OCR Interpretation


The daily dispatch. [volume] (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, August 20, 1873, Image 3

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024738/1873-08-20/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ut PNESOAV AUGUST 20, 1^3.
fUoi^rtod for the VMspntch.)
,mI>OKTA\T DW IWOX OF THK SI.
i.,ti:ni: <oritT of aiteaks or
^ JIU.1M A
? v.?. T'i' l'l'rj/iwjVi it?<l 7Vmm<.?a"
, Hlltill]h
Ij . Tii rol rnlr 1> Mint n hsci rljrlit to
: i;;<? <?* t<l?'inv. :itnl HiPiAiTnlion* to ll ,ivr
: I(.??<? ii" --ui-li rlfrln w))t>n t1??> ?v?m'Is vlearly
? turn. i*r wIh ii lite court ?io?il>1s ?ti.it fai'^
? ?*. N' lull rri'il lii'in tlic o* iilciuv ilt>*
. ;ri mnMnncc* imdf r whirl* a rnl lr<vi<i own
li.Mi t" the owner or the land through
il runs for ??took Wilted ami injured 1>v :ts
;; jJje case ot Trout ?>?. The Virtriniu and
.siy Kailroad Company. lately deei
' \ tin' Court of ApihmU at Wytiieville,
!.>v\ioi; i* tli?* *ub*tanceof tlit* opinion
i ui \ tl'lnt r. d by Moncure, 1\;
? i- a <->?} i r<rdt a.< to a judgment of the
I'outt of Koiiioke ??ounty, rendered
!h<ii ?>i rre*pi** on the rase brought
. pI.i>ni*tl in ? rt'T. Trout, against tin1
?;,!aui* in ? nor. the Virginia and Ten
? Ka:it'".id Company, to recover dam
: Hie destruction ol two marcs and
\ el a hor*e belonging to the plain*
? . railroad of the defendant*, alleged
\ !. i p. rained hy the negligence and
,?[ ;li.' defendant*, their servants
?]?*. nr driv ing and runniiu; their en -
- ;i!ul coaches on said nil road in said
i "*"I> plea in the ea*e was " not
oi?. which i*stie was joined, and the
. wa* tri"i b\ a jury. Four vvitntsses
i-vtiiiiuni in Mialf ol the plaintiff,
.!?n- fh. plaintiff himself, mid live
>5;f!i <?! tin- defendants. The evi
l'iMti? lullv heard, the defendant.*
.ti .i (lemriiier thereto. The plaintitl
.1 to loining in tie' demurrer, tml the
\ t n tiled tin- objection and rcmi.lred
do *:?. wbi'ii lie according', did.
? j|m- i 11 r y found a verdvt tortile
and as*e-*ed hi* daie.-i-jes j., {>?>
! with intet??>? a' the rate of *ix
? ?.?ii!mil pi r annum the,trom the'.uh
\ \ i mher, 1 ssl^ t',1 pijd, siihjee: to the
'??ti ot the court i'pt>n the demurrer to the
r.v. The e WJ> ,,j j}?, opinion
?' evidt'" lV w;i, not >titlicietit in law to
in tb' j?*ue joined oil tin- part of the
' '.itid uvoniiii.'l} ^ive judijmenf for
'' n iiint*. To tliat j'.idgment the super
it-M! slid w.i> awanh d hv tliiseouit.
I;, p! titif ill. in hi* petition for a super
. , i:ipl:oti? that the judgment i* ern?
.!> r<*paet* only?viz . l*t. In re
?:_? " ; l iintitV to join in the demurrer
? ? . ? !? ti-f; and.'Jdly. In *u*tatning the
v i i <i- mtirrer. And,
I ?-?. We are of opinion that the court did
. : in it?juitin^ the pidntiff !*> join in
?I'tiitirrer to i xidenee. The decision*
? ? ; - i mrt on tlii< stilj-ef, which are nti
;-oiK and nio*t ot whieh were cited hy
>un-? 1 i-?r i lie <!< fendant* in error, plain
- u w hat i- the general rule, and what
?: ? e\(i ptiori.* t?? it. (Here the Court
? \-.i tin authorities, and then proceed
V!:- ?i- nil rule i*. that a party has a
:? * <!? i:iur to the evidence; and the
. \ ? !'*!?? it are. that he ha* no such right
) ? j. . !*? i? clearly against hitn, or
< ? i' tho court dotihts what facts should
~ ? ? ' iv ' ( iii!? i ted from the evidence dc
r;. i! to. ] Kohiinon's 1'r.. old edition,
l'!?> case fall* under the general rule.
