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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, November 13, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024738/1868-11-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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DAILY DISPATCH.
VOL. XXXV. RICHMOND, FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 13, 1868. NO. 117.
THE DISPATCH.
BY COW ARDIN & 'ELLYSON.
THEDAILY DISPATCH Is dcliTenxJ to ?nb
at rnrTB*s c*KT8 per -ireek, payable to
,il,'c?.rrWr weekly. Mailed at ??per annum ; |l.n
j?r ?1* month* ; .*?. per month /or a shorter pe
riod.
sFMl-WEKKLY DISPATCH at 94 per an
?r.m. or I17-50 for s,x months.
The WEEKLY DISPATCH *193 per annum.
M
A ITlUSEITf ENXST'.
^ich5oSi> theatre,
'\t nh-'HT Birr one.
vast night hut one.
BENEFIT OF THE
WORRELL SISTERS.
First and on'y Umo of
L a BELLE HELENS,
?w ith the OroolAu Bond.
To conclude wnh the F?rce of
OOOI) fob nothing,
. wbica Ml*5 Jkss'k Wokrkll will Introduce
her gre.*t Clog Dance.
TO-MORROW? LAST NIGHT:
BAKBE BLEUE,
and a
GLORIOUS FARCE.
?i, .tc <-*n l>c reserved at the Theatre from 9 until
1 r, 'clock.
ft,nr..>-iou? 75, 5fl, an^l *6 cents.
Tin- c.tv cars ruu to Kotket is after the perfo?m
?nw ? _ n > 13?1,
JiTROPOLITAN HALL,
RICHMOND, VA.
flX NIGHTS ONLY,
COMMENCING ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9.
MATIN HE on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH,
AT 3 O'CLOCK.
WYMAN,
THE CELEBRATED WIZARD AND
VENTRILOQUIST,
with New and Beautiful Delusions.
GRAND DISTRIBUTION OF PRESENTS
at the close of each performance,
con-lstlnj; of
GREENBACKS, TONS OF COAL, BARRELS
OF FLOUR. and one hitndr* d other USE
Fl'L and FANt Y ARTICLES.
ADMISSION. -'5 CENTS. Dojrs open at 6J : to
fotamence at 7j o'clock. no 7? 7t
GROCERIES. Sir.
COAP AND CANDLES.
We are sole agents for the sale of
M. ALTMYER'S" SOAP AND CANDLES.
A FI LL SUPPLY ALWAYS ON HAND AND
FUR SALE T<> T1IK TRADE AT
FACTORY PRICES.
MVSME & HARVEY,
no U No. 8. Fifteenth street.
COFFEE, COFFEE, COFFEE. ? In store
a n*l f'<r sale
? l, its <".<?OD RIO COFFEE,
<1 Mi-M II tlCE RIO C< 'FFKE
< !,arrr:s H. B. SMART'S PUKE MOUNTAIN
WHISKEY.
id l.arrH- RECTIFIED WHISKEY.
j.. < Mi?l K SUG \H-< UR! !> HAMS,
?0 larrrl- CH 'ICE F \ M1LY FLol It,
t?t. rr. l-? lloI< E EX.KA FLOUR,
i:s NarM* L??W GK^DE KLOUK,
W '.ales NK W YORK HAY.
on h *n<>, a good tupjjly of
Mill kekd,
t O < N and i 'OR N M E A L,
OATS. 1'OTATOES, Ac.;
* !c!i will he sulci at the very lowest price to punc
tui! customers. I.. i'oWEHS,
ij" ? No. 10 Fifteenth street.
BAT! R ELS SUPERIOR FAMILY
LOl'K.
DANDWTDO F. X- ANDFK<QN.
-J A BOX ES VEIl Y FIN E CUTTING
11/ ilifc.l?:E and MACARONI.
:n> 6 D . NOKIDOK A ?N PER SON.
ORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK ? fresh.
no 6 DANDRIiiOE & AN'DKKfcON .
30 ,
B
SUGARS. ? Cut-loaf, Powdered, and Gra
mdat.d Scfjirs; A, B, and Extra C Sugars;
Cliol't pM't.i U:co aii-l Dein<?rara Suffus; Prime
rr/rIM' Island and < uha Srp.ns; Uuud 1.11J Com
i) "CvlMaes Mic.'irb ; l* r s.?le by
no 5 RurtfK-t w. WH.I.IAMS A CO.
Herrings.? No. 1 north Caro
lina riTT JJfcuBINGS.
.,,,.1 SOUTH CAtruC 1\.< ROE HERRINGS,
barrels and half fmVrels ;
Choice New S?. 1 HaLUTaX HEKRINGS,
for Srtle l.'V
ROBERT F. WILLI N MS & CO.
T>1'.'E. ? Choice new CAROLINA and
t ;AN(jUoN KH'K f<?r sale by
I'OHf RT F. WILt.lAMS * CO.
iAm BARRELS SYRUP, 2u BARRELS
1 l/y Morris's Gol'len Syrup. 20 barrels Mur
! s ail!' t r-y ruji. <?<> barrels Grocers' syrup, 30
turrels t. una Molasses,
no MOI'STKM) A CARY.
r.AA SAL KS IIIGGlNss'S LIVERPOOL
(jUv SALT nu storage. For sale low to close
[no S] KMISTEaD ,t CARY.
or; BARRELS EASTERN HERRINGS,
7 barrels S' tin HAMPTON ClL'ER VINE
OAK f.ur ami a half jea-s old.
tin 2 AKM1STWAD * C \RY.
rr\ f.oxe
? /V englis
BOXES PRIME FACTORY AND
E.VGJ
i r sale t v
sH DAIRY CHEESE tj arrive,
n. . * ARMI^TEAD * CARY.
THE BEST PLACE IN THE CITV TO
1 l.ur COOD TE A and ROASTED COFFEE
bat.l.H ANTHONY' ?> Tea "tore, No. 721 Main
street six doors ai*ove the S|?otswood Hotel, tiun
IH.mKrlea t-esl qualltv. per pound ; Japau
t 'M% oolong, a ,il Kii>r lsli breakfast Teas ; Baker's
i- a;i 1 Cocoa ; Honey Soap, 5c. per cake,
E&-. per dozen ; Wine Crackers. Spice Jumbles,
and ? ln?? r Snaps c>n'tantly 011 hand oc 81
s :Er;lJ V/ II EAT, BUTTER, AND BUCK
O WHEAT FLOUR.? I have just rccleved for
sale
PRIME BUTTER,
Mor.VT.AIV BUcKWIlEAT FLOUR, anil
Lancaster seed wheat.
