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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, January 26, 1866, Image 2

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FRIDAY
..JANUARY 26, lSt>6.
How the Work Gets On.
Congress continue* It* daily devotion to tlie
Idol Installed In the marble hall* of the capi
tol. Yesterday, in the Srnate, the bill enlarging
the powers of the F reed men' * Bureau wa*
passed. This extend* its operation* over the
whole Uuion, so that the cases of hardship and
sufferings of the unfortunate blacks in the
great Northern cities (such as the freezing of
a poor black boy, from Petersburg, in the
streets of Newport, the other day, from
neglect,) may receive the proper attention of
this philanthropic body.
The //oust took a step towards diminishing
the influence of the white population in the
District, a* a sort of counterpart to the ucgro
sn 11"rage bill, by ordering a bill to bo reported
by the Committee of the District to exclude
from the right of suffrage all persons who
have voluntarily borne arms against the {
1'nited States iu the military or naval ser
vice. The House then resumed the considera
tion of the constitutional amendment regula
ting the basis of representation. During the
debate, as we are informed, Mr. Bingham,
of Ohio, stated that the Committee on Recon
struction had under consideration an amend
ment to the Constitution for the purpose ol
protecting the rights of all persons (black) j
whose rights had not yet been enforced, owing
to the want of power in Congress. This power
the committee projwsed to give by the con
templated amendment.
What sort of amendment this is we may well
conjecture. It is a foreshadowed attempt, no
doubt, to consolidate all jH>wer iu the hands of
Congress, and reproduce the Dong Parliament
of England on this continent.
As to Mr. Stxvkns's amendment, according
to the telegraph, there does not appear to have
been perfect harmony even in his own party,
for we are told that various Republicans
favored some amendment apportioning repre- j
sentation, but were not agreed on the one j
pending. Thedebateof the day was animated, j
and the subject seeins to have been spun along I
through the day's sitting.
How long is this agitation to continue? and j
how much of the time of Congress is it to 1
occupy? Certainly it is doing no good to the'
poor African, and can but end in a multiplica
tion of the troubles and miseries of the race.
Is it not enough for the present that he is !
free?that he is amongst a people who know
him, and have always been kind to him, and
can better provide for Ills wants in his new ?
relation than those who are now deafening the j
ears of the country with their clamor about!
him ? Their ancestors tore him from his !
native land a savage?a cannibal?and, in it
state of slavery for a generation or two,
we have civilized him?not to that degree
that he should be considered gifted for '
all the immunities and responsibilities of a
citizen ; yet the agitators, paying to slavery '
the highest compliment ever paid to any
system, education, contend that through it, in
that brief time, he is a thoroughly civilized
being, and entitled to the highest rights as
such. They believe no such thing. It is all j
hypocrisy. Were the negro contemptible iu ,
numbers ho would be contemptible every
way, and might have continued a slave'
till doomsday. But he counts up his millions,
and may be used as political capital. Why
has the Induin never attracted the sympathies
of the philanthropists ? He was the owner of
the land we occupy. He is iu no way inferior !
to the negro in any of the qualities of man
hood, but has generally been considered 6upo- !
rior, as he was more like tho white man. The !
difference is merely as to the value of the one
in voting and tho uselessuess of the other for
any such purpose. The negro would pay ; the
Indian promised no profit, no dividend. The
red mau was too independent, too per verse, *
too much devoted to the chase, too fond of,
hunting-grounds, to be subjugated to the vile ,
use* of partisanry. The case is simple enough ; j
but the game is yet not played out by a great !
deal.
Opposition to Immigration.
There are strong influences at work to defeat
the efforts which the South is making for the
introduction of foreign immigration. There
Is great competition throughout the whole
country for labor of all sorts. The public
lands are obtained upon easy terms. The cur
rent of immigration has so long set in a
northern and northwesterly direction that it
is hard to divert it from its accustomed chan
nel. Most of those who propose to come have
relatives or friends already residing in the
North and West. It is natural that they
should seek their association and companion
ship, that they should go where, in many
eases, their own language is spoken, and their
own churches established. To counteract such
influences will require no ordinary sagacity
and energy.
As if these were not enough, an effort has
been industriously made to represent the con
dition of society in the South as unsettled,
disorganized and dangerous ; and, in addition, :
It is asserted that there is here an overbearing |
aristocracy, differing from the baronial life of
the European Continent only in tlie absence of
titles, but having the same contempt for the
industrial classes, and only desirous to obtain
foreign labor as a working machine to increase
its own wealth.
If the foreigners could see with their own
eyes the true condition of affairs they would
eoon discover that a lauded aristocracy in the
Sonth, if it ever existed, has passed away:
that our large landholders, once the most influ
ential of our people, and whose influence was
always exerted for the good and happiness of
society, are now amongst the most impove- j
rished of our people, and that so far from there j
being here a contempt of labor, those among
ns who can find an op|>ortunity are only too j
glad to obtain work. The crops which now J
support us have been raised in great part by
the officers and soldiers of the late Confederate
army, working w ith their own hands. Ladies
who once held the highest social positions
may now be found, iu nil parts of the country,
supporting themselves by their needles, and
cheerfully performing duties once discharged
by their servants. To create a bugbear of aris
tocracy out of the deplorable ruins of our
social state must require a lively imagination
Indeed. That class in the South which once
bore that designation no longer exists, but it
Is due to historic truth to say that never, at
any time, in any section, or in any country, did
aristocracy ever exist iu a less offensive form
than among the cultivated and kindly aristo
crats, so called, long siuce gathered to their
lathers.
a
HcLLiriiD?By an order of General Tiaar
y-frday. all maglll
ttatee, civil officers and others are forbidden
to execute the provisions of the law entitled
? An act providing for the puulehment of
J!!*?*" *>y tb* Virginia la
r)** ? present session, upou any colored
pwsaa In the iJcparUm-nt commanded by the
General. J
Cojrrccitri.?8ome one asked him how many
?tars there were iu the sky ? ?? I don't know "
?aid ha, " I mind things near me." The ques
tioner resumed, "Then how many hairs are
there in the cat's back f" " I don't care," said
the philosopher.
On Monday there were large arrivals of cot- j
ton, tar, shingles, Ac., at Norfolir, via the
Albemarle canal.
