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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, October 11, 1901, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024720/1901-10-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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■I JLfA*>A M%Jkti 1
H| ... fcrofulais a ,^ our It has bee „ .. exten]nl con tion .„ Qver 1
■ children inhent >t A large percentage , f peo, le die from its effects. It is called catarrh 1
H consumption or a kindred disease at the end-but i* was scrofula to begin with $
Mm It wasn't your fault if you inherited scrofula. It zviil be your fault if you pass it on to 1
H your children. It „ . moral wrong if you allow your children to grow up and become a victi 1
■ of lts ravages when j, ,v can find a cur,, for scrofula as sure as • fil
BR With Celery ||
■ The Purifier fm
1 vein! K< ' r " fulo " S ftfe
■ Yager's Cream ChSosofortn Liniment ®^sJlfl&
Cnesapeakt
SOhioßy.
IN EFFECT JUNE 30,1901.
KASTBOUM).
I'ralua leave Stannton as follows:
*:0U A. M. Bally. F. F. V. Limited tor Wash
ington, Baltimore, Philadelphia,
New York, Richmond, Old ±-olnt
Comfort aud Norfolk. Blnlngcai
N0.4
--r A.M.—Bally,Express for Washington
Baltimore, Philadelphia, New
York.Rickmond, OldPoinlCom
fort and Norfolk. Biningcarto|
Washington.
NO. 8
-10:14 For Richmond and Old Point. Except
Sttuuuy.
NO. 6
-3:01 P, M., Except Sunday for Richmond.
NO. 14
--7:38 P. M., for Charlottesville.
WESTBOUND.
NO. 3—
4:22 A. M. Bally, F. F. V. Limited for Clncin
nati, Louisville, St.Louis, Chicago
West and Southwest. Bining Car
NO, 6-
KP. M., Bay Express for Clifton Forge.
Except Sunday.
»M P. M.—Bally except Sunday for Ronce
verte.
NO. 1—
7:39 P.M. Cincinnati and St. Louis Special
Cincinnati, Indlauapolis.St. Louis I
Chicago, West .and Southwest
Bining Car.
NO. 18
--6:58 A. M. Bally for Russell.
Forturtherlnformatlon apply or aadress
James Ker Jr., Pass and Ticket Agent"
Staunton, V a.
WKO.W. STEVENS, H.W. FULLER,
President. Qen lPass.Agt
-^SOuTHEi
Railway
Schedule corrected to June 1, 1801,
Dor the South and Southwest,.
LTCham'ebo. 12 08pm, 2 oßpmi»KSs3m *15l»m
Ar Lynch, 217pm 3 48pnij 2 40ani; 342 am
Ar Danville" It 45 pa 5 lipm 43uani o suam
Ar Oreens. "[, 20pnJ 7 lupn 6o6au,J 7 Usam
Ar Kalelgh " \, 30 an| 5 Igagjdj >»an,|.usuaw
ArSailsb'y " 7 59pmi 8 24pm j 7 Uaam S'l7am
ArChat'ga" j 7 40am l lll5pmlH5pm
ArCharl'te" 933 pm 9 45pm> SlOamTiJljoam
ArColumb"* 110 ani 11 soaml
ArAngu'ta" 715am| 3oupmj
arSv'naSKyP. > 6 00am4U6pm
ArJax'vllle "1 1 » 25am17 4upm:
AJAtla'aSHy i Hloani33spm 455pm
Ar Mo'tg awp 11 ooam 9 20pm 920 pm
ArN.O.,L&iN | 8 25pm17 30aiii 73uam
Arßlrmng'Sol | 12 00n liooopmiooopm
No.»,—Dally— Localfor Charlotte ana In-
termedlate Stations, with connection for
Harrisonburg dally, and Staunton week
days.
*«• 35.—Dally—United States Fast Mall
through Pullman Sleepers to Jackson- i
Tllle via Savannah and to Atlanta and New I
Orleans.connecting at Salisbury with sleeu-
er for Ashevllle. Knoxyille, Chattanooga
Memphis and at Charlotte for Augusta- ar I
Columbia for Charleston; at Danville'for '
Birmingham. Dining Car service. I
NO.33.—NKW YOBK AND H'LOBIDA EXPKESS
—Pullman Sleeping-cars New York to Au-
gusta, with connectlo a lor Aiken; and New
York to Port Tampa. Through coach to
Jacksonville. Dining car service, sunset
PBBBONAI.Li CONDUCTED TOUKIBT SLEFI-EK
on this train leaving Washington even
Monday, Wednerday and Friday, ror Sail
Francisco without change.