N. B. HILL,
_or J1 \'o<i, 14"? and 142fl <"ary street.
1 1)^ BARRELS CUBA MOLASSES IN
litj store and for sale by
,J. B. SrLATER,
"2 No. 6 Fifteenth s n et.
Tl^T RECEIVING IN &TORE,
V Hr.itKl NGS, 300 barre's;
MAfRliJCEL, 5" barrels;
l!ACoN, sl'itb and shoulders;
HAMS, natebt cover? d--very choice ;
M<iAhS. rt ilU' d and raw
L'.kl). choice ijualltv;
Rlt'F, South Carolina, In casks;
HKE;b., eholee Cutting;
Si ! ( 1 i'. all hlzrts ;
COt FEES, Klo and Lspnavra; also, Java.
ALSO, l\ sTvRE
Al'Pl.ES In barrels,
J KI H POTATOES In barrels,
KLTTKR,
'or si'.c a the lowest market rates.
oc^_!m HA li Vh Yt? A WILLIAMS.
TJEU RINGS, HERRINGS.? 500 barrels
Ax N". 1 HKK RINGS. 1 0 half barrels IIER
alNvii, for sale low to close.
?iEO. LEV A CO.,
_ J5 Fonrteenth street below Cary.
BA C 0 N , BACON. ? Twenty hogsheads
SHOULDERS and SIDES for sale low to
U01*- GEO. L ILK & CO.,
00 29 Fourteenth street below Cary.
DENTISTRY.
O eorge b. steel, dentist,
VJ 'JfVutfcb Kt>M?la' Mfti nrir.n fhe nre
H ; alou ln
OULI) OK
prices ae
, W,,..,IU) u. "V.1IV v? "V procured
.Wrwht rf. ( iid -f ?;d plitle tak. n lii exchange.
r.m tvfc It. *1.
Urn . -jj \[Ai;. stkkkt, five doors above
? " ? d H TH, i icinnond, V* Of 21? 3m
T SEl'II WO(jDWAKL>, SURGEON ?558*
U Dkxiist Establish- d In 1850. ue-'SffHSJ
!l's--cUss oleoma at the VI glula Mechau
; ? Iiinttluu-, in i-i5 I r thf Iie-t st-t of artificial
!*, ' ""tiiiues t . mak -u erlor work at usual
'*<*?. <uul j.t norms all tic! tal wpfciatlous with care,
t. . J"'s ' 7-' Wain street between heventb
?-iu Kifiir'i ,-tri'Hs. Klchmond. Va. oo U?lm
DtNTA L NO i KJE-KEDL'CTlUNjjg^
IN THE l'HIf.'K of AJCT1F1C1 AL^SM?
? 'i'lit un(ier6l|ajfd will Insert FULL, bl*
T^.r.V l?wkk SETS OF ARTIFICIAL
for TWENTY lo THIRTY DOLLARS
* ctT. Old gold sets will be takvn In exchange
? iifw bcti ou vu]citiiiu: a 6inall additional
vmt**,
KiVn04'- au<i residence 62S Mxln street, between
au'1 ^evtutli btrccts .
J? i*-*m JOHN MA IIP NY.
SE. KLOEBER, DENTIST, iii-smt
? KEALTIFUL A K llFIClAL'SSrEEP
ffept J. aI TWENTV DOLLaR& per set. Per
?i2.i. kua durability warranUd. Call and ?>e
til" w..rk,
ttT Mention devoted to filling and pre
u? , ,fcxtr?cu-d without pain.
?*1 iw>< Uii?, w>2 IJroad street. oc 10
'CHMOND granite company.?
We
best
Hr(.- prepared t<> furnish the very
?lutllly Git a. Si i'V.. dressed or undressed. In
W.'tv- u ? vsjn ?1m> Ix.ll'i all kindH or GKA N
? U('kK ;ti Bli?rt notice. ^p?''lal atteiitloi)
r.,u^h ur dressed VV ?* LL \V0KK. <-EML
WOUK.4C.. and ull material furnished.
v21i:c corner oi Canal and Seventh streets.
ocU-to
SPEC! ALJKOTIC ES.
i?- CORSETS. CORSETS.
GENUINE FRENCH-WOVE CORSETS, *Sc.
GENUINE FBENCH-WOVfi CORSETS, $1 00.
GENUINE FRENCH- WOVE COR3ET3. $1 ?0.
GENUINE FRENCH-WOVE CORSETS, $2.00.
GENUINE FRENCH-WOVE CORSE IP. *2.Ro.
GEN U1NE FRENCH-WOVE CORSETS, *3.00.
GENUINE FRENCH-WOVE CORSETS, $3.75.
Wo call particular attention to our 6tork of
C' RSETS,
as we are now cffeilng them
MUCH BELOW REGULAR PRICE*.
LEVT BROTHERS,
1213 AND 1215 MAIN ETItKKT.
fcSTtHILDUE.VS MERINO SHIRTS,
ALL SIZES,
AT FIFTY CENTS,
tome of which are worth $1.25.
ONLY A FEW LEFT.
LEVY BROTHERS,
Nob. 15IJ ami 12' 5 Mala street.
jj^-LlXE!* COLLARS AND CUFFS
JOB
LADIES, GENTLEMEN, and MISSES,
IN (.11 EAT VARIETY, AT
LEVY BRCT ITERS',
Nos. 12 1 s and 1815 Main st'eet.
WS" WORKED CAMBRIC BANDS, OVER
TWO YARDS LONG, at 35c.
WORKED CAMBRIC BANDS, over two yards
long, at 35c.
WORKED CAMBRIC BANDS, over two yards
long, at 35c.
WORKED CAMBRIC BANDS, over two yards
long, at 35c.
At LEVY BROTHERS',
At LEVY BROTHERS',
At LEVY BROTHERS',
At LEVY BROTHERS',
Nos. 1218 and 1215 Main street.
Nos. 1213 and 1315 Main street.
Nos. 1213 and 1215 Main street.
