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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, March 17, 1911, Image 1

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PERSONS
Going to dist3 it parts to
reside, should be followed
FCTATOR.
o-ts less per week than
abetter. l „ 1 „ ia L ., r f
SHIRLEY
PRESIDENT SUSPENDERS
are necessary to your comfort for dress wear, busl
cesa or hard work. After a few days' wear you
will wonder why you ever wore the ordinary
Made in three weighta to auit all occupations
and in extra lengths for tall men.
Sold by your dealers or from factory at 5 Oc.
This snows the Riding Cord Signed Guarantee on every pair
2S? THE C. A. EDGARTON MFC CO.
fortabic and durable. i 33 MAIN STREET, SHIRLEY, iIASS.
WHO IS THE
F. S. ROYSTER GUANO COMPANY?
T«AOI MAR*
REGISTEREB.
The F. S. Royster Guano Company is
the largest independent manufacturer of
Fertilizers in the United States.
The business was founded twenty-seven
years ago by Mr. F. S. Royster, who is still
at the head of the Company, and gives the
business his personal attention. It requires
eight large Factories to supply the demand
for Royster g£C\\ j the South alone.
$S»«rous of extending our
terrify* have built in Baltimore one
of h&e '"largest and most modern fertilizer
ana Sulphuric Acid plants in existence.
Ask your dealer for ROYSTER goods
and see that the trade-mark is on every bag.
If he does not handle them, write and give
us his name and we will arrange with
him, or some one else, to supply you.
F. S. ROYSTER GUANO COMPANY.
NORTHERN DIVISION.
Calvert Building, Baltimore, Maryland.
FACTORIES AND SALES OFFICES:
BALTIMORE, MD. TARBORO, N. C. COLUMBIA, S. C.
NORFOLK, VA. MACON, GA. SPARTANBURG, S. C.
COLUM BUS, GA. MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Ir. FAHRIEY'S TEETKK STMT
a* :i» j„, <•* |
Expels from the stomach and bowels the things that make baby cry in
the night. Lets mother and baby sleep all night and get a good rest.
Cures Colic in ten minutes; is a splendid medicine for Diarrhoea,
Cholera Morbus and Sour Stomach. You can't get anything better for
peevish, ailing, pale, skinny, under-sized babies. 25 cents at elurg stores.
Trial Bottle FREE by mail of Drs. 1). Fahrney & Son, Hagerstown,
},ld., if you mention this paper.
LETS BABY SLEEP ALL N'GHT.
The Kind You Have Always Bought, and which has been
in use for over 30 years, has borne the signature of
— and has been made under his per-
t^PLjLj(/^^ sonal supervision since its infancy.
VaWatWJj /■cct&ty/ii, Allow no one to deceive you in this.
All Counterfeits, Imitations and" Just-as-good "are but
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of
Infants and Children—Experience against Experiment,
What is CASTORIA
Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare-
goric, Drops and Soothing Syrups. It is Pleasant. It
contains neither Opium. Morphine nor other Narcotic
substance. Its age is its guarantee. It destroys Worms
and allays Feveri&hness. It cures Diarrhoea and Wind
Colic. It relieves Teething Troubles, cures Constipation
and Flatulency. It assimilates the Food, regulates the
Stomach and Bowels, giving healthy and natural sleep.
The Children's Panacea—The Mother's Friend.
GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS
rt Rears the Signature of
The Kind You Have Always Bought
In Use For Over 30 Years..
THE CENTAUR COMPANY, TT MURRAY STREET. NEW YORK CITY.
Chesapeake=Western Railvay
Schedule Efl'ective Dec. 5, 1909.
20 6 4 j STATIONS. h 19
P M P M ~4M~| P M TTkf AM
_, I ■
143 841 Lv / N. River Gap. Ar 1 421 6 38j,
12 45 202 845 7 Stokesviile. i 188; 63i 11 20
12 57 212 857 Mt. Solon. 128 624 11 04
1 OS? 218 902 Walkers, f. 122 6 1.8 10 54
119 221 907 Mossy Creek. 1 19j 615 10 49
127 227 914 Boring Creek, f, 1 14l 309 10 39
142 236 9 24' Bridgewater. 104 602 10 29
148 240 9 29j Stemphleylowrf, f 101 557 10 18
153 245 933 Dayton. 12 56 553 10 12
212 2 511 9 4Jj Pleasant Hill, f. 12 49 546 957
218 2 54j 946 A 12 46 541 950
Harrisonburg.
