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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, April 25, 1870, Image 2

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MONDAY APRIL 25, 1870.
An Insult and on Outrage.
We announced the other day. the names
of the ncwiy-appolated postmasters at
Charlottesville and the University of Vir
ginia. The one appointed at the University,
where there are hundreds of excitable
young men, is a negro. The one appointed j
at Charlottesville, the XJhronicle says, the
people would willingly exchange for the
negro. These appointments were made for
the sole purpose of outraging the feelings
of the people. The Chronicle speaks of one
of the men as "notoriously disreputable,"
and of both of them as incompetent and
unreliable. That paper says:
"These appointments constitute one of
the greatest or the nunv outrages that have
been perpetrated by the Radicals. There
can be absolutely no object in making them,
except to outrage the feelings and aggravate
the passions or southern men, no doubt
with the hope that it may possibly produce
an indignant outburst that will afford capi
tal to the Radicals at the North, and give
the Government an excuse for quartering
soldiers in Virginia, and, if possible, remit
ting the State again to a territorial condi
tion. The Postmaster-General must have
known very well the character of these men
before he'made the appointments, (if, in
deed, bo has made them, which we hope
will prove to bes mistake,) and hiscour.se
can therefore be attributed to nothing but
malice aforethought. We cannot see, there
fore, that any remonstrance from the Con
servative citizens of Charlottesville can do
any good."
Forney said in a public speech in Wash
ington city on Friday night last that he had
once been in favor of a policy of " magna
nimity," but after travelling over several
southern States he had como to the conclu
sion to demand the policy of "justice."
This statement is of course untrue. For
ney seems never to tell the truth except by
mistake. It is within the recollection of all
who read his paper and who felt any inte
rest in the subject, that upon his return
from the South Forney came out strongly
in flavor of emigration from the North to the
South, declaring that our lands were cheap
and valuable, and our people quiet, orderly,
and peaceful. Forney had then become an
agent for the sale of southern lauds. The
southern land-holders would of course not
entrust the sale of their property to such a
man, and so he has become agpjjt
vile slanderer of tbe soutlm^dfl
ria 4Vt fr ii
8fiH8|BKBBMyB^BP^[TvLLocK has
j^g^usingiQoneyr our Washington corre
spondent tells us, to Influence Congress to
defeat the Bingham amendment, and Brn
lock well knows that Congress would de
feat that amendment if the members could
be induced to believe that owiug to the un
happy state of things in the South the
policy of " justice " ought to be adopted.
It is easy enough to account for Forney's
political summersaults. lie was a Demo
crat when Congress and the President were
Democrats, and he will be a Democrat
again whenever the Democratic party shall
come into power. He has no more regard
for principle than Butler has. Forney is
in fact a laughing-stock amongst even the
Republicans of Congress; and his edito
rials have no more influcnco upon the opi
nions or acts of members than Beau Hick
man's utterances.
Judge Kelley, of Pennsylvania, the pig
iron member, deserves credit for two
things. He has refused to promise to pro
cure offices for any of his constituents, and
refused to try to get free passes over the
railroads between Philadelphia and Minne
apolis for the son of one of his constituents?
and an influential one at that, we infer from
the circumstances of the refusal. Mr. Kel
ley is not only a pig-iron advocate, but he
is a pig-headed Radical. Nevertheless he
has something good in him, wo are confi
dent.
6rsrendered at Last.?The retiring
editor of theFrankfort (Kentucky) Yeoman
is a genuine Bourbon?a Bourbon of the
Bourbons. He must be related to the old
Floridian who went into Tallahassee re
cently and tried to sell a negro. This edi
tor, whilst counselling the Democrats of
Kentucky to adhere to the old principles of
the party, gravely says:
'* We would no longer contend for the
right to carry our slave property into the
Territories."
How many years hence must elapse he
fore that editor will surrendor his opposi
tion to negro suffrage f
National Interference.?The Kentucky
Legislature recently refused to grant a
charter which Cincinnati desired to obtain
for a railroad leading through Kentucky.
Cincinnati then applied to Congress for the
charter, and a committee of one.Uouse has
reported in fbvor of granting it. What
next ? What single right is now left to ac
etate?
An abstract showing the condition of the
national bailing associations in Virginia on
the 24th of March last was published in the
Dispatch of the 16th of April. We mention
the fact because one of our Washington
correspondents?not knowing that the other
had been more industrious?sent us this
statement on Saturday last.
New Railroad.?The Lynchburg Repub
lican learns that " Mr. Moe, the New Jer
" f*ev gentleman who recently purchased
" the splendid estate of Colonel Wimbisu,
" on Staunton river, is agitating the scheme
44 of constructing a railroad between Pamp
u lin's depot, on the Southside railroad, and
44 the North Carolina line at Leaksville."
Our correspondents must be brief. We
can hardly get a column of editorial into the
paper any day, so crowded are our columns
with more important matter. If we had
?room we should like to give full play to the
pens of our correspondents, and use our
own much more freelv.
>
Judge John Gilmer will not accept the
office of county judge unless the salary is
increased above what it is thought the Le
gislature will allow.?Danville ISmes.
This suggests to the Legislature the ne
cessity of providing for holding county
courts in counties in which vacancies oc
cur during the recess of the Legislature.
Blackwood for AprU has been laid upon
our table by Messrs. Woodhoubb & Par
wax, Main street.
The Indians.?Superintendent Jannev
has made a report of the condition of
affairs at the Omaha agency for the first
quarter of the present year,* from which it
appears that the Oinahas show a marked
increase of interest In agriculture. Indus
try and thrift are now taking ttte place of
idleness and improvidence. During the
winter they have been busily engaged in
collecting material for building bouses. The
men work well, and even the old oriels now
shoulder their axes and go into the timber
to work with the rest. The past winter was
the first in which they have had the care of
their own cattle, and, although steadily
worked, they are In good condition.- Most1
of the Omah&e lived in muslins tents during
the lyinter, with a scanty supply of cloth
ing, and scarcely any animal food, corn
being their principal subsistence: yet they
seem cheerful, ana hopeful of aid from the
^Government. Only one day-school has
*beea established, though many express a
desire to go to school, and funds are needed
for the support of others.
SBSTA m
feA#ni?AT, ApritSS, 1870.
The Senate met at 12 o'clock M.?Mr.
