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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, March 18, 1910, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024720/1910-03-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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WANTED— Success Magazine wants
an energetic and responsible man
or woman in Staunton to collect for re
newals and solicit during full or spare
time. Experience unnecessary. Any
one can start among friends and ac
quaintances and build up a paying
and permanent business without capi
tal. Complete outfit and instructions
Free. Address "YON," Success Mag
azine, Room 103, Success Magazine
Building, New York City, N. Y.
yfP^x 5 *
(Compare Our Jewelry.
itches, etc., with any and it will not
suffer by the comparison. In fact we
invite you to make the test in full con
fidence that our jewelry cannot be ex
celled in quality or undersold in price.
80 make all the comparisons you like.
You'll do your jewelry buying here in
the end.
B. C. Hartman,
JEWELEK AND OPTICIAN.
NEW COUJ TV BUILDING,
STAUNTON, VA
60 YEARS'
W< Trade
Pmm Designs
r Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
qolckly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably patentable. Communlca-
tiont strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sant tree. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patent* taken through Munn & Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir-
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a
rear; four months, |L Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.■-»*««-»» New York
Branch Office 6J6 V SU Wasbkn'tutj. I). C.
THE FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK
3 Per cent
Paid on Savings Deposits.
C. R. Caldwell, President. L. W. H. Peyton, V-Prest.
W. M. Hilleary, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
M. Klvllghan. L. W. H. Peyton, Thos. Hogshead,
Alex. F. Robertson, W. G. Kable, C. R. Caldwell,
Edw. Alexander, jos. S. Cochran, W. A. Bowles,
Andrew Bowling, John B. Cochran, R. A. Todd,
John G. Fulton.
=JN[otice=
Having leased the Wayman
--Foundry and Machine Shops
situated on East Kalorama St.,
we are prepared to do all kinds
of jobbing-
Stove Repairs a Specialty.
Give us a trial and let us convince you that we can do yoi
work right. ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
CHILDRESS BROS.,
STAUNTON, VIRGINIA
JW Long Distance Phone 623.
Early Hatched ChicKens ar<
The Best !
. We can supply you with Cypher's Model Incu
bators, Brooders, Lamps, Tharmometers, Drink
lng Fountains and everything in Poultiy Food
and Supplies.
Burpees full line'of Seeds that grow.
Rex Flincote Roofing
baylor bros., Cor. Central Aye. 4 Baldwin!
Chesapeake=Western Railway.
Schedule Effective Dec. 5, 1909.
20 6 4 STATIONS. 3 5[ 19
P M P M AM " PlvT "F"M A M
143 841 Lv N. River Gap. Ar' 142 6 38J
12 46 202 845 Stokesville. 1 38 (i 3A| ]1 20
12 57 212 857 Mt. Solon. 128 6 24j 11 04
103 218 902 Walkers, f. 122 0 181 10 54
119 221 907 Mossy Creek. 119 015 10 49
127 227 914 Spring Creek, f. 114 li 09 10 39
142 236 924 Bridgewater. 104 602 10 2!)
148 240 929 Stemphleytown, f 101 557 10 18
153 245 933 Dayton. 12 56 553 10 12
212 251 9.40 Pleasant Hill, f. 12 49 546 957
218 254 9 46' Al2 46 541 950
"i Harrisonburg.
238 302 955 D / 12 41 537 9-0
246 307 10 00 Rutherford, f. 12 37 5 32) 917
262 312 10 05 Chestnut Ridge, f. 12 31 527 910
258 317 10 10 Earmans, f. 12 23 522 905
325 320 10 16 Keezletown. . 12 22 519 900
338 326 10 23 Perm Laird. 12 16 509 850
338 331 10 29 Montevidea, f • 12 12 503 840
847 337 10 36 McGaheysville. 12 04 456 832
354 342 10 42 Mauzy, f. 11 58 450 822
408 348 10 48 Inglewood, f 11 52 444 815
420 364 10 57 Elkton. Lv 11 45 435 800
PM PMAM AMPMAM
All trains daily except Sunday.
