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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, October 18, 1901, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024720/1901-10-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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TODD
TALKS I
I have in stock, guaranteed, the
Highest Grade Potash on this
market. 500 tons to be disposed
of at once.
Highest Grade Timothy and
Clover Seed.
Improved Cider Mills. Come
and see them.
Drill Tubes and Points— cheap
est on the market.
Best Dairy Salt —"the saltiest
of salt."
Rubber Hose for sale at less than
cost.
Fodder Twine —bundles of it —
at the lowest prices on the market.
J. E. TODD,
ect4 tf 12 Johnson- Street.
Always SoMMee New.
BLAIR'S
KEYSTONE i
STATIONERY.
Guaranteed
Quality. •
Caldwell-Sites Co.,
BOOKSELLERS,
Masonic Temple, - Staunton, Va.
sep 6-2 m
(Pty&% Chesapeake
& Ohio Ry.
IN EFFECT JUNE 30,1901.
KASI'KOUND.
Trains leave* taunton as follows:
NO. *—
2-otf A. M. Daily. F. F. V. Limited for Wash
ington, Baltimore, PMladelplila,
New York, Richmond.Old Folnt
Comfort and Norfolk. DinlngCar
NO.4—
lU.W A.M.—Dally,Express for Washington
Baltimore, Philadelphia, New
York.Rickmond, OldPolntCom
tortand Norfolk. Dining car to
Washington.
NO. 8—
10:H For Richmond and Old Point. Except
- Sunaay.
NO. 6
-8:01 P. M., Bxcept Sunday for Richmond.
NO. 14—
7:39 P. M., for Charlottesville.
WESTISOCND.
NO. 3—
4:22 A. M. Dally, F. t. V. Limited for Clncin
natl, Louisville, St.Louis, Chicago
West and Southwest. Dining Car
NO, 6—
1:87 P. M., Dayßxpress for Clifton Forge.
Except Sunday.
SO. 7
-8:01 P. M.—Daily except Sunday for Ronce
verte.
NO. 1—
T:39P.M. Cincinnati and St. Louis Special
Cincinnati, Indianapolis,St.Louis
Chicago, West and Southwest
Dining Car.
MO. 13—
6:58 A. M. Daily for Russell.
Forturtherlnformatlon apply or address
James Ker Jr., Pass and Ticket Agent
Staunton, Va.
GEO. W.STEVENS, H.W. FULLER,
President. Gen lPass.AKt
-gpUTHEI
Railway
Schedule corrected to June 1, 1901,
tor tbe tioutn ana Souinwesi.
N0.9. Ho. 30.ix0.33.N0.37
LvßtaunC&<- -lolsanJ'losßajill-300pnjUiOOpm
Ar CUarvl'e - 11 4Uan.|ii:utpii I .oopin [idopm
LvCharvl'eSo. 12 08pm «Wpmi*»i 63m * 150 am
Ar Lynch, " -' 17 pm 3i»pm| ssiuaml iiaiu
Ar Danville" U45 pml silpni 4 30am 6 sUam
Ar Greens. " |5 nupmj 7 lopuij sodan.l 7 Usam
Ar Kalelgh "|) 80 ami 5 auan.Uo3Uan.(tuauam
ArSalisb'y " 7 59pm ; 8 24pm| 7(J3am B;i7arn
ArChat'ga " I 7 40am'1115pmlli&pm
Ar Charl'te " 933 pm 945 pm, 810 am 9 35am
ArOolumb'" lloani llsoamj
ArAmtu'ta" 7lsan-|3Uopnij
arSv'naSKyPi i 6 ooam 1 405pm;
ArJax'ville"! I 9 25anil74opmj
A J Atla'a SKy 610 am 3 35pm| 455 pm
ArMo'tgawp UOtaiuaajpnii 920pm
ArN.O.,L&N 8 85pm|7 3Uaml 73U am
Arßlrmng'Sol I 12 00n llOOUpmlOOOpm
«o.»,— flally— Local for Charlotte and in-
termediate Stations, with connection for
Harrisonburg daily, and Staunton week
days.