. Ti* D**?we railroad has been completed
If ? WBWii Ann#, Md#
general Iwpmlv or viroima.
Tnr?KPAT, January 20, H60.
SENATE.
Lion tonal governor CowpI* in the clmir.
mined by sickness.
nor*E bill* RnriRBtii.
An act for the assessment of {>eraons, pro
perty. income and salaries. To Committee on
An'acl providing fur th.<nh olr tond. or ,
scrip donated bv Congress for education, lo
Committee on I uhlic Institu'ti0J*- c0al
An net to incorporate the Mantua torn
Mining Company. To Committee on General
L An act to incorporate the to^n of Eor' Re
public, in the county ol Eotkiugham.
Committee on General ^iw?- t of Nor.
Au act authomtuK the County ^
folk county 5?A?ri ?S on" General Laws.
purposes. To t ojmn t 8ection sixth
o^chapt<nTsixteenth of the Code. To Courts
0f JUwlCEWIC? MANrfACTCRlNO COMPART.
The Senate JJ^X^VfTfvilh 'nnTmS
m^rwhich S^cMto by the Senate, and
the bill pawed.
CHARTER OF ALEXANDRIA.
An act to amend the charter of this city was
passed. bto k roMPANIBf,.
lly Mr. Galt : . \
" Resolved *>y th* General AsstmVv '>f J
Th?, thpSetretarv of th- senate and th- < lurk
of th- 110.1.0 Ol l)elo*atoa civ
th,. K-iici notice to be renewed at the beginning
n thai in all applications made
m thc Gcacral Ara-tubly for acts incorpo
r-iting ioint stock companies, the bill shall be
nrinted at the exiwnse of the applicant and a
Spy of the same laid on the desk of each mem
ber of both Houses. Laid over.
RArK AND ABprCTIO*.
Zti'/y Sf: !oTn"^Vscco'nd is
punished by contln-m-nt in the
not less than three or more than ten j ears.
marriages of colored persons.
The bill amends the fourteenth section of
chapter one hundred and eight of 1 he Code.
It provides for the register oi marriage?, ?
It further declares that "where cohere
nersons. before the passage of this kct. sli.ui
have undertaken and agreed to occupy th
relation to each other of husband and \vifj, and
shall be cohabiting together as such at th?
time of its passage, whether the rites of mnr
riage shall have been celebrated between them
or not, thev shall be deemed husband and w ife
?ind be entitled to the rights and privihgi*.
and subject to the duties and obligations, of
?hatrcl;ition in like manner ns if tin y had been
dulv married as white persons .art'required h>
law to b?- married; and all their childri n shall
1 be deemed legitimate whether born before or
t after the passage ol this act.
"This act shall be in force from its pas
sage." The bill passed the Senate.
rNLAWFTL MARRIAGES.
The bill amends sections one, throe, five,
seven and fifteen of chapter one hundred and
"of'Yt'pmiisims bicamy villi penitentiary for
not less than one nor more than live years.
If anv person, white or colored, shall
out of this State for the purpose of being mar
ried. and be married and rcUira to reside i
it thev shall be punished as it the in.irri.iM
Ad been in li.il Stale. The fact of th.ar
cohabitation hero as man and \wt- sltall bt
evidence of their marriage. ?
(j). Fixes a penalty for marriage without
llV:!lMl'!inishos by imprisonment all persons,
white or colored, Avl.0 lewdly cohabit.to(tether
or who, marrie.1 or not. are guilty ol open or
"MSby a tine the offence of pro
'"Thisam'shaMbe'in force from its passage.
This bill passed the Senate.
admission* or negro evidence.
The bill amends and re-enacts section ni'io,
chapter one hundred and three, of
1S60, delining a mulatto, providing for the] in
ishment of offences by colored pm-sons and or
the admission of their evidence in legal
tigations, and repeals all laws in re ti
"'"Tt^onYvt,.. has one-fourth parlor
more of negro blood shall be deemed a
mulatto^ ^ ^ crjinjnaioffeiicf s commit ted by
colored persons tlio punishment shall be tm
same sis provided bylaw lor white persons
who commit like offences'';
"That in all criminal prosectitums agan-1
colored persons they shall be entitled to trial
bVhsrt "hereafter the evidence of Indians and
colored persons shall be heard in all
tigations, at law or in equity, to bat e sucn
weight and credence as the jury, court or jus
tice hearing it raav allow to it; but such cv i
tieuc? shall in aU in oourl^f equity as
well as in Iproceedings at common law, b?.
Eiven rir " voce before the tribunal that is to
weigh il? ud not in th- form of a d-po..uo. .
Xo aDiiellate tribunal shall supeicedt
?.v-rs- \t judgment, order or decree o an
inferior tribunal on the ^rou? ,rt ;\'X
judgmant, order or decree is
evidence of colored persons, when bj ^ bu
nal seeing and hearing the witnesses.examined
certifies on the record that it did not give ir<
deuce to such witnesses. The evidence of
colored persons, eo taken, may be |--d''-ed to
writing and spread on the recoid, or lib d
rat w when desired by any party to the pro
ceeding, or deemed proper by the coin t. pro
vided, that when the parties to the P?M?li g
?ire all white persons, the evidence of no
colored person shall be received to prove facts
occurring i?rior to the 1st day ot January, r J.:
?? This act shall Is1 m force H orn its p.iss.igf .
The bill passed the Senate.
REPEAL.
A bill " to repeal an act entitled an act
relating to witnesses, passed by the General
Assembly of the Restored Government of , ir
giniaon the 29th day of January, l*t>C wa
passed.
masters and apprentices.
The bill amends the fifth section, chapter
one hundred and twenty-six. of the Code o>f
Ho, and provides that " the writing b,' which
'Viiv minor is bound an appri ntu* <? .
cifvhis age, and what art, trade or business
he Is to be taught. The master, ^etlier it is
AYnrpihlv urovided therein or not, hhiill b
bound to teach the same, and shall be bound to
teach him reading, writing and common antli
metic, including the rule of three.
?? This act shall be in force from its passage.
The bill passed the Senate.
MANASSAS HAP AND WINCHESTER AND POTOMAC
railroad companies.
A bill to amend the charters of tin'-se com
panies was called up on motion ol^iLi Mh i
The bill grants the Manassas trap J ompauy
the authority to construct a. raiiio.id limn
Winchester to Strasburg. It was amended
and passed unanimously.
