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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, April 18, 1866, Image 3

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VKDNKSPAY APRIL lv?*.
TlIK PlSlWlVH Itl'IMHXa IS ON (Jo
VI KXOU 8THKKT, NEAH TO MAIN, AM)
m:\ki.v orrosirw tiik old Pinpatch
0)i;NKU.
i.atkst M'W's nv" mail.
V rot olrbrfllioii in >'orru{k or llioCIt il IliuliN
I aM Outrasr* Attending It ? Two W hiir
pi>r*oii? Killed, Our Mortally mid Our Dun*
Koroted)' Wounded.
I ; ;.i Mi-' N<u!"'.k Virginian ol April 17th.
;erda>. the fiwlmon of Norfolk,
j. . and thosnrroundingcountry, cel
,i ih<> pasture of the Civil Kiglits bill b\
.^.stratum which, considering the popu
, ; ,, i u mh r contribution for the display,
s vm. tiler than we expected. The pro
< contained not more, according to our
ue, than one thouKiiul men and boys
iin :>hals The display had a melancholy
?n .it ?? i ?r n*-. At the head of the column
>: i.oln detachment of negroes in cavalry
futtirv uniform!), multr <> ?')? s ; and, look
,i' wn the vista of the future, we saw in
- i jrrriVle commentary on the t- 1 1 1 \v In ????
? - i.;-' they were celebrating.
I !,(? :o:v;;oing had been written before the
<? m i had transpired. This was
, vh .lowed in our allusion to the uni
,,'vl n.td ;irir.ed portion of the procession.
There are various rumors as to the origin of
l,.P The cene was in a lleld on upper
5 ou > treet. in the vicinity of the cemetery
, r si.n.il ground. Fire-arms were used.?
.? . rt Whitehurst was killed, and lu^ step
if r. Mrs Charlotte Whitehurst. mortally
v John ^ hitehurst, the half brother
h< Killed, v. as dangerously wounded.
V, ,.,,11,1 Mosely . a city watchman, was very
. \ i.. a ten . 1ns son was dangeroiuly beaten,
ln< ii!'1 is devpairwd of. Lawrence liamp
i colored bo\. about ten years of age, was
on Granhy street bv a negro in
:.?? j?!\\ f>si->n. The wound i> in the abdo
? . ami is ot a dangerous character. We
1 , v t ; t k . t si ? \ era I o I* the negroes were inllameil
v . : is ? .t; nt?r.
; re is a negro saloon on the corner ol
t r 1 rland ami Queen streets which \\
? t iit unfrequently by negroe- who
; ;n the procession. They would leave
-ecm of the speech -making, dancing, sing.
? j. liooing, and tiring of muskets ami pi^
. _o io this drinking saloon, ami return,
J. to the > . ene of re joicing and jnl'ilee.
We :? ar that to liquor- -to whisky ? may be
the \i*h<de d illicit II}* of. the day. it is
that a dance ol dea tli was jwrformed over
?. Je ul body Of the mil.'dered Whitehurst by
irenzictl* men who participated in his
?:? it h.
\Vii it further injuries were sustained we are
? ?iivpared to say, but believe all the out*
? ? of i lie day are included in the account
? h i\e given. Major Stanhope, the post
,:ui'ier. arrived at the scene after the
r: .ities had been perjietrated, and used lu^
.. . r i ? . to bring about quiet and order,
s h v. as the beginning and ending of the
l>r liion cf ilie Civil liights bill on Moii
v. : lie l' th of April, i ? a bill which the
president of tin' United States was powerless
in its incipiencv, and which has
! inai!" a law of the land, under constit u
1 provision, by a relentless fanaticism,
? ? i;id with power, bloated with the arro*
e of success, and impatient and restive
? r : he restraining curb of the veto.
\!' r the above was in type, we received
if Hewing additional information from the
j !: e; Whib* the inquest was being held on
l. iv of liober' W'hitehurst, Mrs. White
-? di. d from the elfects of her wounds, and
!. lUf.-t was postponed utitil to-morrow.
\ { 1 1 r the atl'ray was over, A\ Turner was
) wottiuled, on Church street, by a sabre
Foi r arrests have been made.
I AT Eli ? A NE -K<> Ktl.t.i'.l?.
en Monday night the liremen kept guard
n . r the city. iMirin^ the night, a negro,
? ni the regalia of some secret ?ociety,
,i, wn the street, and was shot and killed
hen m :ir the Ol I Dominion sMke.
reiiituiN iu England and Ireland.
! rop'-an news to the 4th instant states that
; . 1 1 s l'enian riots prevailed in llradford,
1 .iid, in which theijueen was denounced,
i ili e laiglish residents had to lock them*
selves in-doors for safety. Several arrests were
: Ni'ie national schoolmasters have been
ii- te l in Cork, and it is thought that the
;i>i r elsewhere is very large. The Ameri
iii Con-ul at Cork had an interview with
? Armviean Fenians in th" t'ork county
i 'i he pi 'liability is they will be sent home.
Ilciuauuractiire ?l* Tobacco.
\V ?,-?:!> i i o.v, April 16.? The Secretary of the
i . -? : v has extended the privilege of re*
: ;.i:ig* or remanufacturing old and damaged
with the payment of duties only upon
t:.e increased weight, to all parties now
?.. I in the business, and having such
k on hand, till the 1-t of May next : but no
!?,tco produced on <?r after the l.itli Aptil
. ? . . i i- to be included.
\ Trial under the <'?\ il It iuht^ Law.
in-. April l->. ? The Tennessee laws
: . it free negroes from keeping tippling sa
- ?.r billiard saloons. In the t riminal
? ' rt to-day. several of these cases were
i ..'lit up "by A t tor n ey - ( J en era 1 Wallace,
i e- c tinsel fur the defence, (Jeneral t 'hambers
.' ii-. Sale, pleaded the Civil Kights law in
'Mien t , contending that all were on an
eqnril fr?oting. Judge Ilunter reserved his
iin >ii until to-morrow. It is thought a test
.'i. . be made of one of these cases.
f i - **ich on Hoard the laiiixrant Shij? ram
laud Pronounced .Asiatic Cholera.
Ni:\v Vhki:, April lo'.? The acting collector
): - !??? ? i\ed a dispatch from ( 'onsul Ja? kson,
? 1 llalilax, to-day, saying that the city
i 1:1 11 s 011 board the ??migrant ship Kng
! ? i . . :? ! i?-r 1 urther developmen is of the disease
further consultation last evening, concur
jm pronouncing it Asiatic cholera.