W. E. D. STOKES, C. B. WILLIAMSON,
President. Superintendent.
C. A. JEWETT, Traffic Manager,
Harrisonburg, Va.
* . I
OWES
HER
LIFE TO
Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound
Chicago, HI.—"I was troubled with
falling and inflammation, and the doc-
\ ' !: "^^pUP^* olßsa * d ' could not
>r y*pSMipp»sSi-"l^ e * unless I
: ;i 1 , liiid an operation.
''•AAjfrffilffß WM*T\ * ' mew I could not
nm Atiiiiil the strain of
/ 2S y y>!i sometime ago
! -3% W$ about my health
j t ~ J X an d you told me
> ]\ #4;;: i what to do. After
taking Lvdia E.
#T>, J' ,'}l-tffW Pinkham's Vegeta-
(xfym,fl i ble Compound and
I f I illWll 111 ißlood Purifier lam
to-daya well woman."—Mrs. "William
Aiirens, 968 W. 21st St., Chicago, 111.
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound, made from native roots and
herbs, contains no narcotics or harm-
ful drugs, and to-day holds the ■•• -cro
for the largest number of act v-! cures
of female diseases of any similar medi-
cine in the country, and thousands oi
voluntary testimonials are on iile in
the Pinkham laboratory at Lynn,
Mass., from women who have beer
cured from almost every form oi
female complaints, inflammation, ul-
ceration, displacements,libroid tumors,
irregularities, periodic pains, backache,
indigestion and nervous prostration.
Every such suffering woman owes it to
herself to give Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound a trial.
: If you would like special advice
j about your case write a confiden-
tial letter 'to Mrs. Pinkham, at
Lynn, Mass. Her advice is free,
and always helpful.
Dr. H. R. Clemmei
Veterinary Surgeon.
Corner Johnson and Lewis Streets
Phones- I Ofrice,'64B.
rnones -| Home, 648 J.
ST All calls promptly answered.
lAWOFFIOEOF
.i J. A. ALKIANDEK,
ATTOBNBY-AT-LAW
jMM^I^MMMpppppppPI^ppppPPPPPPPPPPPpPPPP"
WHICH BREED IS THE BEST?
Puzzling Question in Connection with
Dairy Business Unanswered, as
All Have Good Qualities.
This question is probably asked
oftener than any other in connection
with the dairy business, and it is one
which cannot be answered in a word.
I There is no best breed for all locali-
I ties and even in any particular lo
cality it is oftentimes difficult to say
which is the best breed. In general
it may be said that for dairy pur
poses any of the dairy breeds are su
perior to the beef or dual-purpose
breeds; this is true in any or all local
i ities. It cannot be said, however, with
■ the same degree of positiveness, which
j of the dairy breeds is the best. By
, dairy breeds are meant, Holstein,
A Jersey Herd.
Ayrshire, Guernsey and Jersey. Stack
of these breeds has certain charac
teristics which make it adaptable to
certain conditions, and it shall be the
purpose of this article to enumerate
the qualities of each breed and then
let the reader judge for himself which
breed is best suited to his conditions.
The Jersey is the smallest, and least
adaptable for beef of any of the dairy
breeds. The Jersey gives the richest
milk and the smallest amount of any
at the age of 14 months. Jerseys are
noted for the persistence of the dairy
breeds. The Jersey is the earliest
maturing of any; some heifers have
been known to calve before reaching
age at which they yield milk. Cases
are on record where cows have given
milk for years with only one calf.
One cow gave milk for five years
without refreshening but once. Jerseys
will make a greater amount of butter
fat out of the same amount of food
than will any other breed. There
are two things which make it pos
sible for the Jersey to lead in this
respect. It has the least tendency of
any to convert the food into body fat
instead of butterfat; in the production
of a pound of butterfat it does not
have to produce at the same time
1 so much of the other constituents of
i milk. They are fairly good rustlers,
' and stand heat better than any other
; breed.
The Guernseys are similar to the
Jerseys in size, form and general
characteristics. They are larger, a
little coarser and a little more beefy.
