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The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, January 06, 1872, Image 2

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iritmflitri gisptrit,
SATURDAY JANUARY 6, 1872.
The Legislature and the Finances.
Yesterday, in the House of Belcgates, im
mediately after the passage of the joint reso
lution suspending the operations of the fund
ing act over the veto of Governor Walker, on
motion of Mr. Sutherlix, a resolution for
the appointment of a joint committee on the
whole subject of the public debt and State
finances was unanimously adopted. The
number on the part of the House was put
at fifteen, and on the part of the Senate at
nine.
f This is a very wise measure. Tlic hue and
cry against the funding net, for one purpose
and another, has spread throughout tho State,
end there Is no chance of stopping it or of
doing anything just now?if anything at all
is done?but to put down the funding bill;
unless, indeed, the Senate maintains the veto
and forces a resort to some other exjiedicnt.
Therefore it !s most appropriate that the
whole subject should be thoroughly review
ed and sifted. Something must be done, and
when members come face to face with practi
cal propositions they will discover that de
clamation against the funding net will not
get the Slate out of the difficulty into which
the rc]>cal of that act will plunge her.
"With some thirty millions funded under
the funding uct, and with money to pay the
present January interest on the funded debt,
we see no difficulty in tho way of proceeding
with the process of paying' interest and main
taining the public credit. But as tho Legis
lature seems to think differently, it is very
well, with tho help of tho dispassionate and
Intelligent joint committee, to find out what
is intended to be offered iu lieu of the fund
big act to reestablish confidence and main
t .in tho State's credit, 'i'he committee is a
very good idea. We doubt not that it will
bo au intelligent body of men; and we trust
t hat it will disentangle the Legislature from the
embarrassment which it suffers from getting
u;> iu the .State a storm that could not be
e oily or readily controlled. One good thing
is that we shall be relieved from heated de
butes aud " buncombe " speechos?at least
until the committee is ready to report.
The Louisiana Wrangle.
Two telegraphic news yesterday announced
r- triumph for Warmocth over Carter?i. c.,
1 ho defeat of the Grant party in the organ
i/.ution of the House. Governor Wakmovth
has carried things with u high hand. First
he frustrates Carter in his claim to he Licu
t--riant-Governor to fill the vacancy caused
hytiio death of Fi nn, and next he sweeps
Carter out of the speakership of the House
of Representatives, notwithstanding that the
Federal troops with Gutlin guns were in
readiness for some purpose, and notwith
standing that Waumoutii, under the kuklux
act, was himself under bail for his appearance
? to answer some charge connected with his
interference with the organization of the Le
gislature. lie yesterday, with the police and
mined men at his disposal, seized the hall of
the House of .Representatives, after the clec
tiou of a Speaker to suit him, and closed it
until 12 o'clock to-day, as it is understood, to
? keep out Carter.
We explained sonic days since the matter
at Issue between Warmocth and Carter
with regard to the Lieutenant-Governorship.
The Constitution provides that in the event
of a vacancy in that office during the recess
' rf the Legislature, the President pro tern, of
the .Seuute shall he Lieutenant-Governor;
and in wise there is no President pro tern.,
the Speaker of the House shall he Lieuten
ant-Governor. There was no President pro
tem., and Carter was Speaker of the House.
Warmoitd, to cut off Carter, convened the
Senate (which he had no power to do, he being
authorized upon occasion for it to convene
not one branch, but both Houses of the Le
gislature), and that body elected ITnchback
President pro tcm., and him Warmouth rc
Ojguizcd us Lieutenant-Governor.
Carter made no immediate effort to assert
his claim: and uow Warmocth heads him
off in the House, upon grounds not explain
ed by telegraph.
Carter Is the well-known Methodist
preacher from Virginia (we believe Loudoun
county) who was in Texas when the war
broke out, and who entered the field as a
"fighting parson," and became quite distin
guished. How he got amongst the Radicals
of Louisiana we know not. But there be is
in high feather with tho Administration
wiug of the Republicans.
We hardly think tho matter is to rest with
a triumph for Warmocth. Ilis proceedings
have been qulto bold and high-handed. The
office-holders' party have power, and they
have been treated so roughly by Warmouth
that they will probably take him iu hand.
It is not the time uor the day for the Gov
< eramcnt power and the Government pets to
oe treated with contempt. Warmocth will
probably be brought up with a round turn.
The Richmond Dispatch suggests that the
Tribune, in its call on the State authorities of
Missouri to repress und punish the negro
'killing ruffians of Saline county, "shows a
loss of faith in the efficacy or propriety of
Federal interference with such matters in the
Suites, and suggests a return to the sober
second thought that under the Constitution
the State Governments arc the proper authori
ties for the preservation of order and enforce
ment of law within tlioir boundaries."
The Dispatch may rent assured that the
Tribune never doubted tliat it was the right
and duty of the States to suppress all man
ner of outrages like those iu question. We
.1 should be glad, indeed, to kuow that this
. duty was always and everywhere effectively
discharged, so "that there should be no need
of, no call for, Federal interposition. Virginia,
.we are happy to say, has, under Governor
. Walker, illustrated the true theory by fulfill
ing its requirements. Missouri, under Gover
nor Brown, will, we trust, do likewise. But
where the State is unable or unwilling to
- -protect life and property, then we hold it
the duty of the Federal Government to do
, t, whatever shall be needful in the premises.
"And the Tribune evinces no " loss of tilth in
??-the efficacy" of such interposition.?New
York Tribune.
' Exactly. So we see. But then does not
the Tribune see that tho "right" or the
i)'s,"authority" of the State under the Consti
? tutton Is utterly nugatory and valueless if
' -the Federal Government may whenever it
pleases ihtcrvene and take upon itself the
office of regulating the local affairs of the
?States ? Of what ase is the Constitution at
all in the matter of the power of the States if
( Its forms prescribing the mode in which the
? aid of the Federal Government shall be
called hi to assist a State to preserve order
are to be disregarded whenever it pleases
Congress ? That is the point to which the
Tribune should devote its reflections on the
^,7 Subject.
We know very well what the unanimous
decision would be were there no partisan j
v motives and prejudices to interfere with the j
- Impartial judgment of the country upon the
question. It is only partisan purposes which
have disturbed the generally-accepted con
struction of the Constitution on this subject.