Nos. 1213 and 1215 Main street,
*E"COL NTRY MERCHANTS PURCHASING
FOK CASH are Invited to call and examine our
Stock, as we are prepared to offer great induce
ments. LEVY BROTHERS,
Nos. 12!3 and 12lS Main stree' .
WST CLOSED ON SATURDAYS. ?The store
of LEVY BROTHERS will be closcd EVERY
FRIDAY EVENING at suaset, and remain closed
until SATURDAY EVENING at 5.30, at which
time they will open for the accommodation of
their customers. "Will close Saturday evenings at
8.30. no 13
TEMPORARY REMOVA L
OF
JULIUS SYCLE
FROM 319 MAIN STREET
TO THE STORE FORMERLY OCCUPIED BY
THOMAS D. QUARLES,
319 BROAD, BETWEEN TH1KD AV7D
FOURTH STREETS,
UNTIL ni8
NEW STORE,
NO. 415 BROAD STREET,
16 COMPLETED.
No. 319 BROAD STREET is at present the
headquarters to pet the latest styles of FALL and
WINTER GOODS in the city, and at lower prices
than any other house.
Calico, good fast color, at 12$c. ; Bleached Cotton,
full one yard wide and good quality, at 12Jc.; 4-4
Heavy Brown Sheeting at 14c. ; Beautiful Poplin,
all colors, at 30c.; White Flannel at 20c., a great
bargain ; Empress Cloth, all colors, at 75c.; La
dles' Balmoral Skirts at fl.25, really worth fl.75;
Solid Black Dress Goods, for mourning dresses, for
25c. ; Broadcloth aud Beaver, for ladles' cloaks, for
$2 per yard ; Casslmere from 75c. to $1.25 ; Casi
nets from 26 to 60c.; Kentucky Jeans from 20 to
87 Jc.; Gent's Merino Undershirts at 75c.; Nice La
dles' Black Cloth Cloaks at $3 ; Dress Goods,
Shawls, Hoop Skirts, Linens, Corsets, Notions,
Hlankets, Quilts, Ac., aud huudreds of other arti
cles usually found In a first-class dry goods house
all to be sold at a great inducement. Call at
JULIUS SYCLE'S, 810 Broad street,
between Third and Fourth,
Thomas D. Quarles's old stand.
Store cosed on SATURDAYS. oc 31? 8m
T. M. ALFIiLEND. K. M. ALFHIEND.
T. L. AI.FRIBND.
IgTTHOMAS JW. ALFRJEND & SOW,
INSURANCE AGENTS,
No. co2 Main stbkkt, Richmond, Va.
INSURANCE AGAINST FIRE, AND MA
RINE BISKS, and LIFF INSURANCE effected
on favorable terms and in large amounts.
Our senior has had large experience in the in
surance buslntss, which enables us to prepare our
policies with reference to the wants of our pa
trons.
All kinds of property in town and country IN
SURED AGAINST FIRE, AND MARINE AND
INLAND INSURANCE effected to all ports ?nd
places desired.
Applications by letter or In person promptly re
sponded to.
THOMAS M. ALFKIEND ft SON.
oc 80? im
"X&- GENTS' UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAW -
ERS, all 6lzes and weights ;
BOYS' UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS, all
sizes and weights ;
LADIES' UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS, all
sizes and weigh' s ;
GIRLS' UVDKh SHIRTS AND DRAWERS, all
sizes and weights ;
COURTNEY ft SON arc now receiving the
above goods from the manufacturer's agents, and
will sell them for bmall profits.
J. O. COURTNEY ft SON,
nolo? lm 815 Broad street.
FALL AND WINTER TRADE? 186S.
J. E. DOHERTY, MZKCHANT TAILOK,
No. 823 Main street, between Eighth and Ninth
streets, calls attention to the largest STOCK OF
GOODS he has ever offered at the commencement
of a season.
The styles are new, the fabrics excellent, and
the prices will be made satisfactory to all who are
disposed to have varments made to order.
Call and examine the stock. se JI? 8m
AIR.? 600 bushels PLASTERERS'
. _ HAIR tor sole by HULST ft KING,
US Main zliobU
H
JLtcItmmtd gispldt.
THE CIRCULATION OF THE "DISPATCH"
IS LARGER THAN THE COMBINED CIRCU
LATION OF ALL THE OTHER DAILY NEWS
PAPERS Oi' THIS CITY.
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 13, 1868.
AUCTION SALES THIS DAY.
WELLINGTON GonniN Will sell on the prem
ises. ?t 4 o'clock P. M.,the choice of the two
handsome brick cottages on Gamble's Hill, on
the west line of Fourth between Byrd and Arch
streets.
WILLIAM R. TALL, high constable, will sell at
lo A. M., at Magnlre's r< staurant., on Franklin
st-ee% b*r fixtures, centre tables, chairs, look
lt)g-gl Ac.
RXHARDsOV A NEWBURN will sell on the
premises, at 4 P.M., a neat framed dwelling on
St Paul ' ? t'veeu Federal and t harlty stre?ts.
COOK A LAUGHTON will sell at their store at
10 o'clock hou ebeld furniture, engravings,
fnrs, Ac.
LOCAL MATTERS.
Trr: Griffin Habeas Corpus ? History
or rnr Cask. ? Judge Underwood held a
sp^c-il term of the United States Circuit
Couic yesterday to coneider the case of
Cseanr ?. ?riffin, a negro man, upon whose
petition a writ of habeas corpus wae
awaide- some weeks ago. It will be re
in embe: ed that this is the case upon the de
cision of which depends the tenure-of-office
of n lr.rg? number of Viginia office-holders,
inciudicg the judges of several of the cir
cuit courts. It is claimed that Judge
Hugh W. Sheffey, who sentenced Griffin
to the penitentiary, is not now, and hat
not been since July last, a judge of the
State of Virginia, being expressly disquali
fied and prohibited from exercising the
functions of that office by the fourteenth
article of the Constitution of the United
States.
As this case is one of great importance,
and will doubtless excite general attention,
we have been at some considerable pains to
lay before our readers the circumbtances of
the crime of which Griffin was convicted.
