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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, January 25, 1866, Image 2

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THURSDAY JANUARY 23, 1S66
Circuit Court of Richmond.
There I* a bill now before the Committeeol
Courts of Justice of the House of
the importance of which to the comm ?
prosperity of the city can hardly t
mil. Thu bin provide for '"oh chon^
,Ue Code of TU?M* .? "> r,-quire ?h? < ??? |
Court of Riohmou.1 ? llow
In rnrh yrnr. "<?"?*'> ,w 10 ^ ln-Ul li.
required?it rvq"lr"1 w?k .in.trad Oi
for omoo ?
"Se^nnd^of thU bi.l will be ?
? ecure the speedy decision of civil causes, by
having them matured and heard every month
instead of once in every six months-thm
securing to our business men the read>
command of their capital-a matter o.
grave importance to them at this time
By the speedy enforcement of right, am
the speedy redress of wrong, it will tent
greatly to diminish the causes of litigation >
depriving parties of the benefits of then
wrong doings. Meu are not apt to refuse to j
comply with their contracts if they can gain
nothing by such refusal. And they can gain |
mile if the contract can be enforced within ?
month. Hy such a system, fewer contracts
would be violated, and there would be a much
stricter compliance with business engage
ments?the advantages of this to a comim rcia
community are too obvious to require elucida
tion. It would prevent those delays in the
trial of civil causes which, under our present
system,4 bear so onerously upon the peo
pie bv keeping creditors out of theii
money from term to term, and by keeping
large numbers of our business men, who*
time is as precious to them as money, dancing
attendance upon the courts from day to day
oftentimes for months, as suitors, witnesses,
or jurors. For defendants will not incur the
expense of a defence when the delay obtain*,
is only for a month, while, under the present
system, a large number of cases are defend*,
solely because by every continuance of a cas
the defendant gains six months' time. Such i
bill would beof incalculable advantage tooui
city by giving credit to our business men
abroad ; for the credit of no people, whatevei
may be their character, can be high with com
mercial men if their laws do not promptly
enforce the payment of debts. "While such j.
bill as this would insure the more prompt
and strict compliance with business engage
ments, give an impetus to business, secure to
our city a higher credit abroad, and save incal
culable expense and loss of time now growing
out of delays in the trial of cases, it would a
the same time lessen and lighten the labors o.
the judge of the court, because no cases would
be defended where there was not some just
ground for defence, and the judge wonli:
therefore be troubled with but very few
cases, as experience demonstrates that tlier.
are very few cases indeed compared wit)
the number of suits brought in which there i.
any ground for defence. We venture th<
assertion that one tithe of the tim
now consumed in having cases continue.;
would be amply sufficient to try al
the contested suits which would be bronghi
under the system proposed. Under the pre
sent system,the Judge of theCircuit Court sits
some eight or nine months in the year, and i"
is a well-known fact that most of the time o;
the Court is occupied in efforts to delay thi
trial of causes.
Such are some of the advantages (hastily
alluded to) to be derived from the proposed
bill before Jhe Committee of Courts of Justice.
We are informed that the committee are pre
pared to report favorably upon the bill,
but they entertain some doubt whether,
under existing circumstances, the peoph
of Richmond desire the more speedy deci
sion of civil causes. It is so obviously
to the interest of the whole community thai
civil causes should be speedily decided, that
we cannot for a moment suppose there can b.
any hesitation on the part of any of our citi
zens in desiring such a bill. To test this mat
ter, we are informed that papers will be left
at the offices of Goddi.n & Apperson, Lan
caster & Co., and Gkcubs 3c W illiams, and
the Sheriff of Richmond, for the signatures of
such of our citizens as approve the bill; and
we earnestly hope that all will at once come
forward and sign their names. While impor
tant measures are now being canvassed
for the purpose of attracting capital to
our city, we feel sure none would be
more efficacious in producing that result
than a bill which would enable the capitalist
speedily to recover his money when it became
due. It is one of the soundest and best-settled
maxims of political economy, that the speedy
and rigid enforcement of the payment of debts
conduces to the prosperity of a people, and is
alike beneficial to the creditor and the debtor.
Laws Regulating Interest.
Under this head the Governor of Georgia,
in his recent message, takes the ground that
is snstained by reason and policy. He sets out
with the truism, which none can deny, that
11 undue interference with an individual's use
" of his property, or with transactions between
44 individuals, wherein each seeks, without
"covinous practices, toadvRnce his own inte
rest, always affects injuriously the general
"welfare." "Hence," adds the Governor,
"good governments do not seek to fix the
"prices of articles, either of necessity or of
14 luxury; nor do they attempt to fix the com- '
"pensation to be paid by one man for the j
44 temporary use of another man's property." j
These opinions are altogether orthodox and
indisputable. And the wonder is, how the
law-makers of this day should so far forget
their force as to interfere in the matter of the
interest for the use of money. They had much
better regulate the price of bread and of bacon ;
for those articles enter into the consumption
of the poor, and are necessary for the very
existence of mankind.
The Governor's further remarks on the sub
ject are so very good that we copy them, and j
commend them to the consideration of the
Virginia Legislators:
" Money, or rather the use of it, is as dis
tinctly a subject of value, and its value is as
fluctuating, as the use or occupation of a ten
ement, or the hire of a horse, or other chattel. |
Yet, while rent and hire are left to be regu
lated by contracting parties, interest on money
is fixed by law, and that law enforced by vin
dicatory sanctions. I am unable to perceive on
what principle this difference rests. The
usual pretext is, that the restraint is a neces
sary protection to the needy against the
usurer. But does he require it more than
another child of want, who can procure no
sheltering roof for his family by reason of the
occasional appreciation of rents? Does he
require it more than another nnfortunate
who, at times, cannot give bis family bread
by reason of the high prices of provisions ?