NO. 35.—Dally—United States Fast Mall
tbrougb Pullman Sleepers to Jackson-
ville via Savannah and to Atlanta and New
Orleans.connecting at Salisbury wltii sleep-
er for Asheriile. Knoxyllle, Chattanooga,
Memphis and at Charlotte for Augusta; at
Columbia for Charleston; at Danville for
Birmingham. Dining Car service.
No.33.—NEW YOKK AND FLORIDA EsPKtss
—Pullman Sleeping-cars New York to Au
gus'.a.withconnectlou for Aiken; and New
York to Port Tampa. Through coacb to
Jacksonville. Dining car service, bunskt
PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOURIST SLEEPKR
on this train leading Washington every
Monday, Wednerday and Friday, for SaL
Francisco wlthoutchange.
No. 39.—"Washington and Chattanooga
Limited "via Lynchburg and Bristol, Pull-
man Sleeping-cars forMemphlsand New Or-
leans. Through coach Washington to Mem-
phis. Parlor and Observation car between
Kadford, Va., and Attalla, Ala. Dining
car service. Arrive Charlottesville 1.12 a. in.;
Lynchburg 2.10 a. m.; leave Lynchburg
2.15 a. vi.
NoJJ7.—Dally—Washington and Southwes-
tern Limited, Pullman Sleepers to
Ashevllle, Hot Springs and Nash-
ville, via Salisbury and Chattanooga; to
New Orleans, via Montgomery and Mobile
to Memphis,via Atlanta and Birmingham.
Pullman Observation and Library Sleeping
ear to Macon. Dining Car service.
Trains, except No. 2, from Staunton by
Chesapeake ano Ohio Hallway connect in
Union Station at Charlottesville with
Southern Ry .trains
H AR RIBONB U KG TO WASHINGTON .
tNo.H No. ,tN0.13 "So.
12
AH PM FM I'M
6:46 1:15 Lv. Staunton Ar 4 46
•45 »3 30 "Harrlsonb'g" 630 215
717 4IS "New Market" 846 133
730 428 "Mt. Jackson" 834 117
744 443 " EdlnDurg " 818 100
758 456 " Woodstock " 808 12 49
820 IB " Strasburg " 736 1217
PM
842 600 " Rlyerton " 712 1152
861 814 "Frontßoyal" 701 1140
10 86 830,'* Manassas >> 503 935
1116 920 " Alexandria-' 423 8 2.-
--1187 «940 ArWaahlngtonLv 401 *8 01
PM AM
t Week Days. »l)ally.
Immediate connection In Union Depot at
Washington for and from Baltimore, Phil
adalpalaand New. York.
FrankS.Gannon.MV'k-e-Prest&Gen.Mar.
8. H. Hard wlck.General Passenger Agent.
L.S.Brown. General Agent.
Washington, I>. C
Drs.G.A.&A H. Sprinke!
DENTISTS,
108 W. MAIN STREET.
Modem methods.
Grown and bridge work.
fvT* Jy This shows a number of Mood cor- w£jg>
lils pnsclea magnified S> 0 times. The VJ^
P5jS abundance or scarcity of these corpuscles in the ISgg
|r*. blood indicate its conditiun of healthfulness. v**"-
|J; In the blood there's life — if the blood is good blood. •"'-
--fr*, Good blood consists of rich red fluid in which au r'"
abundance of corpuscles abound. Corpuscles are *f*
f2?| disease fighters. When disease gains a stronghold it fcj^*
|||| denotes an absence of corpuscles. The chief object of f: j
jiS! is to increase the number of healthy corpuscles. It removes f>,
Q& all impurities from tlie blood and destroys the d..>ease germs. j*-
SSfi< Pure blood is supplied to the nerve centers and the whole !?.<;
Bp hodv invigorated and given new strength to fight the battle ab
T*i OI I'fe. To those who in any way suffer from the results of &
Sg impure blood, Yager's Sarsaparilla is a remedy, the won- 1 *
j,, derful power of which cannot be appreciated until it has ..K.
