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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, June 17, 1910, Image 4

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ChesapeaKe & Ohf© Ry.
Schedule subject to chanae withou * natice
fLlim, Limited to Washington and
i.aa ». vi , y or |t.
8.55 a. m. Richmond. Old Point and Nor
10 27 a- m . Washington, Kiehroond, Old
Potntand Norfolk.
7,46 p m. Local to Charlottesville.
Week Days.
1.30 p. m. Local to Washington and Rich
rnonu.
9.15 a. m., Local to Charlottesville.
4.18 a. m.. Limited to Cincinnati and Lou
6.45 p. m./ Cincinnati, Louisville, and
\Vr>St
10 37 p m..Exi»resstpCinclnnatl, Chicago
St. Louis and West.
iTnip* ni'fLoeal to Clifton Forge.
6 53 a.m. LoDal to HuntiuKton.
.12 p. m, "Mountain Special" to Hluton
Week DttVß.
53 a. m., Sunday only to Clifton Forge.
UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.
' Head of Public School System of Va.
Letters, Science, Law, Medicine,
Engineering.
LOAN FUNDS AVAILABLE
to needy and deserving students. $10.00
covers all costs to Virginia students in
the Academic Dopartments. Send for
catalogue. Howard Winston,
Registrar,
may 13 2m University Postoffice, Va.
I. m. qua bus. J. w. *. riMO*
QUARLES & PILSON,
Attorneys and Counselors
AT-LAW.
Law Offices In Masonic Temple.
STAUNTON VA.
Don't Buy
Until you have see Bar*
dy's complete line of
Buggies,
Wagons and
Carriages
And you will be convinced that be baa
the beet. Second band vehicles also
for sale. Repairing a specialty. More
than 40 years experience in tbe car
riage business.
E. C. HARDY,
STAUNTON. VA.
F GOING TO
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Write for handsome descriptive booklet and map ; ,
HOTEL RICHMOND
17th and H Srteets-N. W.
Around the cor- Jk American, $3.00
ncr from the White jL per day upward; j
House. Direct fa i JtjiJll with Bath, $4. 00 I
street car route to i jtl^Jw upward. |
Europeran, $1.50 B- -Sijl:, !sj|__j| i_»| |j * 1: Luncheon 50c,
liinliv ui),vir.lv I jjjH§|[ and Dinner $1.00.
with Bath $2.50 «|j§|jjrt|§|§r« '#"' ; 'iw "IbSi© Restaurant a la'
upwards; each at!- g carte. Reasonable
ditional person 50c. m " — SS■-. ■ -*'"price.; Miiic
A Model Hotel Conducted for Your Comfort. I
Seeing Washington automobiles leave_;hotel daily.
Clifford M. Lewis, Prop.
SUMMER SEASON '
The American Luzerne in the Adirondack foot hills. Wayside Inn
and Cottages on beautiful Lake Luzerne, Warren Co., N. Y. Open
June 26, to October 1. Booklet.
p. s^^,
j CLEM BROS.
Pure Plate Ice !!
I MADE FROM CITY WATER. WEIGHTS §
I AND SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. j
| Phone 609. CLEM BROS. ]
w — -""•»»'»' •"'•^•W"» , »«W"* , W« I VWf WW WWW
l»«w«aji>sssmss»ss»sssss»Bwssass»sssnß»
j
Have some very attractive propositions, in business houses, I
which will realize a handsome per cent, on the investment; 1
also good business lots, dwellings and residential lots. Any I
information will be gladly given. •
*3T Our motto—"Will treat you square and make you money."
Speed <8l Campbell.
Roanoke, Va.
R'hesapeake-Western Railway.
Schedule Effective Dec. 5, 1909.
6 * 4 STATIONS. 3 6 19
1*45 202 lt\ LV N rit„ R J Ver -,? ap - Ar 142 6 38 ~~
ZZ ;2 18 84& Stokesville. ias 634 11 90
12 57 212 857 Mt. Solon. \gg 624 11 04
J m 218 902 Walkers, f. 122 618 10 54
119 221 907 Mossy Cre*k. Jfi 615 10 49
IM9S Qll B £ rin , g Creek ' ' 114609 10 39
1 3 Ifn I!q at Br, lK ew » ter - . 104 602 10 29
1 3 f1? qa? Stemphleytown, f 101 557 10 18
919 9t? a S D , Da y l " n - 12 56 553 10 12
218 otl Pleasant Hill, f. 12 49 546 957
lIN 254 *4b A 12 46 541 950
Harrisonburg.