No. 39.—"Wasnington and Chattanooga
Limited "via Lynchburg and Bristol Pun-
man Sleeping-cars for Memphis and New Or-
leans. Through coach Washington i o Mtni-
Phlß. Parlor and Observation car bet» ecu
Kadford, Va., and Attalla, Ala. Diniut;
car service. Arrive Charlottesville 1.12 a m •
Lynchburg 2.40 a. m.; leave Lynchburg
2.46 a.m. s
•Jl 0 ' 37 VT I> ?i I ?i _WßßnlnßtonanaS outnwest-
mtm matted, Pullman Sleepers to
Ashevllle, Hot Springs and Nash-
ville, via Salisbury and Chattanooga; to
New Orleans, via Montgomery and Mobile
to Memphls.via Atlanta and Blrmingnam.
Pullman Observation and Library sleeping
car to Macon. Dining Car service.
Trains, except No. 2, from Staunton by
Chesapeake and Ohio Hallway connect In
ES. 1 ?!? _?^ tlon at Charlottesville with
Southern By.trains
HAHBIBONBUHGTO WASHINGTON.
"°- I tN0.13 »No.
PM PM
1:16 Lv. Staunton Ar 445
?H ','Harrlsonb'g" 930 216
'18 "New Market" 8 46- £3?
428 " Mt. Jackson " 834 11?
iS " EdlDDurg " 818 100
456 " Woodstock " 808 1248
6*i " strasburg " 736 121J
000 " Klverton " 712 115 i
"Front Hoyal" 701 .114 c
»30|" Manassas " 603 935
920 "Alexandria" 423 I 828
*»10 ArWashlngtonLv 401 »8 01
PM I AM
iv
151
10 86
1116
1187
t Week Days. 'Daily.
Immediate connection In Union Depot at
Washington for and from Baltimore. Phil
adelphlaand New York. v ™
£ r *n?S-Q*nnon,3dVlce-Prest & Gen.Man
S. H. Hardwlck.General Passenger Agent.
L.S.Brown. QeneralAgent. B
Washington.D. o
Drs.G.A.&A. HTSprinkel
DENTISTS,
108 W. MAINSTKKET.
Modern methods.
Crown and bridge work.
ATTOBNEY-AT-LAW.
2Barrister'sEow, - Mutual Phone 292.
RICHARB S. XXX, HUGH H. KERR,
■mon wealth's Attorney
ugustaUounty.
KEK & KEEE,
orneys-at-Law—4 Law Building,
Staunton, Va.
Vy H.LANBES, "~ '
* * * ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.Ji
N0.2, Court House Square.
ftug9-tf
IJENRY wThoLT, " ~~
MJ - ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Staunton, Va. j
Lp B.KKNNEBY,
■*■ • ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Lawyers Row,
o, ( .„ , „ Staunton,Va. I
fspeciaiftttentlon ™lven *-oci>'ipcr*f»no a I
chancery practice .u«.oiieti.ons anal
Jan22-tr
I Awomcuui
*** J.A. ALEXANBEK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
So.B Lawyer's Row,
A C.BHAXTON,
* ATTORNEY ANB COUNSELLOR.
Masonic Temple.
T M. PEhBI,
U • ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Second Floor, Masonic Temple,
b' i ' none - Staunton, Va.
L.W.H. PEYTON. HBHBKKT J. TAYLOK.
PEYTON & TAYLOR,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
t No. 10 Barristers' Row.
D E.R, NELSON,
ATTOBNET- AT-LAW AND COMMIBSIONEB
Uhancebt. ;
OFFICE: No.'lo LAWYERS' ROW,
3an4tf STAUNTON, VA.
cabteb bbaxton, h , h wayt
Com. Atty. for Oity of Staunton.