?xom) Pendleton In the chair. Is o pray
COM31ITTKE KEPOBT.
' f Mr. Ojotslxy, frwa the Committee on
Countv, City, and Town Organization!!, im
ported hack a bill amending various sections
of the Code in relation to roads.
Mr. Uerndon moved that the Committee
for Courts of Justice be relieved from the
consideration of the bill providing for a char
ter for the city of Richmond, ana that it be
referred to the Committee on General Laws.
Agreed to.
RESOLUTIONS, ETC.
On motion of Mr. Moseley the following
resolution was agreed to:
"Ittxolred, That the Committee for Courts
of Justice be instructed to inquire into the
expediency of an act affording relief toper
sons charged with offences which are baila
ble. and lor which it is difficult to obtain
bail under the operation of the homestead
clause of the Constitution."
ATLANTIC, MISSISSIPPI AND OHIO RAILROAD,
j COMPANY.
On motion of Mr. Taylor, of Norfolk,
Wednesday next, at 1 o'clock P. M., was
the day and time fixed for the consideration
of the bill incorporating the Atlantic, Mis
sissippi and Ohio Railroad Company.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS.
I
The House bill No. 120, to amend and re
enact scctiou 16 of chapter 182 of the Code
as amended by the acts of Cd of March,
1800, and 24th of April, 1807, in relation to
appeals, writs of error, and supersedeas,
which was under discussion yesterday when
the Senate adjourned, was taken up. The
question on yesterday was to strike out
" corporation" in the bill wherever it oc
curred.
On motion of Mr. Taylor, of Norfolk,
the bill was passed by until Tuesday next.
ADJOURNMENT.
On motion of Mr. Penn. of Patrick coun
ty, the resolution offered by him in relation
to the adjournment of the Legislature on
the first "V\ eduesday in Juue, ana convening
it again on the first Wednesday in October,
1870, was referred to the Committee for
Courts of Justice.
THE JOINT ORDER.
On motion of Mr. Ripdick, the Senate
proceeded to the further execution of the
joint order, having for its object the elec
tion of county judges.
Mr. Moseley placed in nomination Mr.
John F. Lay for the county judgeship of
Powhatan county.
Mr. Terry seconded the nomination.
Mr. Lay having received 108 votes, was
declared auly elected.
Mr, Ripdick placec
Mr.
ocke tor the judgeship of the
Tstrict composed of the counties of Sussex
and GrceneviUe.
Mr. Cocke having received the whole
number cast?112?was declared duly
elected.
SALARIES OF THE JUDICIARY.
Senate bill No. 132, fixing the salaries of]
the judges of the several courts of Ihe Com
monwealth, and the pay of the reporter for
the Court of Appeals, was taken up.
Mr. Taylor, of Loudoun, who introduced
the bill, requested the reading of the 8th
section of the bill, which provides for the
payment of the salaries of the judges quar
terly out of the treasury of the State:
''"But it shall be the duty of the super-j
visors for each county, and the proper offi
cers of each city and town containing over
5,000 inhabitants, at their annual meeting I
in each year, in addition to the other
taxes and levies which they are required
to assess for county purposes, to levy a tax
sufficient to raise the salary of the judge of
said county or district, or the judge of said
city or town, as fixed by law, which sum
shall be designated as for the payment of I
such salary, and shall be collected*as other
?. ./IL.
taxes, and'paid into the Treasury of the
State in like manner : Provided, That where
the district of a county judge embraces
more than one county the assessment of his
salary shall be apportioned between the
counties forming such district bv the Audi
tor of Public Accounts, according to the
population of said counties respectively, to
be computed as hereinbefore provided."
31 r. French moved to strike out all of the
above section (S) except that portion which
referred to the payment of the salaries out
)f thg. State Treasury, Lost?ayes, 11;
noes, 14.
Mr. French moved to pass by the further
consideration of the bill, which created n
lUUOIWVi MV4VM V- 7 . . , _
Lengthv discussion, being participated in by
Messrs". French, Terry, Taylor, and John
son.
Mr. Johnson moved to lay ou the table
and make it the special order for Tuesday
next.
3Ir. Herndon thought that the bill ought
to be considered at once; that it was neces
sary to end this question. He was opposed
to 'any further postponement of the sub
ject.
The question of postponement until
Tuesday was put to the Senate and lost
ayes, 5: noes, 21.
' Mr. French then moved to postpone until
Friday. . Lost?ayes, 2 ; noes, 24.
Mr. French moved to amend by striking
out twelve hundred dollars and inserting in
lieu thereof one thousand dollars.
Thereupon Mr. Harris moved to lay the
bill on the table, and the question was de
termined in the affirmative?ayes, 16;
noes, 10.
On motion of Mr. Penn, the following re
solution was adopted:
"liesolved (with the concurrence of the
House of Delegates), That a committee of;
conference be appointed, consisting of five
members of the Senate and nine on the part
of the House of Delegates, to consider the
subject of disagreement between the two
Houses in relation to Senate bill fixing the
salaries of the judges of the several courts
of the Commonwealth.
On motion of Mr. Terry, the Senate ad
journed.
HOUSE OF DELEGATES.
The House met at 12 o'clock M. Prayer |
by llev. Joshua Peterkiu.
RECOMMITTED.
Bill to authorize the issue ol registered
certificates to Washington College in lieu
of lost eoupons was recommitted.
REPORTS.
From the Committee on Schools and Col
eges?Bill to incorporate Jackson Female
Institute at Abingdon. The same committee
eports adversely to the scheme of convert
ngthe Virginia State Guard into a military
chool for the education of youug men, in
onnection with the duties of guarding
onvicts, &c.
PRIVILEGED QUESTION.
Mr. Smith Turner rose to a question of j
uivilege. He wished to have the statement!
f the Dispatch that he was arraigned be
are the bar of the House, on the call of the
louse, corrected. -1
[The error was unintentional. The name
furner was taken for Thurman.]
general election bill.
The bill providing for a general election
vas taken up and aiscussed until the hour
or the execution of the joint order.
COUNTY JUDGES.
31r. Cox nominated Mr. John F. Lay for
county judge of Powhatan. .
Messrs. Southall and M addox endorsed
the nomination.
The vote stood: Lay, 83.
Joint vote : Whole number, 109?Lay,
108; Graves, 1.
Mr, Stevens nominated Mr. Charles L.
Cocke for judge of Greeneville and Sussex.