2J38 3i02 955 D 12 41 537 920
245 3o" 10 00. Rutherford, f. 12 37 532 917
252 S 12i 10 05 Chestnut Ridge, f. 12 31 527 910
258 317 10 10 Earmans, f. 12 23 522 905
325 320 10 16 Keezletown. 12 22 519 900
833 3.20 10 23 Perm Laird. 12 16 509 850
838 331 10 2!) Montevidea, f 12 12 503 840
347 337 10 36 McGaheysville. 12 04 456 832
35H 342 10 42 Mauzv, f. 11 58 450 82:
406 348 10 48 Inglewbod, f 11 52 444 Btl
420 354 10 57 F.lkton. Lv 11 45 435 8 00-
--f A |PM AM A M P M A M
All trains daily except Sunday. -
AT E. D STOKES, C B. WILLIAMSON,
President. Superintendent.
C. A. JEWETT, Traffic Manager,
Harrisonburg, Va.
The Spectator $1.00
- gtat&tfton ISBi BpttMm
AND VINDICATOR. IP
[ /
VOL 90. STAUNTON, VA., FRIDAY, MARCH 17 1911 NO 7
STATIONS.
DR. FOSTER KING MARRIES
Ceremony is Performed at the Home
of the Bride's Parents in Canada
Naw York, 3di.\;u 10. — Dr. A.
Foster Kin?, of St .ujjtan, Vs., was
airriel last Satc:';iy at tha hem of
the briis's pared:- in Carats to Mi;t
Margaret fckeeeh. After an estenrie
wedding trip the cacrde will rsside
ia Staaatan Sriii t;vo years aso
Or. King left his Flashing bona on
Sanford Av.iaue in that charming
sarbarb of New Y-ark and with his
taaiilv res,o?el to Staunton, wb9re,
after a yiars res', icace his wifa was
takan fatally ill end died. Sons time
aftar tbe Dnstrrr iretr-Srtss-Slrrojh and
thair oogajre-nai:!: was soon an
aoauoai Tha Dactor h»3 the con
..jrvcilatioas of a ho&t of friends
who bell him in great cnl
affe-tion daring his loag professional
caraer iv Flashing and vicinity.
BRIDAL COUPLE INDICTED
Rumor Negro Blood in Wife's Veins
Causes Grani Jury Investigation
Marion, Va., March 11.—Daisy B.
Harris, a comely looking young
women, to all appearance white, was
married to Charles Shrader, of this
place, last Sunday. The groom is a
well known white man. Following
the marriage it was rumored that the
bride was one eighth negro in blood,
and this being illegal under the stale
law, the matter was brought to the
attention of the grand jury and indict
ments against both bride and groom
followed.
The couple had prepared for a bridal
trip and were released under bond of
$500 each.
PEDDLER IS FINED $100
Several Matfeis Engaged the At
tention of the Circuit Court
la tha circuit coart Satarisy t:e
will of Sanaa! J. Kadaer was aJmit
t?d to probata ani Charles D. Kaduer
qnalititd as ezacntor. Tha estate is
valued at atrial $3,000.
M. L Criykauberjrer was appointed
trustea fc» in lea Lutheran chaich.
in piaca of Gr. Heary Laades, re
signed.
Mis. L. Erla Mish qaalinul a'
admiuistratrix of tbe estate oi hei
husband John W. Misb.
Hanar Fenkel a peddler was flaed
1100 aaa costs far railing goods with
ani a license in Scath River district.
Threa deraaa were entered, on?
final.
Oaatt adjaurnei until 2:30 o'clock
Toes Jay.
BLOWN FROM SHIP'S DECK
Tragic Fate of a Member of One of
the Old Virginia Families
Norfilk va., March 11. — 131 awn
rratttba attack of tha Douinion
steamer Monroe, the body of Mis 3F.
M. Warwick, of Hew Haven. Conn.,
is sous where at sea Miss. Warwick
lef;; New York lasr Tn93day afternoon
far Norfolk, intending to visit her
brother, Abiam Warwick, depnty col
lector of iatarnal revenue at Kicb
Jianii, «,
Oilicers on tha steamer remember
seeing Mies Warwick in the mam
saloon Tuesday night. An awfnl
tara wis aiakinii ft rery raagh for
tie iiviirce aLd she web j. trhing end
plowing through the liiui ssas with
sacii foroa that raoit of hei 150 pas
sengers sought fieir stita rooms
rather than siaud tha risk of being
thrown against the side of tha saloon
»ai injuied.