'~„ J been experienced. Large bottles, at all drug stores, 50c. vj
Yager's Cream Chloroform Liniment for outward applica- ,£■
lion —uo pain can remain where it is applied. £l-
d GILBERT BROS. & CO. Baltimore, Md. t •
lyon's French Periodica! Drops
Strictly vegetable, perfectly harmless, sure to accomplish
DESIRED RESULTS. Greatest known female remedy.
PSllTinii Beware of counterfeits and imitations. The Pennine is put up only in paste-board Car
wAUllUrl ton with fae-simile signature on side of the bottle, thus: dm**a-^bntamm
Bend for Circular to WILLIAMS MFii. CO.. Sole Agents, Clevelaud, Ohio.
For Sale by HOGSHEAD BROS. & CO. Staunton, Va.
F KOF ESS IO Ji AL .
OHN B. COCHRAN.
AT'IOKJSEY-AT-LAW.
2 Barrister's Row, - MutualPhone292.
RICHAKD S. KER, HUGH H.KEKB,
Commonwealth's Attorney
for AugustaGounty.
KEK & KERR,
Attorneys-at-Law—4 Law Building,
Staunton, V a.
WH.LANDr-S,
• ATTOKNKY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
N0.2, Court Hcusa Square.
aug9-tt
HBNBT W. HOLT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
FB. KENNEDY,
• ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Lawyer t Row,
STaUNTON,V"A.
Special attention given to collections and
chancery practice.
Jan22-tJ
LAW OFFICE Ol
J.A. ALEXANDER,
ATTORN E Y-AT-L A W.
No. 6 Lawyer's Row,
A C.BRAXTON,
* ATTOKNEY AND COUNSELLOR.
Office:—Rooms 13,15, IT, Masonic Temple.
Jan 18, '96-it
JM. l'ti.lii,
• ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Second Floor, Masonic Temple,
Mutual i-l.uuf. STAUNTON, VA.
lan6
h. W. H. PEYTON. HEUBKKT J.TAYLOB.
PEYTON & TAYLOK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Barristers' Row.
RE.R, NELSON,
Attokney-at-Law and Commissioner
Chancery. ;
OFFICE: No. 10 LAWYERS' ROW,
Janitf STAUNTON, VA.
CARTEB BRAXTOH, H. H. WAYT.
Com. Atty. for City of Staunton.
BRAXTON & WAYT,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
No. 23 S. Augusta St.,
Offices—2 and 3. Staunton, Va
HAKKY H. BLKASE,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office—Room 8 Masonic Temple.;
Jan 6 Staunton, Va.
JAMES BUMOABDNEB, Jr.
L.BUMOABDNEB. RUDOLPH BCMQARDNX
J., J. L., & R. BUMGARDNER
ATTORNEYS ANDCOUNSELLORSATLAW
Prompt attention given to all legal busl
ness entrusted to our hands.
JOS. A.GLASGOW,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
No. 8 Barristers Bow,
STAUNTON, VA
aug 10- tt
JM. QUARLES,
• LAWYER.
j-.aw Offices in Masonic Temple,
STAUNTON, VA.
HUGH G.EICHELTiERGER,
ATORNEY-AT-LAW'
Staunnton.V
jaSJ CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH
Pennyroyal fills
U .—<&T"*Y. Orhjlnni and Only Genuine.
l?/i7Tt*^\ SA]frE ' Always reliable. Ladle*, ask hrurrirt
J; ft yaH for CUICHIiSTJEK'S ENGLISH
in H£l> ">■* <-old metallic boxen. Haled
"fck with bine rih»«>D. Take no other. Rcfuno
I=l Sfii l>an Kcn»iiit NubMtltntlonK and iiultu-
I r- flf " on *» g 7 f,f your Drnggint. or jend 4c. in
I J» Jf -umpi for Partlcnlttra, Testimonial a
IV E» «d "Relief for Ladle*, "mlettar, bj re-
»X 1' turn Mnil. 10,000 Sold by
„ all Druggim. C'hleheater Chemle*! o*l
Muttoo UIU paper. Mndlsou Park. PlilLA., PA.
S. P. SILLING,
Bfltctor and Cattle Dealer.
Retail Store No. IO North
Augusta Street,
STAUNTON, VA.
