OCR Interpretation


Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, November 08, 1901, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024720/1901-11-08/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Reived is Business.
J. P. KIOE, Furniture Deal
er and Undertaker, has moved
his place of business from
South Augusta Street to Bish
op's old stand No. 118 West
Main street, the Harrison
building, where he is now
ready to greet his customers,
jun 19-tf
Spectacles and Eye-glasses fitted to the
eye by H. H. BOLEN, Jeweler.
Buggies. Phaetons, Carriages,
Spring Wagons, and all
Pleasure Vehicles,
With or without RUBBER TIRES,
Vehicles made to order, and all repaii
work done promptly and and at small
cost.
Tie c_lß_rat.il Easy Riding Noiseless,
Hard Mlier Tires
can be quickly placed on any wheels. In
everything our factory hasthelateststyles
and is strictly up-to-date.
J. M. Hardy's Son,
At _v 01. stand, Main & Market sts
STAUNTON, VA.
Chesapeake
&Ohio Ry.
IN EFFEcT OCT. 13,Mi1.
JfiASTBOU Nil.
Trains leave3taunton as follows:
no. a—
2:06 A.M. Dally. F. F. V. Limited for Wash
ington, Baltimore, Philadelphia,
New York, Richmond, Old Point
Comfortand Norfolk. DiningCai
50.4
--10.56 A.M.—Dally,Express for Washington
Baltimore, i liiladelpliia, New
• York, Richmond, OldFointConi
fort and Norfolk. Diningcarl.,
Washington.
NO. 8—
10:15 For Gordonsviile. Except Sunday.
NO. 6—
3:01 P. M., Except Sunday for Richmond.
NO. 14—
7:39 P. M., for Charlottesville.
WESTBOUND.
NO. 3—
4:22 A. M. Dally, F. F. V. Limited for Cincin
natl, __oulsvllle, St.Louis, Chicago
West and Southwest. Dining Car
NO. 5—
3:38 P. M., Day Express for Clifton Forge.
Except Sunday.
MO. 7—
8:15 P. M.—Arrive Daily except Sunday Gor
donsviile to Staunton.
NO. 1—
7:39 P.M. Cincinnati and St. Louis Special
Cincinnati, Indianapells.St. Louis
Chicago, West and Southwest
Dining Car.
NO. 13—
6:58 A. M. Daily for Russell.
Forfurtherinformatlon apply or address
James Ker Jr., Pass and Ticket Agent
Staunton, Va.
UEO. W.STEVENS, H.W . FULLER,
President. Gen 1 Pass. Agt
-^SOOTHE!
Railway
ttcLedule corrected to Juue 1, 1901,
For the south and Southwest.
Aronarvre"! ii 4Uau.|--.uspii |.35p___ 1 , ,>i>_t.
LvOharvl .So. 12 ospm 2 U6pm *__._m *15Ca_L
Ar Lynch, " |217pm| 3ispni| 2iUanij _i.aoi
Ar Uanville"li4s pm Slipnw 4-Uan.| oouaiu
Ar Greens. " !> 20pn.[ 7 lop__ S.raaii.i ; Usaiu
Ar Raleigh ' • i3oan.f 5 3__iL|.o3uan.|.o3Uaiii
ArSailso'y "|7 59pmj 8 24pm 7 U3ani B.7am
«)______ " | ; 7 40amUll5pmll idpni
.narl'te " 933 pm 945 pm 810 am 9 35am
joluino'" 1 lo am I Uio am I
.-.agu'ta" 7 _>an_| _uiipni|
ai ov'nasßyP j i li 00am . spm
Ai _.x'v_lie"l 1 925am;740pm:
Aa Atla'aSßy 610 am 3uSpm 455pm
ArMo'tgawp llOOanilD'-Opni 920pm
_X______L___t\ 8 25pnii7 3t.au. 73Uam
Arßlrmng'Bol-. I 12 00n jlOuOpnilooopm
I.o.9,—Daily— Localfor Charlotte and in-
termediate Stations, wich connection for
Harrisonburg daily, and Staunton week
days.