The milk is yellower, but not quite
so rich. To offset this, however, they
will give more milk, which makes the
total amount of butterfat practically
the same for the two breeds.
The Ayrshires are about the same
size as the Guernseys—namely, 1,000
--1,100 pounds for mature cows. They
carry more natural flesh than the Jer
seys and Guernsey, which makes them
more suitable for beef, and also for
crossing with beef breeds. Ayrshires
give more but thinner milk than the
Jerseys and Guernseys. Their milk is
especially adapted for retail trade and
cheese making.
The Holsteins are the largest of any
of the dairy breeds. The calves are
large at birth and make good veal.
The Holsteins give by far the most
milk.
FOR GOOD BUTTER MAKING.
Work the salt into the butter thor
oughly, but do no work it long enough
to break the grain and make the but
ter salvy.
An English authority on butter mak
ing claims that adding one pound of
salt to every gallon of cream imme
diately after it is taken off the milk
aids in ripening the cream and gives
from 15 to 20 per cent, more butter
than from cream that has no salt in it.
The buttermilk is, of course, useless,
as it cannot be fed to stock when
it contains so much salt, but its loss
is more than made up by the large
quantity and better quality of butter,
it is claimed. Has anybody tried it
over here?
To prevent the taste of turnips in
the butter from cows fed on them, a
western creamery practices the fol
lowing method: Put the cream into a
vessel and place in hot water at 200
degrees. When the cream roaches a
temperature of 145 or 150 degrees, set
the cream dish in cold water to cool it.
Experiments seem to show that the
longer the interval, between milking
the poorer the milk. The milk is im
poverished by the absorption of the
fats after it is secreted.
If milk which has been set for some
time and on which the cream has
partly raised is stirred the cream
never raises again fully, so there is
a considerable loss of butter from it.
Holland Plan of Combination,
In some sections many of the best
dairymen are adapting the Holland
plan of combining and hiring men to
visit each herd one day in the month
and test the milk of each cow, thus
giving the owners an idea of which
cows are the ones that are paying for
their keep. This plan is a very sen
sible one and should be encouraged.
The cost is comparatively small, as
, the tester boards with the family
while he is doing his work, and is car
, ried to the next place the day he has
THE PLACE TO BUY
TELEPHONES
and have Repair Work done,
.Snyder & Sheets,
5 and 7 Frederick & Augusta Sts.
Phone 236.
HINTS'FaOM THE HIRED MAN j
Good Hustling Farm Hand Tells of
Qualities Necessary to Make Him
self Valuable.
An Illinois man taught me how to
raise and cure sorghum. He puts in
two bushels of seed to the acre with a
wheat drill. This gives a uniform
growth; the plant is small, and the j
yield Is about as heavy as from a I
thinner seeding.
I never worked on a farm until I |
was 18 years old, I had always worked
in a beef-packing plant in a large city, .
and I suppose that is where I formed '
a habit of hustling, which has stuck
to me ever since. When I commenced .
farming I used to listen for the sound
of the whistle at dinner time, but I '
soon learned that in the busy seasons
a man cannot put in too many hours.
Some of the boys in my neighbor
hood told me it was a mistake to do
any more than I really had to to hold ■
my job, but I take notice that I am
now getting $25 per month and my
board and washing all the year round,
while the other fellows get about $18
and are laid off during the winter.
Farm help is becoming scarcer ev
ery year, but I think the farmer him
self is largely to blame. Too many j
farmers regard the hired man as a j
beast of burden, and give him about j
the same treatment that they do their J
mules. How can a farmer expect 'to
keep a good man if he only pays him
$20 per month, makes him sleep in a
hot loft in the house or in the hay
mow, expects him to work 15 hours a
day seven days in the week during
the summer and fires him in the fall?
I notice that the farmer who keeps
his hired man all the year round and
treats him with the consideration '
that is due him generally makes '
money and seldom kicks about the
scarcity of labor.
The farmer who leads and does not
drive is the man who gets the most
work and the best service out of the
hired man.
The hired man who does not keep
himself neat and clean has no right to
expect to sit at the family table.
Soap is cheap and the well is usual
ly handy.