Mr. P. K. Jones seconded it.
The vote stood: Cocke, 85.
Joint vote: Whole number, 112?Cocke,
112.
GENERAL ELECTION BILL.
The consideration of this bill was re
sumed. .
Pending its discussion a quorum wa.
found wanting, and a call of the House wa
ordered and Its execution insisted upon
After much discussion the cull was post
Soned until a quarter-past 12 o'clock Mon
av.
Adjourned.
Ob Friday, says the Baltimore Sun, Gene- j
ral Canby appeared before the Committee
on Appropriations relative to the auditing
of accouuts of officers of the military dis
tricts organised under the reconstruction j
laws.
The office of Bacon & Hyde, on Fulton
street, New York, was robbed on Friday of j
a box containing $8,000 in United States j
bonds. There is no clue to the robbers.
Repeftci for thD:
Scetlnt ?fXe3
Lexingtoh, Va.; A|)tB 21,1870.
The Prwbytcry of Lexington began'Its
regular spring meeting In -this place bat
evening. The opehta&l^rrocit'waa by Ber<
\ Fletcher.
Rev. J/Mewn. Bowman. Murray, Blaln,
Brown, Baiter, Ewing. See, Soott, Fletcher,.
Jiinkin, Kirkpatrick, BelJ, Kennedy, Pratt,
Price, Walker, Calhoun, J. Pinkerton, Gil
more, Taylor, and Swoope. About twenty
elders are also present, representing as many
churches. /.? / '
3 he following officers were elected : Rev.
John K. Bowman, moderator, and Rev.
Messrs. Murray and Blain, clerks.
After organizing, the Presbytery ad
journed to this morning. ? .
This morning the Presbytery met ana
completed its rolL
A night session was appointed to con
sider the new Book of Church Order.
A call was presented by the Augusta
church for the pastoral services of in. i.
W. K. Handy, of Orange county. It was
understood that he would accept the call,
but he could not be present at this meet
tag. It was therefore arranged to hold an
adjourned meeting ol the Presbytery at t ne
Augusta church on May 13th to receive and
install Dr. Handy. The Moderator and Rev.
Messrs. Bell and Howes were appointed to
conduct the installation.
A call was presented by the W ayncsboro7 ?
church for the pastoral services of Rev. S.
J. Baird, D. I). Dr. Baird, by letter, signi
fied his acceptance of the call, and Rev.
Messrs. Walker, See, and Murray, were ap
pointed a committee to install liim on May
23th- ? .
A call was presented by the Warm Springs
and "Windy Cove churches for the pastoral
services of Rev. R. P. Kennedy. The caU
was accepted, and Rev. Messrs. Brown and
Price were appointed to install the new pas
tor on the thud Saturday in June. . !
Rev. C. S. M. See asked for the dissolution
of the pastoral relation between him and
his church (the Tinkling Spring) m order
that he might enter upon missionary work
in Randolph and Barbour counties, "V\ est
Virginia. His request was granted.
Rev. Dr. Thompson, of the Associate Re
formed Churcli, and Rev. Mr. Jones, of the
Baptist Church, were invited to sit as cor
responding members.
Rev. Samuel Brown, who has for a long
time been the stated clerk of the Presby
tery, resigned the office on account ot in
firm health. In accepting his resignation,
the Presbytery expressed, its appreciation
' ol* his long and faithful services. Rev. Ro
bert C. Walker was elected stated clerk.
I Rev. B. P. Price, of Montgomery Presby
i Hill II 111 ' J
Scinucr
Kev W. E. Baker, from the Committee
m Publication, reported. The committee
ias distributed the circulars of the ^ecre
arv of Publication, and has granted books
o two churches. It called attention to the
act that those dealing with the Presbyte
t.m bookstore in Richmond would be as
veil supplied as anywhere else, and at the
cime time he aiding the church. . ?
Mr. Baker also presented the report or,
;lic Sabbath-School Committee, accom
rvinied bv a full statistical table, repre
senting the condition of the Sabbath schools
if the Presbytery. The Sabbath-School
Convention held in Steuntonlast month had
seventy-one members, representing seven
teen churches. This was generaTlycon
ceded to be a meeting of great intel e>t.
Rev. Samuel Brown and Rev. Robert
Scoot, ministers, and Major Tate and Pro
fessor Campbell, ciders, were elected com
missioners to the General Assembly, which
meets in Louisville next month.
The fall meeting ot Presbytery was ap
pointed to be held at Bethesda church, ten
miles north of Lexington, on the last day
? Mr?"Alexander F. Laird and Mr. Frank
Lewis, after the usual examinations, were
taken under the care of Presbytery as can
didates for the Gospel ministry. .
The Presbvtery held a night session, at
which the new Book of Church Order was
considered. About two pages of the Book
was read by the clerk, and discussed. Some
passages were stricken out and others
neuded. The discussion showed a gre.it
ivcrsity of views with reference to many
? il, n T> y"V /\lr
tags in the Book.
At 10 o'clock the Presbytery adjourned to
-morrow morning. D.
Correspondence of the Richmond Pl^patch.
LETTER FROM LEXINGTOX.
IMPORTANT MEETING OF THE BOAUDOF
TRUSTEES OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE?
REV. OR. BRANTLY?THE COLLEGE
DURING GENERAL LEE'S ABSENCE.
Lexington, Va., April 20, 1870.
A called meeting of the Board ot trus
tees of Washington College took place yes
terday. Kev. Dr. B? M. Smith, of Hamp
den Sidney ; General John Behols. Colonel
Bolivar Christian, and Colonel M.
Tate, of Augusta ; Judge John \\ .Broken
brougb, Captain D. E. 3Ioore, and J. I ?
Davidson, Esq., of Lexington; Dr. Alfred
Tevburn Kev. Dr. Horatio Thompson,
cftntain J. McD. Alexander and Colonel
William T. Poagnc, ot Rockbridge, ueie
present at the meeting.
It is understood tliat action Mas had,
which will very materially promote the in
terest of the college, but which it la not pro
per as vet to make public, and that the ses
sion was entirely liaftnoiuous and pleasant.
