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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, January 11, 1901, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024720/1901-01-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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Oftlcial Pireetory Anpsta County
CIRCUIT COURT.
s H Judge, Lexington, Virginia.
Heets'at!StKntoS on May 10 and November
lU.orieach rear.
COUNTY COURT.
Lyman rjhalkley. Judge, MeeU 4th. Mon
n ea«h montti. Address Judge atStaunton.
COUNTY OFFICIALS-ADDRESS STAUNTON.
Clerk Circuit Court-Joseph «£*2LT«**-
Clerk County Court- Harry Burnett
Commonwealth's Attorney-K.b. Ker.
Treasurer- James N. McFarland.
Sheriff—Newton C. Watts.
Jailer-ThomasA. Dawson.
County Surveyor-J.B. McCutchan.
Superintendent of dchools-E. O. Peale, ,
wartsel. Arbor Hill, j
BEVERLY M*NOR DISTRICT.
Bapervlsor-W. A. C-awford Swoope
Comm'r Revenue-J. F. £» y ,\°V on
Constable-J. 8, Denton
Overseer foor-J. H. Hefflln. B
Magistrates-Joa. Houseman, ™»
villefN. L. Wehn Arch ,_
Coaim'ror Roads-H. Taunton; 8.
School Trustees—J. » • l oau -
C. BroWD, Swoope.
MIDDLE RIVER nI8TR1 "- Ar ,_.. n
Supervisor-John O. Mt
Comm'r. Revenue— Wm. n.m««*
Defiance, msewander. Laurel
Overseer Poor—a. J- ""■■'
Hill. _ x,„r>,i« Ft.Defiance; J.
Maglstrates-Wm. McCue, urectWse>
G. Goachenonr,New Hope,i->."
Knlghtley. . „ „„,,„ Burketown.
rJSSSLK^^** k. b.
Koiner.Kolnersstore.
NORTH RIVER ««*»«• ,_.
v n whitmore, Pirnassus.
Supervisor- M. B. w , nl SJ. uu h Vink., Moscow.
Comm'r.Kevenue-G. ' W. bwin w>
Constable-Char esß™ nft ™* n, Mt . Solon.
Overseer Poor-JaoOto*wS!Mt.Solon; J.
Saglstrates-J. W.Boggr»*M» de>
M. Irwin and David VOKfl^
Comm'r.of Roads-J. A. &*« w .
Director of Koads-R. C-Blair . j
School T™?tees-T. S i Ho| S ne ue ,
W. Hopewell, Mt. boiou, •=>
Messy Creek.
PASTURES DISTRICT.
pastu« Buffalo Gap.
Bupervlsor-R.L.Crawioiu, ondj
Commissioner Revenue— Jamc
Churchville. „„.«, Adlal.
ConstabU-G. F. Smith, Aai»^ iUe
Ovei-seer Poor-A. D. rrlDoei, rchvlUe .
Magistrates-M.!*. Bucne , Montgomery.
D.B. Kunkie.Craigsville, J-"•"
D Cons?r W ßoads-B.L Trimble, swoope.^
vU^J O .V:uX?C-raUl"e; M. H. Ooalter,
West Augusta.
RIVBRHBADS DISTRICT.
Kivim M-offatts Creek.
Bupervisor-XH' Bm ""', w Greenville.
Com'r. Revenue-R; *• Larew, vi
Kerr Middlebro broot _
Overseer Poor-J. J. b Sk3SE Middle-
Creek; i. A.
D. McKee, Greenville. Greenville.
Com'r.of Koads-J. D. Lilley, u n reo , woopß .
Koad Director-T.J.Thompson, AJex
School Trustees-J. D. Lilley an n
Bumgardner, Greenville, J. a.
Staunton.
SOUTH RIVER DISTRICT.
K BmTst r ;o K ,e- B OKerrFl d hersvme
overseer Poor-Z. 7 Baste City;
J M i ag p l frrsonfw 1 ay A nesb , o n r d o e rJ. B. Hunter.
L^ m oV^- F -?rao?:rS; , sssSn
FBOFKSSIOKAI..
JOHN B. COCHEaN, __ ._
ATIOBNET-AT-LA.W.
2 Barrister's Bow. - MntnalPhoneß92-
MCHARDsfKER, BWStlS**
Commonwealth's Attorney
for Augusta County.
KER & KERR,
Attorneys-at-Law-4 Law Building,
Staunton, Va.
W. H - LANDK ATTOBNEY-AT-UAW.
Staunton, Va.
No. 2, Court House Square.
aug9-tf
H ENBY «r. HOLT foBNEYA _. LAWi
STAUNTON, VA.
F. B - KKNNE A D T Y T'ORN E Y-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Lawyer* Bow,
Staunton, VA.
Special attention given to collections and
ohancer* practice.
Jan2?-tf
L AW ° FFICE J?A. ALEXANDER,
ATTOBNEY-AT-LAW.