No doubt they will be recalled by many
when we state that Griffin is the negro who
shot Frank H. Brockenborough, a son of
Judge Brockenborough, in the streets ot
Lexington, on the 8th of last May. Young
Brockenborough and his mother were walk
ing home late in the evening, when their
passage was obstructed by a party of
colored persons, both men and women,
who were sauntering along just ahead of
them, Mrs. Brockenborough Btates that
her eon very politely asked them to get out
of the way, when Csesar (the petitioner)
insolently replied, " I won't get out of the
way for any d ? d rascal." Mrs. Brocken
borough said, "Boy, don't get excited.
Frank would have asked any of his fellow
students to do the same thing." One of the
girls of the party then exclaimed that ii
she had known who it was she would have j
stepped off the sidewalk at once. They got
out of the way finally, and Griffin " ripped
out an oath as the white folks passed."
Brockenborough then exclaimed, " I'll
thrash you, you scoundrel, for this." Grif
fin replied, u Do, if you dare. I am your
man." Mr. Brockenborough then walked
with his mother to their own g*te, cut ?
stick, and returned to the spot, intending to
chastise the negro. Grabbing his collar,
he raieed the stick and made Bonit
remark differently understood by each wit
ness, when Grifliu drew a pistol and shot,
the ball passing, it is said, entirely through
his antagonist's body.
The statement of the negroes examined
differed in some respects lrom that of the
whites, 'i hey taid they thought Mr. aDd
Mrs. Brockenborough were colored people,
or thev would have btepped outot the way,
that Brockenborough first cried out, " ain't
you going to let me pass?" and as they
got away said, "if you hadn't got out ot
the way I'd have thrashed you d? n quick ;"
and that they all thought he had a gun in
his hand instead of a stick.
Griffin, v.heu arrested, confessed the
shooting, but said it was in self-defence.
On the let of June he was indicted by the
grand jury ; but electing to be tried by the
Circuit Court, his trial did not come ofl
until September, when he was convicted ol
"unlawful but not malicious shooting,"
and sent sncc J to be confined for two years
in the penitentiary. A motion for a new
trial w s overruled, but subsequently exe
cution of the judgment was suspended for
thiitv days. In the mean time the pri
soner, through biB counsel, C. 8. Bundy,
Esq., obtained the writ of habeas corpus ,
returnaMe yesterday morning. The an
sw r o.' l.c sheriff of Rockbridge to the writ
aetu 'ort'i briefly the principal facts stated
abov?\
W i.t the case was called yesterday, At
torn* y-C.^eral Bowden asked for a con
tinu; no on account of the sickness of Mr.
Lyon.-, -ho was to represent Judge Sheffey
in tho -,ase. He was disposed to ask it,
too, on his own account, as he had had no
opportunity to acquaint himself with the
facts, and the case was one of the greatest
importance to the whole Commonwealth.
Mr. Bundy said that in a case involving
the personal liberty of a citizen, as did this,
he did not feel at liberty to consent to any
long delay. However, he was willing to
accommodate counsel, and would not object
to anything the court might think proper.
He deemed it well to remind the Attor
ney-General that this was not a movement
to unseat Judge Shefley, but to ascertain
by what authority the petitioner is held.
Mr. Bowden suggested that the case be
continued until Saturday. He wished to
post himself as to its meriis.
The Court said the case should be cau
tiously proceeded with, and while a habeas
corvus usually had precedence, this waB
such an important matter that all reason
able indulgence must be granted, even at
the expense of a few days of inconvenience
to the petitioner. The case was theretore
adjourned until Tuesday next.
The prisoner waB given in charge of De
puty United States Marshal Lynham, by
whom he was consigned to the city jail.
Proeahle Homicide.? At about 12
o'clock Wednesday night a stabbing affray
occurred on Main street near Yielding s
bar-room, resulting in the serious if not
mortal wounding of a young man named
"William Jackson, sometimes called William
Gates. It is said that Jackson, a friend
named Burch, and another whose name
ia not reported, were playing bagatelle in
Fielding's bar-room, all being somewhat
under the influence of liquor, and rather
disorderly. While thus engaged JamesL.
Boyden came in and some high words
passed between him and Jackson, which
resulted in their going out in the > i0
have a fight. Jackson called Boyden a
d? d son of a b? h, and struck him,
whereupon the latter drew a large pocket
Life and stabbed him. The blade entered
below the right shoulder and pierced the
lung. Dr. Waring fears that the wound is
mortal. Last night the wounded man was
in a critical condition.
Bo\den was arrested by officers Tyler
and Murphy, and lodged in the lower police
station. He will have a hearing this morn
iuj? at tUe police court.
Convict .?Ct?orleB Cox, of Northumber
land,' was lodged in the pemtentiary jes
terday.
THE NEW KENT MURDERS.
KENNEDY AND GARDNER BEFORE
THE CIRCUIT COURT.
A LOCAL IS JAIL.
A large crowd was drawn to New Kent
Courthouse on Wednesday by the anticipa
ted trial of Gardner and Kennedy, the ne
groes indicted for the murder of Mrs. Julia
Stuart and John Baker. A full account of
this tragedy and the burning of the house
over the head of the murdered woman was
published in the JJis-patch at the time.
At 12 o'clock Judge Christian opened his
court. The grand jury was then sworn in
by the clerk and charged by the Judge in
his usual able manner. The two prisoners,
Kennedy and Gardner, -were brought into
court under a strong guard armed with
muskets. The Commonwealth's attorney,
Mr. T. Taylor, informed the court that he
was ready to go into the trial, notwith
standing the absence of the two efficient
detectives (O'Dwyer end Tyler) who fer
reted out the murder and made the arrest.
Judge Christian assigned the prisoners
Messrs. Benjamin Lacy and Isaac H. Chris
tian as counsel. Mr. Taylor stated that he
would have Mr. C. A. Branch, who had
been employed by the citizens and friends
of the murdered persons, for an associate
for the Commonwealth.
Mr. Lacy, counsel for the prisoner, an
nounced that they were not ready to go into
the trial on the part of Kennedy, and pre
sented the following affidavit, sworn to by
the prisoner :
"New Kent county , to wit:
" This day personally appeared before
me, clerk of New Kent Circuit Court, Lewis
Kennedy, and made oath that James Mil
lev is a material witness in his defence
under the charges against him in said
court. Given under my hand this 11th day
of November, 1868.
"Bat. 1>. Christian', Clerk."