Forcible Release ol" Prisoners.
I- i-vim e, A i > r i 1 16.? The notorious mur
:? Ternlland Withers, were rescued from
>;> ncer jail i,.| iriday morning by a party of
v* \ ? a dis^ni>e<l ami armed men, who threat
' 1 the life ul the jailor oil his refusal to un
lo< k the cells.
I lie Philadelphia Alurder.
1 ' i 1 1 \ i? k i i-n i a, A pril 10. ? The coroner's jury
r the investigation of the murder of the
' iiiir family have fouml a verdict charging
Am. iue Probst, now under arrest, with the
?? ?' l?-r ul the entire eight persons.
1 ' \ ?. 1 1- ax, April P>. ? Nota single ease of sick
-v t urred among the cabin passengers on
:j'd the steamer laigland, which had so
ay cases of cholera among the crowded
? ?? i/e and deck passengers.
' r I I. v?k Pf I li P O 1 X T A MO.S'ii TH E li A 1? ICA I .# .
rn? \ say> the " eminent patriot Governor
' '??li 'point, oi Virginia, 44 boldly declares" the
?'r? - 1 . i ? ? : ; i ' > policy to be a failure.
The negro celebration in WasMnglon was i
?' ed until to-morrow (Thursday) <>n ae
? otiut of the rain.
J.'i i . i h'-, i mx; ? It is stated that the joint
::i in 1 1 tee un reconstr action will meet till
t unlay to make up their final report.
) i ii? re has been a terrible explosion in Sin
! i uii isco. Several |?ersons were killed, and
?iv horribly wounded.
^ ?h tractive tire at Port an Prince, Hayti,
? li I ill, destroyed 11 f teen squares and
^ of t li . ? public buildings and archives.
'i iiej-ii Scott arrived yesterday at New
^ ??i'k, lrom Havana, in the steamer Guiding
Star.
"( is lo the Methodist Conference report
' liirhoji Soule is dying.
1! I < i H 1 h I. AW 1.1 Baltimohk. ? 1 lie
' '("?/. of Tuesday enumerates Ihree cut>"s
? l n?,io excluslou irom civil privileges. It
d'>< ? i ot say that any prosecution had grown
?d them ; but we may infer th it it is the
' I'll ion ihat it Khould or will One of them
i 'he refusal to allow a negro to sit among the
white paMsengers in the York Koad cars ; an
her a refusal to sell a ticket to a negro ut the
?Holiday Street Theatre ; and the third, the
' ef i-.-.ii u> KeJl a negro a drink of liquor at a
hoi.*;* on I. astern and Canton avenue.
at I!a- b in the G ai.i.kky ?? The Mis
' j'pi htiftr, published at f'oltimbiis, Mins.,
i ? -grei . that, "in permitting our eyes to wander
about the ( burch ? few Sunday evenings ago, I
:ii;d chancing to glance eeilitigward, we haw I
sexual paii 5 of boots inotrudiug o >er UUe ,
gallery.'' I
I
THE I A?T REco.N>"TKrcTlo?I |M \\\
Section one prorldw lh.it on and after the
4th of July, ls7<J, there Khali 1 ??? no dl*crlmlna?
lion in the butted State* on arcountof color;
bnt that all male citizen* of the'age of twenty -
one year* *hall be legal voter* at :i 1 1 election*,
Federal ami State.
Section two provide* that, for the period of
ten year* from the 1 1 li of .Inly next, repre
sentation in < 'ongree*. ami electoral votes for
President and N ice- President shall be appor
tioneil according to the nnmher of legal voters
in the respective State*, and after that pfriod
by imputation, a* at present.
. Section three declares that there shall be no
discrimination of civil rights from and ri f t
the passage of till* amendment? alliriniug, in
eil'ect, the constltutionalitv of the Civil Right*
bill.
Section four provides that no obligations oi
liabilities incurred in aid of the rebellion, or
compensation for slaves emancipated bv mili
tary authority. *hall Im? paid by tin* Cnitcd
States or an v Slate.
To the foregoing is attached an enabling act,
\\ hich pro* ides that when any one of theStatcs
late in insurrection shall have ratified the fore
going amendments, and changed their consti
tutions and law* to correspond therewith, they
shall be allowed to participate in legislation',
and their repreaentativea be allowed to take
their seats in Congress, without any other
terms ??r prov i^ions.
While the leadittg radicals in Congress have
not committed themselves to this project, it i*
favorably regarded and is receiving serious
t hoUgh t -( V?/"<V lit ml, I hfjihitl
I' ROB A HI K SPEEDY RF.I EA*B or . I. KM EXT i . < I AV.
Mrs. < 'lement C. < May returned from Fortress
Monroe within a few days, and has laid before
i the President recommendations for her hus
band's release on parole ljontsuch ollicials as
General Grant, Senator and Tliad.
Stevens. They all exm^^^We opinion that
Mr. Clay will observe JlB^role, anil that hi*
conduct iit voluntaril^giving himself up to
the authorities entitles him to this much con
sideration His release from confinement at
Fortress Monroe i*. expected within a few
days.
M A ? X 1 ' .
This afternoon, theSuprcme < 'ouncil, linns ?
third degree of the Ancient and Accepted Kite
of Masonry for the southern jurisdiction of
the United Stateg, convened in the Masonic
Hall and proc eeded lo organize. The Council
i- attended by prominent Masons from all
parts of the country, among whom are Albert
Pike, of Missouri ; W. S. Kockwell, of Geor
gia : A. T. C. Piersou, of Minnesota ; Giles
M. Hiliyer, of Mississippi; Dr. A s. Ma. key.
of t Charleston, S. and Major G. A.
St h wart /.ma u ii, formerly ot 1 1? i - citv . l>ut now
ot Richmond, and will, it is probable, be in
session several days. The session will tje an
iittere.' i nig one. ?
THE ? 001 EST TH IX<- YET.
! About the most refreshingly icy thing of ilii*
muggy weather was the proposal of Mr
Sh'vt'iis, in tin* House to-day, lor llitil body to
take stock in the Washington Monti ay '//<"<<??