No.« Lawyer's Bow,
A C.BEAXTON,
ATTORNEY ANDCOUNSELLOB.
OFFIC«:-Rooms 13,15,11, Masonic Temple.
Jan 18, '9«-tf fc
J, M> pbAbi> attobney-at-law
Second Floor, Masonic Temple,:
Mutual Phone. Staunton. Va.
lan6
L. W. H PEYTON. HEKBERT J. TAYLOB.
PEYTON & TAYLOB,
ATTOENEY-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Barristers' Bow.
p E. B, NELSON,
ATTORNEY AT-LAW AND COMMISSIONER E
Chancbby. ;
OFFICE: NO. 10 LAWYEES'BOW,
Jan4tf STAUNTON, VA.
CARTER BKAXTON, B. H. WATT.
Com. Atty. for Oity of Staunton. 11
B RAXTON& A^cJr T NEYB-AT.LAW.| ,;
No. 23 S.Augusta St.,
Offices—2 and 3. Staunton, Va
JJAKRY H. ■»«*<__„_„_W.
Office—Boom 8 Masonic Temple.!
jan 6 Staunton. Va.
JAMES BUMGABDNIB.jr.
L BUMQABDNEB. RUDOLPH BUMOABDNB
J . J. L., & B. BUMGABDNEB
ATTOBNEYS AND COD NSELLOBB AT LAW
Prompt attention given to all legal busi
ness entrusted to our hands.
JO^^^^TtTOBNEY-AT-LAW.
No. 8 Barristers Bow,
STAUNTON, VA.
auglO-tf
J. M ' CABLES, LAWYKK> .
Law Offices In Masonic Temple,
STAUNTON, VA.
tTGH G.BiCHELBEBGBB,
ATOBNEY-AT-LAW
STAUIWTON.V
Chesapeake
& Ohio By.
IN EFFBi T OCTOBEB 1,1900.
KASTBOI'NI).
Trains leave Staunton as follows:
NO. a—
2-06 A. M. Daily. F. F. V. Limited for Wash
■" A lngton, Baltimore, Philadelphia,
New York, Blchmond,Old Point
Comfort and Norfolk. DlnlngCar
NO. 4—
1U.58 A.M.—Daily,Express for Washington
Baltimore, Philadelphia, New
York, Richmond, Old Point Co
mfort ana NorfolK. Dining car to
Washington.
NO. 8—
10:15 ForGordonsvllle. Except Sunday.
NO. 6-
Ar, 12:20 P.M. Lv. 3:00 P. M, Except Bun
day 'or Blchmond.
WESTBOUND.;
NO. 3
i-22 A M. Dally, F. F. V. Limited for ClnclE
natl, Louisville, St.Louis, Chieagr
West and Southwest. Dining Car
NO. 5—
3-38 P. M.. Day Express for Clifton Forge
Except Sunday.
NO. 7—
Arrives 8:13 P. M.—Daily except Sunday.
NO. 1—
7-88 P.M. Cincinnati and St. Louis Special
Cincinnati. Indianapolis, St. Loul*
Chicago. West and Southwest
Dining Car.
For further information apply or aadresp
James Ker Jr., Pass and Ticket Agent
Staunton. Va. *
GEO. W.STEVENS, H.W . FDLLEE,
President. Oen lPass.Aaf
HHAIR BALSAM
Oietues ad, __of **£*
never SWls to X*gnJf***
Hair to its Youtbfn} WJH:
cSi. sclp diKM" > ii__ m^*
Modern Dentistry.
Tne Baltimore Dental Association
Ight, comfortable and perfect flttir
lal teeth, that' durable and
nken cheeks to their natural appearance,
.nd correct facial deformities. Their crown
and bridge work is acknowledged to be the
finest ever turned out in Htaunfn. 1 hey ao
all kinds of dental work in a tnoroughl> up
to-date manner at just one half the prices
you pay other dentists. They have come to
stay and their business is increasing aau>.
Office in Crowle Building, Staunton, \ a.
OUB PBICES:
The very best Set of Teeth (guaran
teed for 10 years) ... *». »
Second Grade Set of Teeth, . . 000
Gold Fillings * u »
Amalgam Filling, ... JJ
Porcelan Crown, ... J*J
Gold Crown (22k) .... 000
Bridge work, per tooth, . sou
Extracting i 0
All work guaranteed or your money
back. Expert operators In charge. \ lti
lized air used for painless extraction ol
teeth. .-
jgjg»CALL AND SEE
BRYAN
BEFOKE BUYING
Wood, Coal & Lumber.
FLOORING, CEILING AND SIDING,
always on hand.
ANTHRACITE COAL, KINDLING and
STOVE WOOD, under sheds, nosi.ow, no
rain, always in the dry. Try
BRYAN,
SOUTH LEWLS ST., STAUNTON.
WM. S.BBYAN, Mg'r.
Mutual Phone 59. Bell 33. iun22-6m
-^SODTHEI
Railway
Schedule in effect Jan. 3, 1901,
For the South and Southwest.