Miss Warwick, wiausai ta travel
in?, ani it ii baiiavad that she ven
tarnai out on deck aud was blown
ovarbaard. A small :vtcoal and hand
bag, tha propaity of Mi? D Warwick,
ara baing hell by oWcer.s of the Old
Doniaion Line. *
Mi?s Warwick was forty years old.
She passassed iadepeadaat rreans, and
found hai racraatiaa in travel. She
had bsen all ovei tha over tha world.
She has aiaay weilthy relatives in
the nnrth anci south. Ker father wa6
the lata Ba}. William Warwick, of
Richmond, Vt». Ih9 faniiv is one cf
ths oldaat ia the state The county
at Warwick is nam d fjr aa ancestor
of hers. _
Scoffs Emulsion
is the original —has been
the standard for thirty-five
years.
There are thousands of
so-called "just as good"
Emulsions, but they are
not —they -are simply imi
tations which are never
as good as the original.
They are like thin milk —
SCOTT'S is thick like a
heavy cream. y
If you want it thin, do
it yourself —with water 1 —
but dont buy it thin.
FO3 SALE BS AI.I. Isr.'JoSISTS
-*
Send 10c. nana ;of piror cr.a f.ola ad. for ou
beautiful Savii...■:■ L.-ir.k ii.a (.11: .'a Skctch-Book.
Koch bank n—t-'m a Good Luck Penny.
SCOTT & BOV-NE. 4C9 Pearl St. New Yoak
SENATOR ILLiUMS
visits sural
HERE TO SEE DAUGHTER
She is a Student at the Mary
Baldwin Seminary—Talks on
Prospects of Democrats
Senator John Hharp Williams ol
Mississippi came to Staanton on Fri
■day night and epsnt Saturday here
on his way from Washiagtoi to bis
!io'i!9 iv lazio City. Ha (topped off
here to *ea his daughter, Miss Sallie
vVill'.ans, who is a student at the
Vliry Baldwin Seminary. Senator
Williams 3ays ho has baau coining to
itaa-it.iu pratty nearly every year
siaas 1373 when ba first cams here
t i 883 the girl he married
and who was than a student at the
Seminary.
His daughters have all hean educated
hsra. While in Staunton Senator
Willfama was a guest at the Hotel
Virginia.
Ha bad bsen in Washington for the
lust few to some wars.
necessary ta be dove by the demo
crats iv connection -with the exira
session of congress Asked if he
thouaht whether the extra session
would improve the chances of the
laiocrats cf carrying the country
in tha U3xt election ani of electing a
democratic president he said it was
: npo-sible to say. Ha ihonght tbat
if tha damDnrats osed their opportun
ities, wissly, pjs33d the Canadian re-
Oiprooity bill, bills for the reduction
of cbe tariff oz. woolan goods, en steal
jiil gone other things thai even tbe ie
pi'-V.oi!i3 aaaiit ta ba too bigh;if tbey
'strive aioie for tha good of the coun
try ani Us-: far party advantage, they
■viil pat themselves in a position to
jafry tha country and hold a long
leasa on power.
Senator Williams evidently does
■jo*; think very much of the Alizona
constitution, the vote on which led
to the resignation of Senator Bailey
which resignation was afterward
withdrawn, bnt said he did not see
That ia was any special concern of tbe
asnate, so long as it did not violate
tha Federal constitution. The
paopla of Arizona are the people who
have to live under it, and if they
wanted to try experiments in govarir*
neat, he felt tbat tbey had tha right
to do so.
"One of the beautien of ocr system
of government," he said "is the
facility with which these experiments
can be tried by those states whioh want
to do so. without involving the gov
ernment as a whole If they prove to
be good the states which want them
?an take them up, if they do not
work oat, the state tbat tries them
can drop them. Ido think, however,
:'.i>it thare has beea too much put in
state constitutions iv repeat years
that nas been purely experimental.
I think it would be better to bave
these things put in effect simply by
acts of the legislature so that they
oould be readily changed in case tbey
do not work out, rather than in the
state constitutions where tbey are
hard to reach in case it is desired to
obangn them."
Senator Williams left Staunton on
train No. 15 last night.