238 302 955 D 12 41 >i 17 qon
2 45{ 3p7 10 00 Rutherford, f. 12 37 532 917
>mI« .2 ?« • Ch T nut Rid ? e > f - 12 31 ■279 Ii
If*. IU X Earmans, f. 12 23 522 905
& J£> 6 Jt) 10 16 Keezletown. 12 22 519 900
326 10 23 Perm Laird. 12 16 509 850
338 331 10 29 Montevideo, f 12 12 503 840
347 337 10,36 McGaheysville. 12 04 456 BV2
354 342 10 42 Mauzy, f. 11 58 450 822
406 348 10 48 Inglewood, f n52 444 8 U
420 354 10 57 Elkton. Lv 11 45 435 800
iOMAN
ESCAPES
IPERATION
i
Was Cured by LydiaE.Pink
ham'sVegetable Compound
El wood Ind.—" Your remedies have
■ured me and I have only taken six
oottles of Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegeta
ble Compound, 1
Bas sick three
onths and could
not walk. I suf
fered all the time.
The doctors said I
could not get well
without an opera
tion, for- I could
hardly stand the
pains in my sides,
especially my right
one, and down my
right leg, 1 began
better when I had taken only
one bottle of Compound, but kept on
as I was afraid to stop too soon, —Mrs.
Sadie Mullen, 8738 N. B. St., El-
Why will women take chances with
an operation or drag out a sickly,
half-hearted existence, missing vM«t>
f ourths of the joy of living, when they
can find health in Lydia E. Pmkham £
Vegetable Compound?
For thirty years It has been the
standard remedy for female ills, and
has cured thousands of women who
have been troubled with such ail
ments as displacements, innammatron,
ulceration, fibroid tumors, irregular*
ties periodic pains, backache, indiges
tion, and nervous prostration.
If you have t»i® ullsrhtest doubt
that Lydia B. PlnkFiam'g Vege
table Compound will help you,
write to Mrs. Pinkham at Lynn.
JSSL tor advice. Your letter
will be absolutely confidential
and the advicejreg,
Dr. H. R. Clemmer,
Veterinary Surgeon,
Corner Johnson and Lewis Streets
„„_„_. I Office, 648.
ones - I Home, 648 J.
All calls promptly answered.
fcfjy Bil;
TO FIGHT WHITE PLAGUE
(nest Labor Organization to Join
chmond, V., June 9. —Special—|
trade nnions in the State and
y beneficial order represented in
Virginia will soon be enlisted in the
fight against the Great White Plague
if the plans of the State Anti-Tuber
culosis Association, announced yes
terday, ure supported by laboring men
in the state. The association is plan
ning a general campaign among the
unions and is urging upon the local
unions the importance of fighting the
white plague in their midst.
According to the plans of tlie asso
ciation, every union and every chap
ter of every beneficial order in the
state will be requested to form a
health committee and to have spread
tuberculosis literature among its
members, The association will aid
the unions and will probably send a
representative through the state,
lecturing where invited before labor
organisations,
At the headquarters of the Anti-
Tuberculosis Association the follow
ing statemeuf was given out yesterday:
"The Association has begun this cam
paign, because it believes that organ
ized labor and fraternities offer two
of the best channels for fighting dis
ease. The labor union and the bene
ficial orders suffer perhaps more ser
iously thau any similar organizations j
from the effects of consumption, and i
annually pay ont in sick benefits and
death claims many thousands of dol
lars because ef consumption. If this
loss can be prevented, the order and
unions will be greatly benefitted and
the health of their members will be
wonderfully improved. In addition
the Association realizes that the pe
culiarly compact organization of these
bodies renders them especially valua
ble and effective in the work of the
association. They are united as are
'no other men and are willing to es-
Rse any good cause approved by
r leaders. We are auxious to get
communication with the unions
will send literature in any quant
uy desired to any union requesting
m • al ■■
DEATH NOT ACCIDENTAL
Formal Statement of Autopsy by
Physician
New York, June 9.—Charles Coul
ter Dickinson, former president of the
Carnegie Trust Company, and one of
tbest known men in local finance
or to _fiis death after a mysterious
trip to a chemical labortaory at Scran,
ton, Pa , did not come to his end by
accident, according a signed state
ment issued this afternoon by E. W.