HOW TO MAKE CHEAP ROLLER
A Good One Can Be Made Econom
ically from Cast-Off Farm
Machinery.
The frame of the roller is made of
4x4-inch scantling. The brace extend
ing from frame to tongue is made
from an old wagon tire. The drums
are 3% feet in length and are made
of old mower wheels on which are
bolted 2x4 scantlings. An iron shaft
extends the entire length of the two
drums and is made stationary in the
frame. The drums revolve on the
A Home-Made Roller.
shaft. The box above the drums and
in front of the seat is for extra weight
when the weight of the roller is not
sufficient to crush the clods.
The seat is an old mower seat bolt
ed on rear end of the tongue so the
weight of the driver will balance
tongue and take weight off the neck
of team.—John S. Pierce.
FOR BETTER DIRT ROADS.
With a sandy soil and a subsoil of
clay or clay and gravel plow deep so
as to raise and mix the clay with the
surface soil and sand.
The combination forms a sand-clay
road at a trifling expense.
If the road be entirely of sand a
mistake will be made if it is plowed,
unless clay can be added.
Such plowing would merely deepen
the sand, and at the same time break
up the small amount of hard surface
material which may be formed.
If the subsoil is clay and the sur
face scant in sand or gravel, plow
ing should not be resorted to, as it
would result in a clay surface rath
er than one of sand or gravel.
A road foreman must know not
only what to plow and what not to
plow, but how and when to plow.
If the road is of the kind which
according to the above Instructions
should be plowed over its whole width
the best method is to run the first
furrow in the middle of the road and
work out the sides, thus forming a
crown.
Results from such plowing are the
greatest in the spring or early sum
mer.
In ditches a plow can be used to
good advantage, but should be fol
lowed by a scraper or grader.
To make wide, deep ditches nothing
better than the ordinary drag scraper
has yet been devised.
For hauls under 100 feet or in ma
king "fills" it is especially service
able.
Soil Moisture.
Soil moisture determinations were
made on plowed and unplowed soil at
the Delaware experiment station. On
an average for the season the un
plowed land contained 3.7 per cent,
less moisture than the plowed soil.
During the autumn and winter months
the subsoil of the plowed portion con
tained on an average 3.7 per cent,
more moisture than the unplowed por
tion.
I JOB
WORK !
, ,—i —
Persons desiring Job
Work of the best'quali
ty can obtain it by writ
ing to or calling at the
Specttor Office.
&g- Bill Heads, Note Heads,
Envelopes, Posters, Sale
Bills and Advertising
Circulars, furnished
promptly at tiie lowest
prices,
wanTedl
Copies rf Peyton's
History of Augusta
County. Either new
or second hand.
Caldwell ■ Sites Co
MASONIC TEMPI/E,
STAUNTON. VA.
Drat i lew fir
The KAY3EK LITH (A SPRINGS
WATEK. THE CLIRAAX
of Mineral Waters.
$1.00
a mouth Invested in these waters will
brinnyou MOKE KEBIEF from KHKU
MATIS, GOUT, DIAIiETIS. NERVOUS
NESS, INSOMNIA, INDIGESTION, TOR
PID LIVER, all STOMACH TROUBLES
Une Aoid in the blood, all KIDNEY
TROUBLES, SICK HEADACHES, Ac,
than any investment you could make.
Good health cannot be estimated in dol
lars and cents.
J3F" Delivered fret-ti every d»y. Toot j
order will have prompt attention. I
ROBERT H. WEBB,
No. 19 N. New St., - Staunton, Va
WHAT ABOUT YOUR
VACATION
DO YOU KNOW WHERF ""Q
GO, HOW TO 00, Wh(T
TO TAKE, WHAT IT WILL
COST AND THE DOZEN
AND ONE OTHER THINGS
THAT MAKE OR fIAR A
VACATION? 6
All this information can be had for trie asking
through RECREATION'S INFORMA
TION BUREAU and absolutely without
cost to you; the only condition is that you are
a reader of RECREATION either by sub.
scription or by purchase at your newsdealers.