Before leaving Senator Williams
callei oi gone of his old friends in
Staanton including Sauator Echols.
Mr. Aronistead O. Gordon and Mr.
Herbert Taylor.
EDDY ESTATE $2,000,000
Appraiseis Finally File Report
Showing Its Valuation
Concord, K. H., March 11. — A
valuation of $2,612,146 is placed on
the estate in New Hampshire of the
late Mrs. Mary Baker Glover Eddy,
founder the of Christian Science
Oliarch, by tbe appiaiser, whose
report was filed in tbe Merrimack
county probate court today by Henry
M. Baker of Boff, executor of the
estate Although the piopeity left
by Mrs. Eddy iv Massachusetts ba
rjof been formally appraise I, M?
Baker estimates it as abont $250,000.
Died in Chicago
Naws has been received, b-
Messrs. P. H. and F. M. Page,of this
9lty, of the d6ath of their uncle, W.
H. Stover, in Chicago. It came as a
great shock to friends and relatives
as Mr. Stover had visited here in th"
early fall and aDpeared to be in his
usual good - health. He is survival
by his wife and two sons, iuthar of
Chicago, and Ceoil of Miobigan, also
by one sister, Miss Lizzie Stover of
Fishersville.
RESTRICTING I HE SALOON
Will Probably Be Not More Than
Twenty-Seven in Lynchburg
Lynohbnrg, Va., Maroh 11-At a
weli atteaded meeting of prominent
oiiiz=<fls regardless of" wet" or "dry"
vi37.'s, Judge Christian and the city
conuoil were petitioned to restrict the
iasaanoe of licenses for tbe saioons,
whioh will open May 1. to Main
street and s veral of the crisis town
street? between Main and Church
street*. This would eliminate all
saloons on Fifth, Twelfth aud Ninth
streets and practically group then on
Main street. Tbe meeting alsotavored
not more than two to a square, with
one for each hotel. Should thi« be
followed by Judge Christian there will
be less than 27 licenses for retail
plaaes. It is expected the oity will
require tbe saloons to be closed be-
I tween 10 p. m. and 6 a. m.
TO ENTER BLUEFIELD
Rumored Extension of the Lines of
Virginian Railway in West Va.
B ,'anoke, Va , Maroh 11. — From
luehsli it is learned tbat |he Vir
:iaian Railway is making movements
tbat iudioate an intention to build a
<ne in.o that city.
This news oomes as a great snr
irise and is based on the fast tbat
ittoruevs who lepresected the Vir
ginian Railway iv its e*rly days bave
baen located there for some time and
tbat a oompany recently seonred a
iharter at Riobmond nnder the name
if tbe Naw River Oar Company. Tbe
joisibiltiy of stretohing a certain
franchise secured by th» new oom
pany, wbi :h provides for a ear line of
10 sparine oharaoter, also gives rise
C 9 the opinion tbat tbe Virginian
Hail way is to enter Bluefield through
sane devious route not yet known.
It is known, however, th»t a oom
pany has been securing rights of way
along the New river and the Blue
stooe and the narrow __jg of land
whioh~were taken hava led some
people to believe that this land was
not secured by a oompanv which
planned to build a power plant whioh
was tie nominal object for which it
was intended, unless tbat power plant
wbb to consist of a doable track line
of railway on which steam engines
could be operated.
A strip of land has been aoquried at
Glen Lyn which wonld make it ap
pear that a tnnnel may be built at
that point.
If tbe Virginian Railway shall suo
eeed in throwing a line into Bluefield
it will be enabled by it to get a divi
sion of the traffic from tbe Pooa
jDt.is coal field, wbiob would furnish
it something to live on until the de -
valop-neot of the coal industry on its
main lina. It already penetrates a
apagnifioent coal territory, but it will
take woe years to develop it suffi
ciently to furnish tbe freight necessary
to feed such a road as the Virginian
MARTIAL LAW DECLARED
Mexican Government Takes Steps to
Prevent Disorder in Capital
Mexloo Oity, Marob 1L —The gov
ernment today decided to suspend
the constitutional guarantees
throughout the repnblio.
" This mean? a mild form of martial
law.