<te. The House couldn't exactly stand the
dose, and, m thi-t instance at least, failed to
" follow my leader." ? /'
rKRSoNAI. AFFAIR IN THE sEXATE.
In the Snate to-day rather an extraordinary
scene occurred, creating no little sensation tor
a time on the floor and in the galleries. (>n
the quest i < >i i under debate concerning a branch
ot the l'nion Pacilie railroad, Mr. Mclioiigal
charged that hiscollcague was animated in his
action by personal motives. Mr. Comets
made a bitter reply, alleging that ln> colleague
misrepresented ami disgraced his State, and
that nothing but a feeling of charity had pre
j vented liim (Mr. C.) from moving his expul
sion. Mr. McDoiigal, in answering Mr. Con
iiess, proceeded to tell a story which rather
astonished the ladies in the gallery, find was
deemed so objectionable by the President oi
the Senate that lie interposed to stop its t'ur
tlter narration.? M.
?
Tin* Hcconsiructioii Conmiit toe ? ' Testimony ol
lion. Alexander II Mopliens.
He could not answer as to t li?* existence of
an opinion generally that the idea ol secession
as a right still remained among the people,
though he did say it would be dillicult, as well
as unusual, for a whole people to change their
convictions upon abstract truths and princi
ples. The war, by its practical operation
among themselves, in its results upon their own
authorittcsuud their indi\ idnal rights of person
and property, and the breaking down ol con
stitutional barriers, had influenced a change
of opinion as to the policy of secession, not
withstanding the almost unanimous support
which tie* >outheru cause had received upon
the proclamation ot Jlr. J.incoln. in lv| I. rail
ing lor volunteers. Had the ordinance ol >e
cession been submitted within a reasonable
time, ?>r immediately after its adoption, a
majority ol the people would have adopted
it, but if South Carolina and the other States
had not acted, perhaps a very decided majority
would have been against it iu Georgia. The
majority of members of the convention iu
favor of secession, elected by the people, was,
perhaps, thirty out of about three hundred.
In the mountain districts the 1 nion sentiment
was prevalent at first, though the cities and
towns were generally for secession, but there
never was anything like a sectional di v ision iu
the State. The belief of the people that their
constitutional liberties were assailed reposed
mainlv in their social polity, and their appre
hensions from the general consolidating ten
dencies of the doctrines and principles of that
political party which had recently succeeded in
the choice of a l* resident, lie thought that
the apprehension Of a subversion of the Cou
siit.ni ion and its essential guarantees of pub
lic liberty by this successful party was the
sincere, lionest conviction in the minds of the
people of Georgia which led them toact as
they did.
At present, Mr. Stephens thought that the
emancipation of the slaves was generall>
acquiesced iu and accepted in good laith, with
the disposition to do the best that can be done
under the new order of things, the relations
subsisting between the white and black people
being quite as good as that existing any wlieie
else in the world between like classes of em
ployer and employed. Since < hristmas. the
freed men, having gotten rid of their ideas of
obtaining land from the Government, were
rapidly settling themselves down to work, and
readilv entering into contracts, though pre
vious to having their minds disabused ol thi
error they were not disposed t<> make engage
ments for labor. There are still some idlers,
but the number is comparatively few, and the
behavior of all, he said, was much better than
the most hopeful had looked for. 1 hey appeal
principally to desire protection ot person and
property, and to be dealt by fairly and justly,
and the State laws which had been enacted
secured these rights to tliem. Though nothing
had been done by the State authorities for edu
cating the negroes, schools were being estab
lished under other auspices, and all seem desi
rous to educate their children. The laws re
cognize those negroes living together as m. in
and wife as legally such, and there is no ditler
euce between whites and blacks as reg.uds the
issue of licenses to marry.
The voting population of Georgia in
was staled by Mr. Stephens to have been one
hundred thousand, and at present he ap
proximated it at eighty thousand. riie
amended State Constitution had never been
submitted to the people, though Mr. Stephens
supposed it would have l>eeti ratified by nine
tenths. The general opinion ot the State is
very much averse to any extension of the
right of su If rage, lie did not think the people
would ratify a proposition of representation
as a precedent condition to the restoration ot
the Stale to political power in the Govern
ment. They feel now that they are entitled,
under the Constitution of the United States,
to representation without further conditions.
They would not object to exchange and dis
cuss \iews in the common councils of the
country with the other States upon any pro
nosiliou to amend the Constitution, or change
tnv of its features, and they would abide b>
such change if made as the Constitution pro
vides. They are willing, he thought, to leaye
the basis of representation where thet onsti
t ution leaves it ; and while they are disposed to
deal fairly and generously with the freedmen,
would not be willing to make any change in the
Constitution that would give Congress juris
diction over the question of suttrage, and
especially would they be averse to the exer
cise of such jurisdiction unrepresented in ( 011
gres* and with no voice in the councils. He
did not believe the people would accept as a
condition precedent either to extend suffrage
to tho negro or to exclude him from the b is *
of representation, because they hold that Con
gress has 110 right, under the Constitution, to
prescribe anything of the sort. If Georgia^
a State in the Union, she is entitled to repre
sentation ; if she is not an equal, then she
could not be admitted as an equal and at tne
same time be trammelled with conditions not
applied to all the rest ol the States ?jj the
I 'nil *n alike. General universal siiflrngj
among the negroes, as they now are, would be
regarded as about as great a political evil tu
could befall the people of Georgia.
< I U.St ion.- Would they extend unrtVnge to
those who could read, and to tho-e who had
the Union as soldiers?
He thought the people would be unwillimfto
do more than they had done for rector ution.
Ilea trie ted or limited suffrage would not bt so
objectionable; but It if a matter for the Stat#* '
alone to regulate ? a question exclusively of
State policy, as they believe. The only view,
in their opinion, that could justify the war |
which wnc carried on by the Federal Govern
ment against th"in was the idea of the indivi
sibility of tlu? Cnion : that those who held the
administration for the lime were bound to exe
cute the law* ami preserve the lutegrityof the
country under the Constitution. This having
been accomplished, ami i hose ad vacating seces
sion and reserved sovereignty of the States
having abandoned their cause, and the admin
istration triumphant in maintaining its idea
upon which war Was proclaimed and waged,
ami on which a lope it could lie justified at all,
the people of Georgia supposed their State I
was immediately entitled to all her rights un
der the Constitution. That was his opinion;
and he thought they would be unwilling to do
more precedent to being permitted to en joy the
full measure of their constitutional rights.