VIRGINIA WHITE LEAD, PAINT AND OIL COMPANY.
An act to incorporate this company passed.
repeal of oath law.
A bill to repeal an act, passed by the Alex
andria Legislature as a J,re'
scribing oaths in certain cases was passeU.
NATIONAL MER? HASTILE EXCHANOB COMPANY.
A bill to incorporate this company, the prin
cipal otlice of which shall be Kichmotui and
whose business shall he " to lac ill .
excli inge of commodities and productions, e nd
R mate purchases for others; to sell in he
best markets the various productions of the
country; to insure property entrusted to its
SiviiUraiisUv or in store, and to guarantee
the payment of debts contracted through its
agency a ml for this pur,?o,e it may contract
with railroad and express companyits, i
mou carriers, aud with commissioii or other
merchants, to transact its operations, estab
lish agencies throughout the
iudeninitv itself by insurance against lots or
damage by llre, or risks of navigation or trans
nortation ; and generally use such lawful way*
means as may be necessarv to carry on the
"ldb."l" "" It wu ordered to ?ngro.,raent.
01ANOE AND ALEXANDRIA RAILROAD.
Ths ioint resolution which passed the
Satiate in reference to this corJ1l';^^'
back from the House with a sul*titutf^._l h
original declare*! the election ol liarbour .uul
others valid. The House substitute declares
that no legal election has been held, an" rw"
conimeiKU that a new election be ordered by
the liosrd of Public Works
Mr. Keen moved that the Senate disagree
with the House substitute, and that the sub
4"~* referred lo a committee of conference.
1 that the message of the Governor had
tie Senate injustice. They had fairly
uredthe subject for a loug time. As to
prtssion that there had been " legerde
employed, lis declared it u slander, aud
anont unworthy of the high source lroin
it had emanated.
Hull ike favored a re-election and called
livUion of the subject; pending which
iat# adjournsd,
HOUSE OF DELEGATES
House met at 12 o'clock. No prayer.
The Journal of yesterday was rend by the
flerk.
CI.AJM OF THE JCSW ToRK AMD VlRUISlA STBAX
PACKET COMPAXT.
A report from the Committee on Claims, in
regard to the claims of the Virginia and New j
York Steamship Company against the State
for the seizure and loss of the steamships
Jamestown and Yorktown, was presented, and
nt the request of the committee was ordered
to be printed.
The report is a long one, and sets forth in
detail the allegations of the New York and
Virginia Steamship Company concerning the
seizure of the steamers by the State of Vir
ginia in IStil. The committee then deemed it
necessary to enter into not only the nature of
fiie transactions, hut also the actual power ,
and authority of the Stato Government at
Richmond at that time, as well as the powers
and restrictions of the restored Government.
They then enter into the action of the Rich
mond Convention in l^jj^ giving the date of
the passage of the ordinance of secession and
the date of its taking effect; and on the other I
hand, tin* action of the Wheeling Convention,
quoting several acts of the said body declar
ing null and void the action of the Richmond
Convention, which tended to the carrying on or
levying of war, and for the re-organization of
the.State government, which was in pursuance
thereof re-organized, and is now the restored
Government of Virginia, by virtue of whose
authority the Legislature has its being.
They quote also the action of the Alexandria
Convention in 1MJ3, in a section of the consti
tution adopted by them, which declares that
the General Assembly 41 shall not provide for
the payment of any debt or obligation created
in the name of the State of Virginia by the !
usurped and pretended State authorities".''
The committee, with the view taken by
them, thought themselves precluded from
inquiring into the merits of this case
Though it might have been proved or conceded
that the the seizure of these steamers was in
violation of the good faith due to a sister
State, and though it might be conceded that
the liberal terms on which the claimants are
willing to place the settlement of this claim,
entitle them to the most favorable regard,
yet the committee could not forget that the j
requirements of the organic law and the re- !
strictions put on the powers of the Legislature
could not be contravened.
They then investigated the rharacft'r of the
proceeding by whieh the seizure was made.
Concluding that the seizure was not tjio act of
the legitimate authorities of the State, the
committee did not perceive that the claim was
a valid one.
11 the act was only illegal from an assump
tion of authority by an oflieer of the State,
the question would"remain as to how far the j
State was responsible for the erroneous actions
of its olllcers.
While the committee did not undertake to
say that there were not cases where justice, or
even law, required that the State should bo
held responsible for such action, it did not
regard the seizure of these steamers as one of
such classes.
Had the Confederacy succeeded, and the
'?so-called usurped government been deemed
tin* established government of the Slate, the
claim would have been decided by interna
tional law ; but by reason of the failure of the
Confederacy it was the duty of this General
Assembly to conform to its powers and duties
under the restored Government.
It was manifest to the committee thrt view
ing this question in this light, the claim could
not be allowed. The seizure of these vessels
was part and parcel of the plan by which
Harper's Ferry was captured, a volunteer and
militia force organized, and other acts per
formed, which were declared by the Wheeling J
Convention "null and void.'' How, then,
could this Assembly, acting under the autho
rity of the restored Government, recognize
that as valid and binding which that Govern
ment has always repudiated and declared
void ?
In conclusion, the commit tee state :
"It must Uq remembered that, as a proml- i
nent fact, the restored Government and the
Richmond State Government were not only op
posing powers, and, in a general sense, hostile
powers, but. they were engaged in actual war I
with each other. Thisstateof active hostility !
continued to the fall of the Confederacy. Hv i
this event the restored Government conquered,
overthrew and destroyed the State Govern- !
ment at Richmond. The restored Govern-|
ment was established throughout the State, j
with the character and with the right of a
conquering power. When we remember that
the first act of this Government was intended
to avoid all responsibility for .nets of this cha
racter by declaring them void, and that on a
siibscqiien t occasion there was iucorpor.i t? din
the organic law the prohibition that the Gene
ral Assembly shall not provide for the pay
ment of any debt or obligation created in the
name of the State of Virginia by the Richmond
authorities; and that the restored Govern
ment is now the only power in the state
willing all along, and now, by the current of
events, able, to enforce these provisions and
prohibitions?common sense would, as it
seems to the committee, at once, and without
hesitation, declare against this claim.