Round political economy and right reason are
against all such interferences with prices and
value In commercial transactions. There are
times when the use of money is worth much
more than at others. With us it is rarely
worth Jess than the legal rate of iuteresl, but
it is often worth more. The policy of usury
laws generally is to place the legal rate of
interest at the lowest point to which, in a
series of years, it would go if uu trammelled, j
and to keep it there, despite the varying rela
tions of demand and supply, lfence, law-abid
ing capitalists usually prefer other modes of
employing money. Active capital, like run
nlng water, will always leave nn obstruction
for an unobstructed channel open to it. Hut
experience proves that usury laws, as a gene
ral rule, are only obstructions, in money-lend- 1
ing, to conscientious or to cautious men. Their
withdrawal leaves a more ojw>n field to the
unscrupulous and the daring, enabling them
to extort from the borrow ing class higher rates
than, with free competition, could be main
tained. Thus it appears to me the restraint
imposed on this branch of business is not only
wrong in principle, but fails to afl'ord the
intended protection. There is at this time in
Georgia a great want of money. Some need it
to revive a suspended business?others to com
mence a new, in place of an old enterprise,
utterly broken tip. The capitalists abroad
would bring his money here if he were
allowed to charge for its use what it is worth
without incurring forfeiture."
Governor Jenkins considers, however, that
it is best, in making modifications of old cus
toms and laws, to do so cautiously, lie there
fore advises that seven per cent, be made the
legal interest, where no rate is agreed upon ;
and that any rate of interest not exceeding ten
per cent, may be established by, and collected
under, a contract for the payment of money.
The Governor considers that this advance will
tie sufficient to test practically the proposed
i hange, and that it will he easy to recede or
io advance further, as experience may dictate.
The ten per cent, limitation is a concession
of the Governor to the prejudices of the day. I
We doubt not that, pursuing his own nrgu- 1
ment to its logical deductions, he would prefer
hat there should be no limit to the rate of
interest under contract. We believe it would ,
i?e best to leave the rate, under contract, unre
stricted. The danger is that the limit will be
Net up as the regular interest, whereas, if left
:o be governed entirely by the only true and
iust law of supply and demand, interest would
f?e seldom above ten per cent., and would be
generally much below it. In the case of the
interest of the Hank of England we have
known it to be at three and three and a half
per cent., while it rises occasionally to ten per
?ent. It is now eight per cent. It would be
infinitely the wisest policy to leave the lending
of money just where the selling of land, or
horses, or flour, is?to be sold at whatever the
parties concerned agree upon as the price.
Georgia.
"We have received the Message of Govenor
Jenkins to the Legislature of Georgia on the
.ccasion of its recent meeting. It is a very
sensible document. It exhibits the State
>f Georgia making as sincere and unaf
fected an effort at reconstruction as could pos
sibly be expected from any Southern State.
The Governor opens his communication with
a very well-reasoned defence of President
Joiinson's theory of the condition of the
Southern States, viz: that they never were
out of the Union, secession having been
illegal and having proved a failure.
The Governor acknowledges the obligation
resting upon the State to protect that class of
the community lately in slavery, and to aid.
by all just means, its advance in civilization ,
and he contends that, whilst insisting upon
occupying, in relation to that class of persons,
the position of the governing class, tins obli
gation should be faithfully discharged. He
recommends to the consideration of the Legis
lature a report of a commission appointed by
the late provisional government to prepare a
code of laws suited to the blacks in their new
condition.
On the subject of the penitentiary, finances,
education, etc., the recommendations of the
message are generally wise.
The Financial condition of the State b
excellent. The entire debt of Georgia, inclu
ding temporary loans to put the Government
in operation, falls short of three millions five
hundred thousand dollars. The Governor
thinks a loan of two million live hundred
thousand dollars sufficient to repair all
ii reparable damages ' and meet piesent neces
sities. This would make the State debt six
millions of dollars ; and eight hundred thou
sand dollars per annum would meet the interest
ind current expenses of the Government.
This, compared with the debts of the other
States, would indicate that Georgia is as "easy
is an old shoe."
The Governor's remarks 011 the Usury Law
we have noticed elsewhere. His message, in
short, looks very much like that of the chief
official paper of a reconstructed State.
The West and the Seaboard.
The difficulty and expensiveness of securing
transportation! for their crops to market are
now causing considerable excitement in the
Western States. The most vexatious delays
are experienced from the crowded condition of
the great lines of railroad which connect them
with tidewater ; and the prices paid for trans
portation, when it is secured, are enormous.
They state their grievances in the following
pithy form : "It costs three bushels of corn
" to send one bushel to market a distance of
44 one hundred miles ; one hundred bushels to
44 get a pair of boots; one thousand bushels to
44 get a suit of clothes, and two tons of corn
44 for a ton of coal." It is said that corn is
actually burned for fuel in some parts of the
West. A story is told of a farmer who sent a
quantity#of barley to Chicago by rail, and the
charges exceeded the sum he received for his
gruin. The great West is profoundly exercised
in devising schemes lor reaching tidewater.
Some are pressing earnestly for the construc
tion of the Niagara ship canal?a marine rail
way to do the work which the Erie canal is
unable to do. Others are examining the feasi
bility of striking the sea at Norfolk by the James
River aiui Kanawha canal, and, by a connecting
system of railroads, piercing the Northwestern
and Western States. So enormous is the busi
ness between them und the seacoast cities that
it is hardly possible to have too many lines ol
communication between the East and the
West.
No fact gives a clearer idea of the growth
of the West and the increase of its products
than the amount of grain which is shipped
! each year from Chicago. In 1S35 seventy
I eight bushels of wheat comprised the total
exports from what has since become the great
est grain market in the world. In 1S39 it was
3,67S bushels; in 1840, 10,000 bushels; in 1S41,
40,000 bushels ; in 1642, 666,9o7 bushels; in 1S45
it first reached 1,000,000 bushels ; in 1647, over
2,000,000 bushels. In 1651 and 1S52 it again fell
off to less than 1,000,000 bushels ; but in 1653
again rose to 1,660,998 bushels; in 1654 it was
2,744,S60 bushels ; in 1655, 7,110,270 bushels ; in
1856, 9,419,365 bushels; in 1657, 10,763,292 bush
els; in 1658, 10,759,359 bushels; in I860,
16,054,379 bushels; in 1661, 22,913,830 bushels; j
in 1662, 22,902,765 bushels; and in 1663, (
17,925,336 bushels of wheat.