JUNE NUMBER OF
RECREATION
is the GREAT VACATION NUMBER.
and contains more valuable and accurate in*
formation on outdoor vacations, and reliable
and interesting articles on all clean, wholesome
recreation than was ever before published it,
any magazine.
ALL THE ARTICLES AND
ALL THE UNUSUAL PIC*
TURES (OF WHICH THERE
ARE MORE THAN 100)
ARE FURNISHED BY MEN
WHO HAVE "BEEN
THERE." 6400 SQUARE
INCHES OF LIVE OUTDOOR
ARTICLES AND PICTURES
IN THIS JUNE NUfIBER.
We want you to become acquainted with
RECREATION and all its helpfulness.
This June number, especially, is a gem and
the greatest value for the money you ever saw.
BUY THE JUNE NUMBER AT
ANY NEWSDEALER'S. IF HE
CANNOT SUPPLY YOU, SEND US
25 CENTS AND WE WILL SEND
YOU A COPY BY RETURN iIAIL.
RECREATION
_24 West 39th Street NegYpriC
|KIULTHE6©yGH]
.nuaa/aaae- :Jte
I W2l>3 Is^i«atSi ii-iiVii <^J
8 Bttfc#WM»Wß QcTso«asijoo
§ JrimMmEnn
1 AI.D AiITKROCTAND LONG TROiJBIES |
tGUAPANTEEO satisfactory*
Steel Ranges
A beauty and fully
warranted, price
$20.
Heating
Stoves
AT COST rather than carry them
over. It will pay you to buy now
at the prices we offer
Cooking
Stoves
AT LOW PRICES. The lates
patterns, as well as the "Old Ex
i celsior" and Farm Girl cook stove
Enamel. Galvanized Tin
and Japanese Ware.
25c buys a 10 qt enamel Bucket,
not seconds, but a good bucket,
10c buys a 10 qt Tin Bucket.
EST - We make tinware and carry the best,
as well as the largest, stock in the
city, and do any kind of work done
by a first class tinner, stove and fur
laceinan. See us, should you wanl
to build or furnish your house.
Chas. Tanner & Co
71 North Auausta St.
Your
Opportunity
j Whether
It's
i Something
You
I Want
To
Sell
Or
l!uy
In
The
Way
Of
A
Farm
or 1
City
Home,
See
R.W. Menefeed Co.,
10 Lawyers' Row,
STAUNTON, - VA
I ET US HAVE
YOUR ORDER
FOR
Coal!
Before the weather gets
bad. We are also handling
a Large Sock of
uilding Materia 1 ,
Paints. Oils, &c.
Get our prices before
buying.
W S BRYAN
PHONE 615. South Lewis St
We piouj, ;;> ouraii; V. ?. ami Foreign *
tend model,sfcefids or t»i otoctii vti lion ici *
fee report on patcntolmit". Forir,*? o "»k. (
fe^l^ ru TRADE-MARKS v i^'
Opposite U. S. Patent Officer
WASHINGTON D. C. <
PROFESSIONAI CARDS
THOMAS D. RANSON,
ATTOBN EY-AT-I. AW,
Court House Square, Staunton, Va
Ganeral Practice—Virginia
and West Virginia.
DEYTON COCHRAN
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
STAUNTON, VA.
No. 14 Court Plaoe.
HAMPTON H. WAYT.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Practise in all State and Federal Conns.
General Receiver for Corporation Court
for City of Staunton.
Eehols' Building, Staunton, Va.
9. D. TIMIiEULAKB, J K. B. I. P.. NELSON
TIMBERLAKE & NELSON,
Attorneys-at-Law.
I and 3 Law .Building, btanntor, Va
WH.LANDKB,
. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Staubtos, Va.
No.I, Court House Square.
augS-tf
ALEX. P. ROBERTSON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
4 Lawyers" Row,
Prompt attentiou to all legal business.
CITZHUGH ELDER.
r ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Rooms 5 and 7 Masonic Temple.
Staunton, Va.