Buys Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, and all
kinds of stock. Highest cash price
paid for Veal Calves. Call and see me
or good prices and cash payments.
Only Prime No. 1 Meats Sold.
Pho.es: }Ztil Ui - my24 . ly
FARMERS!
Will buy for Spot Cash
100.000 Bushels f Apples
AT STAUNTON EVAPORATING WORKS.
West End of ( .1 O. Yards, Staunton, Va.
(Our branch v» o; as at Lexington and Harri
sonburg, T . i We can use all sorts, not rot
ten, both ;.. ■ %c and s.nall—No. 1 hand picked,
shoots and drops—of all varieties, or will
buy orchards.
IES - " Do not sell until you come and see us
at once. It is to your interest to do so.
Staunton Evaporating Co.
aug 16-2 m
Soft
Harness
You can make your har
ness as soft as a glove
and as tough as wire by
using EUREKA Har
ne n a 011. Tou can
lengthen its life—make it
lust twice as long as it
ordinarily would.
EUREKA
Harness Oil
makes a poor looking har
ness like new. Made of
pure, heavy bodied oil, es
pecially prepared to with
tand the weather.
Bold everywhere
In cans—all sizes.
tde bj STANDARD OIL C
SEST FOR THE
I BOWELS
I If you haven't a regular, healthy movement of the
I rx>wels every day, you're ill or will be. Keep yont
I bowels open, and be well. Force, in the shape of vie-"
I lent physic or pill poison, is dangerous. The smooth-
I eat, easiest, most perfect way of keeping the bowebj
I clear and clean is to take
EAT 3 EM LIKE CANDY
Pleasant, Palatable, Potent. Taste Good, Do Good,
I (fever Sicken, Weaken, or Gripe, 10, 2f>, and 50 cents
I per box. Write for free sample, and booklet on
I health. Address *33
STERLING iIEttEDY COMPANY, CHirAGO or NEW TORE.
KEEP YOUR BLOOD CLEAN
?* irritnpa on P.O. Oaoetr \ma\m
$ promptly procured, OR NO FEE. Send model, sketch,&
wior photo for free report on patentability. Book "fiWnj
wto Obtain. U.S. and Forei;ni Fatentsand Trade-Marks, "yO
w f REE. Fairest terms ever ©ffered to inventors 00
IB PATENT LAWYERS OP 26 YEARS' PRACTICE (€
ffl AT 20,000 PATENTS PROCURED THROUGH THEM. «
ifj All business confidential. Sound advice. Faithful ft)
ft) service. Moderate charges. ?gi
!*£*& A. SNOW & CO.|
S3 PATENT LAWYERS, ffi
Genuine stamped C. C. C. Never sold In bulk.
Beware of the dealer who tries to sell
"something just as good."
£§£&*s? gROTTOES
pM^ 7 Natural bridge
ffiWff Mountain Lake
BRISTOL
CHATTANOOGA
1/VbJh 4 Lookout Mountain
No£S\S!|h £ S"*»INGHAM
ROANOKE MEMPHIS
K.ENOVA MiL NEW
CH, LL ,COTHE %«™
SOLUMBUS, 3
AND THE NORTHWEST. "^il|lG,
Write for Rates. Maps.TimeVii-'es.Sleeplnj) On
Reservafiom.DescriptioeParr.phMs.toßni/ApcntpTi
V/B.BEVILL. yU-LENKuiL. [ JAKBRAGC.
Sen£»»lPa>s.Ace«t. Pivimn Pau.Auni.l Ts>WEiiNo?a«Aot
fJOHHOrtF.Vn. COLVriBUI.O. j jj^gjfcML.
I 3
to^GalMti
HANDY BAG HOLDER. .
It Can Be Made So Easily That 3Vo
Farmer Should Attempt to
Do Withont One.
The accompanying cut shows an ex
cellent sack holder that can readily be
made by taking inch boards and cut
ting them in proper shapes and
lengths, sizes, etc. The legs should
consist of one and one-half inch stuff.
j
IMPROVED BAG HOLDER.
nicely tapered, as suggested, and the
hopper should extend below the point
where the legs are fastened, to give
room for hooks to hitch the sacks on
while filling. The slide in the hopper
enables one to close it while removing
a full sack and putting another in its
place.—Frederick 0. Sibley, in N. Y.