Illinois, which, in 1650, was the flftji State in
the Union in the production of wheat, was in
1660the first, raising 23,637,023 bushels; Indi
ana, which was sixth in 1650, was second in
I860, raising 16,648,267 bushels; Wisconsin,
ninth in 1650, was third in I860, raising
16,657,438; Ohio was fourth in I860, raising
15,119,047; Iowa, fifteenth in 1650, stands
eighth in 1660, producing 8,449,403 bushels ;
Michigan produced in lstfo, 6,330,308 bushels.
These facts show the wonderful production
of the West, and indicate to Virgiuia the vitul
importune* of pushing to completion the
James liiver and Kanawha canal, which has
already begun to attract attention in the West
as an important avenue of transportation to
tidewater. The James Kiver Company and
its friends In both East and West Virginia
should co-operate with those Western men
who are now turning their attention to the
practicability of striking the sea at Norfolk
by the James Kiver and Kanawha canal. They
?houkl place before them the facts, familiar
enough to us in Virginia, but which are
not so well known elsewhere, that this ronte
presents the shortest and most certain
transit irom the West to the Atlantic. Of the
practicability of a continuous water lino, there
can be no earthly doubt, if sufficient capital
can be introduced to overcome some of those
physical difficulties which are bugbears to us
in our present impoverished condition. This
canal was the conception of the great
and sagacious mind of Georoe Washington,
who was personally familiar with the whole
route, and, whoso counsels, if some DkWitt
Cr.i*tos had appeared in Virginia to carry
them out, would have made the Old Dominion
long ago the Empire State of the Union.
The Mexican Question.
The day for the assembling of the French
Senate and Corps Legislatif was the 2'Jd
instant. Great interest is felt to know what the
Emperor Napoleon has had to say on that
occasion to his Legislative Chambers upon the
Mexican subject. In about ten days we shall
be nble to gratify our curiosity. The French
opposition has decided to 41 direct their efforts
chiefly to the Mexican question." It is believed
that the Committee on Foreign Affairs in the
United States House of Representatives will
withhold any report or recommendation in
reference to the Mexican controversy until they
shall have learned what the Emperor has had
to say to his Legislative Chambers.
Public opinion in France is clearly adverse
to the continued French occupation of Mexico,
and, whatever the form of government in
Europe, there are few rulers who do not consult
| public opinion, and fewes still who persist in
' openly opposing its requirements. Louis
1 Napoleon is not the man to set himself against
; the will of the French people. He knows
; when to retire peacefully, and when to advance
; boldly. In the mean time, we perceive that
! the unfortunate gentleman, Maximilian, is
j being sharply berated by some of the French
journals for his incapacity and ingratitude to
j France. His conduct, indeed, is said to excite
much 44 indignation." What his conduct or
I misconduct is, we do not know, but take it for
I granted that he is to be the scapegoat to bear
I off' the Emperor's transgressions. Uneasy sits
j the head that wears a (Mexican) crown.
The Petroleum Cooking Stove.
"We do not ordinarily bestow editorial notice
upon new inventions; but considering the
Petroleum Cooking Stove as one of very great
value at this particular time to our Southern
people, we make an exception from the gene
ral rule, in its favor.
A company of gentlemen in Baltimore own
the right for this State, and their representa
tives are now in this city exhibiting the stove
and proving by actual experiment its capacity
and general advantages. They haven room
over the store of Messrs French & Crenshaw,
corner of Main and Ninth streets, where those
who are curious on the subject may see the
stoves and learn particulars in regard to them.
P or cheapness, cleanliness, security, excel
lent cooking, and the rapidity with which the
cooking is done, we are certain there is nothing
yet invented to compare with this stove. The
oil used in it costs forty cents per gallon, and
by actual experiment this gallon has fed a
stove with two burners for the purposes of
cooking for ten days?i. e., with the cost of
alcohol to ignite the oil, the expense of cook
ing three meals per day was live and a half
j cents! The fact is, the expense of fuel is a
j mere trifle, while the results are wonderful.
The cooking of a beefsteak is one test that is
; generally considered, next to that of good
bread, the most decisive, and this stove cooks
aste.ak in the most complete manner, never
burning it, and cooking it perfectly done, or
rare, as may be desired. We saw a three
pound steak cooked to a turn in /re hUnut<x,
j and a sweeter one no man ever ate. It bakes
bread and biscuit with like success, and boils
and roasts just as readily. The heat is thrown
on by jets of flame, having very much the
appearance of the flame from hickory wood,
j which, striking first an iron disc under
the article to be cooked, passes laterally
j to the edges of the disc, and thence upward
and oa ?r the thing cooking, diffusing
| a general and eflieient, though not a scorching,
i heat throughout the sto\'e. # The flame does
; not rise above the disc; but the heat from it
l penetrates with equal force throughout the
j stove, and cooks what is in it, every part alike,
I while the juices of the meat are preserved
i undiminished and unaffected. So with bread,
( the cooking is thorough and the crust is all
over alike. -It cannot be otherwise; a bad
cook may prepare the bread wrong, but the
J stove will cook it right. With the evidence
j we had yesterday, we are satisfied that this
little petroleum apparatus will cook better
j than anything ever yet invented by man.
j Being an old fogy, we would make an excep
? tion in favor oi spitting a turkey before a big
j hickory lire; but this we never expect to see
in our lifetime again ; therefore we hail the
J petroleum stove as the next best invention.
J We saw it tried in various ways, and when
we departed, a fine canvass-back duck was
just being done to a turn. We left him with
I profound regret.
Now, for safety, we consider it unexception
j able. The fuel passes through an orifice as
l fine as a cambric needle, and cannot be jetted
j in quantity sufficient to do injury, while it is
! perfectly under the control of the attendant.
No wick is used. The reservoir which holds
the oil being filled?and that should be done in
the day time?we see no possible danger. The
reservoir is closed with a screw, and flame
cannot be communicated to it.
We consider this stove a providential dis
covery for us at this time, when we are called
npon to revolutionize our household economy.
And it is this which induces us to give it this
prominence. It is so cheap, so cleanly, so
complete in its performances, it may be intro
duced into the dining-room, or even chamber,
without offence, and maybe attended by the
most delicate lady. It avoids the heavy work
of handling coal or wood, and the dirty work
of removing ashes. In winter it helps to warm
the room, and in summer it may be placed in a
hall or porch, and the moment the cooking is
done the flame is extinguished and the heat
dies.
