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Staunton spectator and vindicator. [volume] (Staunton, Va.) 1896-1916, June 09, 1911, Image 4

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QUAIL SHOOTING.
Rme of the Difficulties That Confront
the Man. With therein.
'One of the difficulties of quail
ootlng lies In the very fact that
would apparently make his killing a
simple proposition, his rising near the
gun," says Charles Askln In Outing.
"Let me illustrate: If a quail rose
■within ten feet of the gun and contin
ued sailing around the shooter's head
at a mile a minute gait tbe chances
are that he couldn't be killed In ten
•hots, both the bird and the gun
changing angle with a rapidity beyond
the ability of the mind to calculate.
In the same way a close springing bird
may change his angle with regard to
the gun soirapidly as,to entail a long
and accurate awing before he can be
covered.
The nature of the quail's flight fre
quently makes this long swing un
avoidable. The bird may rise to the
north, pass to the west and be killed
to the south. Had It been possible to
foresee that the bird would swing
about to the south before being killed
the gun might have been pointed there,
rendering unnecessary a complex gun
movement, but meantime the quarry
would probably have gone in some
other direction. The quail work that
calls for care and skill is cover shoot
ing, and the only safe rule there is to
point your gun as near the bird as you
can when he breaks and shoot as
quickly as you can get on."
HOUSEHOLD SNAKES.
Gibolas Are Used as Domestic Rat
Catchers In Brazil.
In certain parts of Brazil, where the
climate Is Intensely hot and where
rats are a great nuisance, the common
cat does not thrive, but is'replaced by
a domestic rat catcher whose presence
causes a decidedly unpleasant sensa
tion to visitors from the north when
first they come In contact with the
creature.
Gibolas are a species of small boa
constrictor employed very generally In
Brazil for the purpose, above men-
XL They are not at all venomous,
sy sleep In the house, generally
g up their position at the foot of
the stairs. When nightfall approaches
they begin to wake up, and during the
night they slide swiftly about the
premises, looking for rats.
Gibolas are offered for sale In the
markets of Bahia and Pernambuco for
prices ranging from $1 to $5, accord
ing to the size of the creature. It is
•aid that they are so easily domesti
cated that if removed from one house
to another they invariably return to
the house whence they have been
taken. Often when one is bargaining
with a broker for the sale or lease of
a residence in certain parts of Brazil
the broker will expatiate with great
eloquence upon the virtues and skill
of the gibola that goes with it—Har
per's Weekly.
Pride of Race.
Many stories are told of the pride
of these long descended country
squires. They have held their own
even with peers of ancient creation.
A great friend of the Duke of Norfolk
who died In 1815—Jockey of Norfolk
was an old squire who always main
tained that his name Huddleston was
a corruption of the Saxon Athelstan
and consequently much more ancient
than that of Howard. Like the duke,
he was a great toper and at dinner one
day rolled off his chair to the floor.
The duke ordered a member of his
family to raise him up. "Never," hlc
cuped the old man—"never shall it be
said that the head of the bouse of Hud
dleston was lifted up by a junior mem
ber of the house of Howard." "Then,
old friend," answered the genial duke,
"as Howard is too drunk to lift him
up he will lie down beside him," and
he did.—Manchester Guardian.
Sir Edwin Arnold as an Editor.
' Sir Edwin Arnold was perhaps the
most suave man who ever paced Fleet
etreet His correspondence must have
been enormous, but It never- seemed a
"tax. He hailed a contribution from
an acquaintance with thanks on one
•lay, begged forgiveness on tho next
*or a day's inevitable delay In publica
tion and on the third offered his con
gratulations. At first sight people
thought the friendly manner too good
to be true, but Arnold proved true on
long trial. "I nm "a nightly journal
ist," he once said, and one knew he
took pride in the 1 ambiguous sound of
the "nightly." A proper knight of the
pen was he.—London Chronicle.
Not on Speaking Terms.
"Three dollars a minute," said the
youth who had asked the long dis
tance telephone rate between him and
the lady fair.
"Yes, sir," said the telephone clerk.
*T guess I'm not on speaking terms
with her," sighed the youth, sadly
counting out $2.50 In his purse.—De
troit Saturday Night
Not Guilty.
Mrs. Leeder—Norah, do you ever re
peat anything you hear my husband
and myself say to each other when we
have a slight difference of opinion?
Domestic—Th' saints forbid, mem.
His Legacy.
"I hear your rich uncle is dead." ■»
"Tea,"
"What did he leaver*
"A widow 4 we'd never heard oV-*
Milwaukee I^toa,
«-»t j »?* ii ■.*' ' , »>
\i KILL OFF THE RATS.
It's a Mighty Big Job, but Black Death
Looks on and Waits.