Jno. 35.—Daily—United States Fast Mall
through Pullman Sleepers to Jackson-
ville via Savannah and to Atlanta aud New
Orieans.connecting at Salisbury with sleep-
er lor Asheville. Knoxyille, Chattanooga,
Memphis ana at Charlotte for Augusta- ai
Columbia for Charleston; at Danville fur
Birmingham. Dining Car service.
No. 33.—mew York and Florida ExrHts--
—Pullman Sleepiug-cars Naw York to Au-
aus .a, with connection for Aiken; and New
York to Port Tampa. Through coach to
Jacksonville. Dining car service, mir__i,
PERSONALLY CONDUCTED TOUKIBT SL_____l
on this train leaving Washington everj
Monday, Wednerday and Friday, for SaL
Francisco withoutchasge.
No. .19.—"Washington and Chattanooga
Heated "via Lynchburg aud Bris-ul, Pull-
man Sleepiug-cars forMemphlsaua New Or-
leans. Through coach Washington toMtni-
Shls. Parlor and Observation car bet*eeu
adford, Va., and Attalla, Ala. Dining
carservice. Arrive Charlottesville 1.12 an- ■
Lynchburg 2.40 a. m.; leave Lvnchbur''
2.45 a.m. °
N o_i7.—Dally—Washington and Southwest ■
crn Limited, Pullman Sleepers to
Asheville, Hot Springs and Nash-
ville, via Salisbury and Chattanooga: tc
New Orleans, via Montgomery and Mobile
to Memnhis.vla Atlanta and Birmin-naui
Pullman Observation and Library Sleeping
car to Macon. Dining Car service.
Trains, except No. 2, from Staunton by
Chesapeake ana Ohio Railway connect lv
Union Station at Charlottesville with
Southern Ry.trains
HAEBISONBORGTO WASHINGTON.
tN0.14 No. | tN0.13 *No
AM PM PM PM
6:45 1:15 Lv. Staunton Ar ,45
«45 *3 30 "Harrlsonb'tr" 930 2is
717 413 "NewMarke_" 8 4!) 13;.
730 428 ■'Mt. Jackson " 834 117
744 443 " Edinourg " 818 100
763 455 " Woodstock " 808 12 4i<
820 532 " Strasburg " 736 | 1211
84. 600 " Elverton " 712 ___»
861 614| "Front Royal" 701 114(
1036 830j" Manassas " 603 93s
1116 920 "Alexandria" 423 823
1187 *9 40 Ar Washington Lv 401 *8 01
, I PM |_ AM
tWeekDay*. *Dally.
Immediate connection in Union Depot at
Washlnrton for and from Baltimore, Phil-
adelphia and New York.
Frankß.Gannon,3d Tr ice-Prest& Gen.Mac
S. H.Hardwick.General Passenger Agent
L.B.Brown. QennralAgent.
Washington.]), r
Drs.G.A.&A. H. Sprinkel
DENTISTS,
108 W. MAIN STREET.
Modern methods.
Crown and bridge work.
,Cof_l^" l( > : -
HES HEiET'i. IN IT.
The women set upon having sty'ish,
comfortable aud durable
SHOES
can obtain them here. We carry a
large variety of the newest shapes
and styles made ou lasts which en
.ure the greatest case. The materia'
and workmanship are of high grade
so there is no premature wear or
irritating unevenness
i lee Enowles, -;E E
21 West Main St.
STAUNTON, VA.
AGnre for Trail Fever
151 DEALING WITH
B. C. fJArJMAN.
102 South Augusta St. Staunton, Va,
Will help you recoup your losses.
He has an unexcelled assortment
of fine jewelry—such as Watches,
Clocks, etc. He makes a specialty
• of repairing old wares of every des
cription, aud his prices on old and
new work is as low as the lowest.
Go and see him and you will sure
ly go again.
OHN B. COCHKaJ..
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
2 Barrister's Row, - MutualPl_o_h292.
BICHAHD S. KEIJ, H UUII H . KERR,
Commonwealth's Attorney
for Augusta County.
KER & KERR,
Attorneys-at-Law— 4 Law Building,
Staunton, V_l.
\\T H.LANDFB,
'» • ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
N0.2, Court H ust Square,
auga-tf
HENRY W. HOIS,
AT'IOKHKY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
FB. SENSEUT,
• ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW,
No. Li Lawyer * How,
Staunton, Va.
special attention given to collections and
chancery _ ractice.