De Laon, president of the Casualty
Company of America.
The statement followed an autopsy
that was made by physicians, and an
analysis of portions of the body, both
of which proceedings were conducted
at the urgent request of the casualty
company, which held f65,000 of insur
ance upon the banker's life, which
insurance it had reinsured partially
with three other companies.
The formal statment issued today
does not say what did actually cause
Mr.'Dickinson's death. It states in
positive terms that no accident was
responsible for it. The investigation
by the company was ordered after fre
quent reports of suicide had been
made current gossip and denied. The
formal statement f Dllows:
"We have received the report of our
'physicians on the autopsy on C. C.
Dickinson, and the conclusions reach
ed indicate that death did not result
from accidental causes.
| "We have not yet received proofs
of claims from the beneficiary, and we
are therefore not informed at this
time upon what basis claim will be
made. B____
"For this reason we are not in the
position to make any further state
m ut in regard to this case at present.
"E. W. D. ELEON,
President"
DEATH OF S. H. TUTWILER
One of County's Oldest Citizens
Passes Away
Mr. Samuel H. Tutwiler, one of th
oldest residents of Augusta County
died at his home, near Verona, yes
terday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, fol
lowing a severe attack of grippe
which he suffered the past winter.
.Mr. Tutwiler was 73 years of age
and is survived by hi/wife, four son
and three daughters, as follows: C
8., of STAUINTON; P. S., of Wash
ington; W. W., of the county, and a
younger son who lives at home; Mrs.
M. F. Coiner, and Mrs S. M. Sanger
of the county, and Miss Lucy Tutwil
er, who is also at home.
Arrangements for the funeral have
nit yet been settled, and announce
ment will be made later.
Smaller Spot Sales.
j New York, June 10.—Smaller spot
sales and somewhat lower prices in
Liverpool this morning were followed
ta moderate reaction here today,
i market was very dull but steady.
•rations were chiefly professional
there appeared to be a tendency
to await further reports concerning
the change iv weather conditions, j
Advices were received of further cur- j
tailment contemplated by New Eng
land mills during the summer. The
local stock here is rapidly decreasing.
Spot sales today, sixteen thousand.
Aeroplane Kills Woman
Worchester, England, June 9.—
While an aviator was attempting an
exhibition at the agricultural show
here today, his aeroplane became
unmanageable and swooped down up
on a crowd of spectatois, killing one
woman and injuring saveral other
persons. The avaitor was practically
uninjured.
Diamond Ring in Codfish
J B iston, Mass , June 14. —Stanley
T. Redder, of West Brewster, while
cleaning a codfish bought yesterday,
found iv the fish a diamond ring,
which he estimates to be worth $60.
The ring has R. Dr—O., 1904 en
gTaved on the inside. Mr. Redder
paid 45 cents for the codfish.
FOREIGN COMMERCE
B Review Shows Great
Southern Progross
gton, D. C, June 10.—The
Review of Foreign Commer-
United States, just issued
by the Department of Commerce and
Labor, reveals some footsteps in
Southern progress that are of great
importance
Comparing the exports of 1899 and
1909 it is found that those from Gulf
ports have increased 110 per cent, in
ten years- The exports from Atlantic
ports increased only 12 per cent, dur
ing the same period. Of the seventeen
Atlantic ports showing either large
or small increases during the ten
years, seven are southern ports The
greatest increasein exports madejby any
one of the seven was $26,870,584 at
Savannah, Georgia, showing a growth
of more than 111 ncr cent over 1899.
The greatest propoitionate increase was
made by St. Johns, Florida, the dis
trict of Jacksonville, which showed
an increase of over 700 per cent. The
other noteworthy increases were Wil
mington, N. C, 170 per cent.; Fer
nandina, Fla., 102, per cent. ; and
Brunswick, Ga., 42 per cent,. Anoth
er matter worthy at oheerful consid
eration is that whereas iv 1899 the
exports from the Gulf ports equalled
only 22 per cent, of the exports from
Atlantic ports, in 1909 they equalled
41 per cent.