J.JKNRY W.HOLT,
U. AXi'OKNEY-AT-L.a f,
Staunton. v a ,
HE- BCHEELE,
■ ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 3, tirst Boor, Patrick Building.
Staunton, Va.
QHARLES M. EAST,
J Attorney & Counselor at Law.
10 Echols' Building,
Su nton, - - - Virginia.
UMLUAM A. PRATT.
" ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
tar Eehols' Building.
IOS. A. GLASGOW,
1 ATTORNEY-AT-LAW. '
Staunton, Va. j
State and Federal Courts, Will attend
regularly the Circuit Court of Rockbridge '
•ounty.
JOHN a. COCHRAN,
Attorney-at-Liw. I
2 Barristers Row. j
Mutual Phone 2«J2.
uuoa h. kerr;
' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
IV Office in County Conic House.
HERBERT J. I'AUUK,
ATTORNEY AT-LAW,
No. 4, Lawyers'Kow.
Uoru, Atty. for City of Staunton.
GARTER liRAXTON,
Attorney-at-Law,
STAUNTON. VA.
I? B. X UNWED r,
T . ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
23 Himth Augusta St.
Staunton,Va.
Speela (attention given tn collections and
obancery practice
)an23-tt
4RMISTEAD C. GORDON,
*■ Successor to
PATRICK <fc GORDON.
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
7 and 8 Law Building,
Staunton, Va.
Prompt add energetic attention to
all legal business.
a *.!«:>' H.BMHOK,
AITO UNKY-AT-LAW
Offloo—Patrick & Gordon Bonding.
Jan 1 STACWTOB, '•'a.
jAMKB BDHQABDNIB, J li.
KDDOLFH BUMUABDNCB
BUMGARDNER& UIJMGARDNER.
Buceessors to J., J. L. <* R. Bumgarduer.)
Attorneys and Gounsellors-aMaw.
Division Counsel 8. A O. R. R. Co.
Local Counsel Valley b.. R. Co.
Prompt attention given to all legal bus
ftw ftpT.ni»te»l K»onrn„mlc
I. U . QCAKLKB. J. W. H. FILBOB
QUARLES & PILSON,
Attorneys and Counselors
AT-LAW.
lAWOncs* in Maoonlc Tennln.
I STAUNTON VA.
Buy First-Glass Trees from
The Augusta Nurseries,
N. L. SHRECKHISE, Proprietor,
MOUNT SIDNEY, VA.
Apple, Peach, Pear.
Plum, Etc.
Best Stock in the Valley.
Shades and Evergreens a
Sirtrtaltv.
IF GOING TO
WASHINGTON, D. C. i
! '
I Writelfor handsome'descriptive booklet and map ; i
HOTEL RICHMOND
I 17th and H Streets-N. W.
I Around the cor- Jk Ameiican, |3.00
iner from the White L. per day upward; |
gHouse. Direct jr>• , jM|||] with" Bath, $4.00
■street car route to; i J& '^S? ' fc upward. *
[palatial Union Sla- C 1 v b breakfast
Jtion. 100 Rooms, fIKT -.■* , \^ = ifl| 20 to 75c. Table '
|50 Baths. MRte:" : d'Hote breakfast '
| Europeran, $1.50 'Rife ":'' " ;V .. V''■H~-jrlflj W; Luncheon}soc, ?
fper day upwards: P]pj£t - '-'' ; and Dinner 11.00. j
Iwith Bath $2.50 W^f-i'ir«•"'■'' '*' 11111 l Restaurant a |B ' |
[upwards; each ad- {flff^^'V -i^ carle - Reasonable j
Pditional person 50c. -■•-.:-- ."---' 3 ?r —-- —=s** prices; Music. h
1 A Model Hotel Conducted for Your Comfort. '•'
g Seeing Washington automobiles leave hotel daily. v
8 CmffdkuM. Lewis, Prop. B
I SUMMER SEASON U
a The American Luzerne in the Adirondack foot hills. Wayside Inn {"j
I and Cottages on beautiful Lake Luzerne, Warren Co., N. Y. Open \
I June 26, to October 1. Booklet. J
The Most Important Magazine of the Month
is the FEBRUARY number of the *
Burr Mclntosh Monthly
it has <iE€ .BECAUSE ~M&> IT HAS
50 Magnificent Illustrations
selected from among thousands of
subjects, exquisitely printed with
fine art tone inks. Among these
pictures are
SO Full Page Plates
every one worthy a frame. There
is also a special section which con
tains eight of the most beautiful
photographic art studies ever
> Color Section
published, printed in color on fine
enamel paper; any one of these
above would sell at 50 cents in
any art store.