Kev.Dr.W. 'I. Brantly, of Atlanta, Ga.,
has accepted the invitation to preach the
Baccalaureate sermon at the college com
mmicemeat. Dr. Brantly is the popular
pastor of the Second Baptist church, AU
Junta, and is said to be one of the linest pul
pit orators in the country. . ,
B General Lee is, of coure, very much missed
from the college and the community, but |
Kev. Dr. Kirkpatrick is discharging the du
ties of president with marked ability, and
the students seem on their special good be- ?
htOur advices from Augusta are not hope
ful as to the vote of that county in favor oi
the Valley railroad subscription. VV e hear
that there is but little enthusiasm on the
subject, tliax the leaders are apathetic, and
that the people think they will get the road
without voting their money to it, and are
consequently disposed to adopt the
of Mr. Baldwin's famous old man, Mho
4'never treuted, never refused a treat, anu
did not euro tow thingsi went..provided
thev went for his 0Mrn individual interest.
Congratulate us. We have once more a
daily mail to Lexington, and the telegraph
is coming soon. Lexington.
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.
SHooting Aflfoir.
Lexington, Va., April21, 1870.
After mailing my letter last night an un
fortunate shooting affair took place here.
It seems that a negro man, who has been
eookin" for Mrs. (/Ferrall, was guilty of
what her son (Mr. PlunkettO'Ferrall) con
sidered gross impudence to the ladies of the
famUv. Young CFerrall followed ^ him
into the kitchen, and in an altercation
the negro got the better ot lum, striking
and choking him. (VFerrell then ran for
his pistol, followed the negro up, and fired
on aim three times?the last shot taking
effect in the leg just a little below the call,
and inflicting a severe but not dangerous
wound. The case was upjnetoj?
the Mayor this morning, and OFerreU sent
on to appear before the grand jury. There
was some excitement among the negroes,
who have employed (we iearnlablecounsel
! to assist the prosecution. Lexington.
Townships.
Bowling Green, Va., April 22,1870.
To the Editors of the Richmond Dispatch:
Dr. John D. Butler, Major E. L. Wentz,
Miyor S. L. Lewis, and Major b. J. R.
White, the commissioners appointed to di
vide the county of Caroline Into townships,
met last Monday, and made four-to wit.,
Bowling Green, Madison, Reedy Church,
and Fort Royal, and eleven Yotmg piacee :
Bowling Green, Port Royal, Sp^ta. Gui
nev's Station, Farmer's Shop, While s
Mm, Golausvifre, Madison Cor,ne^J?.e?(!j
Church, Xeedwood, and Dunn s .&tore,.to
whi?h M ere appointed the Wa d?
trars : W. J. Anderson, A. B. Bowie, Wade
H. Sale, Thomas K. Chandler, James M.
Dillard, H. B.Brooke, Charles Hands, C.
R. Jones, A. G. Goodwin, W. R. B. Wyatt,
and Reuben B. Rlcherson.
The commissioners, In consideration oi
the state of public finances, added to their
report a resolution that they would not
claim any compensation for their work.
This was voluntary,-and suggested of their
own accord. **?
Alexandria and Washington Railroad
Imbboglio.?The latest phase that the M
Judge tj^wrwooiPs
?melM, Shoemaker a^iinst cer
tain of the cHreotflfg^In the French Com
pany for $25,000 damages each. The fine
I imposed npcm the French directors by
Judge fjnjierwood for eontcmpt. with the
accrued cofts, -"has beencollsctca fromalf
the partiesH
ed except Mr. French, who decmrrapnying
It.^-Alexandria (Va.) Gazette. ? ^ '?t?
Thb Crops.?Wehave seen a gentleman
who has, within the last ten dayB, travelled
over Halifax, Person, Caswell, Mecklen
burg, and a portion of Pittsylvania. He
reports a fine prospect for wheat, and the
f eatest effort being made for fine tobacco.
e never saw tbe like of new grounds. The
freedmcn, so far as his observation extend
ed, were getting along very welL?JPaRtu' lie
Times. ? *;?
. 1 ?
Destructive Fire at Obanqr Court
house.?A lire yesterday in the storehouse
of Fisher & Goldstein, at Orange Court
house, consumed the building with its con
tents ; also the store of Mr. Echlorft. The
loss Is estimated at $4,000.?Lynchburg News.
Townshifs in Roanoke.?Catawba, Sa
lem, Cave Spring, Big Lick.
Townships in Fauquier.?Centre, Mar
shall, Scott, Rappahannock, Cedar Kun.
Townships in Amherst.?Pedlar, Elon,
Courthouse, Temperance.
Townships in Albemarle.?Charlottes
ville, Seottsville, Rivanna, Samuel Miller,
and White IIall.
The townships in Rockbridge are Lexing
ton, Natural Bridge, Buffalo, South River,
Revels Creek, and Walker's Creek.
The surveys for the Shenandoah "Valley
railroad are progressing.
Twelve hundred barrels flour have been
sold ill Danville during the last two weeks.
It was the editor of the Charlottesville
Intelligencer, and not of the Chronicle that
was 44 dyked" the other day.
C. F. Fisher and George W. Barry have
been appointed assistant assessors of in
ternal revenue for the second Virginia dis
trict.
Colonel Edmund C. Moore, formerly of
Amherst county, died yesterday morning at
Orange Courthouse of"pneumonia.?Lynch
burg Virginian.
The storehouse and stock oflgoods of Mr.
P. L. W. Thornton, at FabeFs 3101s, Nel
son county, were consumed on Wednesday
night. He was insured for $3,000, which
will cover the loss.?Lynchburg Virginian.
From the Baltimore Sun.
Farther Particulars Conceritlnfl: the
Victims of the hate Trasedy.
Towards the afternoon the crowd for a
square immediately in front oi the house
was so dense that passage on the sidewalks
and in the street was next to impossible,
and until after the funeral all the side streets
and other approaches continued to pour in
a steady stream of fresli arrivals. Two
thirds of the crowd were women and the
larger portion of the other third children.
The windows of the houses for one or two
blocks on Central avenue, each side of the
house, were filled witli speetators, and meat
throngs clustered like bees upon every little
house-top, porch, or other eminence. In i
many cases a dozen heads were looking out
of oiie little window, from which the sash
had been entirely removed. Several yo
men fainted in the pressure of the crowd
011 the street, and were removed with the
greatest difficulty.
It was a pitiable sight to see the poor lit
tle innocents as they lay side by side iu
death? a sight, too, which did not fail to
inove the stoutest heart, Hach corpse was
arruved in white, decked with flowers.