Jan2?-tf
LAWOriIOEU*
J.A. ALEXANDER,
ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW.
No. 6 Lawyer's Row,
A C.BRAXTON
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR.
Office:—Rooms 13,15,17, Masonic Temple.
Jan 18, '««-&_
JM. IM__,K_,
• ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW
Second Floor, Masonic Temple,
Mututu t-noue. Staunton, Va.
lant>
I_. W. H. PEYTON. HKHBERT J. TAYLOR.
PEYION & TAYLOB,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
No. 10 Barristers' Row.
D E.R, NELSON,
Attorney at-Law and Commissioner
Chancery. ;
OFFICE: No. 10 LAWYERS'ROW,
Jan 4 tf STAUNTON, VA.
CARTBIt BKAXTOH, H. H. WATT,
Com. Atty. lor City of Staunton.
DRAXTON & WAYT,
° ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,.
No. 23 S. Augusta St.,
Offices—2 and 3. Staunton, Va
% _
HAKKY H. ISLtASK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office—Room 8 Masonic Temple.;
•l an 8 Stauntok, Va.
JAMES BUMGAKDNER, Jr.
L.BUMGABDNEB. BUDOLPH BOMGABDNI
J., J. L., & R. BITMGAKDNER
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORSATLAW
Prompt attention given to all legal busl
aess entrusted to our hands.
108.A.GLASGOW,
'* ATTORNEY.-AT-LAW.
No. 8 Barristers Row,
STAUNTON, VA.
auglO-tf
' M. QDARLES,
"• LAWYER.
__aw Offices in MBsonic Temple,
STAUNTON, VA.
HUGH G.EICHKLBERGEH,
ATORNEY-AT-LAW'
Stadnnton,V
Duv Wedding Rings and Wedding Tres
** cnts at BOLEN'S Jewelry Store.
New Grocery Store.
Eosenlierier & Co.,
23 East Main Street.
Now open and ready 'or business
with an entirely
NEW STOCK
of Groceries, and select table goods of
nil kinds. Country produce bought and
sold. All the vegetables of tbe season.
Fruits of all kinds, aiid everything
usually kept in a first-class, up-to-date
Grocery store. Call and see us before
buying elsewhere.
ROSENBERGER & CO.
aug 30-ly
Ob 1 sy c .nyou ___,s_< YOU?
. J mS'X J~J fe= Can you see—
.jwn'jejr-ly [kSbt "by the dawn's
trrA earI >" IS « ht " or
m / — -^7/ —-x «3 by aDy other
'\ w i 7f tyy /A / ''" h _as we " as
v L you ought . if
(^L>'Q____^Ss____2^^ / there is any
defect in your
ision, or any discomfort in using
. our eyes. "p. w ill remedy the trouble
■ romptly i Musses will do it, and we'll
ii . the glasses.
DIEHL,
Jeweler and Optician,
M %rquis Building, No. 3S. Augusta St. 1
STAtINTON. VA.
BETTER THAN
ALL THE
DOCTORS
IN A COUNTY.
A PENNSYLVANIA WOMAN
HAS A WONDERFUL EX
PERIENCE. GOOD
HEALTH SECURED
AT LITTLE COST.
Mr. Charles H. S teach, of McConnels
bnrg. Pa., has written au account of the
ease of his wife, who was suffering from
complaints peculiar to women. He nays:
, "1 bought a hottle of YAGER'S SARSA
PARILLA WITH CELERY from your
a_xnt, J. T.Thompson, intbisplaee,formy
wife. She commenced taking it accord
ing to directions, and I can truthfully say
that she has derived more benefit from
oiiehottIcofYAGER'SKARSAPARILLA
than she has from all the medicine taken
from the different doctors. She is quite
a di tie-rent woman ; better in spirits, more
cheerful, good appetite. In fact, she is
bettor in every way."