Such an apparatus is a desideratum witU us,
and must soon enter into general use. It must
secure a great economy in servants as well as
fuel. Besides the cooking stove, there are
stoves for warming rooms, which nre very I
neat and evolve much heat; but of their
power we cannot speak positively.
The right for this city or State is for sale, and
we hope will fall into the hands of an enter
prising company.
Garrett Davis vs. Dr. Baoby.?Dr. Bagby,
1 his famous lecture, attributes the downfall
f the Southern Confederacy to the want of
bacon and greens." Mr. Davis, United
tates Senator from Kentucky, has a diflereut i
pinion, as witness the following:
" Mr. Davis (Democrat) concurred in the
pinion of Mr. Sumner. He had no spinpa
ly for Jefferson Davis, whose case the bill
as intended to cover. He did not think, how- :
ker, that anylovir of the Union ought to
live unkind feelings for the distinguished
'iminal, because to his conduct more than to
uything else we were indebted for the failure
( the Confederacy."
This was said while discussing thq bill for
xlng up a jury to try Jefferson Davis, which
11, wonderful to relate, Mr. Sumner opposes.
rnE Si'SQi'RiiAxxA IIridub.?1The work on
e railroad bridge at Havre de Grace is being
shed forward with energy. The third span
ill be completed next week. The discharge
some three hundred laborers on account of
e cold weather gave rise to the report that
jrk was su*j>?i?ded on the bridge,
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF VIRGINIA.
Wednesday, January 24, 1906
SENATE.
Lieutenant-Governor Cowfer In the clinir.
Prayer by J>r. Hopson.
EXTRA SESSION.
A joint resolution from tlm House?
1' fttnolrrd, That, the Senate concurring, the
session of the General Assembly he extended
beyond the term of sixty days for a further
period not exceeding thirty days"?
was taken up, on a suspension of the rules,
and passed.
COVIXOTO.t AND OHIO RAILROAD.
By Mr. Peck :
"Resolved, That the Committee on Bonds and
Internal Navigation be instructed to inquire
into and report to thisllouse what action or
legislation (if any) is necessary to complete the
Virginia Central railroad to Covington, and to
complete the Covington and Ohio railroad."
Agreed to.
dismal swamp canal.
By Mr. Robinson :
"Whereas the State of Virginia owns a
large interest in the Dismal Swamp canal; and
whereas it becomes theduty of the Legislature
to inquire into and look after all the interests
of the State in her internal improvements,
"AVtfo/cd, That the Commit tee on Roads and
Internal Navigation be, and they are hereby,
instructed to inquire into the present status
of the Dismal Swamp Canal Company, with
power to send for persons and papers, if neces
sary." Agreed to.
NEORO EVIDENCE.
44 A bill to amend and re-enact the ninth sec
tion of chapter one hundred and three of the
Code of Virginia, defining a mulatto, provid
ing for the punishment of offences by colored
persons, and lor the admission of their evi
dence in legal investigations; and to repeal all
laws in relation to slaves and slavery, and for
other purposes," came up as unfinished busi
ness?the question being on the amendment,
proposed by 3Ir. Coleman, to strike out the
previous amendment and to restore the origi
nal bill as reported by the Committee on
Courts of Justice. The original bill provides
that negro testimony shall be admitted in all
cases where negroes are interested, but where
white men only are interested their evidence
will not be admitted until January 1st, lMis.
Mr. Keen opposed the bill in a short speech,
to which Mr. Gilmer replied. The question
was further discussed by Messrs. Gray, Bul
lino, Cabell, Crocket and McRae.
Mr. Keen said, in response to some remarks
of Mr. Crockett, that he was acting in this
matter in support of the policy of President
Johnson, and not in opposition to it. Mr. John
son stands facing the Radical party of the
North, who press on him the ideas of negro
equality. The President opposes negro suffrage,
and says that it will take generations to efface
the line of demarcation between the negro and
the white man, and that he (31 r. Keen) in
tended, so far as lies in his power, to sustain the
President, so that he could rest secure in the
support of Virginia. lie was in favor of giving
negroes the right to testify in oases where tinw
are concerned, but that he would never consent
to give them the ability to outweigh the evi
dence of white men.
31r. Boyd advocated the admission of negro
testimony in all cases. The object of evidence
is to get at truth, and if truth is attainable in
the admission of evidence ol' negroes incases
where they are interested, then why not in
eases where white men are interested. He said
that he could not express his own views in
stronger terms than those employed in the
bill.
3lr. Meadr moved to amend the bill by
declaring that it shall he in force from the time
of the removal of the Freedmeu's Bureau.
The amendment was negatived by a vote of
four to twenty-live.
The bill was ordered to engrossment.
CONTRACTS WITH NKUROES.
44 A bill to regulate contracts for labor or
service between colored and white persons,
and to define what shall bo n day's or a month's
labor," was taken up.
3ir. Oni.km.t.v offered a substitute.
31r. Mer? ikr offered an amendment to the
substitute.
Mr. 31" Raf. moved to lay ihe.bill, substitute
and amendments on the table to he printed
and referred to a committee of seven. Agreed
to.
WITNESSES.
" A bill to repeal an act entitled an act rela
ting to witnesses, passed by the General Assem
bly of the restored Government of Virginia on
the geth clay of January, 1*04," was taken up
and ordered to engrossment.
MASTERS AND APPRENTIl ES.
41 A bill to amend and re-enact ihe fifth sec
lion of chapter one hundred and twenty-six
of the Code of Virginia for PM, in relation to
masters and apprentices," was ordered to
engrossment.
The Senate then ad journed.
The above bills will come up for final pas
sage at a future day. When they are passed ;
being matters of snob universal interest, full
abstracts of them will be published in the l)is
pat'h, and if the acts be not too long, they will
be given in extenso.
HOUSE OF DELEGATES.
House mot at 12 o'clock, M. No prayer.
1 Journal of yesterday was read by the Clerk.
morni.no hour.
From the Committee on Finance a bill was
reported to repeal section twelve, chapter
twentieth, Code of I860; also, a bill to amend
certain sections of the Code lixiiig the salaries
of the clerks of the Senate and House of Dele
gates.