The funeral service being ended, Father
McDevitt said :
"My Friends,?I have no sermon to
preach on this sad occasion; indeed, it
would be out of place. I have only to as
sure you, in the name of Faith, that the
souls of these innocents are uow in Ileaven,
and that is enough."
MBS. MABSU IN PRISON.
After being locked up in the cell in the
citv jail on Thursday evening Mrs. Marsh
passed a restless night, sleeping but little.
At short intervals she appeared perfectly
anno, but for the greater portion ol the
night she continually raved in broken sen
tences about her children.
INTERVIEW WITH HER FATHER.
Yesterdav morning Mrs. Marsh was visited
by her aged and broken-hearted father, Mr.
Dwver. "On entering her cell she seemed
not "to rccoguize him, but in a few moments
she appeared, by a great effort, to collect
her scattered senses, rind fell on her parent s
neck weeping and uttering piteous cries for
her children. In regard to the terrible
tra^edv she had nothing to say, and the
father," stricken down by grief, had no word
of reproach to utter. Those who witnessed
the scene represent it as being one never to
be forgotten, and full of anguish and de
spair
THE MOTHER AND DAUGHTER.
Mrs. Dwver, the mother of Mrs. Marsh,
was still afive at a late hour last evening,
with, however, but small hopes of recovery.
She still lays iu the basement-room of the
dwelling where she received her wounds,
it being deemed by the physicians impru
dent to remove her. . _
Mrs. Marsh has always enjoyed the confi
dence and respect of her neighbors, and it
is stated had always shown absolute loud
ness for her children previous to the sad
tragedy of Thursday. In regard to the inti
mation of a witness that she drank, lier
father and other relations declare that she
is a stranger to strong liquors. This is cor
roborated by others in the neighborhood,
particularly bv the grocer with whom she
dealt.
THE M1SF0TUNES OF MARSH.
At tlic time of the late flood in Jones's
falls, Marsh, the husband of the unfortu
nate woman, kept a barber-sliop on Marsh
Market space, and was doing a thriving
business. , . .
Marsli is represented as having been sober
and industrious, and devotedly attached to
his wife and children. The flood destroyed
his stpek and shop and deprived him of his
business, and, leaving a small sum with his
wife for immediate use, he left the citv,
promising that as soon as he could establish
himself in business in some other locality
lie would send for his family. The parting
of the husband and wife is said by those
who have reason to know to have been of
the most affectionate character. From thai
dav to the present time, now some sixteen
mouths, Mrs. Marsh has heard nothing
from her husband, and it is thought that
this had a great deal to do with her insanity.
In?the mean time she has toiled assiduously
with her needle, and has succeeded in feed
ing her children and keeping them respect
I ably clad. No one can tell the whereabouts
! of Marsh. The account of the tragedy was
telegr aphed far and wide, but up to a late
hour last evening no tidings had been heard
from him.
From the New York Tiinee.
lUe^ed Fraud# Amounting to Nearly
One Hundred Thousand Hollars.
The church-going members of the Pres
byterian persuasion in Hoboken were
thrown into an unusual state of excitement
yesterday by a rumor, which upon inquiry
was ascertained to be correct, that on Mon
day last a prominent member of their churcn
was arrested on a charge of swindling the
involved beingVted to be nearly
8100,(100. The allemd defaulter is Hanson
Woodruff, who resided in No. 76 Seventh
street, and an investigation into the charge
upon which he is now in eustody, deve
loped the circumstances of a Bcriesofsingu
larly skilful and-successful alleged frauds,
which extend over a number of years. ^
? woodruff's? previous history. ^
Some years jsince, Woodruflj by the aid
of influential friends, obtained a responsi
ble position in an extensive banking-bouse
in this city, but before many months
elapsed his accounts were discovered to be
in a verv confused state, and he v^ dis
chargetf. Shortly alter his dismissal it as
ounl that he was a defaulter to the extent
mittO. LHai Uc was a uumuiw* i?
Df 666,000, and an Immediate search was
instituted for him. Whether a compromise
was effected between himself
? am bov* n CX T*Ar
[ his former
jmployers, or whether he returned^the
imount of his defalcations, has not trans
pired, but he next makes Ids appearance
unong the congregation of the Dutch Re
tained Church in the role of a zealous and
irdent convert. . ,
His religious convictions appear to have
>een founded on no principle of moral rec
itude, but were of that pliable nature
vhich admitted of a modification according
to chancy
period lie wfcs a#rorea?ed
on a change of Jjeflef he erin<
termination nhd^al in the cause of tnfih,
and manifested such apparent sincerity in
his actions, that his advent the church
was hafled as if valuable acquisition. So
thoroughly did he succeed in convincing the
members of thAtchurch Of his devotion and
truth that he was elected to a position
*WBT?F'$aSBte<r3BBE to^c<mtroltte dmrdr
funds conjointly with the treasurer. With
the opportunities for deception and fraud
his old habit returns to turn, and he becomes
a defaulter a second time to the amount of
$12,000.
The swindle was evident, the proofs were
in the hands of the elders of the church;
but, to avoid the scandal which it was sup
posed would follow a prosecution, the
matter was allowed fco rest, and in all pro
bability would never hare attained pub
licity but for more recent transactions.
Woodruff's assumption of piety was of
course exploded, as a consequence of these
developments, and for various reasons he
found a change of residence desirable. He
accordingly engaged a house in Seventh
street, Hoboken, to which place he removed
In the spring of 1868, and again his religious,
belief undergoes a change, and he attaches'
himself to the Presbyterian Church there.
With singular adroitness he ingratiated
himself into the favor of the members of
the church. His piety and assidious atten- ]
fcion to religious services were even moi e
marked than when a member of the Dutch J
Reformed Church, and he was introduced : o
the principal Presbyterian families in Ho
boken. He lived in a style of ease and
comfort, though not extravagance; but!o
meet the demands incidental on housekcci ? .
ing (for it docs not appear what business he
was engaged in) he had recourse to his
friends, from whom, on various pretexts,
he borrowed large sums of money. From !
many persons he obtained money upon the
security of a large landed property which
he represented that he possessed" in Vir
ginia; to others he gave notes purporting
to be signed by his son, aged twenty-five,
who bears his name, but who never at
tached his signature to the document;
while others lie induced upon ingenious
pretenses to make him their del>tor. When
J those notes fell due they were dishonored ; 1
but even then Woodruff managed td ke?p
himself clear from any unpleasant conse
quences.