The import figures for the ten years
prove a closer touch of Southern ports
with the commerce of the world; for
while Atlantic ports increased in the
10 years, 76 per cent. Gulf ports in
creased 240 per cent. As evidence
that the increase of 76 per cent, made
by Atlantic ports was largely depen
dent upon the increases made by the
South Atlantic ports, the following
cities and their increases are mention
ed: Baltimore, Md., $9,151,155 to
$24,022,324; Charleston, S. C, 997,879
to $3,630,796; Savannah. Ga. $376,154
to $2,152,441; Norfolk, Va., $208,005
to $450,598; Wilmington, N. C„
$142,923 to $1,228,991; Richmond, Va.,
$53,360 to $696,984; Georgetown, D.
C,5192,414 to $568,797; St. Johns.,
Fla,, $37,752 to $469,397; Petersburg,
Va., $327 to $264,230; Pamlico, N. C,
$2,337 to $91,922; Fernandina, Fla.,
$25,740 to $90,087, All of them allow
ing much more than 76 per cent. gain.
The total commeroe of the South
Atlantic ports now overtop total im
ports and exports at Boston or at
Philadelphia. The Gulf ports exceed
by $100,000,000 the total imports and
exports of all North Atlantic port* ex
cept New York; the Gulf imports
and exports now equal 33 1-3 per cent,
of the total imports and exports of
New York.
In tlie year 1909 the domestic exports
of the United States show that cot
ton, unmanufactured, alone represent
ed 25.48 per cent- of the total, which
is more than two and a half times the
value of the next most important ex
port, viz meat and dairy products.
SOUTHERN COMMERCIAL CON
GRESS.
I TO RUN LIMITED
Fast Train From Washington to
Harrisonburg
Harrisonburg, June 9.—lt is rumor
ed that in addition to present train
seivice between Washington and Har- s
risonburg, the Southern Railway will
inaugurate new fast limited train,
leaving Washington 3:35 p. m. daily
except Sunday, arriving Harrisonburg
about 9:00 p. in., giving the best
schedule the valley of Virginia and
Harrisonburg has had during the ex
istence of the road
It is assumed that the Pullman
Parlor Car will be handled on tnis
new fast train.
Mr. L. H. Burgess, Southern rail
way reprsenetative in Baltimore,
passed through our city last night
and was interrogated on this point,
and while he did not confirm tlie rum
or, he is of the opinion that some
such change is contemplated at an
early date.
It was reported that the additional
service provides that a passenger train'
to do local work will leave Washing
ton at 4:30, the present time of No.
13, and will reach Harrisonburg about
10:30 o'clock. __
The new limited train will make
very feY stops between Mansasas and
Harrisonburg.
The establishment of this new fast
train snows that the Southern offi
cials are determined to give the val
ley the very best service possible.
~~
| DUEL OF CUBAN OFFICERS
Two Wounded in Sword Duel in
| One Encounter
j Havana, June 9. —Col. Manuel
Aranda and. Francisco Martinez, chief
of police of Havana, fought a duel
today with swords. The duel was
the outcome of charges made by Col.
Aranda of corruption in the police
force. Martinez has been suspended
from duty.
Santiago, Cuba, June 9. —A duel
arising out of political friction was
fought today by Fernandez Guevara,
president of the conservative party in
Santiago, and Wilfredo Al banes, a del
egate from Holgain. Gasvara was
wouuded in the right arm.
Formal Claim to Estate.
Ransas City, Mo., June 9.—Elmer
C. Swope, of Martinsburg, W. Va.,
has had formal claim to the estate
of the late Colonel Thtnao3 H. Swope,
except that portion of the estate be
queathed by Colonel Swope to Frances
Swope Hyde, wife of Dr. B. C. Hyde.
Elmer Swope's claim was set forth
in an answer to a partition suit filed
by Mrs. Margaret Swope in the Cir
cuit Court at Independence.

Meeting Association Colleges
At Stuart Hall, next Monday, Tues
day and Wednesday, there will be a
meeting of the Association of Colleges
and schools, for girls. About fifty
delgeates will probably be present and
addresfei be will made by prominent
ednoatora,^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"I thought you were dead," said
young Ganley, very quietly.
Elton, who had just entered the
parlor of the Brlarslde Inn, shivered
as though a cold wind had come out
of the summer night and struck him.
"It's been worse than that," be de
clared. "After the Zelaya went
down, I drifted on a piece of plank
ing to the rummiest idle in the Pa
clflc. And I've been drifting ever
since. Ugh!"