The people expected, immediately on the aban
donment of the Confederate cause, to be
brought back into their practical relations
with the Government as previously consti
tuted This they looked for, with representa
i ion as loyal men ? loyal to law, order, and the
Constitution. They did what they did believ
ing it was best for the protection of constitu
tional liberty: for the great mass of the people
were always as loyal to the Constitution of the
1'nited States, as they construed it, as any
people ever were towards anv cause.
W lien they found they were not successful
in their object, in perfect good faith, looking
Jo the future de\elopmeuts of their country
in its material resources, as well as its moral
and intellectual progress, their earnest desire
and expectation was to allow the past strug
gle, lamentable as it wan in its results, to pass
by, and to co-operate with the true friends of
the Constitution, with those of all sections
who earnestly desire the preservation of con
stitutional liberty and the perpetuity of the
Government in its purity. They have been a
lit tie disappointed in this, and are so now;
but they wait patiently, believing that when
the passions of the hour have passed away,
the delay 111 restoration will cease.
.Mr. Stephens, in answer to questions, then
went on to state that, his own individual opi
nion wa> decidedly that the question of suf
frage was for the States respectively and
clnsively. and that it was best for the peace
and harmony of the whole country that
restoration should be immediate, when the
representatives from the South might be
heard, and all could judge much better of the
tone ami temper of the people than in any
other way. As it is, he thought the people of
the South l'elt keenly that they are denied the
right to be heard, lie then further alluded to
his individual views as expressed in a late
speech before the Georgia legislature as his
present opinion.
i, Question by Mr. Hout well.? Suppose the
States that are represented in Congress, and
Congress itself, should be of the opinion that
Georgia should not be permitted to take its
place hi the government of the country ex
cept upon its assent to one or the other of the
two propositions? to extend suffrage or to
exclude the negro from the basis of representa
tion, as suggested -is it then your opinion that,
under such circumstances, the State ought to
def line ?
Witness.? You mean the Stales now repre
sented, ami those only? <lnestioner. ? Yes.
Witness. ? Yon mean by Congress, Congress
as it is now constituted, with the other eleven
States excluded (Questioner. ? I do.
Witness.? Ami you mean the same alterna
tive propositions in be applied to all the eleven
St a tes as conditions preceden t to their restora
tiou? t Questioner. ? I do.
Answer. ? Then 1 think she ought to decline,
| under the cir? ?umstnuces, and for the reasons
I stated, and so ought the whole eleven. Should
such an otl'er be made ami declined, am! these
' States should thus con tiutie to be excluded and
kept out, a. singular spectacle would be pre
sented. A complete reversal of positions
would be presented. In 1S01, these States
thought they could remain safely in the I'nion
without new guarantees, and now, when they
agree to renew their former practical relations
in the Cuion, under the Constitution as it is,
the other States turn upon them and say they
cannot permi* them to do so safely to their in
terest without new guarantees 011 their part.
The southern States would thuspresent them
selves as willing for immediate union under
the ( 'onstitution, while it would be the north
ern States opposed to it. The former dis
uuionists would thereby become unionists, and
the former unionists the practicaldisunionists.
Mr. Stephens said he believed the Sta tes had
abolished slavery in good faith, and the ratifi
cation of the constitutional amendment fol
lowed as a consequence of the war, though he
did not think there was any constitutional
power of the Government to have exacted it
as a condition precedent to restoration under
the < 'oiisiitu t ion, or to the resumption of
their places as member* of the I'nion by the
? ^ I .1 ? f." .
The validity of i li?* laws, he said, passed by
( in tin* absence ? >t" the Senators and
Representatives of tlie eleven States depended
npon their constitutionality, which w;i> to be
decided by the courts. As the Congr? . s did
not consent to the withdrawal of the seceding
States, they have had the continuous right to
representation, to be exercised as soon as t! \*
make known their readiness to resume t i.? * r
rights tinder the Constitution , is States.
He said further, that lie doubted whether
t lie law- passed by Congre.-* in the absence ol
Senator.* and Representatives from the eleven
States, levying taxes upon all tile people of the
Cnited States, would be constitutional. It
i would certainly be unjust, and against all
ideas of American representative government,
but its constitutionality would be a question
for the judiciary, by whose decision he would
abide, whatever it would be.
In conclusion, Mr. Stephens stated that the
influencing considerations and opinions lead
ing him to identify hitnself with the rebellion
!so far as to accept theolliceof Vice-President
of the Confederate State* were thorough be
lief in the reserved sovereignty of the States,
lie opposed secession as a question of policy,
but believed his ultimate allegiance was due
10 his State, and he therefore chose rather to
cast his lot with her than to take any other
course, e\ en though it might lead to his sacri
fice and to her ruin.
.Trni. f. Cxiikhwooii. ? This "Judge, *' in a
card to the lnU Uiytnc*r, gives the pur
port of a recent decision of his as follows :
My opinion simply was, that the late peace
proclamation did not pretend to revoke the
pre\ions proclamation of President Lincoln
j suspending in certain cases the writ in the
States lately in insurrection, and I stated that
the peace proclamation did not include Texas,
' and that it had not and was not intended to
have so broad and general an application as
the petitioner supposed, ami therefore refused
to grant his prayer.
JoHX C. 1 TXHKIt\VOOD.
Nkmko Tt Kun.KNVK in Norfolk Cocntv. ?
A negro grew olfensive to Mr. James Carr at
Deep Creek, Norfolk county, a few days since :
and menacing Mr. Carr, he knocked him down
, with a door bar. Mr. Logan Hurst, delegate
from the county to the Legislature and a
magistrate, ordered his arrest. He was ar
; rested ; but the negroes threatening to burn
every lionse<in Deep Creek if he was not >et at
I liberty, it was deemed prudent to release
him in view of the large force of negroes,
lint the whites beat up for recruits, and were
soon enabled to rearrest him and take him to
Norfolk, where the Kreedinen's Bureau turned
him over to the civil courts, and he was put
in Portsmouth jail.
Irishmen vs. Neuroes.? A few days since,
j two or three negroes were employed as ostlers
in the Cambridge Horse Kailroad stables, near
Boston, Massachusetts. Irishmen and boys
had been previously employed. Indignant at
the introduction o{ the negroes, they struck;
whereupon the proprietors sent to Boston for
l more negroes, and in a little while the stables
were supplied with darkeys. So the negro gets
the better in that case.