HIS LAST SWINDLE.
A few months since Woodruff, who was
previously devising schemes for the benefit
of the church, sought an interview with the,
treasurer, [and asked him inm
$1,200 to help a friend out^pecuniary dif
ficulties, promising not onC t0 ije responsi
ble for the return of th^enev, but also to
endeayflf-ffl friend into the faith.
The money was given, but when the day
appointed for payment was at hand, and it
was not forthcoming, the suspicions of the
treasurer were aroused, especially as the
friend whom Woodruff promised to bring
into the church had not-made his appear
ance. A visit to New York and an inquiry
into Woodruff 's previous career coulirmod
those suspicions. The treasurer found he
had been completely imposed upon, and
was justified in having thejdefaulter arrested
for swindling.
At his instance a warrant was issued for
Woodruff's apprehension, and he was ar
rested oil Monday last and lodged in Hud
son city jail. The announcement of his
arrest vvas not made known until yesterday,
when it occasioned great excitement.
Among the many whom Woodruff lias
swindled are C. G". Amende, druggist, cor
ner of Washington and Seventh streets,
from whom he took over $1,100, and Mr.
Clussmann, No. 304 Washington street.
The whole amount T)f his defalcations in
Hoboken have been estimated at $30,000.
Letter from Home?Archbishop Spald
ing and the Pope.?A correspondent oftlie
Baltimore Catholic Mhror, writing from
Rome under date of the 25tli ultimo, gives
the particulars of a recent interview be
tween Pope Pius and Archbishop Spalding:
The Archbishop, on entering into the
presence of the lloly Father, handed him a
large jar of snuff, remarking at the same
time, "Holy Father, I have promised vou
ten years more of life, and claim the privilege
of supplying vou with snuff duringlhat time.
T * ? _ ll Tf KikO 111 ff <1 *?
I.> YtTlllttU, ICfJllCU lilt: in/n x oiuoi, ih.w0xa
ing, and familiarly putting his hands on
the Archbishop's shoulders, " I shall keep
you to your word, and if you fail in your
supply "I will send the sheriff after you."
His grace said there would be no failure in
the supply of snuff if his holiness would
fulfil his part of the contract by outliving
the ten years, as he (his grace) earnestly
hoped. NVhile the Holy Father was sub
scribing his name to a petition of the Arch
bishop, his holiness remarked that he had a
cold. " A very common complaint in
Rome," observed the Archbishop, "for
though the faith of your city is most Catho
lic, its climate is* most hetcorodox. If
you are free from ' every wind of doc-1
trine' you have a succession of every wind
on the compass," a remark which Ins holi
ness seemed to enjoy very much.
Some remark having been made on the
slow progress of the Council, the Arch
bishop playfully said that the Americans
were a fast-going people, and repeated to
his Holiness what he said he had previously
observed to some dignitaries of the Church,
that the use of a little American steam
would expedite matters a good deal. Sev
eral other pleasant subjects were discussed,
but their personal and private nature ren
der them less interesting to the general
reader.
Northern. Men as .Southern Repre
sentatives.?The Philadelphia Inquirer
(Republican), in an article on the recent
Louisiana contested election farce in the
House of Representatives, in which the
claims of J. H. Sypher, "late of Pensylva
nia, later of Louisiana," were upset after
being allowed, says :
"Let us hope 'that the South shall be so
enfranchised by a general amnesty that it
can select its own people to represent it
upon the lloors ot Congress. What does a
Pennsylvanian know of the political econ
omy of Louisiana ? Who can an alien re
present there ? The interests of that State
are altogether divergent from those of Penn
sylvania, and they should have an exponent
and defender in the councils of the country
thoroughly conversant with them. Recon
struction will prove the shallowest fraud in
existence while citizens -of the North pre
tend to legislate for those of the late Con
P
federacy.
Convention of Railroad Officials.?A
convention composed of officers of v;irious
railroad lines was held at Barnum's City
Hotel Friday for the purpose of consulting
upon the propriety of reducing the passen
ger rates from New York to various points
i the South via Richmond and Portsmouth.
There were present, among others, Charles.
Ellis, president of the Richmond and Pe
tersburg railroad; C. F. Collier, president;
of the Petersburg railroad ; P. V. Daniel,
Jr., president,_*J. B. Gentry, general ticket
agent, and E.'F.D. Myers, general superin
. " Richmond, Fredericksburg
ten dent, of the
and Potomac ruilroad.
Mr. Charles Ellis was called to the chair,
and J. B. Gentry and Major J. C. Winder
selected as secretaries. A general discus
sion took place as to the proposed reduc
tion in the rates, and a schedule of prices
ed upon, which is to be apportioned
,.r 7 ? ... j in.- !
agreed _ ,
among the several railroads interested. The
schedule thus arranged is to go into effect
on the 1st of May.?Baltimcn-e Sun, 2Zd.
Father and Son Drowned.?On Thurs
lay while the boat Wellington, one of the
American company's line, was on her wav
ip to this city, and when near Patterson's
:reek, a little boy, son of the captain, Mi
;bael McCann, "fell overboard. Captain
tfcCann was on the towpath at the time
vith his team, and his wife called to him ]
hat the boy had fallen into the canal. He
an quickly to the spot and sprang in to
ave the child, but unfortunately both
bther and son were droWned. When the!
>odies were recovered thev were locked in
iach other's arms. The boat was at once
ent back to Hancock, where the deceased
lad been living. There was no crew on the,
>oat at the time except a colored bby. This j
ad event has created much sympathy for j
he almost distracted woman who was thus
o suddenly robbed of both husband and
hild^-Cumberland (Aid.) Transcript.
A number of femilles have been poisoned
in Philadelphia by eating cheese from a cart,
the driver of which had been engaged to
haul it away from the warehouse and bury
it. Instead of doing this he peddled it
about at a cheap rate. No deaths have as
yet occurred.
%)!
CHOICE
?MB80Ii
. WHITS GOQ&ttj?
HOSIERY,._..
HANDKERCHIEFS, Ac.
We have opened (In addition toosr stock of flaa
embracing In part full Hues of
LACKS, EMBROIDER Y. WHITE GOODS, ?
HOWE hTt; GLOVES, HANDEBB- $'? S $
CHIEFS. RIBBONS, AC.