The Committee on Propositions and Griev
ances asked to be relieved from the considera
? tion of the subject of incorporating tho
Planters' Loan Association.
RESOLUTION'S.
The following resolution, requiring the judg
ment of the House, was offered by Mr. Gar
nett :
" Resolved, That the Committee on Finance
be instructed to report a bill providing for the
sale of all the interest held by the State in
any of the works of improvement or joint
j #tock companies." Agreed to.
ORANUE AND ALEXANDRIA RAILROAD.
The business of the morning hour having
been transacted, the joint resolution in regard
to the presidency of the Orange and Alexan
dria railroad was put upon its third reading.
Mr. Garnett moved that the subject be dis
missed.
Mr. Cabell opposed this motion.
Mr. Gaknbtt argued in favor of the dis
missal of the subject, lie viewed it as a rail
road brawl, and did not think that it was
i proper, if lawful, for the State to mingle in
such brawls.
The question was called, and the House
refused to take the vote.
Mr. English offered an amendment to the
resolution, which declares Mr. Harbour presi
dent and Messrs. Coghill, Cazenove, Hart
and Slaughter, directors, without reference
to election.
Mr. Joyxes offered the following substitute
to the whole:
" Resolved, That the General Assembly is
of opinion thai the Orange and Alexan
dria railroad was not, when taken possession
of by the Hoard of Public Works, liable to be so
taken possession of, according to the provi
sions of section thirty-nine, chapter sixty-one,
of the Code of 1S60, and hereby disclaims, on
behalf of the State, the act of the said Hoard in
taking possession thereof under the provisions
of said section."
After a lengthy discussion, the question of
Mr. English's amendment was put, and the 1
amendment lost.
Mr. Jotnes withdrew his substitute.
Mr. Lee offered the following substitute for
the whole:
" Resolved, That, as the sense of the General
Assembly, no officers were elected for the
Qrange and Alexandria railroad on the 15th
and 16th of November, 1S65, and that the
Board of Public Works be requested to call &
meeting of the stockholders, for the election of
a president and directors at an early day." !
This was agreed to.
Mr. Garnett's motion to dismiss was pnt,
and decided in the negative by a vote of ayes,
24; noes, 58. The joint resolution, as amended,
was then passed after third reading.
On motion of Mr Strauohax, the House
adjourned.
[Messrs. Kellam, Wyatt, Ragsdaie and
Marshall were detained from their seats on
accouutof sickness.]
The New Comet ?The comet discovered by
Mr. Tattle at Washington on the 5th instant
is a dim, globular object, apparently without
nucleus. It Is already moving rapidly from
the earth, and passed oil the bth instant Its
perihelion. It is now in the constellation of
the Fisher, (above the southwestern horizon
in the evening,) and soon will be lost sight of
again, probably for thousands of years, since
its orbit is near parabolic.?O. II. Peters, As
tronomer.
A toast at an Irish society's dinner at Cin
cinnati: "Here's to the Prisldent of the Soci
ety, Patrick O'Raferty, an' may he live to ate
the hea that scratches over his grave,"
DIED. \
On tho 21th instant, MICHAEL O'COUNER, a
native of Clare county, f rr*lan?I, and for the last flf
r?M-n year* ii citizen of Kichtaond, in the seven
tieth year of hie age.
The funeral will take place froru st. Patrick a
Church THIS AFTERNOON at 2 o'clock.
May lie rest in peace.
Baltimore, Washington and Camden, N. J., pa
per a pleaae copy.
B
fcAUTIFUL VOLUMES OFCIIOICE
ENGLISH BOOKS.
BACON'S ESSAYS AND COLORS OF GOOD AND
K\IL. With Notes and Olossarial Index, by
WliMftT. One volume. Umo. *2. ?
THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF THE BEST SONGS
AND LYRICAL I'OEMS. IN THE ENGLISH
LANG!'AGE. Selected and Arranged by Frantic
Tuk.vkr Pai.okavE. One volume'.' l*UlO. *
THE JEST llooK. The Choicest Anecdotes and
Savin#*, selected and arranged by Mark Lemon.
One.volume. Drno. tftT.
THE FAIRY KooK. The heft popular Fairy
Stories, selected and rendered anew by the
author of "John Halifax, Gentleman.'' ?'!.
THE BOOK OF 1'RAlSE. From the bent English
Hymn Writer*, selected and arranged bv Koun
DKI.L PAt.MEK. $2.
THE BALLAD BOOK. A selection of the choicest
British Ballad*, edited by William Allimuiam. j
If 2 i
A BOOK OF NOBLE DEEDS OF ALL TIMES AND
ALL LANDS, gathered and narrated by ''The
Author of the Heir of Redclyffc.'' $2.
THE SUNDAY BOOK OF PofcTKY. selected and
arranged bv C. K. Alexandre. $2.
THE CHILDREN'S OAKLAND FROM THE BEST |
l'OETS, selected and arranged by Coventry
Patmork. $2.
BUNYAN'S PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Uniform with
the 44 Golden Treasure Stories." #2.
THE POEMS OF ROBERT BURNS. Edited by
Alexander Smith. 2 vols. ?4.50.
THE WoRKS OF CHARLES DICKENS. Handsome
12mo. volumes, from $1.50 to ?2. Either work
sold separately. ......
WOODHOU8E k PARI!AM,
(late James Woodhouse k Co.,)
ja 25?ts Governor street, near Main
IMPORTANT TO TRAVELLERS.?
X The old and established BALTI-tf _ ?
MORE STEAM PACKET COMPANY.^sssnlr^ jj
carrying the United States Mail and^yrj.a^ula
Adams Express Freight, so well and lavoraioy
known to the public as the M. N. FALLS'S LINE,
are now running their magnificent, safe and com
modious steamers, .
THOMAS KELSO, Paptain G. W. Russell,
ADELAIDE, Captain James Cannon.
The THOMAS KELSO was built for, and 1*
expressly adapted to, the Bay route, and excels, in
the splendor of her outfit, any steamer now ply
ing these waters. She is provided with HOT and
CoLD BATHS and everv modern convenience.