"Your committee are therefore of the
opinion that the General Assembly have no
power to provide lor the payment of this
claim, and respectfully ask to be discharged
from its further consideration."
COPE or ImJo.
1 Senate bill declaring the (.'ode of Virginia
for lSftiasthe lawful ('ode of the Statu was
read a second time and the question of a third
reading put.
A lengthy and animated discussion here
ensued ; alter wliieli the bill was. on motion of
Mr. Lkk, laid on the table.
DOVER COMPART.
Senate bill to incorporate the Dover Com
pany was passed with amendments.
WARWICK MAXt"FACTl'K1 XU COMPAXY.
Senate bill incorporating this company was
passed without amendment.
BILI.S PASSED.
Hill to amend and re-enact the eleventh sec
tion of chapter one hundred and ninety-two of
the Code of 1S?J<>, providing for the punish
ment of burglary with death, at the disi retion
of the jury ;
Hill authorizing the Governor to lease out
the Armory Grounds and provide barrac ks for
the Public Guard ;
Hill to confirm the acts of courts lmld at
improper places in certain cases.
THIRD ARTICI.R OP T1IR COXST1TUTIOX.
Th?? ordinance altering and amending the
third article of the Constitution was passed, t
On motion of Mr. Roijketbox, the House
adjourned.
| Letter from John Mltchel?The Emperor and
the Next War?The Roman Question?The
I'ope to Retain his Dominions?The Mexican
Question?Comment* of the French Press, etc.
Special Correspondence of the New York New.-.
pAttis, January lSfltl.
The Emperor's short address in reply to the
Papal Nitncia on New Year's liny breathes
the sweetest benignity and the most beautilnl
and trnsttul hope in the future. Nothing
more tenderly benevolent ever before flowed
from those paternal lips, not even when he
I said at Bordeaux ?'the Empire is peace." j
This leads many persons to apprehend that we ;
i are going to have war this year; for some there j
i are who never believe that this Emperor says i
J the thing he means. There is, however, no
good reason to doubt that the French sove- |
i reign really desires peace. In the first place, j
France has need of tranquillity to recruit her
finances ; and in the next place the Emperor
' cannot reasonably look upon any of the exist
ing questions as likely to breed serious
I trouble. The peremptory revocation of the
Extradition Treaty with England has no
! political meaning whatever; it is a mat
ter of jurisprudence only; and before the
six months are out there* will bo assuredly a
new treaty negotiated, with some slight nuxli
lieatious upon the present. Yet folks who
are always lint ling wars ami rumors of wars
in every public occurrence?going about cry
ing lo! here, and lo! there?a cloud of war
rising in the east, in the west, everywhere all
round?"a field of the dead rushes red on iny
sight! "?these sort of people have been trying
to puff up that trilling affair into an omen of
fearful portent. Some affirming that France
desires a new treaty which will enable her to
get hold of political refugees; others, with
eqnal assurance, maintaining that England
wants to lay her hand u]>on some Fenians who
are said to be in Paris; and both equally cer- j
tain that the dreadful nir.tir indicates iheuear
break-up of the coif title. There is
nothing in it whatever. Neither England nor
France has the least chance of pursuing her
political enemies upon the soil of the other
country ; neither has dreamed of it. That
same entente cordlaU, indeed, is worth little,
and may break any day, but not over the
Extradition Treaty.
The question of Rome is somewhat more Im
portant. Ills there that eome of the alarm
ists see their cloud of war. On the JAth of
tSepumiber next tlm French troops withdraw
from Home. Then comes the question, will
Victor Emmanuel go in there? There may t>e
an insurrection in Koine itself, us there was in
Modena and Parma, furnishing him with a
pretext lo take poaaeislou of Romp, ta ho did
of those Duchies?to preserve order. Iji fact,
he himself can very easily excite such a con
venient insurrection as he did In the Dnch
iee. Iltit I believe he will never enter Koine
as master; ami if he should enter, he will not
stay long. The Catholic Powers of Europe
will not permit the total suppression of the
Pope's small domain ; and France herself will,
iu all probability, intimate as much to the j
Kins of Italy before the 15th of September.
The French Chambers are convoked for the
22d of this month ; and you may look out for i
some strong expressions of opiuion 011 th? sub- j
Jeot of the Mexican Empire. Most of the
French had begun to feel the stronger repug
nance to that Empire, especially since they
hare found that It costs them so much and;
pays them nothing. Ever since the beginning ,
of "the enterprise it has been unpopular ; and
the whole of the independent press of the
country is now louder than ever in its denuncia*
tions of the concern and exhortations to have
done with it. There is a foolish impression
prevalent at your side of the Atlantic that
the French press dares not speak out against
the measures and policy of the Government?
a very complete mistake. It is far more dan
gerous in America for a newspaper to criticise '
the " Policy of the President,'* as Ti?e Daily
Xrics has some reason to know. Here is Tht
Revue (Us Dciijv Mmubs of the lirstof the month,
which not only enlarges upon the various rea
sons for leaving the Emperor Maximilian
(after a certain given time) entirely to his own
resources, but coolly calls upon the Emperor
to lay before the Chambers the true statement
of the accounts, and not lobe hiding from the
public how much a Mexican Empire comes to ;
taunts him also with his blunders in coloniza
tion, and sarcastically invites him to write a
pamphlet 011 Mexico, as ho has lately written
one on Algeria, adding:
! 44 His Majesty's Algerian brochure has not
attracted so much attention among the public
as it ought, but we promise him a most bril- J
lhnt and universal success for his work on j
Mexico if it frankly ex poses the true state of
things and promises to put an end to the
French protectorate. All Frenchmen will hail
such a masterly performance of his Majesty."
Vet the Revue does not even get a warning,
still less is the writer kidnapped and sent to
, the Fortress of Ilam without any warning at
all.
The conclusion of the writer iu this most
influential periodical is, that as Maximilian
went to Mexico relying upon French support,
that support should be continued to him long
enough to give the new Government a fair
ohanceof establishing itself?but not forever;
the French did not bargain for that. They
i would stand it, he think", another year. Let
I a day be Fixed then, as it has been, for the!