DRAXTON & WAYT,
** „ ATTOKNEYS-AT-LAW
No. 23 S. Augusta St., '
Offices—2 and 3. Staunton, Va
tTAKRV H. BLKASIS,
" ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Office-Room 8 Masonic Temple.;
J An6 Staunton.Va.
JAMES BCMGABDNEB.M.
L.BUMOABDNEK. KUDOLPH BUMGAKDNB
J., J. L., & R. BUMGARBNER
ATTORNEYS ANB CO CNSELLORSATLAW
Prompt attention given to all Ibp-ri h„.i
ness entrusted to our hands. c USI
rOS.A.QLASOOW,
' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
No. 8 Barristers Row
auglO-tf STAUNTON, VA.
I M. QUARLES, ~
'■' LAWYER.
Offices in Masonic Temple,
STAUNTON, VA.
TTUGH Q.EJCHELBERGER,
** ATORNEY-AT-LAW
Stachnton,V
PENNYROYAL PILLS
"."'* «'n„i n ~ w
! ,ol,i metallic bolt, eeai-d
■«* 2£WB*" I >''i°c"»t.™. Take 800 th.,. Hcfu„
S. P. SILLING,
Butcher aoi Cattle Dealer.
Retail Store Wo. IO North
Augusta Street,
STAUNTON, VA.
Buys Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, and ail
kinds of stock. Highest cash price
paid for Veal Calves. Call and see me
or good prices and cash payments
Only Prime No. 1 Meats Sold.
Phones: I Mutual, 144.
J Bell, 66. my24-ly
Mention I FARMERS!
Will buy for Spot Cash
100.000 Bushels f Apples
AT STAUNTON EVAPOEATIN& WOEIS.
Pest End of c. &o. Yards, Staunton Va
? , ,^;y a,) A *' !in use all sorts, not rot
l ,i, both large a, d mall-No. lhand picked
b^SoS^"^ 0 ' all varletl <*. "will
iW Do not tell until you come and sp» b.
at once. It is to yourinterest to do so. S
Staunton Evaporating Co.
augl6-2m • nwnrn
tin /''iiwii'iii ill
DYSPEPSIA
" For six year. I wag a victim of dys
pepsia in its worst form. I could eat nothing
but milk toast, and at times my stomach would
not retain and digest even that Last March 1
began taking CASCAKETS and since then I
have steadily improved, until I am as -well as I
ever was in my lire."
David H. Muiuphy, Newark, O.
M CATHARTIC
m Wr'^ m mM^at mM mmaaWar im nnn\^aaa\^r
Pleasant. Palatable. Potent. Taste Good. Do
Good, Never Sicken. Weaken, or Gripe, 10c. 25c 50c
... CURE CONSTIPATION. ...
Btfrllng- Mmmmtj Conpapy, Chicago, Houtrtal, How York. Sll ,
NQ«TQ>BAC 8 ? ld and Kngjanteed by all drug-
IW* I U-DNb gists to tint Tobacco Habit.
FRENCH BRIM PIPES*/?
Qs* $"•* ftnimmptmt. ' 4Cf (»
ym-Oi 6m
IS!?»!7 m- ' l ? 1,1,rR Send model, sketch,®
Slf? f ? T r <«• «I»rt on patentability. Book • 'HoW W
) PATENT i^S^.'." H ~lered *° inventors.®
«» LAWYERS OF 26 TEAKS' PB.AOTTPIiJJI
iservice. Moderate charms • ■■■■IIHIIUJ
w irC.A.SNOW&CO.I
PATENT LAWYERS, «L
s.. soe. — ■ ■■■ ItWhm-Yiil ** aaaattm.
Genuine stamped C. C C. Never sold In bulk.
Beware of the dealer who tries to sell
"something just as £ood."
c (r) LURAr
6 QROTTOES
' Natural bridge
Mountain Lake
? f>. Bristol
f Knoxville
CHATTANOOGA
ly LOOK °u T Mountain
<S BIRMINGHAM
ROANOKE XJA /r\ MEMPHIS
KENOVA &J[ff< NEW
CHILLICOTHE ORLEANS . '
SOLUMBUS,
"
Writeforßafes Maps.Timelhl/ es Sleeping Cm
nonHQh.e.VA. j Coi u „avj.o. i gtewwaggfr
i
41VE JH^
TEACHING THE COLT.