Mr. Christian, counsel for the accused,
urged the continuance of the trial on the
ground that Miller was a most important
witness, and that the accused stated that
if there was any one guilty of murder, and
if there had been a murder committed,
Miller knew all about it. He also con
tended that public opinion was very strong
against the prisoner. He heard one man
say in the public road that, guilty or not
guilty, they should be hung for an exam
ple.
Mr. Taylor contended that there was no
such man as James Miller in connection
with this case. He had boen summoned
through a subperna, to the sheriff of Charles
City county, and the summons was returned
notifying the clerk that this man could not
be found. He also contended that public
opinion was not against the prisoner, but
quite the reverse ; for during their confine
ment in the jail there had been no angry
?;rowd lounging around for the purpose of
enforcing the lynch law.
Mr. Taylor was followed by Mr. Branch,
his associate coun-el, on behalf of the Com
monwealth, urging the taking up of the
case.
After a recces the court met at 3 o clock.
The Judge stilted that he thought there had
been due dilligence exercised in trying to
obtain this man Jame* Miller as a witness,
but as the C< mmonwealth's attorney h:id
stated that there was no euch man, he
rhought it his duty to examine into the
matter; he "would hear any evidence ti e
?iouusel for thr accuscd might have as to
the existence of the ?witness in question.
Captain T. C. Leake was brought to the
stand and testified that he had employed a
man by the name of James Miller in the
winter of 186(5, but he would not now know
him if he were to see him, as he had never
aeen him since.
Mr. Binford testified that he knew such
a man, and would know him now if he
should see him.
Captain John Lamb, sheriff of Charles
City county, testified that there was no such
man in his county.
The Judge thought the counsel for the
accused ought to Bhow that Miller had been
in the county since 1 8G6. He was dis
posed to grant everything in his power for
the benefit of the accused ; but there was ,
no evidence to prove that this man had
been here since the year 1866. which was
long before this offence was committed.
He would, therefore, adjourn the case over
until to-morrow morning, in order to give
the counsel for the accused time to inform
themselves whether this man had been in
the county since 1S6G.
Yesterday morning at 11 o'clock the
Judge opened his court. The counsel for
the accused stated that owing to their lim
ited time it had not been in their power to
find out whether James Miller had been in
the county eince I860. Also, that they
were detained in court until a late hour,
and would not have had the time to go ten
miles from the place before the coilrt would
reiiasemble. They would submit the affida
vit of the accused, backed by the testimony
of Gardner, ? not now on trial ? to prove that
this man was a principal witness, and left
his house on or about the 25th of Septem
ber for Charles City county for the purpose
of obtaining work as a wood-chopper.
The Judge stated that he had been to more
than ordinary trouble in coming to a con
clusion in this matter. It was always the
custom of this court to extend to the ac
cused all the privileges in 'his power, not
withstanding his condition ; and in this
case the parties have been in jail since
their arrest, and have had no means to pro
cure counsel, much leas' to compel the at
tendance of witnesses. 1 hey had sent a
subpoena to Charles City, where Miller hud
been when last heard of, and it had been
returned only yesterday with the endorse
ment, " not found " ; and no time had been
allowed them to send to any other county.
They had certainly shown there was such a
man, and had done all in their limited
means to obtain his appearance. He would,
therefore, continue this case until the next
term of the court, on the 10th ot May,
1869. In the mean time the Commonwealth
could n.ot sustain any loss, as the prisoners
were in their hands and a heavy guard sur
rounded the jail ; but, ou the contrary, the
prisoners might meet with irreparable loss
if the trial was commenced at this time.
Our reporter debires to return his thanks
to Mr. John D. Christian, the proprietor of
the hotel at the Courthouse ; to the clerk of
the court, and several others, for the cour
tesy extended to him during his sojourn in
New Kent. He also thanks the jailor for
services rendered, as it was his good for
tune to be confined, in a cell over night cn
account of the scarcity of lodging in the
village.
List of Unmailable Letters Remain
ing in the Richmond Postofe ice Novem
ber 13, 1868. ? Beverly Burell, Gloucester
county, Va. ; box 41, Richmond ; Mrs
Gracy C. Smith, St. Mary's county, Md. ;
Mrs. Anna Davis, Gloucester, Mass. ; W.
J. Dickey, Baltimore, Md. ; Miss Annie M.
Crane, Baltimore, Md.; James W.Ford,
Fredericksburg, Va. ; Miss Sue E. Morris,
Richmond, Va.
Temperance. ? There will be held at
Camp Grant this evening, under the au
spices of Marion Division, a public tempe
rance meeting, with a view to the encour
argement of the soldiers at that post who
have joined the temperance army.
United States District Court? Judge
Underttood presiding. ? The fall term of
ibis court commenced yesterday.
Mr. Weed garc notice, on behalf of the
District Attorney, that on Monday next the
trial docket will be called. Attorneys were
requested to be in readines3.
The court then adjourned until this morn
ing at 10 o'clock.
Hustings? Court of Magistrates.? Al
derman Peebles presiding.? The follow
ing business was transacted yesterday :
James Jackson, indicted for larceny,
pleaded guilty. He was sent to jail for
thirty days.
Stanley Meekins, indicted for petit lar
ceny. He was sent to jail for six months.
John Evans and John Byrd, indicted for
petit larceny, were called. Failing to ap
pear, their recognizances were forfeited and
the case tried. They were sent to jail for
six months.
Thomas Smith, indicted for petit larceny,
did not appear. He was found guilty, and
sent to jail for twenty days.
Letitia Short, indicted for assaulting and
beating Pinkey Johnson, was called, and a
nolle prosequi entered in the case.
William Jones, indicted for petit larceny,
was sent to jail for ninety days.
Thomas Braxton, indicted for a misde
meanor, was tried and acquitted.
Mark Henderson and Randall Hender
son, indicted for petit larceny, were found
sruilty, and sent to jail for twenty-four
hours.
James H. Washington, indicted for petit
larceny, pleaded guilty, and was sent to
jail for ten days.
George Washington, for assaulting and
beating Mary A. Brown, was found guilty,
and fined one dollar. He was als6 sent to
jail for thirty days.
A Divorce Case. ? On Wednesday last
the Circuit Court of Richmond (Judge
Meredith) pronounced a decree divorcing
Mrs. Nancy Ellen Crowley r.^c Smoot from
her husband, William Crowley, of this city.