The cause of Mrs. Steach's complaint
was impurity of hlood. The same cause
is gfving thousands, of j>eople days of suf
fering and nights of little sleep. In some
it takes the form of rheumatisms-neural
gia, Indigestion, nervousness. In others,
loss of flesh, a tired, laggy feeling, no aim
in life are the symptom's. Tbe cause is
the same in each case. The cure is the
same in niI—YAGER'S KARSAPARILLA
WITH CELERY. It purifies the blood,
soothes the nerves, adds sound, healthy
flesh to the body. Sold by druggists
everywhere, 50c. a bottle. Made by Gil
bert Bros. A Co., Baltimore, Md.
& promptly procured, OR NO FEE. Send model, sketch, W
Wor photo for free report on patentability. Book "How W
OT to Obtain U.S. and Foreign Patents and Trade-Marks,"®
$J FREE. Fairest terms ever oflered to inventors.ft)
W PATENT LAWYERS OF 25 TEARS' PRACTICE. OC
* , 20,000 PATENTS PROCURED THROUGH THEM. (8
V All business confidential, ti ■una advice. Faithfulftj
[¥\ service. Moderate charge.. . r§j
$ w {fC. A. SNOW & CO. |
M PATENT LAWYERS, (U
i Wm \W kW M w v *l»'i ill
TAPE
WORMS
•'A tape norm eighteen feet long at
least came on the scene after my taking two
CASCARETS. Tills lam sure has caused my
bad health for the past three years. lam still
taking Cascarets, the only cathartic worthy ol
notice by sensible people." —
GEO. W. Bowles, Baird, Miss.
M CATHARTIC
r__DE uu. Bioirrmro
___________pl*4_____i^^
Pleasant. Palatable. Potent. Taste Good. Do
Good, Never Sicken. Weaken, or Gripe. 10c, 25c, 50c.
... CURE CONSTIPATION. ...
Sterling Kerned? < omrnmt, Chicago, Montreal, New York; 313
MALTA.RIP So,d an<J guaranteed by all drttg
llU* I U-DMb K ists to itKETobacco Habit.
FRENCH BRUM PIPES. /?
45* ? EBT PernioMhil AC£ (1_
__-?' S. _m. fl an P.O. 0. ocq ** YJft
Jasper L.Rowt rm
fIICHmOND Vn „|ES#ll
ym-Oi 6m
Butcher aid Cattle Dealer.
Retail Store No. IO North
Augusta Street,
STAUNTON, VA.
Buys Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, and all
kinds of stock. Highest cash price
paid for Veal Calves. Call and sec me
or good prices and cash payments.
Only Prime No. 1 Meats Sold.
Phones : 1 ___$*»& 144
--/ Bell, 66. m y 24-1 v
, Genuine stamped C. C. C. Never sold In bulk.
Beware of the dealer who tries to sell
"something just as j»ood."
f ' "
■ *y<.srvir\Gmirk, UV/ Ti^°l_,ieiii-"
I aXjtj^^jjm^Sff)
1 W(d Lurav
QROTTOES
\oy Natural bridge
Hy Mountain Lake
- / /jV r~s ERISTOL
IX KNOX VILLE
l/lIKVy CHAT/ANOOGA
/ ' LOO * OUT MOUNTAIN '
NOFb&_tfMh£ BIRMINGHAM
ROangke \U« Memphis
k._no.a 03fi NEW
CHILLICOTHE Wfl' °* LEANS _
SOLUMBUS, CHICAGoH[Oj/" < a)
NORTHWEST/^Jfte.
Writeforrtans.Maps.Timt-Tkbles.SleepJnp On
Ke-'ervDtiom.Descriptiuetemphletj.UwJbentari
yVIBBEVILL,] .Allen Hull, j m*_*uk,
OEN[R«PA_s.A_E.r. Pwuk-j Pass Agent Travel.... Pass Aoi
_/lo«.*OHey». t CoiunßirxO. 1 RoaNO^V^,
IP\
LAYING EOARD DRAINS.

In _____ Lot-it % en and in Certain
Conditions 'lhey Are Almost as
(_ood as Tile.