BAILEY AS~WITNESS
Texas Senator Summoned to Testify
- -fy in The Brodenck Trial
Springfield, HI., Marob 11. -State's
attorney Burke today obtained a
subpoena duces tecum for United
States Senator Joseph W. Bailey of
Texas, summoning bim as a witness
in the case against State Senator
Johii S. Broderiok of Chicago, who
is charged by former Stats Senator
doletlaw of Inka with paying him
{2,600 July 19, 1909, in Broderiok's
saloon in Chicago for Holtslaw's
vote for William Lorimer for United
States senator. Hoist law produced a
deposit slip for that amount on the
state buik of Ouioago, in wbiofi
bank he said he deposited the money.
Hia Trape Profitable '-,
I Charlottesville, Va., Marob It.—
Crapping wild varniats has proved
a very profitibl3 business a 5 Oover
ville, tnis oounty, in the midst of
the Albemarle pippin bait. A night
telegraph operator, for a side issue,
bought 300 steel traps which cost
him $25. —Sinoe tbe loth of Decem
ber be has caught tbe following: 21
skunks, 6 civ it cats, 14 coons, 19 opos
a»ms, 2 red foxes, 2 minks, 2 weasels,
5 mask rats, 8 dogs, 7 cats, 7 bun
zards, 40 crows, 6 partridges, 2 dovei
20 rabbits, 10 mountain ratabird and
I hawks. The fur obtained from
thesa animals netted him last months
over $50 and the meat fron the ooons
and opossums brongbt $3. He now
has on band furs valued at over $20.
Lexington Realty Deale
Lexington, Va., Maroh 1. — Mr.
■V. M, MoElwes has*bought from Dr.
3. A. White of Colombia, S. C,
-tha briok residence on Jackson
avenue, next to Lewis street, paying
therefor $6,300. Mr. MoElwee ex
ueats next summer to occupy the
bouse as bis borne.
Di. O. Hunter MoOiung of Fair-
Held has bought from Mr. J. M.
Quisenberry his residence on Whits
street, next to Jackson avenue. Dr
YtoCluDg expects to move to Lexing
ton in May.
„. „ ,
To Hold County Fair
Orange, Va. Marcn, 11--A mass-meet
ing of the citizens of Orange county
will be held at Court House on Satur
day, March 18 for the purpose of or
ganizing a County Fair Association,
Messrs. R.D.Browning,V.R.Shackel
ford and Dr. L. S. Ricketts compose
tbe committee which is pushing this
proposition.
It is the intention to make this fair
complete in every respect and that
every phase of rural industry shall be
exhibited.
Wedding ol Intereat
, A marriage of great interest took
place in Harrisonburg on Sunday af
ternoon when Miss Olga Ney, of that
place, became the bride of Clarence
Wise of St. Louis. The bride is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Ney and
a sister of Mrs. Isadore Iseman, of
Staunton. Among those who attend
ed the wedding from out-of-town were
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Cohen, Walter
Cohen, Jacob and Ames Klotz ef
Staunten.
SOUTH EAGER FOR
I mm wilsdn
ATION AT ATLANTA
South Claims New Jersey Governor
as Native Son and Will
Swing Him Solid Support.
______ _
Atlanta, Ga., Maroh 11.—Wood row
Wilson, democratic governor of Mew
Jersey, is the Sonth's candidate tor
the presidency in 1912. No more
marked evidence of that fact could
be obtained than tha tremendous
ovation given him last night by the
9.000 Southerners gathered from every
Southern State to bear bit oration
at tbe Southern Coin ess.
The Wilson applause completely
overshadowed even tbat givn tbe pre
sident himself.
Tbe whole ovation was a revela
tion. The vast auditorium, packed
with people, seemed to rise- a* one
man and acclaim Wilson the choice
of tbe Southern people as tbe stand
ard bearer of tbe democratic party.
These people were not A Mint is ne,
giving a welcome to a distinguished
gnat. They were men high in tne
commercial lite of every important
Southern oounty, gathered, not by
anybody's politioal fortunes, bat to
discuss tbe means of presenting tbe
sonth's material greatness to tbe
world. Their ovation to Governor
Wilson, therefore, was spontaneous.
Nothing of a political nature in
the governor's speeoh prompted tbe
boom This speech was wholly
nonpartisan.' It was just an acade
mic dissuasion of tbe dnties of oiti
sens. But every sentiment was
cheered wildly for minutes When
the victor entered tbe hall tbe ap
plause began, and when he arosa to
speak men and women alike stood in
tbeir seats, waving flags, handker
chiefs and bats for nearly ten minutes.