Mrs. Crowley (the plaintiff) complained ot
cruel treatment and adultery on the part of
her husband. The latter charge was sus
tained. Moise for the plaintiff ; Riehard
son for the defendant.
Burned to Death.? Mrs. Mary Cullen,
the lady who was so severely burned by a
kerosene oil explosion on Wednesday night,
died yesterday morning, having been
speechless for several hours. She was
passing up stairs with a kerosene lamp in
her hand, when the lamp exploded, throw
ing the blazing fluid all over her person.
Mr. John Gross was painfully burned in
attempting to save Mrs. Cullen.
Severe Accident. ? Yesterday, while a
negro named James Brooks, a wood -chopper
for the York River Railroad Company, was
engaged in cutting timber about five miles
from the White House, his axe hung a limb
above the one he was cutting, and slipped,
striking him just above the left eye, in
flicting quite a severe gash. He was brought
to the city yesterday . afternoon on the
freight train.
Larceny or Bcttkr. ? James Brooks (an
old negro) was before the police court yes
terday on the charge of stealing a keg of
butter worth thirty-five dollars from the
store of Mr. J.J. Wilson. It appeared from
the evidence that Rrooks had innocently
hauled the butter for the thief. He was
discharged, aud the butter returned to Mr.
Wilson.
Dkatti ok Mrs. IIkatii. ? The venerable
Mrs. Elizabeth Anne Heath, relict of the
late James E. Heath, Esq., for so many
year/? Auditor of Virginia, died suddenly
on Wednesday in Albemarle county in the
sixty-eighth year of her age. Iler funeral
will take place from the Monumental church
at 12 M. to-day.
JFelt, Dead. ? Martha Saunders (a negro
woman) suddenly dropped dead at the cor
ner of Twenty-fifth and Main streets yes
terday afternoon. Her body was taken
home by the police.
Chamber of Commerce Incorporated. ?
A charter of incorporation was granted yes
terday to Messrs. David I. Burr, John Pur
cell, A. V. Stokes, and others, under the
name and style of " The Richmond Cham
ber of Commerce." The objects of the
company will be to represent and protect
the commercial and industrial interests of
the city of Richmond, to erect such build
ings as may be needed, and to establish in j
connection therewith a mercantile library
and reading-room. The capital stock shall
not be less than $5,000 nor more than $200,
O0O, which shall be divided into shares of
$100 each.
The following gentlemen will manage
the affaird of the company for the firet
year :
David I. Burr, president ; Isaac Daven
port, vice-president ; Thomas W. McCance,
second vice-president ; I'. G. Coghlau, se
cretary ; William II. Palmer, treasurer;
and a board of directors consisting of fif
teen members.
Statistics.? The Board of Directors of
the Richmond Chamber of Commerce
adopted at their last meeting a resolution
instructing the Committee on Inland Trade
to confer with the railroad and other trans
portation companies with the view to the
obtainment of regular and reliable statis
tics of articles received and shipped,
j The object is to enable the Chamber to com
pile, alter the manner in which it is dune
I by Chambers of Commerce elsewhere, sta
| tistics of trade for the use of the mercantile
! community, and as an index of what pro
! gress the city is making in the purchase
and sale of the principal articles of pro
duce and general merchandise. Accord
ingly, it is to be hoped that the companies
referred to will cheerfully cooperate.
There ore several stauding committees of
j the Chamber now at work ou subjects of
public interest, and their labors will from
time to time be published in official form.
The statistical statements which may be
collected and compiled will always be acces
sible to the members of the Association.
In the course of next week the Board of
Directors will personally canvass the city,
which they have sub-districted between
them, for an increase to the list of sub
scribers.
j Broom Corn*. ? As the cultivation of
I broom corn has become a source of reve
nue to many of our planters, the queetion
; of getting seed for the crop of the coming
; season is of some importance. We learn
that the Messrs. Cook Brothers, of this city,
will furnish these seed free of charge in
any desired quantity, and give all informa
tion in regard to cultivating, curing, aud
preparing it for market.
This is one of the most profitable crops
which a farmer can raise, considering the
amount required to bo invested in it. One
gentleman (Mr. Owen*) living near Atlee's,
on the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad,
planted eight acres in it this year, and has
realized from it $350, or 643.75 per acre
independent of the seed, which will amount
to about two hundred bushels, worth, when
ground up for feed, about fifty cents per
bushel.
Bankruptcy. ? Noah A. Moss, of Cum
berland, and Thomas E. Marble, of Peters
burg, filed petitions in bankruptcy with
Judge Bond yesterday,
Rr.v. Dr. Moore and the First Prks
ryterian Church ? Dissolution of tiie
Pastoral Relation ? A called meeting of
Ka?t Hanover Presbytery was held in fhe
lecturc-roora of Dr. Hoge's church yester
day in pursuance of a call " for the pur
pose^ of receiving the application of Kev.
T. V. Moore for a dissolution of his pastoral
relations to the First Presbyterian church of
Richmond, and a dismiesion to the Presby
tery of Nashville, with the view of accept
ing a call to the First church of "Nashville."
Rev. John Miller was elected moderator,
and Mr; William F. Taylor temporary
clerk. The roll was then called and the fol
lowing members found present: Rev. John
Miller, Drs. Brown, Moore, Read, Iloge, and
Bsird ; Revs. Price and Watt ; and Elders
Thomas Samson, R. A. Payne, and B. R.
Well ford ?
The call for the meeting having been
read, the call of the church in Nashville to
Dr. Moore, and other papers relating to the
matter, were laid before Presbytery.
Dr. Moore then, with much feeling, stated
his reasons for wishing the change. He
said that it was about the most painful
duty of his life. Twenty-one years since
he was admitted a member of this Presby
tery, and of those who were then present
only one was here now. One-fifth of the
number had gone to their reward, and those
who survive are scattered all over the
country. The e change**, in contemplation
of his early departure, gave a tiuueof sad
ness to his feelings. His relations to his
church were too sacred, too trying for him
to speak of. lie could not do it. Nothing
but the conviction that his usefulness to
t'hriht would be increased could have in
duced the change ; but he found his health
giving wny, and he hoped the change would
be beneficial to him. True, he had thus far
been4fele to keep up, and as he had no or
ganic disease, he hoped that some radical
change would enable him to keep up a good
while longer. He was physically incapa
ble to do the work which he saw spread out
before him : but still he was willing to
labor on, and had'never thought of seeking
a change, and had repelled every attempt
to induce him to make one. Lat>t spring,
however, a vacancy had occurred in the
First church of Nashville, and the question
had been pressed upon him in such shape
that he was obliged to consider it. He
considered that the increased leisure from
the preparation for the Sabbath on his new
field would enable him to take the open
air exercise, so much demauded by his fail
ing health. It would amount, indeed, to a
vacation from study. Every alfcction of
his heart and its every emotion were
against leaving his people ami his charge"
here. Twenty-five years ago he and the
moderator were classmates in Princeton.