Cist of a Former's Interesting Ad
dress Before a Large Meeting
in \e\v England.
If a horse gets his front foot fast.
eye,n on an obstruction only a foot
big'h, he always pulls back and will
keep at it until loose or exhausted
but does not go ahead. If he gets his
hind leg fast he goes ahead 5 ; if he
gets half way through a narrow pas
sage he will struggle for hours but j
not back out. This is the law of his na
ture, i
The center of the body is the pivotal
point of action. This is why he pulls
back on the haJtcr. We should know
what we want him to do and begin at
the right end. A horse is-controlKjd by
his habits and doe a nothing but what
we teach him. He never forgets a les
son, good" or bad. and habit, not cus
se-dness, is responsible for all troubles.
The trainer must know himself what
he wants the horse to do and teach
properly, if a good horse is wanted.
The first lesson should begin at one
hour or one day after birth, and should
n
hi- l-lo^-e:
«= oi_ -r J
afc M .i*tX*94»j*/
- - srJt-i c
CART FOR COLT BREAKING.
I him respect the superior
hof man. Catch him with one
ound his neck and the other
his tail so he cannot get away,
cad or kick you. Bring tie
i contact with all parts ot his
id from both sides. Be gentle,
:n done press a little sugar be
lis lips. In two days he will
ou all over. By this means you
lned his confidence. The hogs,
>gs and sheep come for food
■lied; -why not the horsees?
1 days put on the halter. No
to do .this. But if you begin to
the strap he obeys natural ]
begins to run back. A clothes- I
uld be put around his body in !
the hips, and thVand be put
the halter ring, so both strap
) are held at once. A pull on j
i will la.nd him nearly on top '
Would not put under his tail '
irt where harness, would come '
ive sugar a.f ter each lesson. '
t teach tricks, but useful les
he oolt should be weaned at.
ths. Separate him from his
put him in a box stall. The
1 is swe<et, warm skimmed
Ik, about one quart per day,
ittle sugar, grain and a Ht
ith oats. Do not feed so as
k! the stomach, and do not
day until night. Put milk
id bring lips in contact with
will soon learn to drink,
et a cart with shafts 14 feet
t a crossbar across the shafts
stance from the wheels. Put
.lned horse In the shafts.
s can be trained at once, two
id.c. A jockey stick attached
shaft extends in front of
a snap on it is snapped into
g. Straps from halter ring
■ crossbar for tugs and short
nect the halter rings. When
arts they hang back and the
ik-ikes the heels and they
' to walk and trot.
c word whoa, .(lull up the
every colt gets a kink in the
the jookey stick; a few les
ill that are needed. Drive
ludJioles, over bridges and
•ellas. The old horse holds
eir place, and in a few day«
ell trained.
Never break a horse. A good collar,
properly fitted, never makes a horse
sore, and sweat pads are not only use
less, but harmful. Most collars are
too large, and the draft is either too
low or too high. There should be but
little if any motion or twist when the
horse is moving. A sloping shoulder
requires a close fit to sides -of neck
most collars are too broad at bottom'
and hames will not bring it up. All
collars are fitted over the same block
and a new one is round, but an old oue
flat.
The horse does his work from the
shoulder, and should have his own
collar. A new collar should be put
in water over night and kept on the
horse all the next day while he i=
working. It will give and stretch until
It is a perfect fit. If the horse is in
g-ood flesh, buy a collar which will
only allow four fingers between it and
the breast. You can fet out a hole at
first. A horse is not worth a cent tc
us, except when he is in motion. Knees
and toes should be straight and in
line with shoulder—for anything out
of line interferes with the gait.—Farm
and, Home.
The First Hundred Ponnda.
The first pound, or 100 pounds', of
mutton, beef or pork is where the
profit is made, as the young animals
grow and gain rapidly. The greater
the weight an animal can be made to j
attain in the shortest period of time
the smaller the cost per pound propor
tionately. It requires no m«re labor
to feed and care for a steer weighing
1,000 pounds than for one weighing
much less. The cost of production
does not depend solely upon the
amount of food consumed, but upoE
and labor. "
AN OLD ADAGE
SAY.q —
"A light purse is a heavy curse"
Sickness makes a light purse.