Party feeling is the most dangerous of guides
on constitutional questions. And if ptrty {
interests shall set asldo th$ Constitution to
day?if the party in power may set aside the
authority of the States to-day to beat down
all opposition?another successful party may
in turn resort to a similar expedient tosilence
the voice of States and prolong its power.
There is no safety outside the Constitution.
The Federal Government luis no right to in
terfere in the local afliiirs of the States unless
its aid is called for by a State in the manner
prescribed by the Constitution.
We regret to sec that the Trilwne is as far
wrong as President Grant himself, and, un
der the kuklux law, justifies the invasion of
the States in utter contempt of the Constitu
tion. In thus surrendering the strongest
ground of opposition to the present Adminis
tration we cannot see how that jwper can
possibly make headway against it. " One
term " and " official depravity " won't do.
Presidents are always faithless as to the "one
term," and as to corruption in office that is
too common. Office-hunters generally have
their zeal for the party in power very much
whetted by the prospec ts of " good pickings "
when thev get in office.
Our Relations with Spain.
The recent naval movements ordered by
the Government are significant. Official
sources say that the Federal Administration
has had its suspicions aroused by a change in
the Spanish Ministry and the recall of Scnor
Roberts, the Spanish Minister at Washing
ton. The old ministry was friendly to us,
and the new one is thought to be hostile;
and Minister Roberts maintained kindly re
lations with our Government. For these
reasons it is alleged that General Grant de
termined at once to take precautionary mea
sures. He dispatched one of our naval ships
to release the Hornet and bring her home.
Slie was beleaguered in a Hnyticn port by
Spanish war vessels. She is charged with a
violation of the laws of neutrality, and the
Spanish authorities ordered hor arrest when
she left the harbor. The President is deter
mined that the question shall not be tried
by the Spaniards, and the frigate Congress
will bring her home to be tried here.
In the mean time a demand is to be made
upon the Spanish Government for explana
tion and apology for the act of overhauling
the steamer Florida by a Spanish man-of-war.
It is announced that our own Government
moans to bo ready for whatever course it may
be necessary to pursue, and the Navy Do
partinent is energetically putting such re
sources as arc at its command into the best
possible condition for immediate use. There
is nothing yet tangible in the case; but the
Government acts as though something might
soon arise that would be tangible. The
Spanish Government, however, is so utterly
incompetent to wage a war with this country
that we can hardly doubt it will make repa
ration and do anything else necessary to
avoid war. We have always been for Cuba,
and would hardly regret any event that
might transfer it to the United States. Spain
is not able to govern properly that magnifi
cent island. It is a mere burthen upon
Spain, and an everlasting annoyance to as in
its present situation. It would be greatly in
the interests of peace in the world if it
changed hands?separating from a Govern
ment which is incapable of taking care of it
and becoming annexed to one that will make
the most of it, and will, by occupying it, be
able to preserve order and security iu the
West Indies.
The city charter of New York, under
which Tweed pluudered the city treasury,
was pissed by the Legislature of New York
with the vote of ever)* Republican member
except one in its favor. One of these Re
publican members who thus helped Tweed
to fix things to suit him has been exposed as
the recipient of large sums from Tweed. His
name is Wood, and he represented Gcncssec
county. He went to the Legislature poor,
and soon afterwards, it being known that he
bad $15,000* to his credit in bank, some one
asked lfiin how he had struck such a veiu of1
luck. Ho 6tatcd that he had borrowed that
sum from Tweed ! It is probable that some
one in the Legislature besides Wood has been
borrowing from Tweed. Wood's receipts
amounted to a sum much larger than 915,000.
Patient Calculation.?Governor Bowie,
of Maryland, makes a patient calculation
with regard to the results of the Chesapeake
and Ohio canal. Ho says that if the results
ft-om that work contiuue to improve during the
next eleven years as they have done during
the hist two, it will yield to the State about a
half million of dollars per annum. Well, that
is slow; but really it is still surprising that a
work which had been almost forgotten should
yield anything. It was started to go to the
Ohio river; but it is pretty well settled that
by the route laid down for it it will never
get beyond the Alleghauies. That without
a terminus as it were, stopping as it does at
the foot of tho Alleghany range, the Chesa
peake and Ohio canal will become a paying
work, certainly forbids anything like despair
about canals.
Sample Mercuants.?Mr. W. G. Smythe,
secretary of the Society of Commercial Tra
vellers, calls our attention to the decision of j
the Supreme Court in the case of Ward vs.
the State of Maryland, as one " which
" makes null and void all license laws of any
" State or city in the Union relating to com
"mercial travellers." We beg leave to in
form Mr. Smvtue that we are not so easily
humbugged as he might suppose. We hap
lien to kuow that the Supreme Court has
never rendered any such decision. Its de
cision in the case cited was directly the re
verse of what he represents it to have been.
" Vox Populi" has sent us a very pleasant
rejoinder to our comments upon his first
note. It needs no comment.
A New Fish.?Upon a voyage of discovery
in the Gulf and the West Indies Professor j
Aoassiz lias discovered a fish that builds its !
nest in floating gulf weed, and deposits in
that nest?that floating cradle?its eggs. The
fish has a fin like a hand, and walks rather
than swims.
The Second Concert.?Tho second con
cert of Mi's. Moulton at Assembly Hall last
night was highly successful for the evident
satisfaction afforded by the performance.
Mrs. Moulton appeared much more anima
ted, and sung with marked spirit. Not
having studied for the stage as an actor, her
manner is different from that of the per-j
formers in opera. In this she loses in some
pieces by comparison; but her rendition of |
her sougs Is, nevertheless, very effective.
She has animation, and her emphasis and ca
dence are well chosen. Her voice is full and
powerful, and she sings with remarkable
ease. We remember no lady vocalist who
had more perfect control of her voice, orj
who executed rapid passages and sudden
transitions from octave to octave with more
ease, clearness, and accuracy. Her tones are
mellifluous, at times flute-like, and rise and
fell with exquisite grace.
Last night she captivated the auditor with
the cayatina from Bemirtunis, and bewitched |
hlnr wittfihc exquisite ? capriciosa" of B??
aECjm; The audience encored with rap
ture, and the compliment was most graceful
ly received by the fair singer.
. PEitRANTi waa as full as ever of fun and
life, and sung with a spirit that put every
body in good humor, and made ali his fast
friends. Mr. Bowler sang with his gentle,
soil st rains, some pieces that won for him
very earn eat applause.
General Assembly of Virginia.
Fridat, January 5,1872.