While tile is the standard material
for drains, it quite'often happens that
a tile tlra*_\i does not do so well as one
would expect from so expensive an
outlay. In soft ground they will some
times get out of line or sink into the
mud. At places the line of the drain
will sometimes come above the frost
linej. At such places and at the outlet,
freezing will cause the tile t_P crum
ble, in time, unless they are vitrified,
which adds greatly to their cost. A
tile drain is no more exempt from
trouble with roots, silt or vermin than
is one made of boards. In sections re
mote from tile yards freights add so
much to the cost of tile that their use
is almost prohibited, but it is especial-
a ,-—-, b
c-
HOW TO MAKE A BOARD DRAIN.
ly in these places that wood can be ob
tained more cheaply.
Wood is more enduring when laid in
a drain than is generally supposed.
Hemlock, which is of but little durabil
ity above ground, is still doing service
in a drain which was made 18 years
ago. A well-laid drain of rived chest
nut or cypress will last almost a life
time. White oak and locust are also
very durable. In fact, almost any kind
of wood will last well in a deep drain.
There are no blows to disturb it, and it
will preserve a_n opening for the flow
of water long after decay has set in.
A board six inches in width should be
nailed to one five inches in width and
laid along the bottom of the drain, as
at- A in Fig. 1. If the boards are rived
and there are narrow ones, the nar
row ones may he nailed over two oth
ers, _ls shown at B.
The ditch need not be over a spade's
width on the bottom. In depth It
should average two to three feet. The
deeper the drain, the farther it will
draw the water, but it is not advisable
to go so deep where there is a heavy
olay subsoil. Drains will do better
service after two or three years, as
the ground gets more porous.
In laying the boards have them fit
closety and cover any holes with thin
pieces of wood so the dirt cannot work
in. Be sure to stop up the outlet with
coarse wire screening, to keep out rats,
rabbits, etc. Board drains need n.o
plank on the bottom of ■the ditch,
neither do tiney need any straw or hay
on top of the boxes.
But it is important to get the grade
of the bottom of the ditch uniform, and
It will pay to take some pains with it.
A drain should not have a steep grade
followed by one not so steep. If it is
the reverse it will not matter, but in
the former case the water, flowing
with some rapidity, will scour and car
ry with it some silt. Coming to a sec
tion of lesser fall, the flow is retarded
and the silt deposited, causing the
drain to stop up. Three inches to 100
feet of drain is about the least fall
that is practicable to give to board
drains. j
Where It is not desirable to get the
services of an engineer to lay out a
drain, the farmer may find out what
he has got by using the common spirit
level, and then he can finish the bot
tom of the ditch with a device I have
shown at the bottom of Fig. 1. Take a
straightedge 12% feet long and fix to
It another straightedge movable at
one end. If the two edges»are made
to be one-half of one inch farther apart
at one end than the other and one end
leveled by a spirit level the other edge
will correspond to a fall of four inches
per 100 feet. The movable end can be
so attached as to be quickly adjusted
to represent any fall desired. For
small drains where there is plenty of
fall ithe ditcher can do well enough
with his spade and eye; but in longer
drains with little fall the assistanceof
some kind of instrument is required.
—Grant Davis, in Ohio Farmer.
The Cow Which Pays Best.
During the five' years of careful in
vestigation in regard to the cost of
production of butter between cows
spa re. and angular in form and cows
carrying considerable superfluous tis
sue, our records show that in every
instance the cow that carried the
least flesh charged the least for but
ter, and just in so much as one cow
was a little smoother and plumper
tlia:i»ll)c other would her butter
product cost more than the other. It
should be borne in mind that the re
sults are from accumulated testi
mony, showing not only that every
day, every week, every month, but
during her entire lifetime, the spare
cow is better. That she should be so
much better is almost incredible,
strong and uniform as the evidence
is.—Prof. Haecker, in Farmers* Re
view.
True Economy in Hay.
■ There is only one sure way to save
hay, and that is to make something
else take the place of it. The man who
saves it by feeding scantily is not
really saving- anything; but the man
who makes cornfodder that he usually
wastes serve as hay Is saving hay and
making money on the transaction. If
cornfodder is to take the place of hay
It must be good fodder. It must be
cuit at the riffht time, cured in the right
way and kept good until it is fed.—Na
tional Stockman.
A HAPPY
HOME
Is one where health abounds.
With impure blood there cannot
be good health.
With a disordered LIVER there
cannot be good blood. j
Ton's Pills
revivify the torpid LIVER and restore
its natural action.