The Mysterious North Star
by Garrett P. Serviss, the emi
nent astrondmer, is an article of
unusual interest which discloses
many hitherto unknown facts about
this extraordinary planet.
The Problem oi the Railroads
is the result of a series of confer
ences with President W. C. Brown
' of the New York Central Railroad,
President E. P. Ripley of the At
chison Railroad, President Ralph
j PETERSof the Longlsland Railroad.
It presents this subject of national
THE BURR McINTOSH MONTHLY k 2v. I ranker, except the double Cbriitmn
fpji \ iiippliim nlii li ii ' 1 hi. Ii yi! *iil s .nJ M. JO !a our (duress below for tkt
I lAJA I year 1910. u< V'ju ab'ohivl/ !rec our Art Furfoli.j i.niiiiuns twemy-tive
1 II V / superb pictures printed on cm::- !;'".''." ' ■'■ ' ' Ji-'H); Mid. for K'-ou measure,
/ we will ilse stsp you the Chrisroias, 1909, ma I■ .. cuacppep to i.c the ilucst CLriWiuap
w pP) \ number of the Pcpf - a total retpil viihic ol >'..s').
LllUCi ttl I CHRISTMAS NCMWK. 1-;09 .. ■I^'Lf^uilL
I PORTFOLIO OF X PICYCAEi. . I.W) ( ;._..*..,,„
AHdpg \ *—.»*.a»J •*'•"•
*J'M£sGa \J ' l-"'yf , u n 'islit'»Kt--tacriuainteiUv:tb:i!t:r.ia»;' :ce»;m*:i ■vcu'Jcr, icniustl.oo
/ and we will iend you the iuuca tar January. >'■ -n..!-;. Maxell ai ' April, anj include
free ike SCc. C"!iri-.:m;r. number of l&W — - :-<i-. r.;»il ..ilkC of 5. ..').
YOL'R NEWSDEALER WILL TAKE YCUS o\\ZV'.\ I." V:V SO DE^HIE
Our superb calendar for 1910, regular 23 r*f»f* : irt I■: scstt FREE if yon
mention this paper when ciih-tr vf ihtm abuve of7*r*.
BURR PUBLISHING CT-ffASf : 24 ifert 3&5 Strec,. fie// York
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MILLINERY CREATIONS!
Everything from the "Saucy Toque
Russe" to the "Stately Gamsboro."
Give Us a Call.
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The DAILY and SUNDAY SUN are published by
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RAT.TTMnRP TufTL
Upholstering
.nd Repairing' of Furniture.
ew and Second-hand Furniture bought and sold.
Old Furniture Made New.
OT We make a specialty of Packing Furniture and China. We are th
ly people in the city who makeJFurniture to order.
W Phone 422. All work'positively guaranteed.
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importance from the intimate view
point of the men who run the roads,
and is calculated to interest every
thoughtful person.
The Confessions of Nero
by Wallace Irwin. The most
amazingly humorous article that
this well-known author has ever
. written. It is strikingly original
in tona and the illustrations will
make you gasp for breath.
The Pinkerions, !hc Police,
and the Crooks
by O'Connor Douglas, is an article
from material furnished the author
by a reformed confidence man who
has operated in this country and
Europe for over thirty years and
who writes of startling conditions
little known to the general public.
Besides Other articles and stories we
must mention two crackajack utories:
Tae Watcher in the Pit
by Maximillian Foster, the most
absorbing .-story of vengeance carried
across two continents and an ocean.
Unmitigated Molly
a most deiightful story by Edna
Both these stories are
profusely illustrated from drawings.

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