Matrimonial Fltrrt Amon h Krkei.men.?
The Kreedinen's Bureau of Nashville, Tenn.,
issued an order for the marriage of all colored
persons living in illicit intercourse, under pain
of line and imprisonment. It occasioned a
great stir. Many marriages were the conse
quence, attended with much complaint of the
i license fee of the clerk.
Rock Salt.? It is said that the purest and
mott important natural deposit of rock suit in
the world i? that found on the Louisiana coast,
at a place called Petite Ause Islands. The
property has been purchased by C. A. Weed,
of New Orleans, and Hawkes, Pratt & Co., of
New York. The bed, extending over an im
mense area, is fifteen to twenty feet thick.
Contrast.? An unknown woman, too poor
to pay the toll on the regular bridge at Troy,
N. Y., attempted to cross the open railroad
bridge, and, growing dizzy, fell, and was
drowned. A little boy, supposed to be her
child, was found crying for his mother that
evening. Too poor to pay toll, and perished
in hearing of men who own millions!
A Chalk Mine in North Carolina.? Mr.
Marberry, of Davidson county, North Caro
lina, ha* discovered a chalk mine, very rich,
on liis laud near the Mineral spring*.
I TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
Conjrewlonal I'rorppdim*.
WA*H!!c?Tnjr, April 17.? Senate.?' The mo
tion to reconsider the vote on the admission
of Colorado came np. frntno vote was reached.
Mr. Sumner opposed the motion for the same
! reasons he had presented originally? namely :
the insufficient population, and the fact of the
f < 'onstitntion containing the word " white.''
The I.ill for the relief of pertain naval con
tractors wis discussed.
I J?ot*?E.? The House was engaged in the dis
I cussion of the hill for the increase of the regu
lar army. The section retaining ten regiments
of veteran reserves was parsed. A motion to
repeal the art authorizing nejrro regiments was
lost. The pending amendment is on making
no discrimination among the officers on ac
j count of color.
Arrest of a Fenian? Mr*. Jefferson Davis.
Toronto, April 17. ? Another Fenirtji arrest
was made yesterday? a man named Welsh.
He was sent forward for trial.
The examination of Fenian prisoners began
j to-day. It is thought the probable result will
i be the committal of all of them for trial at the
I next assi/es.
j Mrs. Jefferson Davis is in Montreal.
Movements of (Jenernl Meade and Staff.
I pHTT.Anni.rini, April 17.? General Meade
and staff left here for Ivistport, Maine, to-day.
His mission is supposed to be in connection
with the Fenian movement.
Arrest of a Supposed Accomplice in the Phila
delphia Murder*.
London*, O. W., April 17.? The supposed j
accomplice in the seven-fold Philadelphia j
murder has been arrested here. He gave his i
name as Charles McOutchen. When arrested, i
he turned pale and nearly fainted.
.\rw York Markets.
I New York, April 17 ? Cotton has a de- j
(lining tendency ? sales l,l<)o bales at 37c. Flour
active, and l?Hf?2.*?c. better : Southern firmer
at i?:)..'io/fi *1.V7.V Wheat has advanced .'[email protected]
Com has an advancing tendency. Pork heavy.
Lard quiet. Whisky dull at i<[email protected]*2.27.
Sugar steady. Coffee dull. Naval stores
quiet. Freights declining. < told, 12"? !a.
Baltimore Market*.
Hai ti more, April 17.? Flour inactive ; high
grades firm. Wheat scarce and tending up
ward. Corn firmer and active; white, S.*>c. ;
yellow, SOc. Oats firm at ?jo^MJlc. Provisions
steady. Sugar dull. Coffee firm. Whisky
dull.
1 1 ! 1
I
) A P E R WAREHOUSE,
RICHMOND, V.4.,
MAIN STREET, NORTH SIDE.
BETWEEN NINTH AND TENTH STREETS.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
R O JI I N S 0 N & K A I R B A N K S
have on hand, and are daily receiving,
PAPERS:
Wrapping, Mailing. News, Boo k, Writing, Re
cord, Legal, Sermon, Engrossing, Copying, Tra
cing. Drawing, Oiled, Tissue, Gold, Silver, Color
ed, Bristol Boards, Fancy, Card, ic., &c.
BLANK BOOKS:
Ledgers, Journals, Day Books, Ca*h Books, Ke
ct'i j?t Books, Bank Books, Drafts, Checks, Copy
IJoi *k> , &c . , A;c .
TWINES :
Jute, Hemp, Cotton, Seine, Ac., &<?.
I N KS :
I'rinting, Writing, Copying, Red, Blue, Ac., &c.
Writing Books, Slates, Waters, Sealing Wax,
Mucilage, Crayons, Inkstand-, Copying Presses,
Letter Books, Portfolios, Brushes, Pens, Pencils,
Erasers, Rub's, Memorandum Books, Time Books,
Wallets, and everything in the Stationery line.
Che** Boards, Chess Men, Backgammon Boards,
Cards, Envelopes, Rubber Good-, and a variety of
small wares.
Bankers, Merchants, Lawyers, Clergymen, Pub
lisher-, Teachers, Printers, Public Officers, and
others, will lind everyiJiing wanted in quantity,
quality, and price.
Paper ot any si/.e, kind, quality, and quantity
we can furnish to order or have made at short no
tice.
PAPER BAGS? a large stock.
Being Agents of Paper Mills, Envelope, Paper
Bag, Ink, and Blank Book Makers, and buying
from first hands, we can compete with the jobber#
north or south.
CASH PAID FOR \
COTTON AND LINEN RAGS,
HEMP AND MANILLA STOCK,
OLD NEWSPAPERS,
PAMPHLETS,
BOOKS,
and all kinds of
I PAPER STOCK.
Mk. S. M. DRINKER,
so well known in connection with the Stationery
business in the city of Richmond, is with us, and
will be pleased to see his friends.
?
E. T. RoBINSoN, S. FAIRBANKS,
of Richmond. of Florida,
[ap D-tsJ
N
E\V GOODS.
CHINA, GLASS, AND EARTHENWARE.
We have just received large additions to our
stock of CHINA, GLASS and EARTHENWARE,
HorSE-FPRNlSHING GOODS, Great induce
ments offered at wholesale or retail by
J. G. SNELSON, Agent,
at W. C. Lewis & Co.'s old stand,
corner above the Ballard House,
ap It Richmond, Va.