The LIVER is the seat of nine
tenths of all disease.
Tuffs Pills,
go to the root of the whole mat
ter, thoroughly, quickly safely
I?VRD S . tore * he action of th °
LIVER to normal condition.
2SIS!*2 the s y stem and
sohd flesh to the body.
Tjike No Substitute. |
la\W!&!&Wr , H -'><' ]
! SUNSHINE FOR HOGS.
I Point* to Be Considered in the Con
struction and Innide Arrange
ment of Pens.
Why is it that the nature of the hog
has been so misunderstood? He does
' point that has been too often lost sight
of, his pen should not be dark and dis-1
mal. The hog likes sunlight. The
Maryland experiment station says
that the hog is an animal to which sun
shine is just as essential as it is to the
corn plant. Neither corn nor pork can I
be successfully produced without
plenty of sunshine. In this latitude
and farther north this sunshine iv win
ter will have to be brought into the
pens through glass, but farther south,
under normal conditions, it is only nec
essary to face the pen to the south;
allow the sun's rays to reach the back
of the pen on the beds and give good
shelter and protect from the north and
west winds. In constructing the hog
pen for the station, the following I
faced to the south so as to permit the
rays of the sun to shine upon the beds
of the pigs at the extreme rear end of
the pen in the winter season and also
to give shade in that portion in sum
mer. (2) The lattice construction be
tween the pens at the ends and rear
admit of a free circulation of air Id
warm weather. (3) The location of
the manure pit in the center and below
the level of the sleeping and feeding
floors, with all .the drainage below it,
I aids materially In maintaining a prop
er sanitary condition. (4) Swinging j
gates close the pigs into their beds
I while the manure is being loaded. (5)
The manure pit is concreted.-which en
ables the saving of all liquid increment
which, with the pig, amounts ■to'sl per I
cent, of the total manure value. (6) j
Feed bins are placed in front of each
pen, which facilitates feeding and en
ables keeping different feeds for each
pen if desired. Some of these require
ments may geem pretty nice for swine
according to the old ideas, but they ara
correct and Important to success In
raising the he*t pork.
DOOR FOR HOG-HOUSE.
Constructed So That It Will Always
Be Closed by Action of the Hogs
Themselves.
The advantage of having a door to
a hog house that will always be closed
will be readily seen. The cut shows a
door that has been in service for years
and found entirely satisfactory. It
Is made of one-inch boards and 2%
feet square. It is hinged at the top
(a) and made to swing both ways, out
DOOR FOR HOG HOUSE.
the bottom edge. A pin (C) inserted
in the frame will hold the door shut
when desired, and a post (D) with a
row of holes at varying heights in
which to insert a pin will allow the
door to swinjf open only so far. This
will allow the passage of only the little
pigs If it is wished to keep the larger
hogs In the house. The heavy two by
fours at the bottom of the door will
keep th« door closed. Th« hogs wil] i
coon learn to operate the door—J L
Irwin, in Ohio Farmer. !
HELP THE HOGS ALONG.
is uetier un
derstood.
It is too dangerous to take the risk
of driving- fat hogs this, time of year.
You can save time and trouble by using
a wagon.
Try treating- your hogs, a little bet>
ter this year than you did last. It -will
not hurt the hogs and will not injurs!
you to any great extent.
Ring the hogs if it is actually neces- j
sary, but do it as humanely as possi-l
ble. Get the best rings and the best ap-1
plianceg and do it just right,
Shade is an absolute necessity for
the comfort of hogs in the heat of "sum-1
rner. It is as important to furnish
shade for them as it is food. j
I Never get so busy as to neglect your
hogs. A stroll through the fields every
few days might bring to your notice
some disease or irregularity that
might be costly if neglected.
Dun't hesitate to ask your neighbor
how he manages his hogs if he make*
more of a success in this line of busi
ness than you do. He'll be glad to tell
you If he is a gentleman, and you may
get some pointers in this way thai
I would take you years to find out.—
Prairie Farmer.