The ADELAIDE has been recently rebuilt and
refurnished throughout. Her accommodations for
travellers are of a superior order. She is so \fcgll
known that further comment is unnecessary.
Passengers by this Line arrive in Baltimore in
time to connect* with the early trains to Washing
ton and all points North and West.
BAGGAGE CHECKED TO ALL POINTS and
Passengers and baggage conveyed to the depots
REE OF CHARGE.
Passengers fyoin Richmond wili take the steamers
M. MARTIN and CITY OF RICHMOND at Roek
ett* at <!J o'clock, A. M., and form a connection
with these steamers at Norfolk, going North.
Passage to Baltimore, first class **1 5o
'assage to Baltimore,' second class. 5 00
assage to Philadelphia 1? -3
'assage to New York 13 3o
Any information desired wil 1 be cheerfully given
J our office, at SHIPLEY, ROANE A CO/S, C!o
hiers. Franklin and Fourteenth streets, opposite
Exchange Hotel. M. N. FALLS. President.
W. C. Smith, General Superintendent.
JOHN H. FREEMAN,
ja 25?It Ticket and Passenger Agent.
TEST RECEIVED, at
MAY, HELLER & BROTHERS,
corner Sixth and Broad streets,
a large assortment of DRY GOODS, NOTIONS and
FANCY OOODS, to which the attention of the pub
lic is invited.
We are selling Prints at 20 cents, and good quality
at 25 cents per yard ; Balmoral Skirts at $2.30,
worth #3.50: Bleached and Unbleached Cotton at
25 cents worth 33 cents ; Hoop Skirts, *5 cents ; Do
laines, 33 cent.-, worth U> cents ; l?.'*t Kid Cloves.
*1.75, worth $2.50 ; French Print.-, yard wide, only
3o cents.
<?iir stock embraces all the latest styles of Dry
Good* and Fancy Articles, too numerous to particu
larize in an advertisement. All of which having
been recently purchased, we are enabled to sell
them I.cWER THAN FORMER C'oST PRICES.
In connection with our Dry Goods establishment,
wo^liave also opened, one "door west, (17M Broad
street.) a full stork of Ladies', Misses' and Chil
dren's MIOKS and G?\ITKRS; also, Men's and
Boys BOOTS and .SHOES, HATS, SHIRTS, CLOTH
ING and FURNISHING GOODS, at prices to suit the
times.
For bargains in the above line of good-* rail at
MAY, HELLER <x BROTHERS,
northwest corner Sixth and Broad streets.
ja 23?lw
V
TT EXT ION CITIZ K X S OF MOX
- ROE WARD.?A meeting of the citizen* of
onroe Ward will he held at F. LAUBE'S SHOP,
rmerly L. L. Lacy's vomer of Fir.-t and Broad
reets, at 7 o'cloc k P. M., on THURSDAY, 25th
statu, for the Purpose of forming a CLUB, where
a interest of the citizen will he discussed,
iso, the merits of the candidates for offices in the
?xt spring election.
A full meeting of citizens of all brandies, such
Property-Holders, Merchants, Mechanics, and
iborers, i"> expected, as the success of the object
mend* materially on tlie election of officers,
ill 25?It A CITIZEN.
T RON.
I 100 tons ENGLISH REFINED IRON, assorted
sizes ;
10 tons SWEDES IRON, assorted sizes ;
5 tons COUNTRY IRON, assorted sizes ;
ALSO,
NAYLOR'S CAST STEEL,
English and American BLISTERED STEEL,
SPRING STEEL, for sale by
ja 23_3t E. & S. WORTHAM k CO.
ORANGES, LEMONS, GRAPES.
1 have jio*t received, by Htt-arner, a superior lot
of FHEsH and .SWEET ORANGES, from Havana
and .Sicily, and a large assortment of MALAGA
(iKAl'ES, COCOA .NUTS, RAISINS, Ac. On hand,
a full supply of CAN 1)1 ES, Ac., all of which I_offer
for sale, by wholesale
wholesale or retail, at No. 51 MAIN
STREET, opposite the St. Charles Hotel,
ja25?lw* B. CATOONI.
AN CONSIGNMENT, TWENTY
* " live barrels NAVY BEANS, fifteen barrel*
VIRGINIA BUCKWHEAT, CLOVER and TIMO
THY SEED, and are in constant receipt of BUT
LAX SEED, DRIED FRUITS,
TER. EGOS LARD, FL..~
Ac., Ac. We al so call attention to our stock of fine
MANUFACTURED and SMOKING TOBACCO,
ja 25?2t . COSBY, PUGH A CO.
TUST RECEIVED, CASH'S COVEN
M TRY CAMBRIC TRILLING, all widths: fine
IRISH LINEN, SHIRTING COTTON. TAPE TRIM
MING, ENGLISH HOSIERY, CRAPE COLLARS,
CRAPE VEILS. Ac.
ja 25 LEVY BROTHERS, 15 Main street.
PRESERVED GINGER.
MACCARONI, Ac.
cases PRESERVED GINGER,
cases MACCARONI,
cases MIXED PICKLES,
just received by sdeamer.
ja 25 DANDRIDGE A ANDERSON.
4 T COST TO CLOSE, our wiiolo
\ * ~ " *"
J\ stock of FANCY DRESS GOODS,
ja 23 LEVY BROTHERS, 13 Mainstreet.
rtOUNTRY- KNIT SOCKS, also
\ ) MERINO and COTTON SOCKS, at
ja 25 LEVY BROTHERS, 15 Main street.
MILL FEED.?BRAN and BROWN
STUFF for sale by
ja 25 WILLIAM T. KING A CO.
ONIONS.?NORTHERN ONIONS, ill
barrels, for sale by . _
ja 25 WILLIAM T. KING A CO.
MERINO VESTS, for Ladies and
Children, all sizes, at
ja 25 LEVY BROTHERS. 15 Main street.
?AMILY BOLTED MEALforsalobv
ja 25 WILLIAM T. KING A CO.
TO BRICK MANUFACTURERS.?