T?ISH, FISH, FISH.
X 2o0 barrels No. 1 HALIFAX HERRINGS,
'?o barrels No. '2 MACKEREL, large ;
60 barrels No. 2 MACKEREL, medium ;
6" barrels No. 3 MACKEREL, large;
250 kits No. I MACKEREL, family ;
now landing per brig " Starlight.'' For sale by
ap 13 FRENCH St CRENSHAW.
'PHE HIGHEST PRICE, IN CASH,
1 paid for OLD NEWSPAPERS,
<>LD PAMPHLETS,
OLD BOOKS,
OLD PAPER.
ROBINSON A FAIRBANKS,
ap 0 Paper Warehouse.
Kerosene oil: kerosene
OIL ! '-PURE KEROSENE OIL at one dollar
per gallon, for bale by JOHN W. RISON,
Apothecary and Druggist,
Hi h 1 Main and Third ktreeta.
?VfOTICE TO TO HA ( '( < )N IS IS NEW
1> ENGLAND RUM. -lo barrel* NEW ENGLAND
RUM, warranted proof. Will bell low to close
consignment. mull A V. STOKES A CO.
ONE HUNDRED BARRELS VIR
GINIA SUPERFINE FLOUR, l.ooo pound.
FEATHERS, 30 ke*? BUTTER, for tale to clo??
consignments ffe 23] SPnTTH A GIBSON
Kerosene oil, only eighty-five
cent* per fa Hon, for sale bv
WILLIAM A. MOUNTCASTLE,
mh 13? 2in No. HA Broad utreet.
DORTO Rico SUGAR --Thirty bar
I rein prime PORTO RICO SUGAR on consign
went. fap 17 J A. V STOKES a CO.
rpWENTT- F I V E H U N I) R E i
1 POUNDS COUNTRY BACON on conilgntneni
and for aal* ??r If? 31) KPOTT8_4 GIBSON
10 COFFEE, RIO COFFEE.? FUlgi
bays RIO COFFEE, iiut received,
ap 17 A. V. 3TOKJS8 k CO.
II
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
TtN'DER A LIBERAL CHARTER
Jrora th? General Assembly of Virginia,
pa*??>.i February 2', l?w,
THE INSURANCE
A!*D
SAVINGS COMPANY OF VIRGINIA
i* organized with an
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL OF *l,<v>v>f>o.
Principal otfl<-?> at Richmond.
OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY :
Daxikt. J. Hartsook, President.
David. I. Bi rr, Secretary.
B. C. Wherry, Jr., Assistant Secretary.
DIRECTORS :
Dantfi J. Hartbook,
JoHX E5DBRi?,
W. B. Isaac*,
W. G. Paixf,
Joseph E. Ci.aobtt,
Samtel C. Tardy,
A. Y. Stoker,
David Ci rrie.
Geo rob S. Palmer,
W G. Tatlor,
JoH.X C. WILLIAMS,
J. B. Davis.
Thin Company U mow prepared to make 1NSU
RANCE and Issue POLICIES upon FIRE and MA
RINE RISK'S on the most ADVANTAGEOUS
TERMS, and offers all the inducement* connected
with a HOME INSTITUTION OF UNDOUBTED
ABILITY AND SAFETY. The business capacity
of the Director^ is well known throughout the
State, the condition of the Company can at all
times be ascertained, and any accumulation of
profit* will constitute a fund for the benefit of the
community which pays the premiums.
Office on Main street, between Twelfth and Thir
teenth, over the United States Telegraph office,
jip 11 ? lm
O M E E N T ERPRIS K
T R I U M PHANTI!!
H
INSURANCE
PROVIDED BY OUR OWN RESOURCES.
THE VIRGINIA FIRE AND
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY,
OF RICHMOND,
has recuperated its strength, and occupies its place
on the rolls of solvent and reliable
Insurance Companies,
FOR THIRTY-FOUR YEARS IT HAS STOOD THE
RAVAGES OF FIKE AND WAVE!
and its history proves its capabilities. More than
a million of dollars have been paid in looses,
and we will meet them bravely
when they come again.
ENTERPRISE AND DETERMINATION HAVE
MET THEIR REWARD.
Its declaration of ability to pay its liabilities, past
and future, has been made good.
CLAIMS THAT ACCRUED IN 1*61, BUT ONLY
PRESENTED SINCE THE CLOSE OF
THE WAR, HAVE BEEN
LIQUIDATED
IN FULL.
READY MONEY HAS BEEN ACCUMULATED
to meet losses that may hereafter arise. Its present
revenue Is guarantee of stability.
Its Stockholders have made
NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS TO ITS CAPITAL STOCK
that have been prudently invested.
Its assets are in
CURRENCY,
COIN,
REAL ESTATE,
BILLS RECEIVABLE,
BONDS AND MORTGAGES ON REAL ESTATE,
CORPORATION BONDS,
and other securities, to the amount of
ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FIVE THOU
SAND DOLLARS.
MANY THANKS To TID?SE CITIZENS WHO,
WITH TRUE PUBLIC SPIRIT, HAVE FOS
TERED THIS HOME INSTITUTION.
We expect all our r?l ?1 patrons to aid in further
building up a branch of busine** that will bo
ADVANTAGEOUS TO TIIE GENERAL PUBLIC.
! THE SECURITY OF ITS POLICY-HOLDERS IS
considered of paramount
importance.
equitable dealing shall characterize
ITS TRANSACTIONS.
Now, near the
anniversary of the great revulsion
iii our monetary affairs, we invite our
MERCHANTS,
MANUFACTURERS,
M EC HAN ICS,
and all others, to
SAVE THEIR MONEY FOR THE USE OF OUR
OWN COMMUNITY BY INSURING
AT HOME.
All should feel the importance of doing no.
RATES WILL HE AS LOW AS IN OTHER GOOD
COMPANIES.
To delay to insure is to jeopardize your hard
earned means.
WE ONLY ASK A FAIR SHARE OF BUSINESS
IN OUR LINE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED, AND WE WILL TRY To
GIVE SATISFACTION.
OFFICE, No. 10* MAIN STREET, UP STAIRS.