Governor* Brown, of Georgia, gave
the New Jersey governor a dinier
the other night, At tbis sat the gov
ernors and high off.oials of practi
cally every southern state. This was
a private affair, bnt its design lnaked
out before tbe feast was half over.
It was intended to plaoe Wilson be.
fo-e tbe South as the candidate of
that section for the presidenay.
The commercial congress wants
to keep politics out of its proceed
ings, and it did, so far as tbe pro
gram Was ooncexned, bit it did not
keep politics out of tbe minds of tbe
delegates. Governor Brown observed
tbe proprietien by insisting that his
hospitality was personal, and its
real intent was not mistaken by any
petty.
The South has had no serious can
didate for the presidency since the
civil wir. It had been content to
support a Northerner or a Western* r,
allowing these sections t> nave the
man. And all the while Southern
democrats has been the tail of the
Northern demoaraoy's kite.
Now a change bas some ov«r these
People, they want to produce the
standard bearer. They produce the
votes, ani tbey want to name the
candidate.
Woodrow Wilson is the man they
want
While Wilson tm tbe governor of a
Northern state, he is cltimed by tha
South as one of its own.
He was birn in the South. Ha was
eduoated here. He praotioed law
here. He taught school here. Wood
iow Wilson oan oarry practically
every state Sontb of Maryland, the
men of commerce here say. And these
men are tbe life of tbe new South.
Tbey are ar j oniiness men first bnt
tbey are politicans too.
Mr. Oqb Haa Reoevered
Mr. D. C. Ogg, who has recently re
covered from a serious spell of pneu
monia, is now visiting bis parents, Mr.
and Mrs. E. T. Ogg. He was warmly
greeted by his many friends when he
arrived Monday.
To Hold Primary
Winchester, Va., March 13.—Th«
Democratic Executive Committee of
Frederick Oounty held a meeting at
the Courthouse Saturday afternoon and
decided to hold the party's primary on
Tuesday, June 13, from noon until
sundown.
Foretold Hor Death
Mrs. Katherine Wine, second wife of
the late Daniel Wine, died at her
home six miles from Waynesboro, on
Long Meadows, last Wednesday. She
had been taken ill ten days previous,
and in the early stages oftier sickness
she told those about her that she knew
her end was near. The funeral was
held at Barren Kidge on Friday, Rev.
D. C. B'lory conducting the service.
The deceased is survived by ten child
ren among whom are 8. P. Wine of
near Crimora; Homer Wine, of near
Madrid; John Wine, of Stuart's Draft,
and Messrs. W. M. and Melvin S.
Wine; Misses Ida and Bertie Wive,
and Mrs. Mollie Merritt at home.
Charlottesville, Va.—Mis J. Pierce
Moon whs badly buried about the
hiad neck and arms in a fire whioh
Saturday movaing totally destroyed
her home together with its entire con
tents. The fire originated from a de
fective flue and the roof was ready to
fall in before tbe flaxes were dis
covered by Mrs. Moon, who is qaite
deaf. She endeavored to save some
money whioh was in a bureau drawer
bat in her exoitcment was unable to
locate its biding plaoe. In her haste
to leave the burning building she
ripped and fell bat was able to crawl
WINCHESTER GETS INTO LINE
Organizes Business Men's Associa
tion to Boost City And County
Winchester. Va., Maioh IS.—The
Business Men's Association of Win
chester and Frederiok connty was
organized at an enthusiastic meeting
of representative men held in tbe
Oonrt House on Saturday night]
f hose in attendance repreaantcd many
of the chief industries and financial
aud business interests of Winchester
aud Frederick county, and oat of 51
men present 62 indioated their inten
tion of becoming members of tbe
association and signed their names to
the subscription paper.
The purposes of the organisation
are to promote tbe interests of the
oity and oounty, to advertisa both,
and to attract more industries and
tiade.
Officers for the ensning year were
elected, as follows:
President— S. L. Lupton.
First vice-president-Shirley Car
tar.
Second vice - president — Melvin
Green.
Treasurer -George H. Einael.
Executive committee — Phil. H
Gold, Kay Robinson. Herbert S.
Larriok, H. B. McCormao, H. F.
Byrd and W. E. Cooper.