1 withdrawal of the French troops from Home. I
As the loth of September is to see the French
army brought home'from Koine, so let the 31st
j of December thereafter he the day 0:1 which
the other French army is to come home from
Mexico. If Maximilian cannot stand alone ,
I by that time, he will never stand. All this
matter is viewed and treated from a French
point of view alone, and 011 grounds of French
policy and French finance, without reference
to the menacing proceedings of the Congress'
I in Washington. In fact, it is believed here?;
! and this is the chief ground of uneasiness?
i that a threat of armed intervention, or a
peremptory demand of evacuation, coining
from the I'nited States, would have the effect
, of keeping the French forces longer in Mexico,
and of trebling their numbers and quadrupling
the expense.
Here is an amusing account of the state of
things in the United States, published by a
Paris newspaper a few days ago:
44 Letters from America inform us that the
scarcity of specie isso very great that the news
papers?the Richmond Enquirer en tete?aro !
receiving the amount of their subscriptions in !
merchandise of every species?wheat, oats,:
hay, whisky, butter, lard, pork, eggs, chick- ,
ens, etc. The price of railroad tickets is also
paid in kind, if the traveller desires it. Coal
being but little known in America, a stick of
wood gives, for example, a right to a seat iu
the 4 second class' for a short journey; but a
good fagot of dry oak pays for a seat in the |
? lirst class.' Ancl this is the way people regen
erate themselves !"
It i< easy to divine where these "letters
from America" were written. J. M.
The Anti-Radical Majorifj of ihe IIou*c, and
How it was Thrown Away on flu* District
Negro Suffrage Bill.
We publish the following article from the
New York Ikmhl, rather for the facts it con
tains than the criticisms upon the course of
the Democrats, though we are by no means j
certain that they acted wisely :
The bill which passed the House ol Ilepie
sentativis tin* other day, without qualifica
tion, granting the right of sutfrage to the
blacks of the District of Columbia, although
carried by a two-thirds majority, was, never
theless, passed against a clear majority of the
House opposed to the measure. Let us turn
to the record.
The bill being before the House, the motion
of 3Ir. Hale, of New York (Republican), came
up, viz: To amend the motion to recommit,
with instructions to the committee to extend
the suffrage in tho District, irrespective of j
color, to all persons coming within either of
the following classes: First, those who can
read the Constitution of the United States.
Second, those who are assessed for, and pay
taxes on, real or personal property within the
District : those who have servid in, and been
honorably discharged from, the military or
naval service of the United States; and to
restrict such right of suffrage to the classes
named, and to include proper provisions J
excluding from the right of suffrage those who
have borne arms against the United States j
during the late rebellion, or given aid and corn
tort to said rebellion.
A bill so framed would have been perfectly j
consistent with the well-known views of Pre
sident Johnson on this question of negro suf
frage. There wn? a majority in the House in
favor of such a bill.
Filly-three conservative Republican mem
bers voted for the recommitment with the
aforesaid instructions, against one hundred
and seventeen members voting in the negative. ?
IJut the remarkable feature of this vote is in
the fusion of the Democrats with the Republi
can radicals, Thuddcus Stevens carrying off
the whole Democratic strength of the House?
thirty-five members?from Ancona, llrooks,
Charilcr and Morgan Jones, down to Yoorhees
and \Vinfield?the whole batch. Had these
thirty-live Democrats voted with the fifty- j
three Republican conservatives the bill would
have been recommitted for the modifications
proposed, for the division of the House would
have been:
Republican conservatives and Democrats....^ j
Republican radicals 82
Conservative majority 6
Why, then, did not the Democrats join
hands with the lifiy-three Republican con- |
servatives and block the Radical game upon |
this initial measure? It was bccauso the ,
Democrats have been so thoroughly dyed In
the wool in all the juggling tricks ef party
rascality that they cannot cast them off. This
vote in the service of Stevens was a juggling
trick to push the Republican conservatives to
the wall. The principle involved was nothing
to the Democrats, the Administration was
nothing, consistency was nothing; but the
contemptible party object of driving over the
Republican conservatives to the Radical whip
of Stevens was everything. This was the
result of the Democratic coalition with Ste
vens upon the test question of recommitting )
the bill. The motion having failed through |
this disgraceful fusion, the question recurred
on the passage of the bill for Unqualified negro ,
suffrage, and it was passed?ayes, 11G; nays, ;
:A
What Does it Mrax.?The New YorkjCdDen j
(edited by private Miles O'Riley) has an article 1
laudatory of the Fenians, and urging Irishmen
md Americans to contribute to the Fenian
funds. We quote a single ominous passage :
" We tell the American public?and they
have heretofore found us pretty accurate
prophets in everything relative to the Fenian
cause?that before ten weeks there will be
somewhere?-an Irish Republic existing on the
face of the earth, with a flag, an army, a port
of entry and exit, a navy of privateers, and
the tacit encouragement both of France and
the United States in theprosecntlon of bellige
rent acts aguinst Great Britain. Let no one
ask tis for the present where this republic will
be located, for we cannot answer. It must be
cnlbd a republic, to warrant the ling and
fleet, but will, really, only be used us an imme
diate basis of operations for the transfer of
active hostilities to the Canadian and Irish
soils. A word to the wise is enough. And
now, while the quid nuncs grow excited, the
wise will await developments, giving liberally
of their means to aid the cause; uor will they
have to tarry long for the fulfillment of all that
we herein foreshadow."
Colonel T. II. Roy, late chief of General
Hardee s staff, has become a co-editor and
joint proprietor of the Selma (Ala.) iKiilv Ms
stayer with Mr. Grace, who ha* hitherto so
well conducted that journal.
As the quickest way to male* a fortune, a
cotwuporary euggeetamarrjlng a faehionable
young lady and selling her cloihee.
AMUSEMENTS.
N
EW RICHMOND THEATRE.
( OH.tIR or S*V?*TM AX It B*OAI> *TB??T?.
GRAU& BRICKEN LESSEES.
J B. ROBERTS STAGE MANAGER.
E. LrROV TREASURER.
A. ROSEN BERG EH LEADER OF ORCHESTRA.
FRIDAY EVENING, Ja.xcabt 26, 1666,
the performance will commence at a quarter to f
o'clock with a
GRAND OVERTURE ORCHESTRA.
After which will he performed the romantic play,
in three acta, of
WILLIA3I TELL,
TUK 11ERO OP SWITZKBLAN'D.
robe followed by Shakspeare's Comedy, In threo
acta, of
KATHARINE AND PETRUCHIO;
OB,
TAMING THE SHREW.