W. L. COWARDIN, President.
William Willi*, Jr., Secretary. mh 19? ts
TLTONTAGUE & WHITALL
-U-*- (Late of the Merchant*' Insurance Company
of Richmond,)
INSURE PROPERTY OF ALL KINDS IN THE
MOST RELIABLE COMPANIES.
They also effect
MARINE INSURANCE AND LIFE INSURANCE.
Office, No. 231 Main street, just below the Spota
wood Hotel. de 11? U
VIRGINIA FIRE AND MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY OF RICHMOND.
CHARTERED 1^32. ? Thin Company has pax*ed
throu-h the ordeal of tire, and through financial
cri>?es, and is still solvent. The Directors and offi
i cere are thankful for the liberal support it has re
ceived from a discerning public, and pledge their
! best efforts to make the Company worthy of con
The Interest of oar community Is identified with
the largest success of our LOCAL INSTITUTIONS.
Build up these, and our prosperity is sure.
W. L. COWARDIN, President.
William Willis, Jb., Secretary.
Office, No. 108 Main street
Ja 19? 3m
F
LOUR, CHEESE, AND MOLASSES.
100 barrels CHOICE EXTRA,
100 barrels SUPERFINE,
5 barrels VIRGINIA BUCKWHEAT,
10 boxes EASTERN CHEESE.
So barrels SYRUP and MOLASSES. ,n
U>h J1 A. Y STOKES ? (
WRAPPING PAPER. ? On, thou
sand reams, assorted sires and '4Jt
sale. ROBINSON it FAU?;?*?'
ap9 P^|M,r^?rehonw
COFFEE ! COFFEE! ! _
75 bag* PRIMB RIO
mh 31 10 ***** PKIME J1VY. STOKES A Ct)^
UEINE TWINE, u store and to ar
rive? for,l*,t'- Ku>iXS0N & FAIRBANKS,
Hpj Paper Warehouse.
rriIE CELEBRATED ROCK ISLAND
1 JEANS a??l CASSI MERES for sale by the
aL?ut? PALMER. HARTHOOK & CO.,
Hp __ Libby Buildingi.
r?Ii()UK, FliOt - R. ? Seven hundred
barrel* FLOUR.
I ?p 17 A Y. STOKES k CO.
IMFTY BARRELS PRIME 8YRUP.
[*p I7J A. Y. STOKES * CO_
EY E FLOUR for sale by
ttp ltf WILLIAM T. KIM * CO.
FOR RENT.
F'm RENT, two MCE ROOMS on
the ?*m<! floor, with ft back porch. A/A
* lichen, wood, and coal-house : km iMfflfl
Jr*t*rotHfte place. Also. nae of
* ?f,*l,K?d for ? *mall family. Also, ft stable
for two hoMn,t Sll4 f??4 room. Apply oo the
2r,r?! . f ?r Oracp, second door from Twsnty
fllth street. ftp n_ t*
Foil KENT, a DWELLINO-HOUSE,
on Fifth, between Clay ?nd Leigh strsets,
with ten room*, kitchen, km all the modern fl??W
improvement* ; at present occupied Mr. W,JiJtL
A. VV right Po**e*#lon given at once. Apply to
CHARLES C. EIiLETT, Leigh street,
ap 12 ? tM between Third and Fourth.
I^OK RENT, a T li R E E - 8 T O R Y
TENEMENT. north side of Main, be- AhA
tween 8econd and Third, No. 2?5. A lao, the fSTtB
HOUSE third door below ; both with or inth-jllffl,
oat ?tab|e atid carriage-house. Apply at Jfo. W.
F
OR RENT, A LARGE STORE and
one lar^e ROOM, suitable foracommis
sion house or saloon and billiard-room. Alio,
one very ii ce STORE and on* ROOM, snltft-.
bl?? for a confectionery or grocery store. A1
BaKB-HOI'SE and several ROOMS, all In same
building. i;e tit very moderate to good tenant*.
ApJ'ly at J. L. DOHERTY'S nbo? store,
Wall street, between Main and Franklin,
rn h 27? ts
FOR RENT, One PLEASANT ROOM,
suitable for a Gentleman's Lodging
room, or a Gentleman and Wife.
Mr* II. B -
Seventeenth street, between Venable and Poplar,
fe 2*_ta
s Lodging
am. m
COAL AND WOOD.
( t\R<;o OfT'OAL FOR SALE.? Two
V' hundred and twelve ton* very superior RED
ASH ANTHRACITE COAL, to arrive, for sale low
if immediate application u made.
R. J. WHITE,
south ?id<; the dock, opposite Libby prison.
mli '.'3? t*
PKMHKRTON it CREW, dealers in
I CoaL AM) WOOD, otttce Seventeenth street,
between Cary and Pock. Best RED and WHITE
ASH ANTHRACITE COAL, for grates. stovesjind
foundry use: CLOVER HILL LUMP and MW E
RAGK'COAL ; <?AK and PINK WOOD, nib U-ta
VTKW COAL AND WOOD YARD,
II CORNER OF SEVENTH AND CANAL
STREETS?ANTHRACITE and M I DLOTHI AN
COAL and WOOD for sale by
BLOOD & PENDLETON.
N. B ? Order* promptly tilled. de 11? ta
I FRENCH A CRENSHAW, at thoir
1 EXTENSIVE FURNITURE WAREROoMS,
(I ilKN'KR Main AND XIXTH ?TKKETiO
iire n??w receiving a large and choice selection
of rich and tine GoODS, to which theyinvite the
attention of purchasers. Included in the stock may
be found
PARLOR Sl ITS of anti<iu>) and modern designs,
ROSEWOOD, WALNUT, and MA HOG AN*, in
PLUSH, BROCATELLE, REPS, and HAIR
CLOTH.
CHAMBER SUITS -ROSEWOOD, MAHOGANY,
and WALNUT : some very elaborate in design,
superior tn workmanship, 'and elegant in finish.
COTTAGE SUITS in every variety and style.
LIBRARY and OFFICE FURNITURE in great va
riety.
BEDSTEADS, WARDROBES, CABINETS, WAfiH
>TANDS, TABLES, HALL >ETS, ETEGRES,
4c.
A large and varied assortment of CHAIRS, MAT
TRESSES, SPRING BEDS. Ac., Ac.