The secretary of the association is
to be elected by the exeontiva com
mittee,
CUPID SEES THEM THROUGH
Rockirgfcam Couple Find Road to
Happiness Strewn With Obstacles
Winchester. Va., March 12. — Ben
lamin Breeden and his distant cousin,
Miss Maud Breeden, aged seventeen
aud eiehtean years, respectively, of
tbe mountain section of Rockingham
oounty were married afe w days ago
in Hagerstown, but not until tbey
had encountered difficulties saffioieat
to disoonrage any except sec!, as are
of a determined and long-suffering
nature. Breeden enlisted the services
of Miller Davis, of Elkton, to assist
him iv his mission across tbe moun
tains, and the start was made late at
night. Miss Breeden was in waiting,
and as the carriage drove up she
came ont of a dump of bushes where
she had been biding and was lifted
Into tbe surrey, whioh was driven off
at a rapid Rait—so rapid in fact, that
one of tbe wheels broke off, rendering
tbe vehiole unfit for further service
that night. The balanoe of the jour
ney was made over rough and rugged
roads on horseback to Shenandoah,
which was reaoned in tbe oold. gray
dawn, and jnst in time to board the
early train for Hagerstown. It was
the first ti no that the bride had ever
experience 1 a ride on a railroad
train, and ftw swaying to and fro of
the coach made her tick. With
brave heart, however, she made the
best of it, and as soon es a Hag; s
towu minister tied the knet the
young couple lost no time getting
back home. They were tired and
sleepy from their strenuous experi
ence, and tbev have sinoe been for
given by the folks at home.
•««»»» —
Contract for Handaome Church N
Harrisonburg, Va., Maroh 13.— A I
oontraot for a new Methodist church
in Harrisonburg has been awarded to
the J S.Heatwoie Constinotion Com
pany, whose bia was $39,510. Th»
building will be mada of Bwsusaav
town brown limestone and will be
one of the handsomest and costliest
in the Valley. It is said that the en
tire oost for building and furnishing
the oburoh will approximate $60,00.
♦- a » •
Pneumonia Claims Another
Maryland, Maroh 13. —Mrs. Delia
Ho'singe-.v.ife of Mr. Philip Holinger
who died at her home near here early
Saturday morning was bnried Sunday.
The funeral wps held at th° Lin /ille
Cree'i ohnroh, Rev. David H. Zigle ,
of Broadway,and Rev. John V. Driver.
of Timberviile, officiating me pall
bearers were Messrs Fratk Holsinger
John Lindaxond, William VVampl -r
Perry Harpine, William Spitzer and
Elmar Hilliard.
Mrs. Hclsiuger't death was due to
pneumonia and heart trjubla. Htr
husband who is 68 years old bas been
seriously ill with grip. Lordering on
pneumonia for several weeks. Mrs.
Holsinger leaves besides her husband,
one daughter and thre? sons.
THEIR GOLDEN WEDDING
Mr. And Mrs. Casper Funkhouser
Enjoy Fiftieth Anniversary
Mt. Jackson, March 13.—Mr. and
Mra Casper Funkhonser celebrated
their golden wedding on Saturday at
the old Funkhonser homestead near
Mt. Jackson. The property has been*
in the continuous possession of the
Funkhonser family since the coming
of Jacob Fiukhouser from the lower
Valley of Virginia to this place in
1775. "
Mi. Funxbuoser is 76 years old and
his w ! f6 is 71.
Tbe ceiebraMon was the ooaasion of
a delightful family gathering, thn
•even sons, and one daughter of Mr.
aud Mrs. Fi>nßhonsei coming together
for tbe first tima in 25 years.
Lsray—John J. Skelton, a former
school taaoher of tbis oonnty, who
for, a long time, bas been a fugitive
from justioe, with infraction
of the internal revenue laws, appear
ed before Judge Haas in Luray a few
days ago, begging leniency and prom
ising never to engage in sailing
whisky again. Tbe judge promptly
santenoed bim to SO days in jail and
imposed a fine of $50.
OCR Readers will find
correct schedules of the
Chesapeake & * >hio,
Southern, and Chesapeake-
Western Railways, publish
ed regularly In the Spec
tator.
ELECTRIC SIGHS
jj pi
FIVE ORDERED DOWN
That of Walters & Switzer Has
Already Been Removed, and
It is Said That Others Will
Soon Come Down.