To conclude with the popular Farce of
BETSY BAKER.
For particulars see small bills. ja 26
SHIPPING.
T70R NEW YORK.?The superior side
J? wheel steamship SARATOGA, ~ ?
Captain Kixo, will leave Ludlam
k Watson's wharf, Rocketbs, on
SATURDAY MORNING, 27th in
stant, at 12 o'clock.
Tickets and berths secured either at my office or
on board.
Freight received all day TO-DAY (Friday)
and up to the hour of It) A. M. on SATURDAY.
No transhipment by this line, as by others. Insu
rance, it deemed necessary, can be effected on very
moderate terms.
ja20-2t GARRET F. WATSON.
,X)R NEW YORK.?The new and ele
g:tnt aide-wheel steamship
ALBEMARLE. Captain Boirnk, will
leave her whari at Rocketu on'
SATURDAY, the 27th, at 1 o'clock,!
P. M.
Passengers are requested to bo on board prior to
that hour.
ja 25?St SAMUEL AYRES k CO., Agents.
F
FOR RENT.
T?OK RENT.?1The lino frame 1SUILR
JL ING situated on the upper end of Washington
treet, containing seven line rooms, with a good
msement, a well of good water in the yard, a gar
ten containing an acre of land, well laid off and
n line cultivation, together with a nice peach
irehard, is for rent.
This location is suitable for a fine LAGER-BEER
J \RDKN AND SUMMER RETREAT.
Any party wishing to rent this property can get
f reasonably and obtain possession by the 1st of
Vbruary.
Also for rent, a small FAMILY RESIDENCE, on
lie corner of Tabb and Market streets. Possession
,'iven immediately. a. KIC'HBURO.
ja 26?l\y
EXCELLENT MARKET GARDEN,
U OF TEN ACRES, WITH SMALL TENEMENT
^ij'NEV~ AT THE~ HEAD OF
KA( E hi RbET, FOR RENT.?We offer for rent,
?rone year, the EXCELLENT Lot OF TEN
< ELS, on Grace street, adjoining Mr. L. S.
U1.I,V:,!:AC.slJ,nc^ There is <ui it a COM FORT A
'..N iKl'LLV,A>N'iTH THREE rooms, besides
1 AWl.li, &c. All of the land lias recently been
touched, and Is now ready for cultivation. It is
ell adapted to a MARKET GARDEN, or for a
(JBURBAN RESIDENCE, being on a beautiful
UUU OU.lti
reet and in a delightful neighborhood. Poskps
on given at once. The owner will enclose the
md. Price, four hundred dollars. Applv to
ja 25?2t HARRISON, OODD1N & APPERSON.
7<OR RENT.?I have TWO ROOMS foi
L rent, furnished or not, as required. One
on the first floor, large and comfortable, ffTT?
ts with parlor attached ; suitable for twojiaifi.
"nth-men, or one with his wife. Tho other in the
?coiol story, with gas, suitable for a single gen
eman. References e-rhanged. Apply at my resi
nice, second door from Fourth, on Clay street.
Ja 20?ts THOMAS W. BROCKENBROUGII.
?ARM FOR RENT.?Wo have for
- rent a FA KM, near Staples'# Mill, four miles
oni Richmond, on Broad Mreet road, containing
IGJITY-FJVE ACRES, belonging to C. M. Ter
11. with good dwelling and all necessary out
* " * * - I
ius>'?, with flue orchard. If not rented privately
_ . y ju pebruary, It will
?foret ho" FIRST 31 ON DAY
' routed at public auction at the County Court
uise on that day at 12 o'clock.
COLE k WADE. .Main,
between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets,
ia 17?ts over McCormick's store.
T1IJJ MEMBERS OF DOVE Q
I LODGE, No. 51, are summoned to attend
a tneetii g of their Lodge, at the Hall, <>n Mar- /yr\
shall s reet, on THIS (Friday) EVENING at
. at 7
o'clock. Members of sister Lodges, and transient
brethren in good standing, are fraternally invited
to attend. By ordered' Worshipful Blaster.
ja26?It* AUG. ARSELL, Jk., Secretary.
rp o the CITIZENS* OF RICH
1 3IOND.?A call is made upon the citizens of
Riciunond, l?v the undersigned* to meet at the Citv
Hail on SATURDAY EVENING. the 27tli instant,
at 7J o'clock, to take into consideration the pro
priety of memorializing the Legislature of Vir
ginia regarding the repeal of the U.snrv Laws.
MITCHELL k TYLER,
JAMES EVANS,
C. K. CIIAPIN,
W. S. DON NAN k CO.,
PUTNEY & WATTS,
HARVKY8 k WILLIAMS,
J. T. MORTON.
GEORGET. TURNER,
J. ESBERG,
ROGERS, ADAMS k CO.,
SPOTTS & GIBSON,
MINOR k JONES,
SUMNER, WAGNER k CO.,
W. B. JONES k CO.,
WALKE k GRAY,
CHRISTIAN, I.HA A CO.,
BEERS k SP1 I.MAN*,
E. P. TOWNSEND,
ja 26?2t ami others.
Farmkrs' Natiokal BAxk.J
Rirn.Mo.vn, \*A., January 24, ls66.
4T THE ANNUAL MEETING OF
AY THE SOCK HOLDERS of this lank, held at
their banking-house this day, the following gen
tlemen were elected Director* for the ensuing year,
viz :
N. AUGUST, JOF.L A. FITIIIAN,
J. I. Al'PERSON, HUGH W. FRY,
i.vil t' im> t i*r n f i 'fUDlli
JOHN' DOOLKY, L. W. GLA/EBROOK,
II. B. DICKINSON, MASON LOKB,
W.K.MARTIN, RO. A. PAINE,
GEO. W. WEST.
And at a subsequent meeting of the Directors, the
following officer* were unanimously elected, viz :
N*. AUGUST. President.
JOEL A. F1THIAN, Vice-President.
L. P. HULBURD, Cashier,
ja 26?3t
JOHN DOOLEY respectfully invites
the attention of his friends and tlie public to
bis large stock of HATS and CAl'8 for gentlemen,
boys and children, which comprises alitho styles
and qualities now used. He has, in conseguenco
of the scarcity of money, reduced considerably the
prices of these goods. As well as the floe qualities
of Hats, a good stock of low-priced WOOL IIAT8
will ho kept on hand.