Ganley began to pace the rich,
thick carpet. "Why didn't you* write?
Why the deuce didn't you 'write!"
he almost screamed.
Elion looked up quickly. "What's
the row?" he demanded. "Why
should you snap at. a shipwrecked
man like that?"
"Oh, nothing," answered Ganley,
with a sigh. He dropped into one of
the luxurious leather chairs and cov
ered his drawn face with his bauds
In the adjoining parlor, a girl .began
the most plaintive air upon vie grand
"You see the fortunes of William
Lawrence Elton went with the Ze
laya—down, down to the —mermaids
and cuttlefish and the rotted dere
licts of the forgotten age," explained
Elton. "My bonds, papers, the Elton
jewels, everything went iv the swirl
and the gurgle after the sinking ship.
I didn't get back to civilization unii!
after nine months of dickering anc
fussing and fighting with the greas
iest, dirtiest, fiercest people of thost
greasy, dirty, seas. After 1
got back, I I'd .bettei
wait. There was Lois, you know"—
Young Ganley, his face still buried
in his hands, groaned; while the gin
at the piano changed her chords tc
a lithesome trill of springtime.
"I thought I'd see bow the girl
would take it," continued Elton, "my
absence —and everything. But what's
the matter with you, anyhow? Aren't
you glad to see a fellow?"
"I don't know," answered Ganley
suddenly.
"You don't know!" repeated Elton
"Well, you're frank about it. How's
Lois? I understand she's here."
Ganley arose and started
adjoining room, then halted. "Lois it
well —and happy," he announced.
"Happy?" aaked Eltonr with a
"Perfectly so —but now" —Ganley
left the other to guess the rest.
Elton nodded. "I see. She has
found balm iv the eyes of other
men."
Ganley nodded. "She was deeply
grieved. I thought she would no*
get over it. But Lois is youag."
From the parlor adjoining tame
lullaby chords, the soothing charming
strains of the time of going-to-bed.
Elton looked keenly at Ganley. "And
you're the man," he declared, with
emphasis. ,
"I thought you dead," explained
Ganley. "It was not until months
Elton was moodily silent for sev
eral dragging moments. "Does she
love you?" he demanded.
Rsolutely," said Ganley. "More
she ever did you—or would
She is older, and she has suf
two men sat in gloomy silence
re full minutes. "Come," saio
r, finally, "I'll take you to her."
n did not move, "I don't know,'
.... ™.d. "I don't like to be a stalk
ing ghost of the past."
"Tut, tut" scolded Ganley. "Come
on—let her choose."
Elton started up, then dropped
back. "No," he declared, "I won't
wreck her life twice."
Ganley sat down irresolutely and
the minutes ticked .by. The grand
piano rendered stormy, passionate,
thunderous.
"I'll tell you," said Elton, pres
ently. "We'll leave it to Fate to de
cide for little Lois." He produced a
Ganley shuddered. "She ought U
know and choose."
"No," insisted Elton. "I blighted
her young life once. But she bat
forgotten—and is happy. I've no de
sire to play the unwelcome specter
and maybe render the three ,of us
miserable forever; though—welif you
know how a man loves Lois. Come,
it's Fate!"
"It's Fate then," acquiesced Ganlej
sternly. "Heads!"
Elton spun the coin, glittering In
the flicker from the gas jet. The
golden head of Miss America showed
uppermost upon the carpet.
"You win," announced Elton
"Good-by."
Ganley could not answer. The soft
sweet cadence of a Venetian love
tune came from the room beyond.
"Good-by," repeated Elton. "I'm
, back to the wrer'-ige and strife and
unloveliness of the life that aids to
forget." Then- he passed into the
Rley stood, unhearing, unseeing,
the grand piano hushed alto
. Then a sweet-faced, radiant
r,"i came from the parlor adjoining
B>k him by the hand,
look weary," she whispered.
outside and we will talk of
c."
, child of circumstance," mur
.....cu Ganley, when they had set-,
tied themselves upon the wicker set
And she wondered.