\
Acting! under orders from the mun
icipal authorities, Chief of Police
Lipacomb has condemned a nuauer
of electric signs whiob have helped
considerably in toe illumination of
tbe city. This course has raised a.
great deal of dissatisfaction on the
part of thoaa affected who say tbat
permission was ontaiued for the erec
tion of the signs and who think it is
a hardship that they should be made
to go to the expense of removing and
to bear tbe loss of tbe cost of the
signs.
The signs on the Virginia aud
Angnata hotels, Walters and Switxer'R
stole, Hogshead's drug store, and the
new Beverly Garage, have been
ordered down, the ouly sigu of
any consequenc? that lias seen al
lowed to remain being that over
Cohan's restaurant on New Street.
i'hafc at Waitara and Switzer's store
was taken down yesterday.
Tha ordinance bearing on this sub
jant provides that electric signs may
ba orectad provided they are twelve (
feet Above the sidawalk and do not
extend mors than thirty inches from
the hjilding Ali of tbe signs that
have been ordered down extend more
than the allowed thirty inohes, bat
this clause oi' the ordinance has been
something of a dyad letter ever smc9
the -crdinanoe was &dopted. It is
pointed out that all but one cf the
signs oidered down are in a low lying
section of the town, anu tbat the illu
mination thay provide is needed aud
is a direct benefit to the oity. There
is no objectionable feature connected
witn any of them and the policy of
adhering to the strict letter of the
ordinance in this particular is regard
ed as being deai aely short sighted.
It is said that a protest has baen
niaae against tnem on the ground that
it was unjust to allow them to ex
tend over the sidewalk whe.i the
ordinary board sign and the sign on
the awning flap is not allowed to
extend tbe same distance and that it
is a discrimination in favor of the
man who can afford the more ex
•pensive electric sign aud against the
man who cannot afford more than a
paintea board or strip of canvas.
This, it is argued, is really a penal
ty put upon enterprise.
»■ a «■
Heart Disease Claims H. Arnold
Winchester, March 13.—Mr. Harris
Arnold of the Timber Ridge section of
Frederick County,died Saturday morn
ing at his home near Bethel, from
heart disease, age 43 years. Mr. Ar
nold was a member of the old and
widely known Arnold family of that
part of the county, and had been en
gaged in farming all his life. He
leaves his widow, Mrs. Minnie Arnold,
'two sons, Raymond and Alvey Arnold,
and one daughter, Miss Edna. His
funeral took place Sunday.
Blood Poisoning From Scratch
Mr. Walter Binford, a graudson of
Mra. fhoebe Smith'of tbis f.oity, has
been taken to his home in Koifoik
suffering with blood poisining. He
was attending the Virgini -. LMyteob
uic Inst it ut: when cakeu ill The
trouble came from a naiull scratch on
his haiid and nothing was thocght of
it at first. He is a most promising
voaug man aud an only child. Mits
Oatheiine Smith, bis aunt, will leave
this morning for Norfolk to be with
him.
Dies in West Virginia
Moses Sntton,a native of Verona and
a fcrmer resident of Staunton, died at
Hinton, W. Va., Sanday night of ty
phoid fever. He had been in a criti
cal condition for several days i»u ! his
death was not unexpected. The t'auer
al will be at Verona this aftaiuoon
at 2 o'clock.Ray.Ran will conduct tbe
services.
The deobased was a son of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Sntton of Verona
and was S>4 years of age. He leaves his
wife, who was a Miss Bariley of
Staunton,and two small children, nlso
six brothers and one sister.
Buy* Business Property
Harrisonburg, Maroh 13. — Mr.
George £. Sine, bas purchased from
tbe heirs of the late Dr. James H.
Ha --is the three story briok-eoilding,
anti! leoently occupied by I Holland
er, hot now occupied by Ewing and
Hawkins. The purchase price was
$17,000
■ aa aw
Hanged in rtest Virginia
Wheeling, W. Va., March 13. —
J3383 Cook, aged 24, the yourgest
man ever exaon-el in this state, was
hanged at the State PeniteLtiray at
Monndsvilla at
afternoon He w*nt bravely to tbe
gallows after spending the entire af
ternoon Witb Father Flanagan, a
Catbolio pri3st. to whioh religion he
was converted five days ago. Tbis
morning iv wrote a farewell letter
to his wif a and then 10 minutes later
wro'.e her another. Cook 'killed
Frank Beunetvxin a quarrel in Mo-
Dowell caunty last Christmas nigbt.
He chained it was done in self-de
f anse. -

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