Of all those who were there, but few, com
paratively, are left. One by one they are
falling off ; and in a short time this ques
tion of parting with his congregation would
have to be met at the death bed, and un
der circumstances much more impressive
than those by which he was nowsurrouuded.
For these reasons he had felt himself
compelled to aek for this dissolution of pas
toral relation.
/\t t ue conclusion ot Dr. Moore's re
marks, Mr. William P. Muuford, one of the
commissioners from the First church, read
the proceedings of a meeting of the congre
gation, and a letter from the pastor giving
in detail the reasons for his resignation.
K';v. M. D. Huge offered the following
min.ite ag expressive of the feeliugs ol
Presbytery and its action in relation to the
question before it :
" The Rev. T. V. Moore, D. D., having
applied for the dissolution of his pastoral
relation with the First Presbyterian church
of Richmond, and for a dismission to the
Presbytery of Nashville, with the view ol
accepting a call from the First church in
the city of Naohville, and the commission
ers appointed tor the purpose having pre
sented the resolutions adopted at a congre
gational meeting of the First Presbyterian
church of Richmond, signifying its sorrow
ful acquiescence in the request of its pas
tor, the Presbytery of East Hanover does
hereby declare the relation between Dr.
Moore and that church dissolved, and also
order3 that a dismission to the Presbytery
of Nashville be grafted.
" In sundering tiie tic which hag 80 long
bound Dr. Moore to this body and to the
church in which he has ministered, this
Presbytery cannot refrain from giving some
expression to the sorrow which fills the
heart of every member in anticipation of
the separation about to take place. For
more than twenty years, at regularly re
curring meetings, we have had spread be
fore us the evidences of the zeal, fidelity,
and success with which he has discharged
his pastoral office. We have appreciated
the efficient attention to Presbyterial du
ties, the earnest devotiou to the interests of
the kingdom of our Lord, the uniform cour
tesy and kindness of manner which have
characterized his connection with this body
aud his intercourse with its members, and
we cannot part from a brother so valued
and beloved for his personal worth, varied
attainments, and wide-spread usefulness,
without the heartfelt prayer that his trans
ferrence to another field may prolong his
days and make the remainder of his life
even more happy and honored than the past
has been."
Dr. Doge prefaced the introduction of
the paper by alluding to the many things
daily happening to remind him that this is
a world of changes in which we live. Three
parties were particularly affected by this
change. First, Dr. Moore himself, who
has spoken to you of his emotions on the
occasion. He had long thought that the
separation of a pastor from his people was
much harder on the former, for while tluy
part from one, /mparts from hundreds. He
felt in this instance much for both. The
commissioners had spoken of their feelings
in view of this separation, but they could
not be expressed in words or told on paper.
Dr. Mooie had alluded to the fact of the
speaker being the only member of Presby
tery now present when he entered it twenty
oue years ago. He (Dr. Iloge) had presi
ded at the meeting which admitted him,
had taken part in his ordination and in
stallation, had been with him in seasons of
joy and of sadness, of mirth and of grief,
and he could lay his hand on his heart aud
say that not one unkind feeling towarda his
brother had ever there been entertained.
Rev. Dr. William Brown seconded the
resolution iu touching terms, lie Had ai- |
ways regarded this as the most eoleina !
business which a Presbytery had to per- j
form. Relations of this kind are not al- !
ways long-lived ? seldom as long as this. j
!Je (Dr. Brown) had but recently passed >
through the same trial, in which a pasto- '
ral relation of twenty-five years had been j
standing, and he knew what it was, but ho i
considered that when it was done iu tho j
fear of God it was always overruled by j
Him for good. lie felt that it was so in his 1
ca &e, and had no doubt but Dr. Moore
would find the same blessed result flowing !
from his action. He Baw an eminent fitnebs j
in Dr. Moore for the new field, and he
could see the finger of God in Bendina: him '
there.
Rev. John S. Watt bore testimony to the '
piety and usefulness of Dr. Moore.
i?r. ?. T. Baird eaid that he knew tho
field of labor to which the brother had been
culled, and knew of no place in the whole
church where his usefulness could be great- ,
er than there. The Cumberland Presbyte
rians, the Methodists, and the Baptists, all
had headquarters at Nashville, and it was !
necesdary that tho Preabyteriana should 1
THE DISPATCH.
TERMS OF ADVERTISING.
cash? is variably nr ai?vahcj&.
One Kjuwb. one lna?rUoa.^...?*. f 2
One KjUArtj two lnttertloas^.^., } ?
Oae square, tbre*; ln?ertifma , 1 J
Qnesqnarc, eli Insertion* .... .... I ?
One ?ju*re, twelve insertions.. .. ? W
One square, one moatb... 1* M
0'ie g'jnarft, t"wo months..... It M
Onesqnam, tbre* months. ........ ....... ...... * ??
wend one of their best tnen to this field. It
is, with the exception of Dr. Palmer'*
church in New Orleans, the largest Preaby
terian church in the Sontli, ardin member
ship was also very large and wealthy. The
Npshville Presbytery was composed of
young men, and they longed for an older
head to give counsel to them. They exhi
bited great delight at the prospect of having
Dr. Moore amongst them, and he knew of
none more fitted than ho for the place.
Dr. Charles H. Read remarked that
twenty years eince, he left an endeared
congregation and came to a milder climate
for the same reason that Dr. Moore now
leaves us. His health demanded the sun
dering of the tie, and he felt that his labors
here had been blessed of God. Although
they did not at that time belong to the same
ecclesiastical organization, their intercourse
had been uninterrupted, and ho recalled
with pleasure the fact that they had worked
together for the reunion of the different
churches which they represented, and with
what pleasure they hailed its consumma
tion.