Tribune.
SYSTEMATIC THINKING.
Intelligent Brnin Work Is as Xeces
«*»•■> on the Farm as In the
Business Office.
It ia not always the man who works
the hardest that prospers most. We
frequently find men who seem to do
little hard labor, yet they get along
better and clear up more money every
year than their neighbors who work
in season and out of season and take
no time for rest, study or recreation.
That these facts exist no one of an ob
serving turn of mind will deny. The
reason for it is not hard to discover.
The Creator in His all-wise judgment
gave man the power to reason and
think. The command to work was no
more imperative for man than was
the iJea of improving his thinking
powers. Our most successful men are
those who think to the best purposes;
not those who think the most. Idiots
think as much and just as hard as our
most learned men. It is the trained
thinker who succeeds. It takes time
and energy to think and plan to a pur
pose. No man can wear himself out
at hard bodily labor and get best men
tal results. The mind is always affect
ed by the condition of the body.
The fact remains also that some
men are mentally lazy. Some men are
industrious and hard working but they
do not like to think and plan and
scheme. Such men are easy prey for
those who do scheme and plan and
think, and the results of their labor
are often enjoyed by those who work
their intellects instead of their bod
ies. There always has been and al
ways will be a premium on intelligent
brain work, and the sooner some men
realize this the better it will be for
them. —National Stockman.
Information Worth Having;.
The United States government dis
tributes nearly $1,250,000 yearly
among agricultural colleges. This
money is to help meet the heavy ex
pense necessary to secure the best
specialists in all forms of agriculture
and for the dissemination of the in
formation gathered in their experi
mental work. Much of this informa
tion is published in the papers in the
form of bulletins, and despite this fact
you will find farmers who sneeringly
refer to this class of literature as
"book farming." Specialists in agri
cultural experiment stations are
usu*lly men who have been successful
in the lines thej- represent and are
eminently qualified to teach the re
calcitrants who condemn "book farm
ing."—Drovers' Journal.
What a Windmill Can Do.
An estimate has recent]}-been made
of the capacity of a windmill running
ten hours a day for six months from
an interesting report on windmills and
their use, issued this year by the
United States geological survey, which
is studying the great plains to make
available these rich underground wa
ter resources. It was found that an
average wheel, 12 feet in diameter,
with the wind blowing 3fi miles an
hour, is capable of pumping 1,920 gal
lons an hour, 19,200 in a day of ten
hours, 576,000 each month, nnd 3,456,
--000 gallons in six months. This is the
work of only one windmill. Add to It
theworkof hundreds and thousands of
others, and realize the vast amount of
water brought into use by this means.
The Time to Sell Crops.
It is just as well, and a little better,
on the whole, to sell the crops that are
raised for sale right from the field. It
is to run no small risk to hold them
over with the hope of getting a higher
price. There is the extra cost of'hand
ling - and storing, and not a little
shrinkage to boot. If potatoes will
bring 50 cents a bushel in the fall, it ij
safe to say that it is better than 75,
next spring. The same holds good
with most other crops. Apples will
shrink still more, for you are sure to
find that no small percentage of them
will rot, and so quick sales will pay - the
best in the long run.—Agricultural
Epitomist.
Ms Pills
FOR TORPID LIVER.
A torpid liver deranges the whole
system, and produces
SICK HFAnAPHF J
Dyspepsia, Costiveness, Rheu
matism, Sallow Skin and Piles.
There is no better remedy for these
common diseases than DR. TUTT'S
_ , LIVER PILLS, as a trial will prove.
Take No Substitute.
*%\- GO TO
A- C. MABREY & CO,.
FOR
Upholstering anil Fnrnitnre Repairing.
All kinds of Old Furniture done up in the
Latest Style.
Furniture Packed for Shipment.
All work entrusted to uur care will receive
Prompt Attention. j
Corner Main & Market Sts.J
STAUNTON, VA.
nov3o I;
A WORD OF ADVICE.