I No.B. I No. 351N0 33.iN0.37
LvStaunC&CMtlO 15 anJnos6aMrt3oopm t3oopm
ArCharvre'T 1145anj 12Urjpm|4;i5pm \ 435pm
LvCharvl'eSo. 1208pmj 206pmj*K54m'*15lam
Ar Lynch," 817 pm 3 48pm| 2 46am| 8 42am
Ar Danville" 445 pm 5 4ipm 4 28amj 5 40am
Ar Greens. " 6 25 pm 7 10pm 5 4Sam! 7 05am
Ar Raleigh "I K amj 5 80amll0 3uamHOSuam
Ar Ballsb'y " p 59 prni 8 24pm j 6 55am 8 12am
ArChat'ga" |740 am; 7 40am 1 11-35pm1135pm
ArCharl'te" »SJpm 955 pmi 815amj 9 25am
Ar Columb'" 115 am 1120amj 8 56pm
Ar Anan'ta" ] BWaig 250pm;
arSv'naSßyPl .1 5 lOamjiilspm!
ArJax'vllle" I 925am1740pm:
AJAtla'aSßyl SlOairt 455pm
ArMotgawp 1100 am 920pm
ArN.O.,L&N| 830pml 7 40am
Arßlrmng'Sol 11135aml 10 00pm
No.9,—Dally— Local for Uharlotte and In
termediate Stations, with connection for
Harrisonburg dally, and Staunton week
days.
No. 35.—Dally—United States Fast Mali
through Pullman Sleepers to Jackson
ville via Savannah and to Atlanta and New
Orleans,connectlng at Sallsbur j with sleep
er for Ashevllle. Knoiyllle, Chattanooga,
and Memphis and at Charlotte for Augusta;
and at Columbia with sleeper for Charles
ton. Also at Danville with sleeper for Bir
mingham. Dining Car service.
No.33.—New York and Florida Express
—Carrying Pullman Buffet Sleeping-cars
Now York to Augusta, with connect"" i for
Aiken; also to Jacksonville, connecting
there with drawing room sleeping car for
Port Tampa. Through coach to Jackson
ville. Dining car service.
No. 33.—"Washington and Chattanooga
Jinlted "via Lynchburg, witn Pullman Bur-
et Sleeping-cars for Memphis and New Or-
eans through Bristol. Through coach
Washington to Memphis. .Parlor and
Observation car between Kadford, Va., and
Utalla, Ala. Dining car service.
No.37.—Dally—Washington and Southwest
ern Vestlbuled Limited, through Pullman
Sleepers to Ashevllle.Hot Springs and Nash
ville, via Salisbury and Chattanooga; to
New Orleans, via Montgomery and Mobile
to Memoliis, via Atlanta and Birmingham.
Pullman Observation and Library sleeping
car to Atlanta. Dining Car service
StSUNSET PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURIST
sleeper on this train every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, from Washington
to San Francisco withoufeehange.
Trains from Staunton by Chesapeake and
Ohio Bailway connect in Union Station at
Charlottesville with Southern By. trains
HABBISONBUBGTO WASHINGTON.
tN0.14 No. tN0.13 'No.
AM PM PM PM
6:45 1:15 Lv. Staunton Ar 445
(45 *3 30 "Harrisonb'g" 930 215
717 413 " New Market" '8 49 133
730 428 "Mt. Jackson" 834 117
74414 43 " TSdinDurg " 818 100
753 455 " Woodstock " 808 12 49
820 5K2 " Strasburg " 736 1217
PM
842 559 " Biverton " 712 1152
851 814 " Front Boyal" 701 ,11 40
1036 828]" Manassas " 503 92a
1118 920 " Alexandria" 423 823
PM AM
11 11 »9 lOJAjWashlngtonLy 401 *8 01
tWeekDays. 'Dally. _ , „ _.
Immediate connection In Union Depot at
Washington for and from Baltimore, Phil
adelphia and New York.
Frank S.Gannon,3dVice-Prest & Gen.Man
IS. H. Hardwick.General Passenger Agent.
L.B.Brown, General Agent.
Washington. D. 0.
Wr Trade Marks
711 llr Designs
'Pfff V Copyrights &c.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention Is prohably patentable. Communica-
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents
sent free Oldest agency for securingpatents.
Patents taken through Munn £ Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American,
A handsomely Illustrated weekly, {.argest cir-
culation of any scientific lourna . Terms, S3 a
year; four months, »L Sold byall newsdealers.
MUNN & Co. 36, Broadwa - New York
Branch Office. 625 F 8U Washington. P. C.
Potontc —R. 8. &A. B. LACEY, Pat
r a 101 l Id. e nt Attorneys, Washington,
D. C, examination and opinion on paten
tability and hand book free. 21 years
experience. Jun 22 ly
r\sO. DEAWER bB. B.C. HABD?
1848—1899.
Reliability
Is a consideration when it comes to
Carriages and Bu^^ies
As all must admit—it's a fact.