"The pneumonic plague Is due to the
marmot. The marmot lives in the
lake Baikal region. Kill it off—and it
can easily be killed off—and the pneu
monic plague will disappear forever."
The speaker, a bacteriologist of the
University of Pennsylvania, resumed:
"Tho bubonic plague is due to the
rat Kill the rat off and the bubonic
plague will disappear. But to kill off
the rat!"
He made a gesture of despair.
"A litter of rats," he said, "numbers
thirteen. Of these six will be does. A
doe rat will have her first litter at tho
age of three months and thereafter an
other Utter every six weeks all through
the year, winter and summer alike.
Thus if every member or these litters
survive the progeny of one pair of rats
In a year would number 25,000.
"They don't number that, of course,
but they number something like it
and If our millionaire philanthropists
don't help us to exterminate our para
■ltes-our rats and mice, our cats and
dogs—lf they don't help us to extermi
nate all animals save those that are of
direct value to us—why, some day an
other black death will nearly, will per
haps completely, exterminate civiliza
tion."—Cincinnati Enquirer.
DA MA GED !=DA MAGED 11
two large upper rooms, and the rain, hail and glass slightly damaged
the following goods:
Plain Oak Extension Tables, Quartered Oak Extension Tables, round and square;
All Priced Rocking Chairs, Couches, Parlor and Stand Tables, Dressers' and
Wash-Stands of all kinds, Hall Racks, Side-Boards, Porch Shades, Iron Beds,
Druggets, Matting* and many other small articles. All of these goods we have
marked in plain figures that will sell them and we must move them regardless of
cost, so don't put off visiting our sale if you expect to buy this class of goods this
year, as we will save you 25 per cent, at least. This small lot of goods will only
last a few days at the prices we are offering them. Remember every damaged
piece must be sold at once.
The Big Department Store
22 South Augusta Street Staunton, Virginia.
SAVAGES AND CLOTHES.
Carefulness That Was Not Appreciated
by the Missionaries.
Ardent missionaries were trying to
convert the natives of a village in un
clad Africa to nlbdesty as well as to
Christianity and for that purpose pro
vided them all with more or less com
plete outfits of clothes. The natives
were delighted and spent several days
simply in parading in civilized garb
through the one narrow village street
But when Sunday arrived and the
blacks thronged to the weekly church
service, carrying the new clothes in
bundles under their arms, the mission
aries were dismayed and feared some
kind of barbaric outbreak. But since
there seemed the usual min
gling of curiosity and reverence on
the part of the natives they decided
to ask no questions until after the
j service. There was a normal quiet
until just as the sermon was begun.
Then suddenly a huge chief, who
had been squatting with his face to- i
ward the open doorway, leaped to his
feet with an exclamation.
Immediately the others of the tribe
did likewise, crying, "The sun—the
sun!" unwrapped their bundles and
proceeded to put on their clothes.
"What does" it all mean?" inquired
one of the white teachers.
old chief turned to him with
equal amazement said
he, "we could not wear our beautiful
ornaments when the .rain might come
aifd spoil them."—New York Tribune.
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
DO YOU CARRY TORNADO, HAIL
OR PLATE GLASS INSURANCE
This is an important question and one that should be answered and
remedied if necessary before a repetition of the enormous loss caused by
the storm of Sunday afternoon.
Write, phone or call and let us explain this
form of protection and give you rates.
W. J. PERRY CORPORATION
PHONE 666
Smuggling In Italy.
In no other country are the laws
against smuggling so severe as in It
aly. All the custon. ■• officials on the
Swiss front: r are ni\ned with car
bines, and they are authorized to shoot
any seeks to evade
them. Any peasant caught with even
one pound of contraband tobacco Is
sure of two years' imprisonment, be
sides a ruinous fine. Still, many are
found to run the risk, for the profits
attached to smuggling are great A
knapsack full of tobacco, cigars or
salt safely landed yields a small for*,
tune to the bearer, so heavy are tha
Italian taxes upon \ these. The cus
tom house officers cannot guard everjr,
point at once, and their movement's
are closely watched and reported 'by,,
the people, who are all in league
against them.
A Misapplied Diminutive.
The late Bishop William N. McVick
ar of Rhode Island harbored a largo
soul in a body to match. He/ was a
bachelor, whose sister kept house for
him. On one occasion he telephoned
to his tailor that he wished to have a
pair of trousers pressed, and the tailor
sent a boy to his 1-esielence to gefi
them. The bishop's/sister admitted tho'
messenger aud carted upstairs, "Willie,
the boy has come for your trousers."
her brother appeared the
youth's astonished gazo traversed the
prelate's impressive "eorporosity";
then he murmured:
"Gee! Is that Willie?*—Youth's Cob>
panlon.