Tte Man Who Don \m Know Hll
Fields and Crop* Will Sever Be
Quite SnceeHsfal.
> Although we can gain a livelihood
with less manual labor than did our
fathers of 30 or 40 years ago. yet if w*
keep up with the manner of living ol
to-day, we must put into our manage
ment more method and skill than was
required b\- their simple and less lux
urious manner of Irving. They had
broad acres of virgin soil, upon which
they planted large crops, much to the
impoverishment of the land, and now
in order to overcome this evil and in
crease the productiveness of-our fields,
we must inten-sify our labor, and tc
do this successfully requires a knowl
edge of the needed elements of this
productiveness. Successful farmers are
4hose who understand these princi
ples and practice them, while the un
successful ones are those who do not
know these principles, or if they d-o
know do not regard them. Misman
agement, in many instances, is the
cause of the rapid exhaustion of the
fertility of the farm, and to manage
in such a way so as to produce good
paying crops and not unduly exhaust
the soil calls for Judicious planning
and management. Not every one who
calls himself a farmer is one. He may
pursue the business after a manner,
but in point of knowledge and skill he
is wanting, and at best is merely an
imitator. There are many in this class,
and most of them fail because they do
not understand or properly adopt lhe
best means of maintaining the fertil
ity of their land. Often they cultivate
more land than can be conveniently
cared for, and this of course results in
indifferent cultivation, and poor crops
usually follow poor cultivation. Such
farming makes a sterile farm, the
drain upon it being the same whether
large or small crops are grown. Then,
again, there is the widely practiced
method of growing grass for the rais
ing of stock to be sold off the farm.
This can bemade very profitable if con
ducted rightly, but the piling up of the
manure in the lots and sheds, where
it lies and leaches away, instead of
using it upon the land, is anything but
profitable. We must have something
to replace the heavy drain upon the
land. Innumerable are the farms un
der this Mismanaged system of farm
ing.—B. F. Litfcon, In Prairie Farmer.
SIMPLE WIRE STRETCHER.
Althoiißli Easily and Cheaply Made
at Home, This Contrlvauce Is
Strong and Durable.
It often presents a serious difficulty
fa building a wire fence to keep the
wire taut while fastening it to the
'iil ■ !v
post. The device illustrated here pre
sents the advantages of cheapness,
simplicity and efficiency. The roller
is made of wood, turning on a stout
Iron rod, and is fastened to the post
with a chain and a hook. Stretch th»
wire by attaching it to the roller and
turning crank, staple firmly and move
the stretcher on Beveral rods, then
repeat the operation. The contrivance
can be made at home easily and cheap
ly.—Ora J. Purkiss, in American
Epitomist.
Reservoir for tlie Farm.
There is one thing that every farmer
should do, if his land is in such a shape
that he can, and that is to dam up a
ravine on his farm so as to. form a lake
—not a mud-hole, but a lake. I know
hundreds of farms on which this can
be done at little expense and a depth
of ten to twenty feet of water secured.
I have noted many sorry attempts at
building dams for this purpose, the
work being less than half done, with
the usual result—a broken dam and a
shallow puddle. I have also seen the
work well done, and a fine lake 200 to
300 yards long, 30 to 60 feet wide and
10 to 20 feet deep secured, from which
hundreds of pounds of fish and tons of
ice are taken every year. —Fred' Gru
ndy, in Farm and Fireside.
Time to Prevent "Waste.
The farmers of the state of New Jer
sey paid, within a period of 12 months,
the snug sum of $1,600,000 for commer
cial fertilizers, in order to furnish
requisite plant food to exhausted soils.
If that little state put out such a
vast sum, how much must the farmers
of Illinois, c. g., with seven times the
area, pa}' under like conditions of
soil exhaustion? Better still, answer
this conundrum by firm resolve on the
part of every farmer in our rich west
to take proper care of his soil through
wise crop rotation, summer fallow and
the use of legumes which do so much
to supply needed deficiencies. —Farm
and Home.
Modern System of Irrigation.