SENATE.
The Lieutenant-Governor in the chair.
Praver by Rev. Mr. Dodge.
The President laid before the Senate a
communication from the Secretary of the
Commonwealth furnishing the Seuatc, in re
sponse to a resolution, with nil agreements
and bonds generally given by C. H. Bryant
us a contractor for public printing, which,, on
mot iou of Mr. Patterson, was^ referred to
the joint committee on public printiug.
TESTIMONY IN MISDEMEANOR CASES.
Mr. Herndon, from the Committee on
Courts of Justice, presented a bill to author*
izc the accused to testify in cases of misde
meanor. Put on calendar.
OTIIER COMMITTEE REPORTS.
Mr. FiTzrATRiCK, from the Committee on
General Laws, reported without amendment
House bill entitled an act to amend and re
enact chapter 180 of the acts of Assembly of
1871.
An act to make Clinch river a lawful fence.
Mr. Thomas, from the Committee on Fi
nance, presented a bfll for the relief of SimoD
Hirsh.
Mr. Gkimslet, from the Committee on
County, City and Town Organization, pre
sented* a report asking that the House bill
entitled an act to amend and reenact an act
entitled an act to amend and reenact the
charter of the town of Leesburg, in the coun
ty of Loudoun, passed Febru;uy 27, 1858.
BILLS PRESENTED AND REFERRED.
JBy Mr. Penn : To regulate and define the
jurisdiction of the county and circuit courts,
to prescribe the number of terms of the cir
cuit courts and to fix the pay of the county
judges.
By Mr. Ghimsley : Amending section 12,
chapter 181 of the Code of 1S60, as amended
by chapter 201 of the acts of 18GU-70, in re
lation to printing records in the Court of
Appeals.
PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REPERRED.
By Mr. Ward: Of the Clarke County Cen
tral Agricultural Club, praying tho passage
of a law for the protection of sheep from
dogs.
Bv Mr. Lewis: Of the citizens of Lancas
tcr/toallow dredging in the waters of the
Chesapeake and its tributaries.
RESOLUTIONS OP INQUIRY INTRODUCED AND
ADOPTED.
By Mr. Anderson, of Pittsylvania: As to
repealing section 8 of the act approved March
28th, 1871, directing the Board of Public
Works to sell the State's interest in the vari
ous internal improvement companies of the !
Commonwealth.
By Mr. Nowlin : As to amending "an net
to establish and maintain a uuiforni system of
public free schools " in the following particu
lar: Section 27, so as to provide for dividing
the townships into school districts of not less
than one hundred inhabitants; section 24,
paragraph 8, so as to provide that if
any district shall fail to provide a suitable
school-house, the trustees may he empow
ered to lay a tax sufficient for'the purpose;
section 44>, so as to provide that the enforce
ment of the clause in reference to vaccination
lie left to the discretion of the local school
office l-s.
INTEREST ON DAWSON FUND.
Senate bill to amend and reenact the 28th
chapter of the acts of 180G-'G7 so as to pro
vide for the payment of interest upon the
Dawson fund was read the third tune and
passed?yeas, 30; nays, noue.
SENATE BULS FAS3ED.
To amend and reenact section 8 of chapter
1S6 of the Code of 18G0 in relation to judg
ment liens.
To render valid the charter of incorpora
tion of the Charlottesville Woollen Mills and
to legalize all acts done in pursuance thereof.
HOUSE BILLS TASSED.
To amend and reonact chapter 18G of the
acts of Assembly of 1871.
An act to make Clinch river a lawful fence.
ANIMALS AT LARGE.
The report of the Committee on General
Laws, asking to be discharged from the fur
ther consideration of Senate bill to prevent
mischievous and roguish animals from going
at Large, and that the bill bo referred to the
Committee on General Laws, was taken up
and agreed to.
THE CONTESTED SEAT.
At 1 o'clock, on motion of Mr. Connally,
the Senate proceeded to the execution of the
special order of the day?the consideration of
the report of the Committee on Privileges
and Elections, recommendiug that the peti
tion of R. B. Berkley for the seat occupied
by A. P. LATHRor be denied.
The report of the majority of the commit
tee, a very long and able paper, giving the
reasons for the decision, was read.
A minority report from Messrs. Taylor,
of Loudoun, and Prldemoke, ol'Lee, was also
read, favoring the unseating of Mr. La
Tuuor, and the recominission of the question
to the people of the district composed of
Charlotte and Mecklenburg for a new elec
tion.
Mr. Pridemore explained briefly his posi
tion, and for the purpose of bringing the
question before the Senate moved the adop
tion of Ills report.
[Mr. Berkley having been allowed to ad
dress the Senate in his own behalf, took the
.floor and delivered one of the most brilliant
and eloquent speeches that lias been made in
this body for years. His review of the case
was a complete and exhaustive presentation
of his claims, and lie was listened to with
profound attention by members of both par
ties throughout.]
At the conclusion of Mr. Berkley's argu
ment Mr. Thomas moved to suspend the
special order, as 3fr, Penn, the chairman of
the Committee on Privileges and Elections,
desired to speak in support of the report of
the majority of the committee.
MESSAGES FROM THE HOUSE.
A message was received from the House of
Delegates by Mr. Tidball, who informed the
Seriate that the House have, upon recon
sideration, agreed to the joint resolution to
discontinue the issue of bonds required to
be issued by the act for funding the public
debt, No. 5, notwithstanding the objections
of the Governor. '
Another message, by Mr. Sctherljx, from
the House, was received, informing the Sen
ate that that body had passed a joint resolu
tion providing for the appointment oi a joint
committee of nine on the part of the Senate
and fifteen on the part of the House, to take
into consideration all questions of finance re
lating to
THE FUNDING BILL AND THE PAYMENT OF INTER
EST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT.
Mr. Thomas moved to take up the resolu
tion and to agree to it.
Mr. Pkidbmore suggested that it would be
a desertion of the principles which had actu
ated him, and those who had acted with
him, to act upon this resolution before first
disposing of the message from the House
with reference to the veto of the Governor.
Messrs. Fitzpatrick, Hundley, and Que
senberry?all of whom had been warm ad
vocates of the resolution suspending the
funding of the public debt?urged the taking
up aud adoption of the resolution for the
appointment of a committee as a measure
of conciliation calculated to bring about a
settlement of all differences, and to result in
some plan in which all might concur.