A Woman's Great Idea
is how to make herself attractive. But,
without health, it is hard for her to be j
lovely in face, form or temper. Aj
weak, sickly woman will be nervous
and irrjtable. Constipation and kid
ney poisons show in pimples, blotches, i
skin eruptions and a wretched com
plexion. But Electric Bitters always
prove a godsend to women who want j
health, beauty and friends. They reg
ulate stomach, liver and kidneys, pu
r.fy the blood; give strong nerves,
bright eyes, pure breath, smooth, vel
vety skin, lovely complexion and good ,
health. Try them. 50c. at B. F. j
Sunday School Ms'sn. to Meet
The fourteenth'session of |the Mid
dle River District Sunday School As
sociation will be held in the United
Brethren Church at Verona, Va., on
Saturday, June 11, 1910. The Rev.
W. S. Ran, pastor, will be in charge.
An attractive program has beeu ar
ranged for the occasion, and pleasant
time is promised all who attend.
Mrs. J. E. Booker of Farmville
w4s here yesterday on her way to the
Rockbridge Alum Springs, where she
will have charge during the coming
a Jason.
YEAR'S FOOD FOR TRAVELERS
Some Surprising Figures from an
Atlantic Line —Coat was $4,000,
--000—Beer by the Half Mil
lion Gallons.
It must be the gyroscope attach
ment on the modern transatlantic
liner, or else the ball bearings on
which they run. which has reduced
the proverbial amount of sea sick
ness among the passengers. If it
ehall turn out that they do not have
a gyroscope attachment and naviga
tiou has noihing to do with ball
Ings, readers are respectfully re
ed to supply their own explana-
That an explanation is due
s to one's understanding after
a little examination of the
figures relating to 1907, pictur
esquely set. forth by the chief stew
ard of pne of the big lines.
Ksick passengers, no matter how
of them are carried, could not
comfortably consume food of which
the wholesale cost was more than
$4,000,000. This is seen at once
when it is noted that the total ex
pense for coal on the same line was
but $7,000,000, and of course none
of the boilers was seasick and their
consuming-, capacity is notoriously
greater than any passenger, no mat
ter how good an appetite he has.
Before noting some of the figure!
of food it is*pleasing to observe some
of those relating to beverages. Now
as to champagne, which is said to be
an excellent cure and for that mat
ter a preventive of seasickness, pas
sengers last year pulled the plugs
out of only a few more than 51,000
bottles of champagne. When it
comes to claret the figures jump so
respectably that Itf is seen that a
man hiay rise a thirst some where
west of Suez as well as east. Of that
e!i-ful and ruddy beverage the first
s passengers consumer! 129,209
les. That sounds prei y good,
but the consumption by the third
§ passengers makes it appear a
tipple by compari on, for those
ie steerage joyfully drank not
than 121,297 gallons of claret
presumably of the variety known as
petit bleu, about which there is a
song which the Paris students sins
when inspired by it.
Bre is something (observing this
s the Prohibitionists have noin
thelr ticket, rather appalling
d that of the various grades of
y the passengers consumed 20,
--uttles and 73,384 gallons. But
these are after all trifling nip's when
we come to look at the figures relat
ing to beet, for of that beverage j
more than half a million gallons
were drunk, and it is not reported '
that the quartermasters had any un
usual police duty to perform at that
The recent installation of the a la
carte system in the restaurants of
the modern liners accounts for an
amazing growth iv the consumption
of delicacies, such as were seldom
found on even the best ships when
the business of feeding passengers
was exclusively table d'hote. Res
.taurant diners on the liners whose
figures are being considered con
sumed many, many thousand part
ridges, snipe, quails, pheasants,
grouse, canvasback ducks. They de
manded literally mauy hundreds of
thousands of live lobsters and craw
fish, of fresh littlenecks, b'.uepolnts
and softshell crabs. They consumed
such a quantity of green turtle soup
that the chefs had to use up 13,407
pounds of fresh turtle in its making.
Coming around to the more sub
stantial articles of diet it is found
that of fresh beef there were used
8,311,927 pounds, and of pork and
veal and mutton about three-quar
ters of a million pounds of each.
Potatoes to go with these weighed in
excess of 10,000 tons, a very fair
K> In itself,
c passengers seem to begin the
day with hearty appetites, as well as
going to lunch and dinner in the
R blessed condlton. They con
d of eggs six and a halt million
if calves' liver and bacon an ap
propriate quantity to supplement the
eggs, and with their morning toast
216,503 tins of marmalade and other
such sweets.