HARDY Sells Bern
Of that sort low down—makes 'em, too.
Harness for Sale also.
Repairing Gets Attention
BUOND-HAHD VEHICLES FOB SALE
John M. Hardy's Son.
Main & Market Ste., Staunton, Va. >
SCIENCE IN FEEDING.
Nitrogen and Carbffn the Two Princi
pal Snbstanees Desired in
Food for Poultry.
give directions for feeding, although
some farmers have made such matters
a study. A farmer may not know the
relative proportions of the several sub
stances in foods, but he should en-
Ir to learn by experience what to
lis flocks, what to avoid, and how
The two principal substances
id desired for poultry are nitro- j
for flesh, albumen, etc.) and car
bon (for fat). The nitrogenous foods
are meat, beans, clover, and to a cer
tain extent grains. The carbonaceous
I foo<rS are corn, fat meat, grease, rice,
i etc. If a ben is fat she needs no food
excelling in fat. Hence, finely cut clo
ver hay scalded la the morn'ng, with
a tablespoonful of linseed meal at
night, is better for egg production
than grains, if the ben is poor, give
grains at night. All foods, however,
contain fat and also some nitrogen.
It should be borne in mind that the
more quiet and sluggish the disposition
the less corn or heating food is re
quired. A laying hen should never be
very fat. for the accumulation of fat
is very injurious to reproduction. If
too fat the hen may not lay; she be-
I comes egg-bound, breaks down, and
I soon proves unproductive. Any fowls
I that are active foragers and are laying
may be fed all they will eat; but if the
I hens are apparently in good health, but
do not lay. feed no corn, give plenty
oT meat and allow bulky food, or they
will fatten quickly. If fed heavily, a
hen will either lay or fatten in a short
time, and if the hens are Asiatics and
cease to lay the feeding must be done
cautiously. It is even better to get
them down to a poor condition rather
than permit them to become too fat.
An excellent mode of feeding is to
allow plenty of bulky food, and to give
each hen an ounce of raw chopped
meat in the morning and whole oats at
night. A few grains of wheat or corn
By be scattered in litter, in order to
uce them to scratch, which will be
leficial; but grass may be fed free
ly. There is no advantage in break
ing an Asiatic from setting; but the
best way to break her i.s to place her on
a grass-plot in a yard and compel her
to hunt for her food. A box may be
allowed her at night, which should be
removed the next day, unless in damp
weather. The object should be to get
her to work and reduce her in flesh.
If food is scarce in the yard a few
oats at night may be given. If all
breeds are kept together some of the
hens will lay, while others will not, for
the reason given above. Therefore, it
is best to keep only one breed, so as
to give all the hens the same manage
ment. —Farm and Fireside.
TEN-DOLLAR HENHOUSE.
It Does Well for Summer and In Shel
tered Location Will Answer
Doling Winter Use.
This coop costs ten dollars and Is
large enough for 12 fowls. It is built
7xlo feet in size of boards costing six
W- -
feet high and roof boards, cat five feet
long, are covered with tarred paper.
The doorway in front on the south side
is 20 inches wide and live feet high.
This kind of coops does well for sum
mer and will answer during winter use.
There is one great objection to it;
snows blow in during winter and
fowls with large combs, like Leghorns
or Minorcas, freeze them and will not
lay.—c. H. Chester, in Farm and Home.
POULTRY YARD CHAT.
Forty hens can no more eat from
one plate than 40 people. Broadcast
grain and provide long troughs for
feeding soft food.
Oatmeal is an excellent feed for
young fowls that have not wholly
feathered before winter. Bought by
the barrel it is not expensive.
It is a mistake to sell all the old
turkeys. The two and three-year-old
birds are better than the young ones
for breeding. The best of them should
be kept for this purpose.
Coal ashes for the dust box should
be run through a medium fine sieve;
for a disinfectant on the dropping
boards run them through an ordinary
ash sifter. Wood ashes should never
be used in a poultry house.
For winter it is well to arrange
perches in one end of the house and
have a curtain-to let down in front
to the level of or a little below them.
This helps to hold the animal heat
about the birds and does not interfere
seriously with ventilation. — Farm
Journal.
Black Breeds Are I'nuopnlnr.
That the black varieties are not
more generally popular is due prin
cipally to the prejudice against them
as dressed poultry. Consumers of
poultry object to dark legs, to white
skin and to dark pin feathers in the
carcass. Now, a prejudice of this kind
has to be reckoned with ami consid
ered by the poultryman, and it must
be taken at its face value. There Is
no way of discounting it. Further
more, a poultryman is safe in taking
it at its present value, for there is
not the least likelihood of its chang
ing within a generation. —Farm Poul
try.
Cures Blood Poison.
SCEOFULA, DLCEES, OLD SOBES, BONE
PAINS—TBIAL TBEATMENT FREE.