The resolution was taken up and passed
with but od or two disscutiug voices.
The Piti jext appointed as members of
the committee on the Senate's part: Messrs.
Thomas, Fitzpatrick, CochraD, Hundley,
Connally, Nowlin, Ward, Herndon, ?nd
Terry.
On motion of Mr. Fitzpatrick, It was or
dered that he inform the Honse of Delegates
of the adoption of the joint resolution.
A motion (made by Mr. Nowlin) to tnfrq
up for reconsideration the joint resolution
discontinuing the funding of the public debt,
which was vetoed by the Governor, was
pending at adjournment
' HOUSE OF DELEGATES.
Speaker H anger in the chair. Prayer by
Rey. John A. Dearborn.
PLACED ON THE CALENDAR.
House bill to amend the charter of the
Radford Iron Company and for other pur-)
noses, with Senate amendment, was pticed
on the calendar under a suspension of the
nlThe following bills were reported from
committees and placed on the cmendar:
Senate bills lo incorporate the I otomac Land
and Improvement Company: to incorporate
the Virginia Iron Mining, Chemical, and
Manufacturing Company; to the
Code concerning crimes and punishments ,
to amend the Code concerning warrants for
small claims ; and to extend the time for the
correction of assessments of lands; House
bills to simplify declarations in actions against
insurance comiiauics; to amend the charter
of the Masonic Temple Association; to amend
the Code in relation to juries in criminal
cases; to amend the C'odo in relation to ex
emption from juries; and to incorporatc thc
Eastern Branch Turnpike and loll Bridge
Company.
PUBLIC PRINTING?AGAIN.
The following resolution, submitted by
Mr. St. .Tons, was adopted:
uResolved, That the Auditor of Public Ac
counts be, and Is hereby, instructed to fur
nish this House as soon as possible with a re
port, of expenditures incurred by the Com
monwealth of Virginia through the present
Superintendent of Public Printing forpapcr
and all other expenses pertaining to the pub
lic printing of the State during the official
term of the said superintendent not hereto
fore reported to the House of Delegates.
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
was granted Mr. Patterson for one day.
BILLS PASSED.
House bills to amend the charter of the
Radford Iron Company (with benate amend
ment) : to amend the Code in relation to ju
ries ; to amend the Code m relation to the
meeting and adjournment ot courts, to
relieve the sureties of Benjamin Robinson,
late sheriff of Greon county; for the reliei
of Frederick Griffith, of Westmoreland
countv, refunding the amount expended by
him in recapturing an escaped prisoner, al
lowing incorporated towns to use countj
jails; amending the Code in relation to the
adjourned terms of the circuit couitsofthc
city of Norfolk; to authorize the Auditor
and Attorney-General to compromise with
Andrew Bvrne, an absconding debtor; ex
tending the time for the qualification of Jack
son Godbev, clerk of Floyd county; author
izing commissioners in chancery to adminis
ter oaths ; providing for the reassessment of
lands throughout the Commonwealth.
THE TCBLIO DEBT.
House joint resolution providing for a sus
pension of the fundiug of the public debt
came up a3 the special order, the question
being upon sustaining the objections of the
Governor. . , ,
Mr. Robertson, of Allegliany, favored a
reconsideration. lie thought there was no
way of ascertaining the exact amount owed
bv the Slate, principal or interest, without
the debt was funded. He ably and eloquent
ly urged that the pcuding resolution was a
step towards repudiation, and begged the
House to hike this opportunity to withdraw
its assent to a measure so pernicious.
Mr. Smjtij, of NVl.son, called the pending
question, which was ordered.
The question was then put (whether on
reconsideration the House would pass the
bill), and was decided in the affirmative by
the following vote:
Y eas.?Messrs. Allen, A micron, Bcrger. Bernard,
Bishop, Booker. Boutnu, Brooke. J. l,. ho\\n, Bry
ant, llurkhodlcr, Butler. Campbell, Peter J. Cor
tcr Jack Carter, Clopton, Coleman, Cox, Ciitz,
Cumuiings Dalton, Delaney, Dcnealc, Douglas,
Dunirev. Knrlv, Klllott. Flt/irenild, Freemau, Fnl
kerson", Gardner. Graham, Graves. Gray, Gresham,
Hamilton, Hardest}-, Head. Hill.
fm s Jones. Jonrenson, Keyser, Lassitci, I.cvi 1
Llphtner. Lipscoinhe, Matthew, p Jw
vii-Wom \oble. Norton, Nowlln. Orerrall. Fiugc,
Patterson Buy lie, Bearee* Powell, Radford, Rams
It.,per,'. Rolcr. B??cll. ?0Sj?r.
Scrupps. Smith, Smoot, Snidow, Stephens, St. John,
Stnvall Strothcr, Swruiu,Suttlc, Taliaferro, Thomas,
Tldball, Tnndn, Van Ankeu, Wall, VI entworth,
Wharton. Williams and Yotmp?ss.
v-? Messrs. Bagwell, Borland. J. Thompson
Brown, Cottrell, Daniel, Donald, Doolev. Lvans,
Fletcher, William Gilliam. Gllniun. Peter K. Jones,
Kelly, Lawson, A. B. Liplitner, Loveusteiu,Mat
thews, Minor, Ncale. Parks, 1'oapue. liobertsou,
Sutherlin, Walke, Watts, Watson, and Mr. Speaker?
2/.
A NEW PLAN FOR ADJUSTMENT.
Mr. Sutherlin offered the following joiut
resolution under a suspension of the rules:
" Resolved by the House of Delegates {the
Senate concurring^. That a joint committee,
consisting of nine on the part of the Senate
and fifteen on the part of the House, he ap
pointed to take into consideration all ques
tions of finance connected with or growing
out of the act of the General Assembly
known as the funding bill, or touching the
payment of interest upon the public debt,
and report such measures as they may deem
expedient for the proper adjustment thereof."
The passage of the resolution was advoca
ted by Messrs. Sutherlin, Booker, Talia
ferro, Smith, Daniel, Brooke, Matthews,
and others.
Mr. Sutherlin said that the resolution was
offered because lie was assured that the tem
per of the House was against the funding
bill, but opposed to repudiation of any kind,
and because lie thought all desired to arrive
at a plan of equitable adjustment.
The joint resolution was agreed to without
dissent.
BILLS, AC., INTRODUCED AND REFERRED.