A healthy LIVER means pure
_________ *--•-
Pure blood means health.
Health means happiness.
Take no Substitute. All Druggists.
lliPi|_, hair"balsam
. _:,,l b.autiflci til. halt
_BR§!_p__i->_H l ' evop Faila to Bestore Oray
Hair to its Youthful Color.
__l!_«_lli____HCure- icalp ii,,.&.?_ & hair t_ll_,_.
__»____» __| Wc,anJtl.Dua DrugeiiU *
FEEDING OF SORGHUM.
there Are Many Arguments For and
Against Its Use Worthy of Care
ful Consideration.
Precaution is necessary in the feed
ing of sorghum. From time to tima
reports have been received of cattle
dying from eating the sorghum in
certain stages of growth. All at
tempts to find the poison have failed
thus far. However, the losses have
been so small compared to the num
ber of cows being fed that the use of
this kind of feed has been continued.
A recent communication from Prof.
D. H. Otis, of the Kansas experiment
Btation, says: "During the time the
Kansas station has been pasturing
sorghum several reports have been
received of cattle dying in ten or fif
teen minutes from the time they en
tered tiie sorghum patch, but in every
case where we have been able to get
details, the cattle have eaten the sor
ghum on empty or nearly empty
stomachs. Cattle should have their
stomachs so well filled that they feel
completely satisfied before touching
the green sorghum, and then allowed
to eat only a few minutes at a time
until they are accustomed to it. If
sorghum can be pastured successful
ly, as has been done by the Kansas ex
periment station, it means that the
dairymen and stockmen can get an
immense amount of pasture from
a small area, which is available at- a
time when their other pastures are
getting short and dry. Pasturing will
also be the most economical way of
utijjeing sorghum. The man that
turns his cattle in a sorghum field,
however, must realize that lie may be
taking risks. He must weigh the evi
dence for and against its use and
then decide for himself whether the I
benefits will outweigh the risks."
FEEDING AND BREEDING.
Tbe Two Go Hand In Hand In Im
proving the Value and Indi
viduality of Com,
To what extent does feed affeot«the
individuality of a cow? This is a
question that has yet to be answered,
so far as conclusive experiments axe
concerned. It is doubtless true that
feed is constantly changing the char
acteristics of animals, but we do not
know how rapidly the changes take
place, nor do we know just the effect
each food has. To a certain extent we
are feeding in the dark. The Maryland
experiment station has been feeding a
herd of common cows for several years
and noting the effect of proper feed
ing on individuality. C. F. Doane, who
reports on the results, says: "No very
material results could be noticed the
first year from the extra feed and care
the herd received, but through sub
sequent years there seems to be a
steady improvement. Judging from
the Coords of these cows, it is a ques
tion if the quality of a dairy cow does
not depend almost as much on the
feeding as on the breeding. It is also
a question if cows that have a more or
less pronounced beef tendency, or, at
least, would not be called good mate
rial from which to build up a dairy
herd, cannot, with proper manage
ment, be developed into profitable
dairy cows." This is a view of the mat
ter that will not strike some of our
investigators very favorably. It has
against it the generally accepted truth
that we have now so many good dairy
cows that it will hardly pay to spend
time, feed and effort in an attempt to
reverse a tendency already strongly
developed in a direction opposite to
that of milk production.—Farmers' Re
new.
FODDER FEED RACK.
It Can Be Filled at the Patch and
Wheeled to the Pasture or
the Ilarnynrd.
The rack shown herewith can be
filled at the fodder patch and wheeled
to the pasture or barnyard. There it
£ T^^f' >
GREEN FODDER FEED RACK,
can be hung up against the fence by
ihe hooks at the back. Make the rack
of three-inch strips of board and cut
the wheel from a piece of hardwood
board.—Orange Judd Farmer.
DAIRY SUGGESTIONS.
Butter that is covered with salt
crystals ia not desirable.
The large udder doesn't always give
assurance of a heavy milker.
If the friction is too violent, the
butter is produced speedily and is de
ficient in quality.
The flow of milk should be main
tained as uniform as possible while
the cow is in milk.
Cream will make better butter
when it rises in cold air than when it
rises an cold water.