His stock of Ladies' FUKS Is large, containing
some beautiful CAPES. llALF-CAPhS and MUFFS.
These goods he is selling now at Cost, to close out
the st'wk. They are well worth the attention of
the ladiea.
He is now getting the beautiful DERBY HAT for
ladies, of tine quality, beautiful shapo, and mode
rate priceil. ja 26?ts
TO THE citizens
1 OF THE I.ATE CONFEDERACY.
I
F.. B. SPEN'CE, Aoent,
MERCHANT TAILOR AND CLOTHIER,
No. 120 Mai* street, corxer or Thirteenth.
desires you to call and see hi* stock of
CLOTHS,
CASS1MERES and
VE8TIXGS,
which he U prepared tomako up at short notice
and in go.ai style. Also, bis stock of
KEADY-MADE CLOTH1NO AND GEXTLKMKX'8
FURNISHING GOODS.
Call and soo hira before purchasing elsewhere,
ja 20-1 in __
mFe KO-CALLED CO-PARTNElt
I SHIP heretofore existing under the ?tyle of
FKKNOH k CO. being this day disntdved by arbi
tration, the undersigned assumes all hist dents dne
by the concern, and requests those Indebted thereto
to make an early settlement with HIM ONLY.
JOHN G1BL1N.
N. B.?J. J. FRENCH. Etq.,i? not responsible
for any debts contracted by rae. and 1 will not be
for any of bis. [ja 2??at) J.O.
WILLIAM C. BARNES,
it HOUSE, SIGN AND
ORNAMENTAL PAINTER,
Fraxklix street, near the ?oknbu or Xixth.
Orders promptly attended to. ja 26?lw*
iJ E V E N T Y -FI V E BARRELS
^ ' APPLES, lauding from steamer, for sale by
J* 26?2t WM JT. KING * CO
I/ORTY BOX F>f ORANGES AND
J? LEMONS recetring to-dar by 11A
Ja2?-tt Wll. t. KING k CO.
TUON,
1 loo tons ENGLISH KFFINED- IRON, assorted
h> tons SWEDES IRON ju* ort <d Mies;
3 torn COUNfRT IU?'N, assorted sliee,
ALSO,
J, lE* bTBfcL' Y * S/fowtSSH 100. |
AUCTION 3AUB&-THIS PAY. ^
Bj James Luxford, Auctioneer,
No. 70 Main street.
HandsomeTarlor furni
TURK, Ac., FOR HALE AT AUCTION?On
FRIDAY, the 20th instant, at 10o'clock, I will Ml)
at uv store
* 1 handsome ROSEWOOD PARLOR SUIT,
3 handsome MAHOGANY POPAS,
3 handsome MAHOGANY DIVANS,
? WALNUT PARLOR CIIAIRS,
WARDROBES,
BUREAUS,
BEDSTEADS,
WABHSTANDS.
FEATHER BEDS,
MATTRESSES,
TABLES.
NAPOLEON BOOTS,
SHOES, Ac., Ac.
ja 2ft?It JAM EH LUXFORD, Auctioneer^
IGH &)NSTABLfrS SALE.-Will
be sold on FRIDAY, January ?8tb, HM .at to
o'clock, A. M , at the store of William H. Plea
sants, on Fifteenth street, between Main and Cary.
1 barrel HOLLANDOIN,
8 on arte r pipes WINE.
1 WASHING MACHINE,
1 LARGE BOILER.
Lot FLAT IRONS,
2 SETTEES.
t IK4?N BEDSTEAD,
1 COOKING STOVE,
1 SIDEBOARD,
4 TABLES,
3 rolls MATTING,
4 mahogany tables,
1 BOOK-CASE.
2 LARGE ARM CHAIRS,
1 HOFA,
1 CARPET,
1 TWO-HORSE CARRIAGE,
1 CANDLE STAND,
1 WARDROBE,
PITCHER, BOWLS, Ac., &<*.,
to natlnfy execution* and 'listrp*# warrants In mjr
hands in favor of Moran r*. Clark, Hachrach rt.
Wagner, Davis vs. King, Howe A Townaend vt.
Fitzgerald, Taylor, agent, ra. Stone, Toinlln x*.
Hills, Hamilton rt. Collins, W llliam* ra. 8hore.
A? a*k? Ail f
ja 25?3t High Constable city of Richmond.
By Pilklnton, Pulliani A Co.,
Auctioneers and Commission Merchants,
No. 48 Main street, Richmond, Ya.
FOR SALE AT AUCTION.?By onl. r
of the County Court of Chesterfield county, I
will proceed to sell at public auction, for division,
on the premises, commencing at 2 o clock P. M. on
FRIDAY, the 28th of January, WW, the following
property, viz: , , ,
First. One LOT, fronting twenty-eight and one
half feet on Hull street, and running back one
hundred and sixtv-five feet on suuare opposite old
Farmers' Hotel. Manchester, with a small SHOE
MAKERS' SHOP thereon, lately occupied by John
Evans, Em}.
Second. At the same time and place, will sell the
EIGHTY ACRES OF LAND lying on both sides of
the Petersburg railroad, at Rice s Station, and the
improvements thereon, consisting of a COMFORT
ABLE DWELLING, with good out-houses. One
half the land open, and one-half cleared?now
occupied by Mr. Lemuel Chalkly.
Third Will sell, <>n premises, one LOT, front
ing on the Midlothian turnpike, one-ouarter of a
mile above the Petersburg iailr?st.i dejiot. sixty
feet front, and running back four hundred fen,
with a verv comfortable NEW DWELLING with
four rooms, and KITCHEN, Ac. Lot well enclosed.
Lately occupied by Mr. Furcron.
TKhMs ; One-third ra-h ; baiance, four and eight
months, negotiable notes, interest added, and title
retained until payments are usade.
WILLIAM AMBERS, Commissioner.
Ja 18?tds
AUCTION SALES?FUTURE DAY.
By Harrison, Goddin A Apperson,
Bankers, Brokers and Real Estate Aiwtionecrs.