By Mr. Freeman : Bill to amend the road
' By Mr. Keyser : Bill to incorporate the
Luray Savings Bank _
By Mr. Keyser : Bill in relation to the
gauge of railroads.
By Mr. Hill : Resolution as to what legis
lation is necessary to enable boards of super
visors to compel settlement with sheriffs of
accounts for county levies prior to the 1st of
January, 1870.
By Mr. Hill : Petition of Amanda Tutwi
ler, administratrix, to be released from a
fine.
By Mr. Robertson:. Resolution as to ex
tending the time for settlement by the county
treasurer with the collector.
By Mr. Paige: Bill.reluting to the adop
tion of a fence law in Norfolk county.
By Mr. Bishop: Joint resolution as to the
expediency of amending the Constitution so
as to provide for the election of assessors not
oftener than every tourth year.
By Mr. Minor : Bill to amend section 9,
chapter 196, of Code, in relation to marriage.
By Mr. Scruggs: Resolutionamendiug the
Code so as to make it the duty of county
treasurer to return to the hoard of supervi
sors a complete copy of hi3 receipts and dis
bursements for the year.
Adjourned.
Disputed Boundary Between Maryland
and Virginia.
In his annual message to the Maryland Le
gislature Governor Bowie says :
For two centuries a question of unsettled
boundary has existed between Maryland and
Virginia. At first, the interests involved being
unimportant, probably, no effort was made
to settle the line because of the difficulty at>
tending in consequence of the colonial records
of Virginia having been removed to London,
after Bacon's rebellion, by order of the
crown.
But what was comparatively unimportant
two hundred years ago has become of grave'
consequence now; not so much because of
the land territory involved as of the wealth
of the waters in dispute. There is in this
portion of Maryland a hardy, brave, resolute
class of citizens, whose chief occupation in
season is that of oystering.
They having previously complied with
State law requiring them to take out license
to oyster, and their ancestors, from time im
memorial, having been accustomed to fish
these waters, are naturaliy retentive of what
they believe to be their rights.
- Claiming these under the " compact" of
1775, between Maryland and Virginia, and
to the channel of the Pocomoke river or
Sound, as appurtenant to the ownership and
jurisdiction of Maryland, they insist upon
plying their vocation in these disputed wa
ters.
But the State of Virginia claiming them as
within her confines, in the enforcement of
her rigid oyster Law, arrests of Maryland
citizens are frequently made by her oyster
police force, and serious conflicts sometimes
ensue.
The most serious of these occurred in the
autumn of 1870, .wlieu a large number of
vessels and their crews were captured by the
Virginia author! tiesnnd taken to Druinmond
town, Va., where tfce crews wefe imprisoned.
They hiving made their escape to Maryland
before I could interpose, and earnest threats
being made of an attempt by nn organized
force to recapture the vessels, they were re
moved to Hot-folk and dismantled.
I immediately communicated with his Ex
cellency the Governor of Virginia, nnd he to
the Virginia Legislature then in session.
Although matters bad been much compli
cated, and bad feeling engendered by the
forcible escape from jail and return to Mary
land, the Gorernorand Legislature generous
ly responded to my appeal, restored the ves
sels, and abandoned any further legal pro
ceedings in these eases. In return, I pledged
the oystennen of Maryland not to cross the
line which had been previously agreed upon
between Captains Davidson and Lovitt, the
commanders of the State oyster police forces,
until the question could be examined by the
State commissioners. To the honor of these
oysterman, I am glad to say, I have heard of
no infraction of this pledge of mine, and I
have recently had the same assurance from
Governor Walker.
The State of Virginia appointed a commi3
sion of three of her most eminent citizens,
headed by ex-Governor Wise, made an ap
propriation to defray expenses, and sent one
of the commission to Engbnd to obtain such
records as were necessary to establish the
claim of that State.
I did not feci authorized to appoint any
commissioners, but the General Assembly of
1868 having appointed such a commission,
consisting of Attorney-General Jones, Hon
orablcs L. L. Wraters, and William J. Aydc
lotte, and they not having reported results to
the succeeding session of 1870, as seemed to
have been contemplated by the net of 1868.1
requested them to continue to represent the
State until the matter could be settled or the
Legislature convene. They have not re
ported to me, but doubtless will to your hon
orable bodies.
I cannot too strongly urge upon you the
necessity of taking such steps ns your wis
dom may suggest to settle at once" and for
ever this vexed question. Nothing but the
considerate and conciliatory course pursued
by the authorities of the two States nnd the
perfect accord of friendship and sisterhood
which has always existed between Maryland
and Virginia, prevented a serious outbreak
and probably much bloodshed on this occa
sion ; and something must he done to pre
vent a recurrence of sfich incidents.
It is an act of pleasure and of duty to ex
press my thanks to the Governor of Virginia
lor the manner in which he cooperated with
me in the temporary adjustment of this im
portant question, and which doubtless had
much weight with the Virginia Legislature.
The Debt of DTarylanp.?Tbe aggregate
debts of tbe State, l'or which Interest" has to
be provided, wore on the 30th of September,
1871, ?12,430,718.08. The State holds as au
offset, what are considered by the Comptrol
or's report productive assets, $7,718,425.94.
Leaving the State debt $1,718,205.74 greater
than Iter estimated productive assets.
But supposing that the State may lose
$1,000,000, estimated among her productive
assets, of the large sum due from accounting
officers, incorporated institutions, Ac., we
have this debt incmised that amount.
To cover this excess of say $5,718,205.74,
the State has present unproductive assets,
?20,577,109.60, or nearly four times tho
amount of her debt above her productive in
vestments.
How sound the financial condition of the
Shite is will he seen when it is mentioned
that of these temporarily unproductive as
sets, $19,330,959.73 are in the bonds, stock,
and interest of the Chesapeake and Ohio
canal, which, for nearly a quarter of a cen
tury having been looked upon as almost
worthless, has shown by its returns within
the last two years that with similar results in
the ensuing eleven, the State will begin to be
in the receipt of nearly if not quite lialf a
million of dollars yearly revenue from that
source.-- Governor Boxcie's Message.
Pub Cab pet-Baggers.?The "Washington
correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial
says:
"Since the right of representation was re- i
stored to the South half the seats in that
great forum [United States Senate] have been i
filled with weak and inexperienced men, ol
whom it is not at all an unfair derogation to
say that their abilities would not have elected
them to the lower branch of the Legislature
in any intelligent district in Ohio. When we
are overwhelmed with such an avalanche of
the crudest carpet-baggcra from the South, it
is time to see that we at least lose nothing of
ability or influence in the senatorial material |
from the North."