No matter how good the cows in the
herd the bull should be good enough
to.improve the progeny.
In making good butter quite as
many difficulties lie in the care of the
milk as in the mode of churning.
To rush cows into the stable from
the pasture night or morning, is to
excite them sufficiently physically to
heat their milk to a feverish point,
quickly undermining its quality.
The importance of producing on the
farm butter of the highest excellence,
fit to compete with the creamery
product, seems to be often disregard
ed, or perhaps the undertaking is con
sidered too difficult of attainment,
This is largely through lack of knowl
edge of details.
I lures Rheumatism or Catarrh
UGH THE BLOOD—COSTS NOTH
ING TO TRY.
:ild you like to get rid of that
ie rheumatism or offensive ca
tarrh forever ? Then take a bottle of
Botanic Blood Balm which has cured
thousands of hopeless cases that had
resisted doctors and patent medicine
treatment. Botanic Blood Balrfi (B.
15. B.) cures through the blood by des
troying the poison which causes the
I awful aches in the bones, joints, aud I
back, swollen glands, hawking, bad
breath, impaired hearing, etc., thus
making a perfect cure. B B. B
t loroughly tested for 30 years. Com
p.sed of pure Botanic Drugs.' Perfect
ly safe to take by old and young.
Druggists $1. Trial treatment free by
writing Blood Balm Co , Atlanta, Ga.
Describe trouble and free medical ad
vice given until cured. Don't give up
hope, but try B. B. B. which makes the I
blood pure aud rich and builds up the
'all run down' tired body. B. B. B. I
makes the blood red, giving tbe skinl
the rich glow of perfect health. <
See Biyn's Stock
Before h>-< ' vnur Building
Material o raintinjf your
m House.
Flooring, CYi-.g, Ceiling. Sash,
Doars md Blinds,
f'L I r_ .'IAI.TIFK.
HEATH & Mli.| JUAN Paints, and Rail
way Whii. I. ad. The Best and Pur
est on tiit. ma rket.
The Carey sX .nirnes Flexible Roofirg,
Better than Iron, more durable than
Tin, and Costs i ess.
BUILDING PAPER and LADDERS of
all kinds on hi ud.
South Lenis St. Staunton, Va.
MUTUAL BIIONE 59.
Yours r-spectfully,
WM. S BRYAN, Mfj'r.
PfltPnts _KB * A - B - LACEYTVat.
* ni Attorneys, Washington,
D. C, examination nud opinion on paten
tability and hand book free. 21 years
experience. jun22-ly
OPIIIM COCAINE*-*whisky
\T IU! 'I H_,bit_ Cured at my Sunator
. „ mm. In 80 da. m Hundred*
of references. 26 yearn a Rpeoialty. Book on
Home Treatment »ent FREE. Addrees
B. M. WOOLLEY. M. P.. Atlanta. Ca.
Racket Store!
* »
A. E. Harnsberger, Prop.
PALL & WINTER.
ilO Different Departments!
AU full of
BARGAINS.
w four;car-loads op up-
TODATE MERCHANDISE JUST
RECEIVED FROM NEW YORK.
AND MORE COMING EVERY
DAY.
The Almighty Dollar is the dollar
you spend with us, because we give the
greatest value for your money. We
keep quality, and we sell it at LOW
PRICES.
The Newest Styles in Great Variety.
All Departments are fully stocked for
the Fall and Winter Trade with the
most popular and desirable stock of]
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Dress
Goods, Fancy Goods, Notions, Etc.
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Trunks, Stoves,
Capes, Cloaks, Shawls and Wraps.
Glassware, Chinaware, Woodenware,
Tinware, Corduroy Pants, Furniture,
and Clothing.
Our Stock of CARPETS and RUGS
is recognized by all to be the most
complete ever carried by any carpet
house. Smyrna, Moquettes, and
firussells, Unions, and all wools.
Prices according to quality. Get
them you will be pleased. _a
Don't waste your money, we have
the best and most durable line of
Stoves in Staunton.
Air tight stoves saves half the fuel.