First, second or third stages posi
tively cured by taking B. B. B. (Botan
ic Blood Balm). Blood Balm kills or
destroys the Syphilitic Poison in the
blood and expels it from the system,
making a perfect cure. Have you sore
throat, pimples, copper colored spots,
old festering eating sores, ulcers,
swellings,scrofula,itching skin, aches
and pains in bones or joints, sore
mouth, or falling hairY Then Botanic
Blood Balm will heal every sore, stop
the aches and make tbe blood pure and
rich and give the glow of health to the
skin. Over 3,000 testimonials of cures.
B. B. B. thoroughly tested for 30
years. Drugstores $1. Trial treat
ment of B. B. B. free by writing
BLOOD BALM CO., Atlanta, Ga.
Describe trouble and free medical ad
vice given. Don't despair of a cure as
B. B. B. cures when all else fails.
FAPfrCMfH
DOES MUCH DAMAGE.
Oyster Shell Bark Loose Is a Parasite
Dreaded by Gardeners and
Fruit Growers.
The scientific name is Mytilasp's Po
monum. In our illustration "a" is a
female scale from beneath, filled with
eggs; "b," the same from above; "c,"
twig infested by female scales; "d,"
male scale and a twig infested there
with. The insect is so named because
of the resemblance that the scale bt ars
to a long, rather narrow oyster, and
OYSTER SHELL BARK LOUSE.
this renders it easily recognizable.
The cast skins of the larvae are at
the narrow end of the scale and form
its head. The female comes to ma
turity during the latter part of Au
gust, fertilization having taken place
in the earlier portion of the same
month, and egg-laying continues into
September, when the entire space be
low the scale will be found filled with
minute, pale yellow eggs; something
over 100 in some cases, though often
much less. These eggs remain dur
ing the winter protected by the scales,
and from them hatch the crawling
larvae in early June. Growth is slow;
there is only one brood, and, when not
excessively abundant, the insect does
not do much injury. As a matter of
fact, however, it does often become
excessively abundant, and lilacs, for
instance, may become so covered that
no portion of the bark can be seen
between the scales. The male scales
are about one-sixteenth of an inch
long, and the female about double
that length.
Walnut and butternut trees are very
susceptible to the attacks of this spe
cies, and are sometimes killed even
when of considerable size. Among
fruit trees apples are the most sus
ceptible and branches are occasionally
destroyed. Young trees may be killed
in some instances, but old trees are
rarely much harmed. Of the shade
trees willow and maple are sometimes
severely injured.
The remedy is to spray with kero
sene emulsion when the larvae are
hatching, at which time they are
killed by even a weak eolution.—
Farmers' Review.
LOCATION OF WELLS.
Pnt Them Where There In No Danger
of Either Surface or I niter
Drainage.
We believe that far too many farm
ers and stock-raisers pay but little
attention to the supply of water, both
for house use and for the farm stock,
and do not fully realize the impor
tance of an abundant and convenient
supply of pure water at all times
upon the farm. The shallow well dug
in low places about the farm or feed
lots and carelessly covered or stoned
or bricked up is the catch-basin for
nearly all the refuse that flows from
the stock yards, and if the water is
not kept very low by constant usage
it is liable to become impure. It is
through sheer thoughtlessness that
wells are ever located in the low
places of feed-lots. They should al
ways be dug upon the higher ground
where there is no danger of the
drainage from the barn lots or feed
lots flowing into them, and then if
they are well walled up and a close
cover put on them there is not much
danger of contamination. If it Is not
possible to have the wells located con
veniently and where there is no dan
ger of contamination from the drain
age from the barn lots we would rec
ommend a changing of the location
of the barn and feed-lots, and in no
wise compromise by placing a well j
where there is the least danger. We
remember one large feeding barn es
pecially, in western lowa, upon which
four large wells were located and wa
ter was pumped for stock by huge
windmills. One of these wells was
located probably a distance of 150 feet
from the barns and at least 15 feet
below the level of the barns. This
well, of course, received every bit of
the drainage and surface water from
the barn lots. The other wells were
located at convenient places about
the feeding lots, but invariably at the
lowest places in the lots. There "was
no reason for these locations of the
wells at all except that the farmer
did not have to dig so deep in making
them. They were expensive affairs
at best. The wells were large and
well bricked up and the windmills
were expensive, and if the four had
been placed on suitable grounds where
the water could have been kept pure
they would have been of almost in
calculable value. As it was within
three years' time every well had to
be abandoned. We can give no better
advice in the location of wells than
to put them where there is no danger
of either surface or under druinage.—
PRINTING PRESS FOR SALE.
The printing press on which The
Spectatob has been heretofore print
ed is for sale. We have put in a new
press which is faster, hence the reason
for selling. This press is in good order
and will print the issue of any ordinary
country paper with ease. Its speed is
about 700 per hour. No press made
does better work. Easy terms of pay
tnent will be given. Address.
Staunton Spectatob,
Staunton. Va.