This is good advice to the North; hut
what a reflection it is upon the Radical policy
of reconstruction!
It is now reported that a secret investiga
tion set on foot by Ben. Butler, and which
has been in progress more than a year past,
has resulted in showing that the Government
has been defrauded out of at least ninety mil
lions of dollars during the past slx years.
The frauds occurred mainly in the collection
of the internal revenue. A Washington cor
respondent says that the report will be made
public in a short time, and will develop offi
cial corruption ten-fold more startling than is
charged upon Tammany.
A "\ IGILANCE COMIUTTEE IN IvENTCCKT.?
Cincinnati, January 4.?The Commercial
(Radical) has a special from Frankfort to the
effect that a party of twenty citizens made a
raid upon some negroes near that place on
the night of the 2d instant, whipping one
and ordering the others to leave the neigh
borhood on pain of death. One fanner, it Ls
stated, was notified that he must employ
white laborers. The special adds that it: is
the declared purpose of the outlaws to drive
these negroes from the country, and desig
nates them "a band of kuklux." -
HARRIED,
On the 2ith instant. ;it St- John's cburrh, bv the
Rev. Mr. Wall, CHARLES K. TENSOR and Miss
LMMA J. SMITH, lloth of tills city. _
Stauutou pajjers please copy.
By the Rev. Dr. J. J. Petorkln, on tho 29tli Decem
ber, at the residence of the bride's father. Captain.
31. T. Phillips, JAMES J. ARTHUR, of York
city, to Miss IDA C. PHILLIPS, of Richmond, Va
?ana??
DIED,
On yesterday afternoon, GEORGE W. WIL
LIAMS, in lila eighth year, sou of Isaac and Guetiua
WlUams.
Hla funeral will take place TO-MORROW MORN
JJSG at n o'clock from the Oregon IIIH Methodist
church. The friends of the family are Invited to at
tend.
3Iorrts (Illinois) papers please copy. * '?
Friday, at i o'clock A. M., at the residence of her
sister, Mrs. Fanny Angle, 3Iisa LUCY ROBINSON.
The funeral will take place from St. Mark's church
THIS (Saturday) AFTERNOON at 3 o'clock. Tho
friends of the family are Invited to atteifd. ?
WOOD and coal. ,
WHY NOT SAVE"50^o^L25^whei)
times are so very hard? Everybody must liave
ure, for winter comes on mpid and tierce, while we
are selling coal of all kinds at from 50c. to sih's
cheaper Uiun any establishment In the city. Wood
both OaJi and Pine,cheap as the cheapest. Cull or
send to Gary and Nineteenth, or to Grace street. No
700, and he convinced.
deiS CHARLES H. PAGE & CO.
A NTHRACITE COAL.?Now afloat, 800
SSfHP Si EGG and STOVE
COALS, wlilch will be ?old from the Teasels at low
figures. 4 Jyf
Call and see my prices, and lay in your winter sup
F Ti c?a ?i,?fV>re there ia an advance In coal and
n eights In Hie northern markets.
. _ WIRT ROBERTS,
Jy 18 corner Seventeenth and Dock streets.
"^TORTHERN HAY.
300 bales NORTH RIVER TIMOTHY HAY In
store for sale by ? g. p. LATHROP,
Nineteenth street, at Draw-bridge.
Richmond, January l, I8J2.
TO OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTODIERS.
The subscribers wish to return their sincere
tnanka for the liberal patronage liestowed on the
concern of STORES & Co. for tbe puat two year*
and hope by strict attention to all orders entrusted
to us to merit a continuance of the same at your
your hands. 1
Wc are better prepared now than we have ever
been to give dispatch to HAULING of every de
scription. A. S. STORKS,
T. P. TURNER,
Our ofllce is still with MeMtsfR?Krsa
Cary street. [ja l-M,W,S3tl STQRRS ACQ.
Book and job printing neatly
DONS AV1MU QFMIQS* 2 V: ^
spimt jromc
iHi5n?^cjjca.i? v^jhS. wwaaga
; -'va
No.. 318 NINTJ^VBTBBjEJf, CORNER BROAD,
, ^ , 'tTF-STAlRS.
One BEAtJf lFCTt. SOLIDSILVER ICE-CREAM
SET, "fourteen pt?fflfM?nilng Glory pattern,
-- hi case, $75. ??- - ?
One net Of THREE SOLID SILVER OYSTER and
GRAVY LADLES, same pattern, In ca*e. $70.
One SOLID SILVER SOUP LADLE, Morning
Glory pattern, gilt bowl, tn can?, $40.
One set SOLID SILVER SUGAR-DISH, CREAM
POT; SUGAR TONG8, and SIJTEB, In awe,
These articles may be wen at NOWLAN A CO.'S,
3Iain street. Raffle to take place TUESDAY NIGHT
at 8 o'clock. Chances may be taken any nigbtafter
6 o'clock at 21S NINTH STREET, and on the night ]
of the raffle. Ja
?2T REMOVAL.?After occupying No. 2
Exchange Block for twenty-eight years, I am com
piled by the late fire at the Exchange Hotel to re
move, and have located at NO. 14 GOVERNOR
STREET (Belvln's buildlngj, where I am prepared
to furnish to the public, as heretofore, pure WINES,
LIQUORS, Ac., and request a continuance of the
patronage so liberally extended to me at tho old
place. OSCAR CBAKZ,
Importer of and Dealer in
Ja 4-1 w Wines, Liquors, and Cigar*.
SOT SEVENTH ANNUAL CLOSING
SALE OF DRESS GOODS at
LEVY BROTHERS',
rriccs marked down. Now is the time to buy.
DOUBLE-WTDTII ALPACA, In all colors, at 25c.
per yard worth 35c.;
REPS, of the most daslrablo styles, at iso. worth
35c.;
DELAINES at 20c. worth 35c^
SATTEEN8 at 50c. worth 75c.; at 75c. worth $1;
PLAIDS at 25c. worth 85c. per yard;
BLACK SILK at $1.25, $1.50. $1.75, $3, and $2,30,
just 25 per cent, below regular price*;
EMPRESS CLOTHS from 6oc. to 75c.;
CORDED HEPS ut 6Gc. worth 75c. per yard;
PURE SH.K and WOOL POrLINS at $1.23 worth
$2 per yard;
And like reduction In all styles of DRESS GOODS.