In addition to the above, can always be found a
large and well-*e|?>cted assortment of CARPETING,
OIL CLOTHS. MATTING. WINDOW SHADES,
PAPER HANGINGS, PRINTS for furniture covers,
and FURNISHING GOODS generally, ap li? 3m
READ, UKAI), III5AU, ? .11181 re
ceived at LEVY KUOTHKE^', Blenched tint
Unbleached Cottons, Calicoes, Parasols, Dress
Goods, Summer Ca*>iinere, Linen Pant Stuff!*.
Goods received twice a week by steamer from
X e w York, one of the lirm being constantly there
buying good- at auction. Remember, the place
for bargain* is LEVY BROTHERS,
(Successors to Jacob A. Levy,)
ap 17 15 Main street.
WE CANNOT BE UNDERSOLD.
T BUMGARDNER'S OLD RYE
>1 ? WHISKY.? After a suspension of my Di*tille
ry for four years and upwards, I have, within the
last lew months, resumed business, but I hai*e as yet
sent to market but tkn hakkki.s ok my whisky,
which, I think, without doubt, as good as I ev?-r
made in my life, and most assuredly as pure an li
quor can b'e produced from the best of grain.
My agents are . IAMES E. LIPSCOMB 4 CO.,
Franklin street, between Thirteenth and Four
teenth, Richmond, Ya.
ap 14? tit J A M ES B U MO A R DN ER .
rp<) THE PUBLIC.? Having been in
1. formed that some parlies, in certain portions of
the city, have been allotting the numbers of their
houses to various persons, we de?i re to state that,
limb r the direction of the City Engineer, and by
authority of the City Council, we are the only par
ties .tutliori/i d to number the streets and houses of
the < ity, and anv intelligence received from others
is unreliable. We shall in due time call at every
house in the city, and are now engaged inregu
larlv numbering the houses and street*.
n p M?.'u* STARKE k MILLS.
A G. BABCOCK, WHOLESALES
J\ . AM) RETAIL DEALER IN NORTHERN ICE.
I> E I' o T B K T W K E N SEVENTEENTH AN I)
EIGHTEENTH STREETS, SOUTH SIDE DOC?.
Familiesand all places of business supplied daily,
onb-rs may he left with Messrs. BRANDER'dt
GILES, Grocers, corner of Grace and Second
streets, am I A. II. CHRISTIAN & CO., Booksellers,
*1-1 Main street. Parties leaving orders with th?
above lirms will be ussured of prompt delivery of
ICE every day, and no increase of price during
the hot sep$on. ap 16? iw
N'OTICE.? J have oil hnnd several
handsome MAHoOANY JENNY LIND BED
sTE.\l?, several MARBLE-Top MAHOGANY
CABINETS, besides other desirable FURN1TURB,
whi? h 1 propone to sell verv low.
GEORGE C. BRAY, Mainstreet,
between Twentieth and Twenty-flrst.
apl7? lw south side.
M O N TTioif k k y s mountain
CABINET WHISK V .? ' Twenty-flve barrels of
the above celebrated WHISKY. Dealer* are
assured that it cannot he surpassed by any
WHISKY in this market. For sale by
WILLIAM TAYLOR k SON,
ap 1?T ? Hi Sole Agent*.
RON I)E l> WAREHOUSE.? We aro
prepared to receive in our store and place in
bond anv kind or GOODS SUBJECT To REVENUE
TAX. * W<* can take charge of TOBACCOS, LI
WUORS, COTTON,
If ARVEYS k WILLIAMS,
ap U? lin Commercial Block.
\F 1 KG I NI A BACON. ? Ten thousand
V |>ouuds best VIRGINIA BACON, on consign
ment, which we olfer wholesale and retail at low
est market rates. STEVENS & PEGRAM,
Commission Merchant*,
ap H 611 Bfotditr?<t.
VOCAL CLASS.? Chuwes *or voting
ladies in the RUDIMENTS ANb SCIENCE
OF MUSIC will he given tin- 1st of April.
Tkhkx : T W o DOLLARS fHU MONTH IN
CLASS. Apply at the Arlington House, No. *.
lull JO? ts J
I^oK SALE, IN BOND, OR DU' "
1 PAID, ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-'""
CASKS SUPERIOR OLD FRENCH BRANDS
Robhin, and Otard. Dopuy k Co. brand*, y
this dav per British brig W. D. Nash. gt\\W.
mhtf FRENCH k CRJg^ -J?
1 YPE FOU ND U Y. ?The Pthe^Sc"
m. is printed on TYPE MADK Atldi tMalilt#
MOND TYPE FOUNDRY. E ve/(7e?.
for a Printing Otliceat NorthenftJuZE k CO.,
H. L. Ir Richmond. Va.
aplT-.lia / ?
rpw7 X K-Fivc
1 three hundred prizes, for sale.
pound* Cotton, aasort^^goN k FAIRBANKS,
Y Paper Warekoose.
ap X ? ?
;T7,VtEMPLE.? a RESTAU
131 LJ J A ly*\TER will be keut at the B1L
* J RANT/V commencing THIS (Saturday)
L1ARD TEf * JONES k 0EI8W0LD.
I AFTEKXjr '
a?F MACKEREL.?
|/f)r?e hundred barrels Eastport Herrlnff* ; M
1 -lit r- five barrels No*. *? ,* ,
Nu-a'.'yj woKalt'oo.
I "Sour hundred and fifty
1 bane!* of FLOUR, of varlou* brand*, Joal w
celved ..,i for HABTtOOK * CO.
ap 9 -ts tlbby Biildlf'
I
ap 9 -I*
I^TnE SIIIRTS AND COLLARS.?
. We take pleaaure in directing attention to omr
stock of line shirts and Collar* a* being of tto M
1 ""
qto'ver tinware, and house
0 FURNISHING GOODS, for *ale, wholesale and
null. .< r.auc^^^J MOCSJCima
mh w? 2m _ No. 1M Broad gA
r I ME AT ONE IH)LLAR AND FIF
1 J TY CENTS PER BARREL. r^We fur dUln
?pl>UJt* Ba*ln Bank, n. v Twelfth ttreeC
f >APEK II AOS.? Ten tlwujwuul MA
1 I NILLA BAGS; for wilier*', Kroc?c?\ 4fU
i druKdlsu' use; belter than hemp and cotton. Tw
sale by ROBINSON k FaIRBaMKS,
api? Paptr WaretUi**.
CHEESE? Fifteen boxes GOSHEN
, o. co.

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