1 FOUR ACRES OF VALUABLE BRICK CLAY,
NEAR PORT MAYO, ON THE OSBORNE TURN
PIKE, FOR SALE.?We offer for salo the valuable
square of brick clay land, near Rocketts. formerly
worked by Glenn A Davis, and adjoinlug the
brick yard*of Mr. J. Powers, containing four acree.
on this lot there is a most valuable quantity of
SUPERIOR CLAY, and several buildings suitable
for operatives, and a never-failing supply of water
always on hand. To effect a speedy sale, a great
bargain will be given. Apply to
ja -3?3t HARRISON, GOD DIN A APPERSON.
Treasiekr's Office, )
National Expkess and Tkawsportatioi* Co., >
i. s
Richmond, Va., January 24, IiM.
A T A MEETING OF THE BOARD
iY OF DIRECTORS of this Company, held on the
20th instant, the following resolution was adopted :
" Resohea, That a further requisition of five
(5) per centum be made on the Stockholders of
thin Company, payable by the 1st day of February,
In accordance with the above resolution, Stock
holders will pay in their respective assessment* at
this office by the date specified (1st day of February,
1???). . J. V. II. ALLEN,
ja 23?t latfo treasurer pro tnn.^
I/OR ?A LE, A BLACKSMITH shop,
now doing a good business. Reason for sell
ing, having other business to attend to. Apply to
TTl,
JOSEPH LONGINOI
on Seventeenth street,
ja 23?Jt between Grace and Broad.
/REHH GARDEN SEED.?UNION
WASHING M ACHINES ?By steamer we are
iceipt of our Spring supply |of tKKMI and
B GARDEN SEEDS? And on hand,
in recell
purb a
UNION Washing machines,
PLOWS, castings.
j? tMt*
AUCTION SALES?THIS DAY.
> Wv*vwv X v-vy*?V^V^V ?"W ??*
By Kegnault ft (4'.,
Main street, between Eighth and Ninth.
WE WILL SELF, AT AUCTION,
(without reserve; THIS <Thnr*di?y? MORN
ING, 2-*?th instant, ?t half-p*?t 1<? o'clock, a
line assortment of NEW Ff KXITPRK and ?n
excellent assortment of MKRC'HA.VIMSK, fin' ra
cing, in part,
MAHOGANY andWALXCT RrRF.AVN,
MAHOGANY and WAL.VI'T WASHsTAXDS.
30 COTTAGE BEDSTEADS (three size*),
10 dozenCANE-SKAT CH \IKS,
5oo yards CARPETING?Brussels, Ingrain ami
Hemp:
l o.\K extension table.
I WALXI'T EXTENSION' TABLE,
lo HAIR MaTTKK?KS,
CASSIMEKKS, CROCKERY, ft<\
KEOXAl'LTftro ,
ja 2'?It * Auctioneer*. ic>
AUCTION SALES-FUTURE DAY.
HI<;if CONSTABLE'S SAI,K.-VVi!l
he Hold on FRIDAY, January 20th, 1*W. at 10
o'clock, A. M., at the store of William H. PI a
(?ant*, on Fifteenth stre.q, between Ma'n and Car;.*
1 barrel HOLLAND GlX, ?
<5 quarterWINE.
1 WASHING MACHINE,
1 LARGE BOILER,
Lot FLAT IKONS,
2 SETTEES.
1 IRON BEDSTEAD,
1 COOKING STOVE,
1 SIDEBOARD,
4 TABLES,
3 roll* MATTING,
4 MAHOGANY TABLES,
1 BOOK-CASE.
?2 LARGE ARM CHAIRS,
1 SOFA. 9
1 CARPET, .
1 TWO-horse CARRIAGE,
1 CANDLE STAND,
1 WARDROBE,
PITCHER. BOWLS, ftc., ftr.,
to satisfy execution* and distress warrant* in my
hands in favor of Moran r*. Clark. Bachrach <??.
Wagner, Davis r#. King, Rowe ft Towus.nd >*.
Fitzgerald, Taylor, agent, t?. Stone, Tomlin is.
Hilis, Hamilton vs. Collins, WUli^tn- i^. Mjoro.
ja 23?2t High Constable city of Richmond.
By Grubhs ft Williams, Auctioneers,
Main street, live doors above Spotswood Hotel.
riOMMISSIOXEuJf SALE OF VAF.
Vy CABLE REAL ESTATE IN THE CITY ? F
RICHMOND. ?In execution of a decree of the ( ir.
cuit Court of Richmond, entered^on the lTtli of
Januarv, HM, in theca-e <it " NNall and wit.- ,
Nott and als," the undersigned, commission,-r^
appointed for the purpose, will sell at public auc
tion, upon the premises respectively, in the order
named b^low, on MONDAY, swth Jmnriry, 1*
commencing at 12 o'clock, M.,if lair, i! not. then
on the next fair day thereafter, at the same In ur,
the following priipertv, to-wit:
Tlie valuable LOT on the north aide of Main
Street, between Eleventh and Twelfth streets, n \r
above the Exchange Bank, and formerly oceutde.t
bv A. Antoni. It fronts twenty-two and a half m.r,
and runs hack one hundred and ten feet to an au.y
in the rear.
This is regarded as one of the most desirable I. ?.
in the citv, being centrally situated and con\,..
nient to tlie best business part of the city.
After which, will be sold the two tine, three--;, ry
BRICK HOCSE^at the southeast corner of Fnt.i ?
iin and Third streets?the ono a double tenein. ,
known as the " Revere House,'' and the m-xt
adjoining tenement on the ea*t.
This projiertv is so well and favorably known
that further de-ciintion is deemed iiiniec y
Suffice it to say, the location i&about the best in ;m<
citv for private residences.
Terms: One-fifth cash : balance at four. eiJit,
twelve and sixteen months, lor notes with inbr -t
added, titles being retained by the court until tli
purchase money is tully paid. Purchasers to |<y
all taxes for l-<?6.
JOHN HOWARD, )
AN DREW .Jo||X>TON,> Commis-mm i-.
THOM AS J. EVANS, )
Garni:.- ft Williams, Auction, crs j;t !
By i'ilkinton, Pulliain ft Co.,
Auctioneers and Commission Merchant*,
No. 10 Main 6tre?-t, Richmond, Va.