The goods were selected within a few day* by
Mrs. Habrib in person, wltkgreat care, and trttfc
a view to please tbe moot refined taste In quality,
design, and price. We are prepared to show soma
, of the finest and choicest goods ever offered In the
: city. MARCUS HARRIS A BROTHER, '
I 3J) fS iw Corner Fifth and Broad streets.
? ' ?' ? ? M ? ?J
BREBDEK & FOX are opening this
week their second supply of
SPRING ANIT SUMMER DRY GOODS,
which will embrace
THE LARGEST AND MOST ATTRACTIVE
ASSORTMENT
over offered by them. < -
I BBEEDEN A FOX, j
| ap23-5t No <01 Broad street. I
| Oar STARKE & RYLAND, 91ft Main |
fctreet, Richmond, Vn? respectfully call attention |
to the following books :
A BRAVr. LADY, by tho author of John Hall- j
fax, $1; ?'
A RACE FOB A WIFE. byHawley Smart, 60c.;
RED AS A ROSE IS SHE, 60c.;
HEALTH BYCKIOD LIVIXG.Wi W.HalJ, $1.50;
AMONG MY BOOKS, by Jam a? Russell Lowell,
*2;
ALFRED THE GREAT, by Thomas Hughes,
M. P., *2;
LITTLE WOMEN, 2 vol*., Louisa M. Alcott, $3;
OLD-FASHIONED GIRL, by same, gL60;
HOMES WITHOUT HANDS, by Rev. J. Q.
Word, $4.60;
THE HOHENSTEINB, by Splelhagan, $2;
THE PERCY ANECDOTES, $3.60;
1001 GEMS OF POETRY, $1.75;
TENNYSON'S POEMS, paper, 50c.; cloth, $1;
GARDENING FOR THE SOUTH, by White, $2;
BLUST'S FAMILY KITCHEN GARDENER, $1;
GRAPES AND WINE, byHusmanu, $1.50;
THE GRAPE CULTUKISr, by Fuller, $1.60.
' up 23. 2t . j
flgfiT THE BEST end most perfect Sub
stitute for YEAST in making hot bread, biscuit*,
rolls, cakea, corn bread, and waffles, areourowil
home-made article, the VIRGINIA YEAST
POWDERS. They are cleanly and neatly put up,
of pure and positively not injurious lngiredlenta,
and withal fully equal If not superior to any In
market. Sold by druggists and grocers.
up 23?2t*
dST SMASH! CRASH ! BANG GO THE
PRICES OF DRY GOODS bTILL LOWER!
But few cod realize bow very low the prices of
DRY GOODS are unlll they visit the store of
LEVY BROTHERS and see tbo full yard-wide
FRENCH PERCALES or PRINTED CAM
BRICS at 20c. per yurd, would bo cheap at ?0c.
These goods measure thlrty-slx Inches wide.
Handsome GRENADINES at 10c. per yard worth
20c.;
LAWNS at 12$, lej, and 20e., the cheapest goods
ever mido;
All wool I)E LA1NE8, every shade, at 33c, per
yard worth 30c.;
Good GINGHAMS at 124. 15, Die., cheaper than
Ihccheapest;
Real EARLSTON GINGHAMS, very line, at 25c.
worth 37Jc ;
PIQUES from 25c. to 81 per yard?the cheapest
and best assortment ever offered In any estab
lishment In this city;
Handsome STRIPED MUSLINS at J5e. worth 30c.;
CHECKED MUSLINS from So to 50c.;
NAINSOOK MUSLINS from 25c. to 81 per yard;
CORD EDGE TRIMMING RIBBONS at floe, a
piece worth f l;
CORD EDGE TRIMMING RIBBONS at 7flc.
worth $1.25 a pleco ;
SATIN RIBBONS nearly two inches wide at 20c.
per yard, would be a bargain at 50o. per yard;
DIMITY BANDS at 10c. worth 20c.;
The largest and boat assortment of IIAMBERO
IN8ERTINGS and EDGINGS ever offered;
The new etyle-GUIPURE BANDS and COLLARS
at popular prices;
LINEN NAPKINS at 75c. per dozen worth 81;
HUCKABACK TOWELS at 10c. a piece worth
20c.;
Large size HUCKABACK TOWELS at 25c. sold
a month ago at 40c.;
IRISH LINEN, werrantod all pure flax, at 85c.
per yard worth 50c.;
MARSEILLES TRIMMINGS at 85?. apiece, some
of which are worth 15c.
NEW 8TTUJ
RUFFLE COLLARS,
CHEMISETTES,
READY-MADE GARMENTS FOR LADIES,
and lota of other gooda.
But half of the tale has be*n told.
For further particulars, call at tbo
OLD SOUTHERN DRY GOODS STORE.
LEVY BROTHER8,
ap 21 ? 1218 and 1215 Male street.
CLOTHING
AT BALDWIN'S.
We are receiving dally by steamer and expreee
our
SPRING 8TOCK,
comprising everything desirable In the way of
FINE BLACK AND COLORED COATS
AND
VESTS;
FINE CAS8IMERE SUITS,
MEDIUM CASSIMERE SUITS,
CH^AP CA88IMEEE SUITS, SHIRTS,
COLLARS, TIES,
AND
FURNISHING GOODS GENERALLY,
all of which are offered to buyers at
REASONABLE HATES.
T. S. BALDWIN, Clobier,
ap 15 corner Main and Tenth streets.
FEATHERS.
G. B. STACY A SON ' " *?'
will always pay the highest market price for
FEATHERS.
VIRGINIA BEDDING WAREHOUSE,
ltM and 1110 Main street.
[mh si?lm J
%3T TO PHYSICIANS.
CHLORAL-HYDRAT,
chemically jmre, mode by 35. Sobering, Berlin,
just imported and for sale by
MEADE k BASES,
Dispensing Pharmacist#, fir Main street,
tab 10
T EATHER,
1J LEATHER,
LEATHER.
'J' .
Call and examine onr stock.