And if these figures were not proof
enough that Lloyd's should make a
very low rate of insurance against
seasickness these days it is noted
that besides what smoking material
passengers took on board with them,
2,327,223 cigars and packages of
cigarettes were had from the smok
ing room steward. It is interesting
to note in conclusion.that while the
consumption of beer, wine and spirit
uous liquor indicates pretty gener
ous living, figuring on the basis of
all the passengers carried for the
year each passenger consumed after
all only five-sixths of a gallon of
such cheering beverages, while the
average consumption of mineral wa
ter was a full gallon. These figures
do not include 76,223 bottles of steri
lized milk, which were dealt out to
the children on board.—New York
Sun.
A railway bank has been opened
In Peking under the direction of Li
Chintsz, a son of Li Hung Chang.
Its special object is railway finance.
One never sees a boisterously
drunk person in a Swiss town, ex-
I: in the tourist season, and then
offender invariably proves to be
statue of Samuel J. Tilden is to be
led in Washington. Ii will not be (
ed in close proximity to that of l
Rutherford B. Hayes.
RECREATION
For Men Who Fish,
Hunt, Canoe and Camp
If your newsdealer cannot supply you
send a postal to us for a sample copy,
worth 25 cents. It will be sent FREE if
you will give name and address of your
newsdealer.
The BIG FOUR
April, May, June, July
The finest numbers ever issued of any out
door magazine. A special offer will be
made you on The Big Four if you name
. this paper when you ask for Free Sample
Copy.
RECREATION, 24 W. 39th SuNew York
Bring us your liar .work, as well aa
the starched work. Its an ecodomy.
All work ctille.i for and delivered.
SPECIAL C.O.D. PRICE LIST
Sheets, - - .3c a piece
Pillow Slips - - 2c a piece
Towels - - lc a piece
Table (Jlotlis - - 3c a yard
Napkins - - -lc each
Spreads - - 10c up
"Not How Cheap, But How Good."
For Stale
At Lowest Market Prices:
Choice Red Clover Seed,
Choice bapling Clover Seed,
Choice Timothy Seed,
Choice Kentucky Blue Grass Seed,
Choice Redtop Seed,
Choice Alfalfa Seed,
Choice Alsike Clover Seed,
Choice Orchard Grass Seed,
Detrick's Animal Bone Fertilizer,
Champion Corn Grower,
National Fertilizer,
Coon Brand Guano,
Patapsco Trucker,
Special Oat Fertilizer,
Choice Recleaned Western White Seed
Geo. W. Blackley,
(Successor to Jas.H. Blackley,)
Greenville Avenue. Staunton. Va
Buy First-Class Trees from
The Augusta Nurseries,
N. L. SHREGKHISE. Proprietor.
MOUNT SIDNEY. VA.
A])ple. Peach, Pear.
Plum, Etc.
Best Stock in the Valley.
Shades and Evergreens a
Specialty.
We promptly ohtair. U. d. sniri Foreign
lend model, sketch or j>l oto cf invention lor
reereport on patentability. For free .Kok,
3. Patent Office
WASHifJQTON D.C.
HIHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS.
n Fishel strain. (The best general
uii'ity fowl in the world.) Limited
number settings s2.oo per 15. cockerels
apr l!9-4t " Goshen, Va.
DM tbe Hew later
The KAYSER LITHIA SPRINGS
WATEB, THE CLIMAX
of Mineral Waters.
4 moDtn invested In tbese waters will
bring you MOEE BELIEF trom RHEU
MATIS, GOUT, DIABETIB. NERVOUS
NESS, INSOMNIA, INDIGESTION, TOE-
PiD LIVEB, all STOMACH TROUBLES
U-ie Acid in the Mood, all KIDNEY
TROUBLES, SICK HEADACHES, 4c,
than any investnie.Lt yon could makr.
Good health canuot be estimated Id dol
lars and cents.
fi#" Delivered frech every Say. Your
order will have nrompt attention.
RORKRT H. WEBB,
No. 19 N. New St., - Staunton, Va.
I ET US HAVE
YOUR ORDER
Coal!
Before the weather gets
bad. We are also handling
a Large Sock of
Building Materia',
Paints, Oils, &c.
Get our prices before
buying.
W S BRYAN,
PHONE 615. South Lewis St
.kfciAilatsf SO YEARS'
jH
Trade Marks
rfWKk \W&r Designs
r Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communica-
tions strictly conndentlal. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for eecuringpntents.