♦—♦—•
The State Board of Education in
Richmond Thursday took summary
action in the interest of purchasers of
school books. For Maury's geography
published in board covers, cloth covers
were ordered to be-used. The board
also took important action by which
county superintendents will receive a
larger compensation than at present,
Tbe action will allow salaries based up
on tbe school census of 1900. This
gives a large increase in some of the
counties of the State in others the de
crease will be something. {
DEATH TO HOPPERS.
Agricultural Department Tells Farm
ers How to Spread Dlsense
Anionic the Insects.
The experts of the agricultural de
partment at Washington have discov
ered a contagious disease which can
be disseminated by insects with dead
ly effect to the pests, but without
danger of spreading an epidemic
among members of the human race.
By close observation it has been dis
covered that many annoying insects
have distemper, some of a highly con
tagious character. By propagating
these disease germs and spreading
them, so that the insects will be af
fected, contagion is spread and liavot
follows. Farmers will be especially
interested in the announcement that
a disease among grasshoppers similai
to leprosy has been discovered and
that experiments conducted in Mis
sissippi, Nebraska and Minnesota dem
onstrate that it is possible to dis
tribute the germs in vials through the
mail, with instructions to farmers as
to the method of using the contents
so as to produce the best results.
The farmer becomes in a short time
the manufacturer of his own grass
hopper poison. The germs are placed
in a tumbler of water, a number ol
healthy specimens of grasshoppers se
lected, immersed and afterward fed
upon greens that have been dipped in
the water. The disease rapidly de
velops, the grasshoppers are given
their liberty and are permitted tc
spread the contagion. The scientists
believe that the method of extermina
tion will not be only efficacious in
freeing the farmers of the harmful
grasshoppers, but that the principle
:an be adopted with equal success iv
driving out other insects.
FOR HOME MECHANICS.
How to Hnlld a Movable Fence for
Farms Where Stock Is Pastured
on Green Crops.
The fence shown in the illustration
is very satisfactory for placing around
straw stacks or using for pasturing
calves, sheep or hogs on green crops.
such as rape, artichokes, clover and
the like. The panels may be 12 feet
long and the pickets four feet high.
The support for the panels has no
brace on the inside. If this brace is
mum
DETAILS OF MOVABLE FENCE.
present, the animals get under it and
displace the fence. The notches are
large enough to admit ends of two
panels. Some farmers consider three
feet high enough for a sheep fence
and the height may be reduced one
foot if thought best.—Orange Judd
Farmer.
A Lightning- Rod Story.
The lightning rod agent is no re
specter of persons or colors. A cor
respondent of the Texas Farm and
Ranch tells this story of a little log
house: "A negro's family occupy it.
At one time this negro's note was
good for as much as $50. About that
time a lightning rod agent came
through the county. He ascertained
that said negro's note was good for
100 feet of rod and he sold it to him,
charging him $50, taking his note in
payment. The negro paid the note
and has never since had that much
money. It's rather an incongruous
sight to see a $50 lightning rod on a
seven-dollar house; still it furnishes
another instance of how much some
people love to humbug and others to
be humbugged."
Gedde* Goes to England.
Dr. T. A. Geddes, chief of the mis
cellaneous division of the bureau of
animal industry of the United States
department of agriculture, has been de
t ailed as a special inspector and or
dered to Great Britain to inspect cattle
intended for importation into the
United States. Dr. Geddes will make
his headquarters in London, and will
go to such parts of the United King
dom as may be required for examina
tion of animals before shipment. The
increasing prevalence of contagious
diseases, and particularly of tuberculo
sis, has made this action necessary for
the protection of the animal industry
in this country.
How Plant Food Is Lint.
When there is an abundance of
plant food in the soil in an available
condition the greater is the loss by
leaching. There is also some loss of
ammonia, which escapes into the at
mosphere, but the rains bring back to
the coil nitric acid from the atmos
phere In variable quantities, it be
ing estimated that five pounds of ni
trogen per acre comes to the soil in
that manner. The loss of ammonia
from one farm may be a gain to an
other, and any loss of plant food from
the manure or soil is so much gone
that cannot be secured again without
cost.
New Variety of Alfalfa.
Oasis alfalfa is a variety with which
experiments are being made at sev
eral points and considerable promise
is given of its superior qualities. The
seed comes from Tunis, and the plant
appears to be quite drought resist
ant. It has the faculty of reviving
upon being wet after having previous
ly dried up and apparently died.
What is needed in many sections is a
good forage plant which will stand
still or dormant but yet retain its
vigor during drought and then put
forth rapid growth as soon as wa
tered.
The Court of Appeal will, today, ex
amine candidates for license to prac
tice law. Tbe number of applicants
this year will exceed that ever known
since the adoption of the new law.
Until a few years ago these examina
tions were held by tbe circuit judges
and were nearly always perfunctory.
Now it needs to be a well-equipped
man who can successfully pass the ex
mi nation of the Court of Appeals
judges.
Save Your Money.
One box of Tutt's Pills will save
many dollars in doctors' bills
'They willsurely cure all diseases
of the stomach, liver or bowels.