Food Affect, the Wool. I
Deep pastures or lowlands are not
conducive to the health of sheep, as
they prefer upland pastures and' a
great variety of grasses. It is knows
that the quality of the food and tlw
pasture more influence on the
wool th#s does climate. Fat sheej
produce heavier and coarser fleeces
than do those that are poorer in flesh
I la affecting the quality of wool jj
shown by the fact that when fine wool
I theep have been taken from the east
I 'to the %est the fineness is not always
, retained, although the sheep will
gradually b.ecome larger and th(
I fleeces heavier.
I VIRGINIA: In Augusta County Court
■ September 23rd, 1901. «"•"•■
TT° A , mi , HufffD an, Elizabeth Grimm and
John Wesley Grimm, her husband
In the matter of Samuel Forrer and
others, for the establishment of a road in I
North River District. . 1
Pursuant to an order of the County Court I
of Augusta county, Virginia, you are here-1
by summoned to appear before the Judee
of our County Court of Augusta county at
the court house thereof on the first day of
our November term of said Court (that
J being the 2oth day of November 1901) to I
show cause, if any you can. why the road
petitioned for by the said Samuel Forrer
and others, shall not be opened and estab
lisned through your land agreeable to the I
report of tbe Koad Board of North River
District, filed in this cause on this day ami
the prayer of the said petitioners I
Attest— HARRY BURNETT
. o- Vi erfe of Au (*usta County Court. ,
sep _ i 4t
Be Life McKiHleal
alist and author of Lincoln
of Wartimes, will be the best and most au
thentic, profusely illustrated and hand-1
somely bound; GOO pages, price 51.50- an
elegant portrait 11x14 of McKinley free to
every subscriber; books shipped freight
paid; agents wanted quick; send 10 cents
stamps for outfit; we give best terms, Ad?
Sff'"i&!? 1 ! ,> , X £ elK £ Co - Sixth and Arch
Sts„ Philadelphia, Pa. sep2T-4tj
Pc Br pi's Stock
Before Kni yonr B u ii d i D g
Material o ; Hinting your
House.
Bring. ?.>,, Ceiling. Sash,
Door-, and Blinds,
Ol rPCJALTIES.
HEATH & MI..I.JGAN Paints, and Rail-I
way Wint. i,ead. The Best and Fur-1
est on the. market.
S Carey aTagbaea Flexible Rooting
etter than Iron, more durable than
n, and Costs fees.
i'kind. P ' U ' ER aDd LADDfi KS ofj
nth l.c« is St., Staunton, Vb.
. •' 1-! & ttorne ys.Washington!
examination and opinion on paten
y and Imtid book free. 21 years
eDCe - ]nn22-ly
PJJiM COCAINE " n WHISKY
■ S U l>l Habits Oured at my Samtor.
ff™'T°°* * «"" 1 B«t Book on
B.M.WOOU.EY, M. 0., Atlanta, Ca.
Racket Store f
A. E. Harnsberger, Prop.
PALL 5 WINTER.
IDiftnt Departments .}
All full of I
BARGAINS. I
♦•♦•♦••««♦«•«♦«» I
FOUR OAR-LOADS OP UP-I
ATE MERCHANDISE JUST!
:iVED FROM MEW YORK,!
MORE COMING EVdRYI
♦•♦•♦»••«♦«>.«♦«» I
Almighty Dollar is the dollarl
end with us, because we give tbel
st value for your mouey. Wei
tiality, and we sell it at LOwl
58. I
—t—————| 1
Newest Styles in Great Variety!
partments are fully stocked fori
11 and Winter Trade with the!
most popular and desirable stock off
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Dressl
Goods, Fancy Goods, Notfons.Tltc I
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Trunks, Stoves!
Capes, Cloaks, Shawls and Wraps!
Glassware, Chmaware, WoodenwareJ
Tinware, Corduroy Pants, Furniture,!
and Clothing. B
Our Stock of CARPETS and RUGsI
is recognized by all to be the most!
complete ever carried by any carpet!
house. ' Smyrna, Moquettes, andl
Brussells, Unions, and all wools!
Prices according to quality. Get|
them you will be pleased. 1
♦•<■««.»«.«.„„ I
Don't waste your money, we have
the best and most durable line of
Stoves in Staunton.
Air tight stoves saves half the fuel.