Irrigation is conducted upon an eco
nomical and unique system in the San
Joaquin valley in California. The
streams_in the mountains are used to
run the electric machinery at a power
house, and the electricity thus gen
erated is transmitted- to the fields be
low, where It is applied to an electrlo
motor operating a centrifugal pump
which lifts the underflow from the
stream to the surface and distributes
it over the surrounding land as re
quired. The farmer turns on his motor
and the water flows. When he has
enough he shuts it off and prevents
useless waste.
VIRGINIA : In Augusta County Court,
September 23rd, 1901.
To Ami Huffman, Elizabeth Grimm and
John Wesley Grimm, her husband.
In the matter of Samuel Forrer and
others, for the establishment of a road in
North River District.
Pursuant to an order of the County Court
of Augusta county, Virginia, you are here
by summoned to appear before the Judge
of our County Court of Augusta county at
the court house thereof on the first day of
our November term of said Court, (that
being the 25th day of November, 1901), to
show cause, if any you can. why the road
petitioned for by the said Samuel Forrer
and others, shall not be opened and estab
lished through your land agreeable to the
report of the Road Board of North River
District, filed in this cause on this day and
the prayer of the said petitioners
Attest— BURNETT,
Clerk of Augusta County Court.
sep 27 4t
The Life of McKinley
By COL. A. K. MoCLUKE, the noted
journalist and author of Lincoln and men
of Wartimes, will be the best and most au
thentic, profusely illustrated and hand
somely bound; 600 pages, price *1.50- an
elegant portrait 11x14 of McKinley free to
every subscriber; books shipped freight
paid; agents wanted quick; send 10 cents
stamps for outfit; we give best terms. Ad
dress Keeler-Raleigh Co., Sixth and Arch
See Bry?Vs Stock
.Before bni \rnr Building
Material v fainting your
House.
Flooring, S-.aq, Ceiling. Sash,
Door-, and Blinds, •
OL !I»J ALTIFS.
HEATH A VL.I.ItIAN Paints, and Rail
way W'hii- i,H»,t. The Best and Pur
est on the market.
The Carey .\Ugimes Flexible Rooliig,
Better than Ir. n. more durable than
Tin, and Cost.* less.
BUILDING PAIrR and LADDERS of
all kinds on L; nd.
South i.-ni-O't. Stannton, Va.
MUTUAL PIIONK 59.
Youis respectfully,
W.I. S BKYAN, Mg'r.
PatPllfc ~ K - e * A - B.L4CEY. Pat
l aicmo. e„t Attorneys, Washington,
D. O, examination mid opinion on paten
tability and hai.d book free. 21 years
experience. jun22-ly
COCAINE"" WHISKY
U IU IWI Habita Oared at mySanator-
" iim. '" so day*- Hundreds
01 reference*. 2fi yean* n specialty. Book on
Horn-) Treatment Bent FREE. Address
B. M. WOOLLEY, M. P.. Atlanta. Ca.
Racket Store !
A. E. Harnsberger, Prop.
FALL & WINTER.
10 DiH Dspartrats!
All full of
BARGAINS.
«sT FOUR CAR LOADS OF UP
TO DATE MERCHANDISE JUST
RECEIVED FROM NEW YORK,
AND MORE COMING EVERY
DAY.
The Almighty Dollar is .the dollar
yDU spend with us, because we give the
greatest value for your money. We
keep quality, and we sell it at LOW
PRICES.
The Newest Styles in Great Variety.
All Departments are fully stocked for
the Fall and Winter Trade with the
most popular and desirable stock of
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Uress
Goods, Fancy Goods, Notions, Etc.
Hoots, Shoes, Hats, Trunks, Stoves,
Capes, Cloaks, Shawls and Wraps.
Glassware, Chinaware, Woodenware,
Tinware, Corduroy Pants, Furniture,
aud Clothing.
.aiftia.aa.a.aiai
Our Stock of CARPETS and RUGS
is recognized by all to be the most
complete ever carried by any carpet
house. Smyrna, Moquettes, and
Brussells, Uuions, and all wools.
Prices according to quality. Get
them you will be pleased.
Don't waste your money, we have
the best and most durable Hue of
Stoves in Staunton.
