel
MILK INSPECTION IS NO FUN
Incident Showing How Hard lt la to
Force Sanitary Rule* on Dirty
People.
The trials and tribulations of a milk
inspector trying to force insanitary
people to live according to sanitary
rules are shown in the issue of the
Healthologist. the official organ of
the Milwaukee health ' department.
The story follows:
A Milwaukee milk inspector during
a farm inspection, came upon a place
hopelessly filthy, disorderly and run
down. A motherly person with a big
heart, but Arm anel weird convictions
listened to the young man's sugges
tiona. Then looking over her spec
tades pityingly, she said:
"Boy, my mother was ninety-sever
? years old when she died. She was
: dirtier than I am, and lived in 1
dirtier house anei drank dirtier milk
If she could nt and it I guess then
ain't no reason why I and the cit;
folks that get milk Hom this farn
can't stand lt too."
And not being able to answer tha
argument, the mi'.k inspector left he
?kindly withal, but yet voicing he
indignation over "them there nei
fangled idees of cleanliness."
Civic Center Idea la Old.
The civic center idea ls not new. ]
is as old as systematized building. Th
forum of a Roman city was flanke
with Its courts of justice and bundine:
of administration. The agora of Atl
ens, aa nearly as one may learn, hu
Its temple and schools and courts <
law. Rut In American cities only tl
oldest and the newest hav.* their pu
lie buildings so grouped that each mi
he seen by itself and yet bo that s
flt into a consecutive archltectur
scheme.
WHY WE DETEST PARASITE
Feeling of Instinctive Revulsion
Juatlfied, for They Are Carriers
of Disease.
The feeling of instinctive* re\-*s*I*?J
against parasites ot all kinds w-Tli
characterizes humanity generally, a
which is due to something much mc
than the mere pain or annoyance lt
their bites might inflict, become mc
interesting as further discoveries shi
the role of insects in the spread
disease.
Unfortunately this natural abh
renee has not been enough to proti
man under conditions of poverty a
uncleanliness from harboring such p
asites. and now those who understa
i how much more than a mere perso
j annoyance is in question from the
I lstence of parasites must take up
problem to eradicate them.
The possibility of the bedbug c
veytiig relapsing fever, typhoid i
leprosy has been suggested and
1 parently there is no parasite of n
that may not be a mode of dise
conveyance. Files, fleas, mosquit
and bugs not only are all under i
picton, but most of them are i
actually demonstrated as ordinary
frequent conveyors of diseases of
rious kinds.
Health authorities must now t
up the problem of getting rid of
sect parasites In order to stamp
disease. ? From the Journal of
American Medical Association.
He Waa Prepared.
Mrs. Marryat?"Oh, John, I di
expect you home to lunch. We 1
nothing but smoked sausage In
house." Mr. Marryat?"Well, b
hungry, I'm prepared for the wu
?Catholic Standard and Times.
CASTOR I /
1'or Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bon
Bears the
Signature of
c^W^S
Ta
-HlCKESTtR'S ENGLISH
_^U. <>> IfUaT nm* Only K.aali
"7S?**SHAKK. V aav.raHat.la l.a.lt... ...
4(K.*jja. r.r e HieiinsTKK-s km,
?"^ i Ba***** sui ***>!?? mn* '??? '-?<?'
ann I lu* nab... T A. au ulhi r
HaMC.'roua Hwballtutloaa sn*
tl.*.. K..J af yoor Kr ****. SS ??
nae ... for l*?rtlcul?ra. Twill.
as.1 *' K*ll?r for L a.11 M.' <? I< ??
lura si ul. ?O.B*'l> lc.u?..n..,.
all Hr...UK.. IklrhiiKrllirial
ateniiua this v?vuc. MaUsoss ?. l'lilla
PARKER'S
HAIR BALSA
menari **?! Vsi.tif.es th
l's,,.iv tts a la-*uriari ty..
Vrv.r Falia to Hmwm
Hut Io its Youthful ?
*r*roY?it. hur laUfasj.
60c. una ii o?) >.t pnisrci
MT-WIONAL
SBNMTSCnOOL
Lesson
? By E. O. SKI.-KKS. Kir." tr>r of Eve?
ning IK-i.artm.nt. Ti,, Moody Bible
Institute "f Chicago.?
LESSON FOR AUG. ll.
;s
un
ch
ad
re
Mt
rd
tm
et
or?
iel
nt
er
.n ii
?al
the
on
in.l
ap?
ian
as,'
tel
ma
ilM
Llll.i
va
A TROUBLED SEA AND A TROU?
BLED SOUL.
LESSON TEXT-Mark 4:35 to 6:20.
QOI.DKN TKXT-"God ls our r, fufre
and strcriKth. a very present help In trou?
ble. alMlt?r?tt will we not fear. thouKh
the earth do chanicp, and though the
iiiiiuntalim be removed Into the heart or
the sea.-' He. __-t
We now tufn from our studier* in
the muh If est o or Inaugural address of
Jn--un to oue of the outstanding Inci?
dents of his life of service.