Coddling the 1 Hippo.
Writing in a London periodical, an
Englishwoman ljegins the story of her
Afriefanj hunting Hrip with:
"Hippos are ustually killed in the wa
ter, but a more /humane method is to
shoot them by moonlight when they
cometup on dry fland to graze." .
Could anythhgg be more considerate?
The/hippopotaious must positively en
joyfbeing shot rty moonlight <aspecially
when his feet siire nice and dry. —New
York American.
. » >
Raising Geese.
' The. raising of "geese was a', profitable
occurmtion of farming in/ England
year* ago, and some flocks
of 8,000 or, 10,000. Each pro
duced a shilling's worth ot feathers
every year and quills to the" value of
threepence. The quills were)used for
■ -j
■'•■ Not Necessarily.
"The face is the index of the mind,
it is said."
"Oh, I dom't know. Because a wo
man's face is made up Is no sign that
her mind Blade.
It is easier to find a thousand re
cruits than 'one general.
frosted or colored by dipping in a thin
solution of white shellac and alcohol,
to which may be" added any desired
Aye.
»A Mighty Big Can.
h harvester found himself In
Scottish town. At the gas
works he saw a gasometer for the
first time In his life and stopped a
countryman who was passing to ask.
"What's that big round thing there
standing on end?"
The Scotchman scratched his head
and replied. "A dinna ken."
"Get out with you." said the Irish-
Vn. "You never saw a dinner can
big as that iv your life."
Putting His Foot In It.
Guest (to hostess at private theatric
calsi—Madam, yon played .your part
splendidly. It lith you to perfection.
Hosli>ss— I'm afraid uot. A young
and pretty woman is needed for that
part.
Guest—Oh. but, madam, you have
positively proved the contrary.—Bos
ton Transcript.
Its Class.
"How do you like my sew hat? Isn't
It a darling? Only $10!" exclaimed a
delighted lady to her husband.
"Great Scott! You said the hats
could he hoML'hl nt from $Zsf> up."
"Yea, dear; this is one of the ups!"
Mild Exactions.
"BHggens says he loves his work."
"I should think he would. He's one
of the men whose work leaves them
about half tbe day to play golfc"—
Washington Star.
l-ove of Trees.
We find our most soothing compan
lonsbip In trees among which wejiave
lived, some of which we ourselvesTmay
have planted. We lean against them,
and they never betray our trust, they
shield us from tbe sun and from the
rain, their spring welcome is a rfew
birth which never loses its freshness,
they lay their beautiful robes at our
feet in autumn-, in winter they stand
and wait, emblems of patience and of
truth, for they hide nothing, not even
tho little leaf buds, which hint to us
of hope, the last Element Jn their triple
symbolism.—Dr. O. W. Holmes. ■
Vulgar
I Until 1870 It was against the law
,and sacred custom for any subject to
look at the emperor of Jnpith. His
political advisers and attendants saw
only his back. "When he first left the
palace tha shutters of all the houses
Lad to be drswn, and no one was per
mitted in the streets. Even today,
the emperor has the privilege of
flriving through the streets like one
|of his subjects, it Is not considered
.quite proper to'cast a glance at him.
Exoorlsnce, j£
"Experience la the best *-
quoted the wise guy. * .*
I "Yes, but J>er charges are rrilfritj
high," added Che simple mug.—Phila
delphia BecorcL
s V •
; "We must laugh before we are happy
,or else we may die before we ever
faugh at all.—La Bruyere.
CONVENTIONS IN MUSIC.
tes Which Song Compoasrs oeer.i to
Feel They Must Follow.
r hy Is It that all our musicians 1j
ting a nautical song invariably use
ortion of the best known hornpipe
as the introduction, "'vamp,".or cojn
ter-melody? Why do the open fiftLs
in the Dass always appear in rus.it
songs? Because it can't be helped, it
seems. Our popular Irish souks al
ways have a bar or two of a well
Known old Irish melody or a drone
bass, otherwise they wouldn't be Irish.
The exhausted old Turkey and hi.f
partner, the straw, come to the rescue
ot every "rube" song or dance that is
perpetrated, and our national airs
must run all through the accompani
ment of patriotic songs to give them
"flavor."
Because all of these things are "set"
they are conventions. Why must ev
ery song end ou the tonic note, with
the preceding tone either the second
or seventh of the scale, unless we ex
cept the detestable third or the hollow
fifth? Because our audiences expect
It-.