Patents taken through Mann * Co. receive
special notice, without charge. In the
Scientific Jfmericam
A handsomely llrastnted weekly. largest dr.
culatloi iof anj scientlnc journal. Terms. 13 a
year; four months. It gold by all newsdealers.
OROFESSIONAI CARDS
Alex. F. Robertson. A. Stuart Robertson
ROBERTSON & ROBERTSON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Staunton, Va.
1 M.raKHx,
Us A TTOKNBY-AT-LAW
B»coud floor. Masonic Temple,
Mutual *-uone. STAtnrros, v a.
LAwoFirioKO"
J. A. A LUX AND RK.
ATTOKN B VAT- LA W.
l«f,.«Tj»wver'"Row
THOMAS D. RANSOJN,
ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW,
Court House Square, Staunton, Va
Ganeral Practice—Virginia
and West Virginia.
QEYTON COCHRAN
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
STAUNTON, VA.
No. 14 Court Place.
UAMPTON H. WAYT,
■ ATTOKNEY-AT-LAW,
Practice in all State and Federal Courts.
General Receiver for Corporation Court
for City of Staunton.
Eahola' Building, Staunton, Va.
a. D. TIMBERLAKK, JK. B. K. a. HILSOH
TIMBERLAKK & NELSON,
Attorney s-at-Law.
2 and 3 Law .Building, Staunton, Va
VA7 U.LANDBB,
VT • ATTORN Bf-AT LAW
BTAinROa,VA.
No.a. Court House Square.
aufO-tl
ALEX. F. ROBERTSON,
n ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
4 Lawyers' Row,
Prompt attention to all legal business.
FITZHUUH ELDER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Rooms a and 7 Masonic Temple,
Staunton, Va.
lIBNKI W.HOLT,
JUL f,
BTADBTOM. V A .
HF- SCHEELJS,
• ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 3, brat floor, Patrick Building.
Staunton. Va.
QHARLKS M. EAST,
** Attorney it Counselor at Law.
10 Echols' Building,
Su nton, ... Virginia.
UiILLIAM A. PRATT,
" ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
fair Eehols' Building.
IOS. A. GLASGOW,
• ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Staunton, Va.
State and Federal Courts, Will attend
regularly the Circuit Court of Rockbridge
sounty.
JOHN B. COCHRAN, ~
* Attorney-at-Law.
2 Barristers Kow. -
Mutual Phone 393.
UUGH H. K.E&R,
" ' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
tST Office in County Court House.
HEKBEKT J. lAIIAIK,
ATTORNS? AT-LAW.
No. 4, Jawyeii'Kow,
Com. Atty. for City of Staunton.
CARTER BRAXTON,
Attorney-at-Law,
STADNTON. VA.
FB.KIMKEOr,
• ATTORNKT-AT-LAW,
i -a South Augusta St.
Stadhtoii.Va.
apeolalattentlon given to oolleetlona and
chancery prajstlee
I*n3*-tf "^
i RMISTEAD C. GORDON,
*■ Successor to
PATRICK & GORDON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
1 and 8 Law Building,
Staunton, Va.
Prompt add energetic attention to
all legal business.
HABKY H. HLKAHK,
ATTOBNBY-AT-LAW
Offloe—Patrick & Uordon Building.
<«" » BTADWTOH.V*,
AKta BUM6ARDNIB, JK.
BUDOLPH BUMUABDNrS
BIMGARDNIK* bumgardner.
Sueeesaors to J., J. I. «R. Bumgardner.)
Attorneys and Gounsellors-at-raw.
Division Counsel B. & O. R. R. Co.
Local Counsel Valley R. R. Co.
Prompt attention given to all legal do*.
p»u ontrnsrari jnoiiThsnrt"
wanted!
, Copies rf Peyton's
History of Augusta
County. Either new
or second hand.
Caldwell - Sites Co
MASONIC TEMPLE,
STAUNTON, VA.
DR. W. F. DEEKENS",
SURGEON OENTIBT
OFFICES:
Rooms'l and 2,
Crowle Buildta*.
Staunton, Va.
WORK!
Persons desiring Job
Work of the besf quali
ty can obtain it by writ-
Spectator Office.
Envelopes, Posters. Sale
Bills and Advertising
Circulars, furnished
promptly at tbe lowest

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