We are determined to close out every yard of Dress
Goods, and have fixed the prices of our goods ac
cordingly, as it Is our Intention to open with an en
tire new stock when we open our new store. So now
is the time for bargains.
LEVY BROTHERS,
Ja 2 - 1213 and 1215 Main street.
AST SPOTTED LACE, for Veils;
TISSUE GRENADINE and BAREGE, for Veils;
CRAPE and LOVE VEILS,
INFANTS' ROBES and FROCK WAISTS,
LACE, EMBROIDERED, and HEMSTITCHED
HANDKERCHIEFS;
LACE, LINEN, and MUSLIN OOLLARS and
CUFFS;
HAMBURG EDGINGS and INSERTING6 ?
? U1PUR E,VALENC LENNES, CLUNY. and ENG
LISH THREAD EDGINGS;
BLANKETS,
COMFORTABLES.
QUILTS,
SHEETINGS,
SHIRTINGS,
IRISH LINENS,
TOWELS,
TABLE-CLOTHS,
NAPKINS,
CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES,
SATINETS,
all at very low prices, at
LEVY BROTHERS',
Ja 2 1213 and 1215 Main street.
23T LEVY BROTHERS, Sole Agents for
JUGLA'S KID GLOVES, ARTHUR JAMES'S
NEEDLES, and BUCKSKIN GARMENTS. Jii 2
QST GENTS' GENUINE FRENCH DOG
SKIN GLOVES?the best glove ever offered in tiild
market?color, quality, and fit, cannot be surpassed
we have all numbers from 75 to 10. Also, an excel
lent article of BLACK, WHITE, and COLORED
KID GLOVES, at ?1.50 a pair.
Also, a full assortment of BUCK, CLOTH, CAS
STMERE, BERLIN SILK, and THREAD GLOVES,
at low prices.
UNDER-GARMENTS In all qualities at very low
prices. LEVY BROTHERS,
1213 and 1215 Main street.
KNITTING COTTON at 50 cents par pound.
COTTON YARN, all numbers from 4 to 12. Ja 2
CST READY-MADE SUITS FOR GIRLS.
We now offer our whole stock of WALKING
SUITS for girls at cost. We arc determined to
close out every garment, and have fixed the prices
accordingly. LEVY BROTHERS',
1213 and 1215 Main street.
KNITTING COTTON at 50 cents per pound.
COTTON YARN, all numbers from 4 to 12. Ja2
3STKID GLOVES.
We now offer an excellent article of Colored,
Black, and White KID GLOVES at $1 a pair; uu ex
cellent two-button Ktd Glove at ?1.50 a pair, among
which will be found a full assortment of white and
light colors, suitable for operas, balls, receptions, Ac.
Being sole agents lor the sale of JUGLA'S KID
GLOVES, we can now supply our customers with
any style desired. Our stock of Gloves Is very com
plete at this time. We are confident that we can
please all who favor us with a call.
LEVY BROTHERS',
1213 and 1215 Main street
UNBLEACHED KNITTING COTTON, 50c. per
pound.
COTTON YARN, all numbers from 4 to 12. Ja 1
23" FURS, FURS, FURS,
CLOAKS. CLOAKS. CLOAKS.
We call attention to our stock of FURS, especially
to thereto of Alaska Miuk at $5, which would be
cheap at $8. Sets of Fur? as low as $2.50?not half
their value. Furs for Children at $2.50 and $3 per
set A few sets of line Mink tend Astracban at greatly
reduced prices.
Also, at great bargains, LADIES' CLOAKS of
every description, among which will bu found some
of the new style double capon.
Also, a full a'sortmuat of BRAIDED 6ACQUE6
at rwduced prices. LEVY BROTHERS,
1213 and 1215 Main 6treet
UNBLEACHED KNITTING COTTON, 60c. pei
pound. JL _J
COTTON YARNS, all numbers from 4 toll. Ja S
22T FOR CHRISTMAS
AND NEW YEAR.
MORE NEW AND ELEGANT GOODS.
FANCY ARTICLES FOR PRESENTS, A3 WELL
AS STAPLES FOR TIIE COLD
WEATHER.
T. R. PRICE & CO.
continue to keep their splendid stock well up, and
have recently opened for the holidays presents, Ac.
Beautiful boxes HEMSTITCHED and EMBROID
ERED HANDKERCHIEFS,
LACE COLLARS AND LACE SETS,
LADIES' FANCY SILK SCARFS,
GENT'S GLOVES and TIES,
LADIES' KID. GLOVES, all numbers and shades.
IN Dl.ESS GOODS:
FRENCH SATINS, all colors; ' ?
SUITING SERGES and REPS,
IRISH and FRENCH POPLINS,
OXXOMAS,EMPRESS,aud TYCOONS.
? IN STAPLES:
CLOTHS, CASS1MERE8,
BLANKETS-a full line;
REP ELL ANTS, LINSEYS,
SHEETINGS, COTTONS, TOWELS,
WOOL SHIRTS and DRAWERS,
GLOVES, CORSETS to flt every figure, i
All they ask from a critical public Is an examlu
tlon and comparison of their stock.
T. R. PRICE & CO.,
1103 Main street.
MEADE & BAEEB'S
MEDICINALLY PURE
CO D-L IYER OIL.
Fresh supply of the acvr crop just Imported from
Newfoundland, direct.
We have the testimony of physicians who prescribe
it, and patients who bare takou It, that U Is more ac
ceptable to tbo stomach and more oeuUy assimilated
than any other olL
MEADEJfcBAKER,
Importing aad Dispensing Pharmacists,
dels 0l? Mala street.
tgrnmrnammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrnMs:
Book and job fkintxnq neatly
BOMS AX XKJ? V7IVA .
1
riLanflSGICtOTHlNG f
Vy ??
All of myutoek is being dowdevt rapidly at tor
profits to make room for mora, web as
MEN'S, YOUTHS*, BOYS',
jiih-tfjl ?>'*n ASD CHILDREN'S WEAR.
Call early and often at
. WJL IRA SMITH'S, 1109 Main street,
Can for'tfiTpreMema. ? *-*????
?" Sr . f >; -. ' .?. ' > ? ?