O. H. CHALKLSY A CO,,
ap 20 Thirteenth street
. H. D. TALIAFERRO retpeetfully
offters hit PROFESSIONAL SERVICES to
the citizens of Richmond. Office and ntUnaw
at Mr. Robert A. Mayo's, 110 Seventh street, be
tween Franklin and Oreoe street* apt?in
D$T GOODS JOB TBS MILLION AM WELL
AS THE MILLIONAIRE 1
3- s?- ?'* C- 1f- ? -
All of our goods are not bought at tt? New
York auctions, a* no BTSBT-CLAflfi STOCK M?
be fed from auction tale#, ;
&e&Yj arrivals by steamer sad ^sprees of HE'W
mniixrw>oimr&#T*wi*, not <am.
rifely YOB CA8H, baSboegKrightand sold right.
HSndsow* GBEWAOTNET C?y ?* per dr?n;
Efrgsnt BLACK and COLORED BILKS very
low y ?
^OfcGANDIEfl and JAPANESE POP
CHECKED JAPANE8E SILKS and ORENA
SI A -SIDE ] and other POPLINS for walking
MOZAMBIQUE^ cn (fleas assortment, l?f, SO, M,
PIQUES, colored and while, for ladle* and chil
.AJ^IbWY and other LINENS for solU;
u*/3V1W? COLLARS) OOB8ET8>
RIBBONS, BLACK THREAD LACES, Ac.;
Larg| assortment best PRINTS at 10,12, it, and
A splendid line of Llama Lace and Thread
Point*; Shawl* in groat rarlcty: Holsery, Sock*.
Ac.; a foil assortment of French and American
Casrimcrcs for men and boys: Irish Linens, Tow
ellings, Ac., at ante-bellum price*; Quilt*, Skirts,
Linen-Bosom Shirts; Gentlemen's, Ladies', and
Children's Undershirts, Ac., Ac.
. T. B, PRICE A CO.,
ap 1# corner Mala and Eleventh streets.
FIBST-CLASS STOCK.
CHARLES B. BOUSS,
No. 14# Dl'ANK 8TRKKT. NlCW YORK,
the gallant Confederate soldier and gennlne Vir
ginia rebel, who surrendered with his beloved
commander at Appomattox Courthouse, buy*
more than TWO MILLION DOLLARS' WORTH
OF GOODS ANNUALLY at the great auction
sales of New York, where all the first-class whole
sale houses of New York bay their goods, and
from bis headquarters distributes bis BAB
GAINS to his fifty retail houses, locatod In six
different States.
We get our share of these bargaint, and are now
opening
1.000 yards beautiful BERAGE DRESS GOODS
at onlv lcjc. worthdSc.;
FRENCH CAMBRICS;
1.001 yards elegant DRESS GOOD9 of different
kinds;
The best BRITISH HOSIERY;
The best KID GLOVES;
The best LINEN DAMASK;
Tho bust TOWELS at soc. worth 78.0;
The best STRAW HATS for ladles;
The beet PLAIN and FANCY MATTING;
The best SASH and NARROW RIBBONS;
and the best everything.
DUCKWALL A ROUPS,
a p is 1013 Main street, opposite post-ofUce.
yy BUEEESS, WILLIAMS & CO,,
1UT MAIN STREET.
We take pleasure Id informing our friends that
we are now receiving our second regular supply
OF
SPRING GOODS,
which makes our stock full and complete. These
goods have been bought within the past two weeks,
since the recent heavy decline In all foreign goods,
and we confidently assert cm be sold as cheap as
similar goods were ever offered in this market.
We take this occasion to tender our thanks to
our friends and the public for the unprecedented
patronage which has been accorded us, and to
assuro them that no effort on our part shall be
spared to merit its contluuauce.
We Invite all In waut of
FRESH,
FABHIONABLE, and
DESIRABLE
DRY GOODS
OF
EVERY DESCRIPTION
to give us a rail and be convinced that theycsn
supply their wants at lower prices than before
the war.
We name In part
DRESS GOODS of every kind. In rich SILKS,
JAPANESE SILKS, IRH5II POPLINS,
REAL MOHAIRS, IRON BAREGES,
GRENADINES, PLAIN and EMBROI
DERED LKNOS, JAPANESE CLOTHS,
BAREGES, PIQUES, PERCALES,
BRILLIANTS, LAWNS, JACCONET8
ORGANDIES,
FRENCH CAMBRICS, GINGHAMS,
LINEN LAWNS,
MOUSSEL AINE8, MERINOS,
WHITE. BLACK, and CO LOB ED
ALPACAS, BOMBAZINES, TAMI8B
CLOTH, HERNANI8, and a complete
line of MOURNING GOODS.
BLEACHED aud BROWN COTTONS (all
makes),
CALICOES, FLANNELS,
CURTAIN GOODS,
IRISH LINENS (a large stock).
LINEN SHEETING, PILLOW LINEN,
TABLE DAMASKS, NAPKINS. TOWELS,
HANDKERCHIEFS, HOSIERY,
GLOVES of all kinds (Including twe-buttoa
sea mice 6 kid) very cheap,
CLOTHS, CAS8IMERE8, LINEN, DUCKS
and DRILLS, COTTONADES, CRA
VATS, BOWS and TIES,
TABLE OILCLOTHS,
REAL THREAD and LLAMA LACE
POINTS,
LLAMA LACE 8ACQUEB,
REAL and IMITATION LACE COLLARS
and SETS,
LINEN COLLARS and SETS.
THREAD and IMITATION LACES.
CAMBRIC and SWISS EDGINGS and IN
SERTING?.
IT IB IMPOSSIBLE TO ENUMERATE ALL
THE ITEMS WE KEEP.
, * * * vf f t ' ; . - : * ' H **
OUR STOCK
IS UNUSUALLY LARGE,
and we Invite an examination of it, knowing
that we con give
PERFECT SATISFACTION
TO ALL
WHO FAVOR US WITH TREIM
PATRONAGE.
' *A
' ' BURRESS, WILLIAMS * CO.,
ill' Main etreet.
r>
/. ? 4 TJ57 ' 5 .
ap 18 between Eleventh and Twelfth
ACMCBITOU MPIiEHKm
/TARDWELL>S THRESHER AND
V CLEANER
awarded tret premium at Virginia fair,
GENERAL FOUNDRY and WORK
done by
w w? CAKDWELLA CO.,
mh it-am \sii Cory etreec
nOEK PLANTERS, with and without
V GUANO ATTACHMENT.
We have placed a new tad wperlor Guano At
tachment en oar CORN-PLANTERS this yea*.
.J?? Prtoe,-ftvi. ?
Manufactured by . ?? *
J. W. CABDWELL* CO.,

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