B. R. Wellford represented the people
who were so vitally interested in this mat
ter. It was a hard matter for him, in their
name, to acquiesce in this dissolution of
pastoral relations. Had their wishes alone
been consulted, this thing would never have
been done ; but it seemed an act of Provi
dence. The duty, however sad, muat needs
be performed. I>r. Moore can never find &
people who will appreciate him more highly,
and in his new field he will carry with him
our affections and our prayers. We grate
fully accept the sympathies of the Presby
tery, and trust that God will soon send us a
man after His o^n heart who shall break
unto us the bread of life.
The moderator would refrain from saying
many things that he would like to have
said in regard to this parting from aa
old classmate. As moderator he would re
spond warmly to Dr. Moore's expression
about this Presbytery, and he heartily en
tliat had been spoken of Dr.
Moore.
The minute offered by Dr. Hoge having
been adopted, Dr. Baird was appointed to
preach tQ tho congregation and declare tho
pulpit vacant.
A copy of tho minute was ordered to be
sent to Dr. Moore, and another transmitted
to the church at Nashville.
The Presbytery then adjourned.
Governor Weli.s and General Wick
ham ox the Tram p .?Governor Wells and
Williams C. Wickham will speak at Bowling
Green, Caroline county, to-morrow. Major
B. B. Douglas, of King William, will re
spond to the General.
T ii k Potato Crop.? The quantity of Irish
potatoes (so called) arriving from the coun
try for sale in commission houses is quite
'arge. They are offered at 65 to 75c. per
bushel, and arc rather dull of sale. It is
difficult to form anything like an accurate
estimate of the amount of the crop in the
?State. The quality is, however, generally
very good, while at the same time some of
the crop arriving in market is injured by
wet and careless handling.
The report of the Department of Agricul
ture says that in southern New England,
New Jersey, Delaware, the 0 ulf States, and
California, potatoes are reported as a full
average crop, with a deficiency of 10 per
cat. in New York and Pennsylvania, from
li to 7 per cent, in the southern Atlantic
States and Teunessce, 20 per cent, in Illi
nois, 10 in Iovra, 11 in Indiana, 15 in Ohio,
It! in Michigan, and i\ greateror less reduc
tion iu oth(?r western States.
.Mr. Donelly, the Irieh Kegistrar-Gene
ral, iu his annual report, says that, com
pared with lhi(J7, the crop of potatoes in
Ireland this year is increased by 33,072
acres. At the 'sunie time the tl ax crop,
from which was produced the celebrated
fabric Irish linen, has decreased this year
by 4 G , y 1 1 acres.
Tonxrco and Cigar Stamps. ? General
Mulford, collector of iuternal revenue for
this district, haB received tobacco and cigar
stamps of nearly all the denominations
used, and is now ready to deliver them to
all parties desiring them. In the thirty
two-cent class, used for manufactured to
bacco, he has the 5, 10, 20, 40, 50, and 60
pound stamps ; and in the sixteen-cent
class, for smoking tobacco, he has the
stamps for 2, 4, 8, and 16 ounce packages.
These stamps are required to be used by
manufacturers after the 23d of November.
The stamps to be used ou tobacco export
ed will be received to-day.
Normal School.? Governor Wells, B. M.
Manly, and Dr. A. II. Christian, have been
appointed visitors to the Normal school
for the ensuing year.
Friends' Meeting.- ? Mr. Samuel Bettle,
of Philadelphia, a minister of the Society
of Friends, tield a meeting in the hall of the
House of Delegates yesterday afternoon.
He spoke for some time on the plan of Gos
pel salvation and the necessity of each one
examining their own heart for themselves,
founding his remarks on a portion of the
first chapter of Paul's Epistle to the He
brews, commencing with " God who at sun
dry times and in divers manners," &c.
His manner was earnest and impressive,
and he was attentively listened to through
out his discourse.
Wtman's exhibition is attended nightly
by immense crowds. Once or twice the
press has been so great that many have been
turned away from the door without being
able to obtain admission. Of course every
body is delighted, especially those who
have been so fortunate as to be the reci
pients of the great magician's handsome
presents. To-morrow afternoon there will
be a grand matinee for the benefit particu
larly of little folks who cannot go out after
dark.
Please acknowledge l>vo hundrei bushels of ave
rage coal for the poor from General ( ii AUMCS P.
Stonk, of the Dover Company. As this coal has
ben already Issued, no one need apply for It. I
have on band some Inferior average coal, bough!
of Tli" Springfield Company at $2 per load, and one
hundred tons Inferior hall eoal. bought of the ' lo
ver Hl.l Company at *3 per load, which I will sell
at these rixures. W. W. PAUKKB.
Now i? your time to have finely-executcl PllO
TO(rKAPIIS, Poiicklaixs, and Mk/.zo r ints- U ken
at low prices, 'lhc Messrs. Kicksc A CO. defy
competition In p-lce and quality. Their pslnted
as well as the plain work Is superior to anything
heretofore nude this side of the Potomac.
Colds! Colds!! Colds ! ! !? If you arts suffer
ing with a cold call on \V. W. Thihbctt, next
door to the DUpatch oillce. and get a box of hla
highly flavored Mkdicatkd Candy. It Issupti*
rlor to all preparations of Die kind. Give It a trial.
FYAR1NE ITOIXIOEWCE.
MINIATUKK ALMANAC. NOVSJUJlCIi 13, IWi.
hun rls??....~ <??! *oou rl*?
run sets HUb tide, P. M. a.U
PUttT OF RICHMOND, iiOYJCMJJXJl 11, W<W.
AJtltlVXD.
steamer Eliza Haucox, fcrlfford, Norfolk, mer
chandise and passengers, L. IS. latum.
.8AILKD.
Park (Br.) Fa'ellte. Turner. Rio Janeiro, flour,
Gall'-jfo Mauufa?it'trl?jc ? mptuy.
^?hoontra H*b en Kuigut ?> C. McSLsln, and
J. 11. Kapp, dowu the rl.er, light.
MKMOKANDA.
Pchooner Btvs hence, at Norfolk <>n IhftUth.
*ch?ocer J lzxle Carr, for York river, put Into
Nt*wpa t on the
bchoouers Alexander WUey, J. H. Marvtli. fcnd
Keeling Kallroaj JSo. V, cleared ffcm i*hJlttU*N
phi* on the lltlu

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