Air tight stoves saves half -the fuel.
We save you in price.
I®"Stoves from $1.90 to $5.00
2,000 j aids of wool Dress Goods,!
heavy twill Cheviot and Flannels,*
slightly damaged. Bought from Auc-1
tion Sale. Fully worth 25 to 50 cents!
per yard. Our price 10 to 18 cents.l
Come quick, and get the pick. 1
Clothing at a Sacrifice.
A Record Breaker in Clothing Selling.
And there is good reason for it hundreds of Suits and Overcoats are
piled high on dozens of counters, all this Fall and Winter
Styles, and all offered at such Marvelous Price
Reduction as they must attract people.
NOTICE! Please Say you saw these Goods Advertised in the SPECTATOR.
Bring the Paper With You.
A. E. Harnsberger's
Racket Store.
Ten Different Full Departmtnts.
NOTICE!
Seed Potatoes:
We have now in stock the following
varieties of seed potatoes and grass
seeds—Michigan Hose, Early Ohio,
Hebron, White Star. Bliss Triumph—
The Bliss is the earliest potatoe known
Crass Seed.
Old Red and Mammoth Clover, Tim
othy, Orchard and Kentucky Blue
Grass Seeds.
Seed Oats:
Choice White Seed Oats.
All of the above will be sold at low
prices. All we ask ie come and see
our stock and get prices, .hat will set
tle it.
J. A. Fauver & Co.
South Augusta Street.
! For Fresh Drugs,
And everything in the
Patent Medicine Line,
Toilet Articles,
Paints,
Oils and
Glass,
Call on
B. F. HUGHS, Drift
NO. 6 S. AUGUSTA ST.
ENTIRELY NEW STOCK.
JOB PRINTING
NKATLT EXF.CTJTF.D.
a l.lanKets and Comfortables, 10i4'
Ifeet, strictly hll wool blankets puaran-
Steed to give satisfaction. Onr price
Is 2 OS. Blankets from 50 cents up to
the best. Full size Comfortables at
any price you ale looking for.
*W Prices 75c to 82.00'
Gentlemen's Underwear—Men's ex
_tra heavy lleeced lined shirts and
{drawers—only 25c.
1 Ladies ami Misses' Ribbed Vests—
IThe best grade known for washing
Baud quality, positively unapproachable
! "prices. <&>" Underwear at all prices.
100 Piece Dinner Set, beautifully
decorated porcelain, wall worth 88 00,.
Our special price 86 50.
100 Piece handsomely decorated im
three colors, warranted not to crack„
! fully worth 812; our price $8 50.
m fW m rWwarw
1,000 pairs of Drummers' Sample-
Shoes and Boots, bought of the manu
facturers at half the cost to make tlieoi.
A good ahoa for children's school
* loe —only 50 cts.
B A better grade, stand more wear,
Bgive entire satisfaction ouce worn,
■ warranted again—only 75c.
t 100 pairs womeu's dongolas, coin toe?
Iheavy soles, samples, closing them out
|at |1, $1 15 and 81 25.
jj 243 pairs women's dougolas, round
■toe, lace, sizes 3to 8, drummer in
iples, closing them out at $1 86, $1 45
land 81.50.
1 03 pairs men's heavy calf skin, round
jtoe, heavy sole, worth 82; price $1.25.
A Men's heavy kip boots, all sizes, our
Jspecial price to sell them ff>st only
si W $1 50, 1185, 81.85 and 82.00
Red Room Furniture—A bed room
suit of three pieces, golden oak finish,
nicely carved dressers, has large
French mirraws. Regular value $10 50
onr price $13,50.
A bed room suit of 8 pieces, best
ever offered on this market, sold else
jwhere 813.50, our special price only $10
MmT See this suit before buying.
[ Handsome Parlor Suits— This suit is
specially line and we offer it at greatly
reduced prices; upholstered iv very
(iue figured assorted color tar.estry.
Original -price 82S. To close it out
quick, will sell it for only $22.
Ticking—Good ticking only 8 to 10c-
Extra good quality only 14 to 15c
Best feather ticking only 15 to 18c

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