This lesson ls a dramatic one. lights
and shadow- surprise and revelation,
rebuke and encouragement are rai I
ly mingled. The subject of the 1 -
son ls well chosen. leaving 'he multi?
tude to whom he had been peaching.
Jesus commands that they pass over
to the other side of the lake v. 35.
"Let us pass over." he says. Jet?I
never nsk~ his disciples to go ai
he will rot zo or has not been befot .
How touchingly vivid is the sugges?
tion of v. ::?;. "they took him as he
was,"? be ls tired and weary, he.
whose Invitation ls to all who are
weary and needing rest, he who had
not where to lay his head, is carr'ed
by loving hands Into the boat and la
soon lost in restful slumber? Lovng
hands minister to the loved teacher
Both master and friends, who are
soon to meet a case of great sin. are
before that met by a great storm. Pat
be who ls Lord and Master of fe
sleeps calmly on. Why not? V'ho
else could be indifferent? Not so I
disciples; they have yet to know him
perfectly and hence it is quite natural
that in their alarm they should awak?
en him as they view the rapidly Till?
ing boat and exclaim. "Master, cai cst
thou not that we perish?" Weary us
he was. and i?f-rsonally Indifferent as
he may have been, yet for the sake of
his chosen friends he arose and re?
buked the storm, and the peace which
he later gave the demoniac ls Brat
shown In material things as he qt:
the waves I Compare v. 39 and 15).
Had Little Faith.
It was a great storm, v. 37, like?
wise a great calm. The psalmist says,
"great peace have they who love thy
law," great peace have they who truly
know and love Jesus. (John 14: "Ti.
His rebuke to the disciple-, v. 4''. waa
so gentle as to lose its sting.-"how
ls lt that ye hav,- sn ;:;;le faith?" They
had some faith, lt is true, for they ap?
pealed to him in their great need, but
oh so little Our i roportion of faith
is the measure of our fear. What
wonder tv. 411 that they were amr.zsd.
This man of Bash who had been sleep?
ing the sleep of IntenM weariness com?
manding the sea and that it should
obey him with tha meekness of a
child. "What ma?ner of man is this?"
Nineteen hundred yean has failed to
answer that unary.
?teaching the other side they entered
the land of Gadara. There they met
a demoniac who ls, we believe, a type
or picture of great sin In that he was
ial without restraint, "no man could
bind him." v. 3; (bl he was Injuring
himself "cutting, etc.." v. 5; (c) he
was separated from his friends, "dwelt
among the tombs," v. 3; (di he wai
"unclean." v. 2. There is also evi?
dence of the ftitlllty of human resolu?
tions and the ...unless of allen .rts at
control or reformation, see verse 4.?
"no man had the strength to tr ir I
him." Then note the torment of h's
life, v 7.
uki.
tn
out
the
idn't
Sins to Account For.
Church men:hers have no right to
condemn the liquor traffic and then
to rent stores in which to carry on
the same. Naturally therefore. I
people when they saw their ilic;.al
gains interfered with should request
Jesus to depart, v. 17, and this eve .
in the face of what had been done for
stricken man. Luke tells us (Luke
8:37) that they were holden with a
great fear. Fear of what? Surely act
any fear of this Galilean teacher, but
rather were they fearful of the effect
of his life upon their material pros
lave i Parity. Big business will have some
the ' tint *?<> account for when in the face
eing
rat."
ight
of known facts they still press for
the'r gains ignorir.:; i".u> cry of the af?
flicted and careless of unreason ".I
house and unsanitary living condi?
tions.
\On the other hand why did Jesus re?
fuse such a logical and seemingly rea?
sonable and proper a request as Ikat
recorded in verse IS? Was it not a
very natural request and an evidence
of gratitude as well? Jesus, however.
.._?> j knew a better place, for he saw a
ff~.. greater joy In store for this man.
?**** Hence he commanded the man to "go
home."
A suggestion outline for this lesson
ft 0t ' voul^ t>e as follows:
JL^ I. A great storm 4:35-41. The eom
B. rn mand of Jesus, v. 35; the weariness of
iL?i?J Jesus, v. 30; the alarm of the dis
itt?'.-. etplea, v. 38; the Indifference of Jesus,
/Tit. v. 38; the great calm, v. 39.
t'T*.1?!' II. A glorious cure. 5:1-20. (1) Tho
_?.*?__ Gadarene a type of sin, v. 1-5. unclean,
? *** separato1. no restraint, self-Injury,
i_> Th.- Cadarcu.a cleansed, v. 6-15. Ho
recognized purity.
III. The great mission, v. 16-20. An
lniproi>er request, v 17. A proper re
Mi
> St_
on. < quest, t" 18. A hard request, v. 19. A
11 gre?t result, see Lu_? g;40.

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