No Reckless Assertion
For sick headache, dyspepsia,
malaria, constipation and bilio
usness, a million people endorse
TUTT'S Liver PILLS
f CURES \
THE 5
COUGH. J
i, A pleasant, never-felling <
I remedy for throat and lung J
5 diseases. 1
s Sellers'lmperial j
{ Cough Syrup {
l Isabsolutdyfreefromspirituous >
f or other harmful ingredients, r
c A prompt, positive cure for /
< coughs, colds, hoarseness, infra- 1
«! enza, ■whooping cough. f
t OveramillionbottlesFoldin tna \
) last few years attest itr. popularity. C
S W. J. GILMORE CO. {
C PITTSBURG. PA. >
S At all Druggists. C
\ 2gc and 5 0C,^^^^^ r^fV^-/ J
ODIUM cpcaiwea-whisky
H BSJ ill Habit. Curo.l at mySanator-
■ *■*» ■■■ mmi |„ so day.. Hundreds
of references. 25 j..r. a specialty. Book on
Home Treatment sent FREE. Address
B. M. WOOLLEY, Wl. 0., Atlanta, Ca.
RACKET STORE,
No. 6 East Main Street,
AAAAAAAA A AAAAA4i4A4A
A. E. NARNESBERGER, Proprietor.
AAA aAAAA AA AAA4AA * A 4A
A Large and Complete Department Store, Hand
ling all Lines of Goods.
Goods are Up—Our Prices are Down I
Wheat 68c, other articles of produce in proportion, and half ciops at that, every
thing you have to buy in the regular line at an advance, you can equalize things by
buying your JFall and Winter Goods from us. We do ;his by buying and selling for
cash. We buy no goods that cannot be sold as a Bargain. Can you afford to ignore
low prices'?
All loads for Bargainslead to the Racket Store. We would like
to C. U. B. A. Customer of Ours.
Read Our Price List and Be Convinced!
Millinery
Department.
Our present millinery stock is one of
the most artistic ever show by us, com
prising all the latest styles from New
York and Baltimore's leading uiilli
nery houses. Come and see it you
admire pretty stylish hats at a low
price.
Just received a lot of trimmed velvet
pattern hats at 2. worth 3.50.
Trimmed hats 1. to 5.
Sailors, Untriinmed hats, ribbons,
velvet, plumes and fancy feathers ali
kinds of prices.
Job and sample lots of millinery our
speciality.
A new departure. If you select a
shape and trimmings from us we will
trim it up to your order without extra
charge.
Ladies' Furnishings.
Ladies' fine quality Kid Gloves, Car
ter hook, at 75c; the $1 kind.
All best make Corsets, H & L, R & G
and Armorside. ,
The best 50c Corset in town.
Ladies' Gauze Vests sc.
Ladies Waists from 35c to $3 50
Special—a lot of Taffeta Silk Waists
at 2.00, would be cheap at 3.00
Ladies' Skirts trom 50 to 4.00
A bargain in Black Figured Mohair
at 1.35, worth 2.00
Ladies' Tailor Made Suits 3.50
A bargain in a fine all wool Suit at
7.50, worth 9.00
Clothing
Department.
A good heavy man's suit at 2.80
A nice suit at 4.*0
Extra quaility suits at 6 00
Fine all wool at 6.00
All wool clay worsted at 9.50 worth 18
Fine quality suite at 8 to 10
Boys suite from 1.00 to 6 00
Children's suits from 100 to 3.00
Ladies' tailor made suits from 3.00 to
. 9.00.
Capes and Cloaks.
A cheap cape at 50c, better ac 75 aud
1.00.
A nice large cape at 1 50, extra nice
and large-at 2.
One nicely trimmed with braid and
fur at 2.75 and 3.
Plueh capes at 2 50 3. and 3.50 to 6.
Collarettes at, from 2 to 5.
Coats from 2. to 12.
A job lot of coate at 3.50 worth •>.
Gents Underwear.
Gent's heavy knit shirts and drawers
at 25c, worth 3r»c
Uamelhair at 37Jc. Drawers to match
Wool mixed at 50c.
Fine grade all wool at '■ Oc
Red medicated at 75 c or 1.09
We sell a full line of (ient'e goods of
all kinds.
Cook Stoves.
The celebrated steel oven at 10 and
12 ."(I with fcope.
King Heaters from 2.(0 to ti 00.
Please Say You Saw These Goods Advertised.
Now "the proof of the pudding is the eating." We would like for you lo investigate
our prices and if you do we are sure thatyouwill be pleased with goods and prices.
IUIMIIIII ■ 11' saiafiataia(iMMa«mwiWtia»a*a«asa««^ t . ttt| <
A. E. HARNESBERGER, Proprietor,'
Staunton. Virginia.
N O TI_C E !
TO
J. A. Fauver & Cos.
To Buy
Harness and Saddle?,
Horse Goods of all kinds.