We save you in price.
t^" - Stoves from $1.90 to $5.00
■»▼•▼• vssv
2.000 yards of wool Dress Goods,
heavy twill Cheviot; and Flannels,!
slightly damaged. nought from Aur-J
Clothing- at a Sacrificp
A Record Breaker in Clothing Selling.
And l^ g u° d eaSOn foHt hundrec| s of Suits and Overcoats are
Piled high on dozens of counters, all this Fall and Winter
Styles, and all offered at such Marvelous Price
Reduction as they must attract people.
NOTICE! Please Say you saw these Goods Advertised in the SPECTATOB.
A. E. Harnsberger's
Racket . Stork.
' T fl\*-A"tf*' mt aW m ■■
I EaII I l||ffl| OIiT II I lAn amvimXmsL/s.
lITKE!
Seed Potatoes:
| We have now in stock the following
varieties of seed potatoes and grass
seeds—Michigan Rose. Early Ohio
Hebron, White Star. Bliss Triumph—
The Bliss is the earliest potatoe known
i Grass Seed.
Old Red and Mammoth Clover, Tim
othy, Orchard and Kentucky Blue
Grass Seeds.
j Seed Oats:
Choice White Seed Oats.
All of the above will be sold at low
prices. All we ask is come and see
our stock and get prices, that will set
tle it.
J. A. Fauver & Co.
South Augusta Street. '
N
For Fresh Drugs.
- And everything in the
Patent Medicine Line,
Toilet Articles,
Paints,
Oils and
Call on
B. F. HUGHS, Drags!,
NO. 6 S. AUGUSTA ST.
ENTIRELY NEW STOCK.
j JOB PRINTING
■feet, strictly all wool blankets p'uaran-
Iteod to give satisfaction. Our price
■$2 OH. Blankets from 50 cents up to
■the best. Full size Coinfortaoles at
gany price you ale looking for.
a feg" Prices 75c to S2.CO
§ ♦•♦•♦•♦••♦«»»♦»♦
J| Gentlemen's Underwear—Men's ex-
"fftni heavy lleeted lined shirts and
gdrawers—only 25c.
,'H J.adies aud Misses' Ribbed Vests—
■The best grade known for washing
■andquality, positively unapproachable
fp. ices, fejT Underwear at all prices.
| •——•■———
H 100 Piece Dinner Set, beautifully
■decorated porcelain, wall worth $8 On.
WsW Our special price 86 50.
3 100 Piece handsomely decorated in
■three colors, warrauted not to crack,
■fully worth $12; our price $8 50.
I ♦•♦•♦•>••♦•♦♦)♦«♦
I 1,000 pairs of Drummers' Sample
■Shoes and Boots, bought of the manu-
facturers at half the cost to make them.
I A good shoe for children's school
■shoe—only 50 cts.
1 A better grade, stand more wear,
■give entire satisfaction ouce worn,
■ warranted again—only 75c.
jj| 100 pairs women's dongolas, coin toe
■heavy soles, samples, closing them out
£J 243 pairs women's dongolas, round
Itoe, lace, sizes 3 to 8, drummer sam-
Ipies, closing them out at $1 35,- $1 45
land $1.50.
J 63 pairs men's heavy calf skin, round
■toe, heavy sole, worth $2; price $1.25.
gj Men's heavy kip boots, all sizes, our
■special price to sell them fast only
|« mt $1 50, $1.65, $1.85 and $2.00
♦•♦•♦•♦••♦•♦»<■»
j Red Room Furniture—A bed room
■suit of three pieces, golden oak finish,
■nicely carved dressers, has large
■French mirraws. Regular value $16 50
■our price $1,!,50.
I A bed room suit of 8 pieces, best
■ever offered on this market, sold else-
■where $13.50, our special price only $10
Vizg" See this f>uit before buying.
Jj Handsome Parlor Suits— This suit : s
■specially fine and we offer it at greatly
■reduced prices; upholstered in very
■line figured assorted color tar est ly.
[Original price $28. To close it out
fquick, will sell it for only $22.
jjj ♦•♦•»■♦■■♦«♦■»«♦
I Ticking—Good ticking only Bto 10c
I Extra good quality only 14 to 15c

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