TfERY VALUABLE LOTS, ON THE
V CORNER of GRACE AND TWENTIETH
STREETS, FOR SALE AT AI C TJON
sold at auction, on tin- premises, on \\ EDNKSDAT.
the 31st January, lHtkJ, at 4 o clock, P. M., the
VALUABLE lot located .iHjibore. fronting a'"?i;t
one hundred and twelve feet on the east side of
Twentieth street, running back one hundred and
thirtv-two feet on the seuthsideof Grace street, to
he divided into four lots of twenty-eight feet each
These are beautiful lots, and located in an excel
lent neighborhood. ... . , ,
Tp.kmh : One-third cash: balance at four and
ei-'ht months, for negotiable notes, interest added,
secured bv a trust deed. The ttxes tube paid by
thjft^"rtfhtiHARRISON, GODDIN A APPERSON.
By Pilklnton A Pulliani,
Auctioneers and Commission Merchants,
No. ?<J Main stre? t, Richmond, Ya.
rr RUST EE'S SALE OF V A LU ABLE
1 RES T A II R A N T PROPERTY.-On WED
NESDAY, January 31st, 1*88 as to o'clock. A 31.,
at the Bank Restaurant, I shall sell, by virtu- ?d
a deed of trust to me from Shanty k Page, all
the STOCK, FIXTURES, GOODS and FUKMTIRL
belonging to and contained In the B A N* K
RESTAURANT, in Locust alley, at public auction,
by consent of all parties concerned. ? The pn?
nerty consists <?f an HAK and I IX
TURKS, splendid CHAMBER and PARLOR FUR
NITURE. very tine COOKING ARKANCJ-.MEN'Ts
and KITCHEN' FURNITURE: line FRENCH EX
GKAYINGS and OIL PAINTI VGS. and all neces
sary appliunces for a F1R8T-I LASS KESTAt
KANT. WILLIAM J. CLOPTON, Trustee.
Pilkixtox, Pct.Liam it Co., Auctioneers,
ja 28?tds _
By Grubbs it Williams,
Auctioneers and Real Estate Agents,
four doors above Spotswood Hotel.
Ha X I) S O M K PRIVATE RESI
DENCE, ON THIRD 8TREET, GAMBLh'8
HILL, FOR 8 ALE AT AUCTION .-On MONDAY,
the 2i?th of January, after the half of the Revere
House?*ay Kt o Clock, IV M.?we will sell at
auction the huixlKOine BRICK DWELLING situs
ted on the went hide of Third, between Arch .u.J
Byrd streets, and now occupied by Colonel W. I..
James. It is nearly new, has ten rooms, with fold
in# doors in basement; iron verandah in front;
kitchen, water and gas on the premises. This
house was erected by the owner for his own m?\
and is beautifully finished throughout. The lo> a
tion is very desirable, commanding an extensile
view of the city and the surrounding country
above and he low the city. Altogether, this is a
very valuable property, and it should attract the
attention of those wishing to purchase a desirable
residence. Tcrmh: Atsitlo.
(IKI'BBS At WILLIAMS, Auctioneers,
ja 24-tds
A 1 >M IXISTRATOlV'S SALE.?Will
IV hold at the residence of the late George D.
Pace, In the county of Henrico, about two utiles
and ft half from the city of Richmond, on the
Meadow Bridge Road, (the residence of the late
Thomas B. ( urter.) on FRIDAY, the Oth day <>f
February, IHCt, all the personal effects of the said
George 1). Pace, deceased, consisting, in part, a?
follows, to wit: HOUSEHOLD and KITCHEN
FURNITURE, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, two lire
YOUNG MULES and one HORSE, WAGON*
carts and carriage, crops, corn, fodder,
COWS, HOGS, Ac., Ac. Terir?s made known on
day of ?ale. P. H. HUFFMAN 8. II. C..
and as such administrator of 0. D. Pace, dee d.
ja 2fi?td*
By Giubb* A William*, Auctioneers,
Main street, fire doom above Spotswood Hotsl.
/^OMMISSIONERS* SALE OF VAL
V ^ IT ABLE REAL ESTATE IN THE CITY yf
RICHMOND.?In execution of a decree of the Cir
cuit Court of Richmond, entered on the Uth r'
January, lMt, in the rase of " Wall and Vif< "
Nott and als," the undersigned, eommission'^
appointed for the purpose, will sell at public vu
tion, upon Him premise* respectively, in the order
named below, on MONDAY, 2vth'January,
commencing at 12 o'clock, M., if fair, if
on the next fair day thereafter, at the same b"i?r
t the following property, to-wit:
The valuable LOT on the north aide of M?>' |
street, between Eleventh and Twelfth street*. I
i above the Exchange Hank, and formerly occui^
by A. Antoni. It front* twenty-two and a !>?>? v ?
and run* bark one hundred and ten feet to au ??'?.
in the roar.
This 1m regarded as one of the m<*t desirable D*
in the city. being centrally situated and c? m'
nlent to tuo best uusitios* part of the city.
After which, will be bold the two fine/three-*^.
BRICK HOUSES at the southeast corner of Frank*
Un ami Third street*?the one a double tenement,
known a* the " Revere House,'' and the
adjoin tug tenement on the east. . __
Thl* prt?j?erty I* so well and favorably know
that further description in deemed ui?nece??*v
Suffice It to say, the location is about the best in
citv for private residences. . k.
Trans: One-fifth cash ; balance at four, et*o
twelve and sixteen months, lor notes with iuiy1o."*
added, titles being retained by the court otnii
purchase money is fully paid. Purchasers to F*.
all tuxea for ISM.
JOHN HOWARD. ) , ,
ANDRBW JOHNSTON,) Commissioners
THOM AS J. EVANS. , )
Gri mus A Williams, Auctloncprs. Jgw-w1
( \RANUES, LEMONS, GRAPES.
a full supply of f ANDlife, Ac., all of which !<$
for sale, oy wholesale or retail, at No. M MAl
STHBK+.w?PP^t? tk. ?<? Chulo.
O" N CONSIGNMENT. TWENTY
live barf els NAVT BEAN8. Rfteen
VIRGINIA BUCKWHEAT, CLOVvEK ??d Wf.
THY 8EKD, and are In constant receipt of ftL
MACKEREL AND HHRRIN&J.
14 kmSnWkD 11*011 *01 HI**1*'*
(01 suit low
JtfsMlW
'?ZfjffH.'

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