I eather and Rubber Belting,
Endless Thresher Belts,
Shingles and Lathes,
Feed of all kinds,
Machine Oil,
Harness Oil,
Foot Oil,
LiLsetu Cii.
Harness. Sole and
Upper Leather
and Findings,
Ml_At Lowest fflarlfet Price.
Hides and Tallow Wanted.
J. A. Fauver & Co.
33&355. Augusta St., Staunton. Va.
Mutual Phone 25.
Fall and Winter
Dry Goods
Good quality outing 5c and Oc, extra
heavy at 7+c and Be.
Heavy weight dress cheviots suited for
house dresses at 7c, worth 9.
Good qnalitv Canton Flannel at GAc
better at Sc. Extra heavy weight at
10.
Flauuelette all the latest patterns at
Sc and 9c.
Solid colors pink and blue 12ic.
The best bleached Muslin at He.
All best prints at sc.
Heavy unbleached cotton 5c and 6c.
10—4 Sheeting at 18 and 20c.
Double fleeced canton, grey and brown
for skirts and underwear at 9c.
Heavy twilled shirting at 12£ c worth
18.
All wool red flannel at 18 medicated
25c.
Glass and
Queensware.
6 good tumblers for 12c
Fine quality blown tumblers 25c a set
Glass stands 35c
1 set Decorated Cups 50c
Plates same price, beautiful designs
White Queensware at lowest prices
Dinner sets, 100 pieces, 6.75
A beautiful set, 100 pieces, 9.00, deco
rated in 3 colors, artistically trac
ed in gold
Real Cailsbad China, 112 pieces, at
18 00, worth 25 00
Toilet sets from 200 to 6 00.
Furniture
Department.
Notwithstanding the advance, we are
enabled to sell this class of goods
as cheap as ever.
Beds from 1.85 to 4 50
Chairs from 45c to 1 25
A bargain iv an oak chair at 90c
Solid oak suits at _X), worth 12 50
A beautiful 3 piece suit, large plate
mirror, 16.50
Finer suits from 20 00 to 35.00
Separate Dressers from 5.00 to 10.00
Iron Beds all prices
Do not buy furniture until yon get
our prices.
Ladies' & Children's
Underwear.
Heavy ribbed vested at 121 c worth
18c Extra heavy at 25c.
Pants to match.
Children's vests and drawers from 8c
to 25c.
Ladies flauelette waists at 50c worth
75c.
Sewing Machines.
A high class Machine, all improve
ments, as good as any $50 machine on
the market, $17.50.
JOB PRINTING
NEATLY EXECUTED.
For Fresh Drugs,
And everything in the
Patent Medicine Line,
Toilet Articles,
Paints,
Oils and
Glass,
Call on
B. F. HUGHES, Brniisl,
NO. 6 S. AUGUSTA ST.
ENTIRELY NEW STOCK.
(tCfJ per month and expenses can be made
h*"" by a capable woman .Permanent
position Experience unnecessary. Write
at once for particulars. CI.AItK & CO.,
234 S. 4th St., Phila., Pa. oct 5-3ni
Small Wares at
Unheard of Prices.
3 cakes of good toilet soap at 5c
Fairhank's White Cloud Soap sc, reg
ular 10c size
A good t-pool of Silk 3c
200 yard spool Cotton 2c
Mucilage 3c
Vacilene 4c
Machine ril 4c
Combs all prices
Velvet skirt binding 8c
Agate buttons 1 gross 4c
Pawer best brass pins 3c
Knitting silk 4c
Dress Goods
Department.
Half wool dress goods, all colors, 10c
Wool mixed fancy at 20 and 25c
Cashmere, ali shades, at iOc
Black fancy mohairs at 12ic for dress
es and skirls.
Heavy weight casimeres for skirts
without lining, at 25c to 50c
60 in. grey cheviots for ladies' suits at
65e per yd worth 1.00 same in black.
A lot of all wool dress goods at 38c
worth 65c.
A lot of fine quality Beaver cloth,
black, blue, tan and brown,
55 in. at 95 yd worth 1 25.
Shoe Department.
It is the remark of traveling men
that we sell more shoes than any one
store in the State considering tbe stock
we carry. Low prices and good quality
enables us to do this.
Our first line of sample shoes has
just arrived. If you call early you will
get first pick.
Men's shoes from 85c tos3 00, worth
from 1 25 to 4 00.
Ladies' shoes from 75c to 2.00.
Children's shoes from 25c lo 1 00
Ladies' and Children's Oxfords all
prices.
House Furnishings.
Window Shades from 10 to 45c.
Lace Curtains from 45c to 2.50
Dotted Swiss at ll'lo
Chineal Portieres 2.50, worth 3 50
Table Oil Cloth 15c, worth 20c
Woodenware of all description
Turkey Red Table Damask from 18
to 86e
Linen from 25 to 75c
Carpet and Matting.
Carpets from 12$e to 75c yd
Floor oil cloth from cheapest to best.
We are never under sold en carpot and
mattings.

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