JOHN" LATOUCHE,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
can be fonnd (until his old store Is refitted) at No. 83
FOURTEENTH STREET, the store of John Pitt,
where he has lils STOCK In order, and fuDy pre
pared to prosecute his business as promptly as here*
to*"*
pLOSING-OUT SALE
\j ?
of
11 :
CLOTHING AND FURNISHING GOODS
?V. \ C' J
' FO*
me* "and boys,
REGARDLESS OF tOST,
UNTCL
THE 10th OF FEBRUARY,
as at that time I retire from business in this citr,
?*
and bars to vacate the store I oeeup7, it being
rented from that (late.
To those lu want of
CLOTHING,
SHIRTS and COLLARS
(oar own make^
UNDERWEAR,
HOSIERT,
TIES,
GLOVES,
HANDKERCHIEFS,
UMBRELLAS,
SHAWLS,
STRAPS, and
DRESSING ROBES,
all reliably made, an opportunity U offered thsm to
purchase at LESS THAN THE ORIGINAL SCSI
OF manufacture.
JOHN 6. DEVLIN,
1007 MAIN STREET,
? OITOSITE rOflT-OFFICB.
fde 33-tJuWj
DRY GOODS.
JJAVE JUST OPENED A LARGE LOT
of GENT'S WINTER GLOVES, cheap.
Ja 5 DUCK WALL A ROUPS.
JJAYE JUST OPENED A LARGE AS
SORTMENT OF
LADIES' FLEECED und FURRED GLOVES,
very cheap;
MISSES' and CHILDREN'S FLEECED Mid
FURRED GLOVES,
LADIES' BLACK SILK GLOVES.
LADIES' CLOTH GLOVES.
Jh 5 DUCKWALL & ROl'SS.
WE
WOOL SHAWLS, If yarda square, at
Ja 5 DUCKWALL & ROUS.*
QHILDIIEN'S AND MISSES FANCY
HOSE, cheap;
CRUMB-CLOTHS; DRUGGETT, very cheap.
Ja 5 DUCKWALL & ROUS*
N
JEW-YEAR'S BARGAINS.
BLACK ALPACAS worth 82J, 75, ?7je., and *L at
50, 90, 03, aud 85c.;
SATTEENS, all color*, worth $1 at ?5c. per yard:
IRISH POPLINS worth $2 per yard at ?>1.25,
JAPANESE DRESSES worth ?l2at?9 per pattern ;
82 BLACK VELVETEEN reduced to ?1.50.
>5l.5o BLACK VELVETEEN reduced totl.25,
*1 BLACK VELVETEEN reduced to Sio,
I'LAID POPLINS,
BLACK aud COLORED SILKS,
BLACK FRENCH MERlNoES,
GROS DE ZURICH, TAMISK CLOTHS,
EMPRESS CLOTHS,
ENGLISH aud FRENCH POPLINS aud 410
HAIRS.
CLOAKS, SHAWLS. BLANKETS,
QUILTS, WATER-PROOF CL0TH8,
SKIRTS, UNDERWEAR,
CASSIMERES,
DOESKINS,
BROADCLOTHS.
AND ALL WINTER GOODS
now offered at greatly reduced i>rict?, a? tJ:?*>" will be
sold at and below cost, rather than be carried oror.
WILLIAM THALIIIMER & SON'S,
Ja 1 No. (JOI Broad, corner Sixth street.
ARE SELLING FASHIONABLE
J^INEN TABLE-CLOTHS at 84, would
be cheap at $5;
Also, TABLE DAMASK by the yard, cheap.
Ja 5 DUCKWALL A ROUS*.
QELARLOTTESV JLLLE W 0 0 L L E .V
MILLS.
The high standard of these relcbrniod tnllls Is fu!!f
maintained Lu the
FALL STYLES OF HEAVT WOOLLENS
fox
THE TRADE OF M7I,
with <Jeeldod improvement la finish of ?oci? let
tarns. For sale In RIchtuo'nd by
? THOMAS It. PRICE ? CO
DUCKWALL & ROUSS,
LEVY BROTHERS, ti
oc 3 CARDOZO, FOUKQUREAN A CO. t
J. E. STA-VSliCBY. GEOBGE Arsi>d0>
QTANSBURY & ATKINSON,
O CENTRAL MARKET AND
PROVISION STORE.
We,lhe undersigned,finding the nurkct?*Uo<! <f
Stansbury Jc Atkinson one of the greatest coitc
nlcncea and accommodations to the neighborhood.
saTiug our wives and selves great trouble lu
long distances to market through luclcment seaeor-ss
respectfully petition the honorable Council of the
city of Richmond not to Interfere with the establish
ment of tills and similar local market* In the varl^-i
porta of the city,
Respectfully signed,
R. C. Smith, I). N\ Walker,
R. II. Dlbreli, Wai. Wallace Sous,
0. A. Crenshaw, M. D., John W. Williams,
F. B. Watklns, M. D., 31. Blair,
E. G. Leigh, Armistcud Jk Peei,
Wm. IL Palmer, J. M. rmlstcad,
Charles T. Palmer, James T. Gray,
Ko. A. Paine, K. a. >> iblauw,
John W. Powell, W. S. Robertsou,
K. Talley Hasher, E. Currant,
D. X. Willhuns, Wm. H. Christian,
B. C. Gray, JohnW. Rlsoo.
* Ja S-Jt*
^ RAJRE OPPORTUNITY OFFERS
TO THE LADIES OF RICHMOND.
U
i ? Hating decided to soon discontinue the
... REPAIRING OF LACES
in tills dty, I will, for a reasonable mnuneraiioo.
take in, from the 1st of Janturv, 117?, until tb*
\"'
month of July following, a limited number of LA
DIES for the purpoec of teaching them how to do- t
up and mend and repair their own LACES.
3UtS. J. M. GRANGER,
de ?7 621 Broad itrvce.
JRON, STEEL, Ac.
tso tons BEST ENGLISH and AMERICAN KK
F1MCD IRON, assorted elios;
10 tons SWKEDKS IKON, assorted ?!*?: ...
6 tons NAYLOK'8 CAST 8TEEL-S?iv*ra, ??*?
and Octagon;
1 ton AMERICAN BLISTERED STEEL,
sWe&VES?'
PIG TIN, SPELTER, AC., for?J? . ro
ja 8-eod3w E. A S. WORTHAM A 10
KW HAT STORE.
^gpFOJ^THE HATTER has Just opexwd bS j
<5$ HATS AND CAPS
uiada to order and fitted with the j
Confonaener. *

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