FOR SALE AT AUCTION.?Bv onU-r
of the County Court of Chesterfield ?.<u?e/. I
| will proceed to sell at public auction, fordivi-i- u,
; on the premises, commencing at '2 o'clock IV M. < u
FRIDAY, the 20th of January, lst>6, tiie folio win
J property, viz :
First.* One LOT. fronting twenty-eight and one.
half feet on Hull street, and running back nn?
hundred and sixtv-tive feet on square opposjv . |
Farmers' Hotel, Manchester, with a stu.-ll SH'dl
! MAKERS' SHOP thereon, lately occuph d by J, hu
Evans, K>q.
Second. At the same time anil place, will -ell th-*
I EIGHTY ACRES <>F LAND lying on both siJ.? ;
| the Petersburg railroad, at Rice's Station, and V ?
' Improvements thereon, consisting of a CoMFoRT
ABLE DWELLING, with good om-house*. Oie ?
; half the land open, and one-half cleared?luuv
occupie i by Mr. Lemuelchalkly.
Third. Will sell, on premises, one LOT. fr? et
Dig on the Midlothian turnpike, une-nuarb r - t i
mile above the Petersburg railroad ?Ie;t. s vy
feet front, ami running back four liundr.-d ? ,
with a very comfortable NEW DWELLING witii
four rooms, and KITCHEN, fte. Lot welleiiclo- .l,
: Lately occupied Ly Mr. Furcron.
Term* : One-third cash; balance, four and eiyU
1 months, negotiable notes, Interest added, an t t. .
; retained until payments are made.
WILLI AM AMBERS, Commissioner
I ja 10?tdi
SHIPPING.
IK)R N'KW YORK.?The new anil elf
gant side-wheel steamship
ALBEMARLE. Captain Boi rxk, will^
leave her wharf at Rocketts on'
SATCRDAY, the '-7th, at 1 o'clock,I
1'. M.
Passengers are requested to be on board prior t ?
that hour.
j a 25?3t S A M C F. L A YIIES ft CO., A gents.
FOR RENT.
J EXCELLENT MARKET GARDEN.
J OF TEN ACRES, WITH SMALL TENEMENT
THEREON, IN SIDNEY, AT THE HEAD ' K
I GRACE STREET, FOR RENT.?We offer for rem.
lor one year, the EXCELLENT LOT <>F 1KV
! ACRES, on Grace street, adjoining Mr. L. S.
! Squire'* residence. There is on it a COMFORTA
BLE DWELLING WITH THREE ROOMS, I..
: STABLE. Sic. All of the land ha* recently t u
| ploughed, ami is now ready for cultivation* It is
i well adapted to a MARKET GARDEN. < r f< r t
SUBURBAN RESIDENCE, being on a b.-autiR:!
street and in a delightful neighborhood. Pul
sion given at once. The owner will enclose tL
land. Price, four hundred dollars. Applv to
ja 23?2t HARRISON, G'HHMN & APPERSO.N
TWO I >HSIR ABLE ROOMS FOR
L RENT, with or without BOARD. Ga*. kg*
water and attendance; also, a coal-house
and use of kitchen, if desired. Apply at M r*.uViA
Lewellvn's, Eighteenth street, betwe n < a: I
Broad streets, second door from Broad.
j;l *3?3t *
I^OR RENT, A VERY DKSIRARRR
lot of LAND, well enclosed, near Che!* \
and adjoining Mr. Charles L. Bruce, suitable I r .
Market Garden. Possession can he h id at otic .
K. D. EACHO,
Real Estate Agent, Fourteenth street,
ja 23?It* near Main
fOR RENT.?I haveTWO ROOMS foi
rent, furnished or not, as renal red. ??ne >ri.
is on tile first tb>or, large and comfortable, ffTTT
gas with parlor attached ; suitable for twgUJJk
gentlemen, or one with his wife. The other in tu*
second story, with gas, suitable for a single v "?
tleman. References exchanged. Apply at my r- ? t
dence, second door from Fourth, on ClAv^tr- '
Ja??te TH??MA?^ W BIDK KKN6k<H'?JH
FARM FOR RENT.?We" havo t'-r
rent a FARM, near Staples'a Mill, four ni.!*
from Richmond, on Broad Street road, contain- ?>
EIGHTY-FIVE ACRES, belonging to C- M f'r*
rell, with good dwelling and all necessary out
houses, with tine orchard. If not rented privatelr
before the FIRST MONDAY in February, it *ul
be rented at public auction at the County Co'if-*
house on that day at 12 o'clock.
COLE A WADE, Main,
between Eighteenth and Nineteenth stret.4.
Ja 17?ts over McCorroick'e ?
I \ESIRABLE RESIDENCE.?KOOM^
1/ FOR RENT, corner t?f Twentv-nlnth
and Franklin streets. PARLOR, DlNlN'i- ???n
ROOM. BED-ROOM and KITCHEN. XPI-lvJi*
to Samuel m. pkicL.
corner of Ninth and Main streets,
ja 17?ts or at the hou?c
F
WANTS.
\IT ANTED, by a middle-aged woman,
? Y a SITUATION AS HOUSEKEEPER, or. "
ant. is a go?Ki plain seamstress and is willing n
make herself useful. Good references given ??*
required. Address post-office box No. 234
/a 2J-3t?
NOTICE.?All adjourned meeting vf
the Stockholder* of the Clover BUI Ha-lb1**
Company will be held at their office, in thi?cny,
on THURSDAY, 25ih Instant, at II o'ciock.
JAM KB H. (OX,
1
JOHN FKKKLAND, > CowioiUe*
ja 11?tdtn W. T. JOY NEB, S
City Water Works, January 23, l?w
Notice.?This otiioe luw Ikvij
removed from Cary, between Eighth *?>l
Ninth streets, to Bank, between Ninth and Ten"1
streets. J. L. DAVIS,
Ja 21?Ivv* BuperlutendonL^
r|MIE UI8PATCH U printed on TYl'K
1 MADE AT THE RICHMOND TYPE FOUND;
R Y. Every article requisite for a Printing Office
Northern prices. aft. L. PKLOUKK <k CO.,
Ja la?3in Klsbvond, > ?? .
PINK-APPLK CHBESK AN1> FKK
19?1? Mo. Mf Broad #trv#L

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