We save you in price.
t3r Stoves from $1.90 to t&00 '____
2,000 yards of wool Dress Goods,
heavy twill Cheviot and Flannels,
slightly damaged. Bought from Auc-
tion Sale. Fully worth 25 to 50 cents
per yard. Our price 10 to 18 cents.
Come quick, and get the pick. _ m
Clothing at a Sacrifice.
A Record Breaker in Clothing Selling.
And there is good reason for it hundreds of Suits and Overcoats are
piled high on dozens of counters, all this Fall and Winter
Styles, and all offered at such Marvelous Price
Reduction as they must attract people.
NOTICE ! Please Say you saw these Goods Advertised in the SPECTATOR.
Bring the Paper With You.
A. E. Harnsberger's
Racket Store.
Ten Different Full Departmtnts.
NOTICE!
Seed Potatoes:
We have now in stock the following
varieties of seed potatoes and grass
seeds—Michigan Rose. Early Ohio,
Hebron, "White Star. Bliss Triumph—
The Bliss is the earliest potatoe known
Grass Seed.
Old Red and Mammoth Clover, Tim
othy, Orchard and Kentucky Blue
Grass Seeds.
Seed Oats:
Choice White Seed Oats.
All of the above will be sold at lon
prices. All we ask is come and see
our stock and get prices, that will set
tle it.
J. A. Fauver & Co.
South Augusta Street.
For Fresh Drug,
And everything in the
Patent Medicine Line\
Toilet Articles,
Paints,
Oils and
Glass
(Jail on
B. F. HUGHS, Druggist,
NO. B S. AUGUSTA ST.
ENTIRELY NEW STOCK.
JOB PRINTING
NKATLT EXECUTED.
~'g l!laiiKets and Comfortables, 10i4
ffeet, strictly all wool blankets guaran-
■teed to give satisfaction. Our price
I$2.!)N. Blankets from -50 cents up to
Btlie best. Full size Vomfortables at
Hiiiiy price you ale looking for.
D *W I'rices 7-5 c to ,-.00
& ♦•♦•♦•»■■♦■♦■»«♦
1 Oentlenien's Underwear—Men's ex-
~"*tia heavy fleeced lined shirts and
({drawers—only 2.5 c.
?j Ladies and Misses' Ribbtd Vests—
■The best grade known for washing
land quality, posithely unapuroachable
■prices. W Underwear at all prices.
i 100 Piece Dinner Set, beautifully
Edecorated porcelain, wall worth ,8.00.
"ie. Our special price ,6 50.
I 100 Piece handsomely deaorated in
■three colors, warranted not to crack,
■fully worth ,12; our price $8.50.
23 1,0(10 pairs of Drummers' Sample
■Shoes aud Boots, bought of the manu-
■factureis at half the cost to make them.
_1 A good shoe for children's school
""■shoe—only -50 cts.
I A better grade, stand more wear,
■give entire satisfaction ouce worn,
gwairauted again—only 73c.
_| 100 pairs women's dongolas, coin toe
Bheavy soles, samples, closing them out
gat $1, $1 15 and $1.25.
J 243 pairs women's dooflolas, rouud
..■toe, lace, sizes 3 to 8, drummer sam-
■ples, closing them out at $1 35, $1 45
Hand .1.-30. .
a 03 pairs men's heavy calf skin, round
fltoe, heavy sole, worth .2; price $1.25.
3 Men's heavy kip boots, all sizes, our
■special price to sell them fast only
I t__T $1.-50, #1.0.5, 81.85 and $2.00
| ♦*♦•♦•♦••♦•♦•.•♦
■I Red Room Furniture—A bed room
■suit of three pieces, golden oak finish,
■nicely carved dressers, has large
■French mirraws. Regular value $10 .50
KOur [trice $1.">,-50.
8 A bed room suit of 3 pieces, best
Jever offered on this market, sold else-
■wtiere . 13..50, our special price only $10
■ -*" See this suit before buying.
Handsome Parlor Suits—This suit is
specially line and we offer it at greatly
reduced prices; upholstered in very
line figured assorted color tar. est. y.
Original price $28. To close it out
quick, will sell it for only $22.
Ticking—f.ood ticking only 8 to 10c
Extra good quality only 14 to 15c
Best feather ticking only 1-5 to 18c

xml | txt