Should one of your composers In a
moment ot bravery e>r recklessness
produce a score in which he disregard
ed these many conventions his first
night hearers would go away remark
ing that the music was crazy. They
do not realize that they expect to hear
the same old thing, served up a trifle
differently, of course, but still the
same.—From "Where Have I Heard
That.Tune Before?"., in Metropolitan
! Fierce Night Alarm
se, startling cough ol a child
ittackeel by croup. Often it
£wis ChamberlinJ of Man
, (R.~R.~ No. 2) for" thei
en were greatly subject to
mietimos in severe attacks,'
'■we were afraid"they~woul<
ace we proved what a cer
ly Dr. King's New Discov
have no fear. We rely on i
md for coughs, colds or any
ung trouble." So do thous
lers. 80 may you. Asth-
Fever, La Grippe, Whoop
, Hemorrhages fly before it
.00. Triai bottle free. Bold
lughes.
ESSIONAi CARDS
Jbertson. A. Stuart Robertson
ttTSON & ROBERTSON,
TTORNEYS- AT-LAW.
Staunton, Va.
UOtl,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
nd floor, MasonlaTample, ■
hone. BTAOHTOB*. Va.
■Mm
J .A.'ALEXANDER,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Ho.B Lawver'sßow,
S D. RAN SON', ~
ATTO RXK Y-AT-I.A W,
use Square, Staunton, Va
leral Practice—Virginia
anel West Virginia.
— —— I.—.
p 'i TON COCHRAN
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
STAUNTON, VA.
No. 14Court Place.
JAMPTON H. WAYT,
1 ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Practise in ail.State and Federal Courts.
! General Receivei for Corporation Court
Or City of Staunton
j Eehols* Building, Staunton, Va.
■. D. TIM KKKI.AKK, JB. B. I. B. MLSON
I TIMBERLAKE & NELSON,
Attorneya-at-Law.
I and 3 Law Building, btaunton, Va
' * *" *— a" 1 ■
(17 H.UNDKS.
vv • ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
j S ra UNToa, Vi ;
No.a. Court Home Square.
I tngS-tf
*LEX. P. ROBERTSON,
n ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
4 Lawyers' Bow,
Prompt attention to all legal business.
CITZHCGH ELDER,
1 ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Rooms s and 7 Masonic Temple.
j Starnton, Va.
ITENRY W. HOLT,
a* ATTORNEY-AT-La y,
BTAUNTOa. Va.
LI F- BCHEKLK,
■*■ ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Room 3, first floor, Patrick Building.
I , Btaunton, Va.
QHARLE3 M. EAST,
| Attorney & Counselor at Law.
j 10 Echols' Building,
So nton, • • • Virginia.
WILLIAM A. PRATT,
i ATTORNEY -AT-LAW,
I Staunton, Va.
\W Eehols' Building
JyHN B. COCHRAN,
Attorney-»t-L«w
2 Barristers Row.
Mutual I i.one 29S
UUGH H. KERR,
I ATTORNEY-AT-LM /
Vg~ Ollice in t'ouuty I'oii't House.
tTERBERT J. TAILOK,
•J- ATTORNEY AT-LAW,
No. 4, Lawyers now.
Com. AHy.for City of Staunton.
CARTER BRAXTON.
Attorney-at-LaWj
STAUNTON, VA.
FB.KBNNEnr,
• ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
23 South Augusta St.
. . Staumoh.Va.
Specla (attention glv.n tocolleotloni mug
shancery practice
Jan32-tf
1 RMISTEAD C. GORDON,
*■ Successor to
PATRICK & GORDON.
Attorney anel Counsellor at Law.
7 and 8 Law Building,
Staunton, Va.
Prompt add energetic attention t
all legal business.
HARKS 11. lILKASK,
ATTORNBY-AT-LAW
Office—Patrick & Gordon.Rulldlng.
I»n6 Staobtom.Va.
AMIS BriIOARDNIC, JB.
BCDOI.FH BnMOABDIII
BUMGARDNER4 BUMGARDNER.
Sueeessors to J., J. Bumgardner.)
Attorneys and Counsellors-at-law.
Division Counsel B. & O. R. R. Co.
Local Counsel Valley B. R. Co.
Prompt attention given to all legal bus
ness entrusted to our hands.
tW. F. DEEKENS
UROEON DENTIST
OFFICES:
Rooms: I and 2,
Crowle Buildinj?,
STAUNTOIf.iVA.
IJ. M. Qnarles J. w. H. Prison
QUAKLES & PILSON,
I Attorneys and Counselors
AT-LAW.
LawOflWs in Masonic Temple.
I'lione 736.
WANTED
to purchase a limestone loam
farm, well watered. Resi
dence must be large, attract
ive, old-style house, preferably
stone and located to have a
wide view over the surround
ing country. Prefer a large
acreage. State all particulars)
Address,
T.J. McINTYRE,
Rockefeller Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio

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