: ?? i und? r either ol the exceptions to it.
*i?-.>ndly. We are ot opinion (hat the Cir
. .? .'iiit erred in *u*taining the demurrer
?? t!(??. \ id? nee. (Here the Court *tated Mih
' ' '?:? \ a ! the cudence, andtlieii proceed
'??! tin:*;:
lining stated nil the e\idenccon hotli
? !?* a!ii?Ti m- deem fo he material to the
,|e.i*i ?n ot the ?|ius!ion ari*ing on these
1 :? 1 .i**ignineiit "i error, we now proceed
? > ?'-ider that ?|Ue*tion?-viz.. Whether the
? it ? rn d in sustaining the demurrer to
t \ id? n<-e
I' ? - - not app. ar tint the pi unlitV** horses
'i "'ii the deleiulant'* railroad track hy
1 ? i*"ii oj ?iny tatilr or neglect on his part.
? li < Mitrary rather appears, lie made
id Kept up ;i -oud and *utlicieut fence on
? i ti *idei:| the track from the bridge across
p. ?. r. creek ail the way to the rattle-guard
i' the ue*t i-ud oi hi* land ; and at hi* only
<i" -u;_' oj the tiack in that, whole *jnice he
made ami kept up a sutlicieul gate with
ut fastenings on each sine of the rtil
1: and it does not appear thai he did not
-? <1iii dilueliee to ke? p tin* gate*; hut and
la-'* i ' d. He pa*-ed through andshut them
dm:ii. ti.e same ni^'lit in which his horses
>\i !? killed, hut Im tore the train that killed
in p i?td along llie road. He tia* a riirlit
;*? hi* land ttnou-h which the railroad
;- a* well t??r i?a*ttirade a* lur tillage, and
> a i i>u\? nietit way across the track from
' - ' iiid "ii one side to hi* land on the other
! ?; ii.- pluitation and other purposes (Code,
? i. *ec. 2-. page .'!2T); and there
.- tioiliin- unlawful in his permitting
In- ii.-i^htiors to u*e that way as a mill or
i- .hi>"iiiood road. It hi* horses, durum
tte- niirht. when two of them were killed
?i:. l a third di*ahled hy the engine of dc
!? ndaiii*. irot through one td' the gates and
upon the railroad hy reason of the said gate
h i\ i:u i < ? ii h It ojH'ii hy some person with
out the knowledge or consent of the plain
till, a* was probably the fact, the plaintiff
? aiiiiot .iu*il> be Named therefor.
Mein-r without fault in thi* matter, he had
a li lit to > \pect and require the defendant*
to \?.|-v raivful not to injure Ins horses
ihu* found upon ihi* road: and this give.*
hint a _'icat advantage in thi*controversy.
?'ii the other hand, then* were no eatt If
.Hard* at the plaintiff's ero-sing of the rail
i 'ad. It there had been, the horses could
onlv have cros^'il the road, and could not
!i;;\e none up or dowii upon it ? none ol
them would have been killed or injuied.
The had no riijit to linke these
? liiii-.'iiani.*, at lea*t without theeon*ent ol
the c.? tendiiit*. 7'(cv only had a right to
make them, or permit them to be made.
1 !i? plaintitl" '? u.entiom d to the seetion
iin-ter that there ouullt to be cattle-iruurd*
at the eru*-ing ; who replied that it would
i.e u?e|?**- to apply, as he could not gel
lie in." He tlieretore made no such applica
tion. l he defendant.* knew tnere were uo
eatth-guards there, and that they would be
? I .'teat advantage in preventing injury not
oii;\ to stock w hich might get through one
"i tiie jfale- upon the railroad, but to passeu
-' i* 11a\t-lling over the road.
I! i- unnecessary for lis to decide, and we
do not decide in thi.* case, whether the mere
"im?M"ii to make such cattle-guards was in
|' ' It. *uch negligence on the [Kilt of the dc
lt iidant* a* made them responsible for the
'i ia*age done to the plaintiff in the killing
and ui-aoiing of his horses. Hut we think
Ae iiiiv at ie;i*t *a\ that, not having used
that ob\ iou* precaution, tiie defendants were
iiouud to he \cry carelul not to injure the
I' "i-'t;ll - hor*e*, which were enabled to go
ii "ii the road only because I here were 110
oaltl'-iiuard* at I he crossing.
I hi* being the relative position of the par
ti*-, we now address ourselves to the que*
?i"n*. W heiher. at cording to the settled rules
ot law which govern the court in ils deci
sion upon a demurrer to evidince, and to
wiiich we ha\e already referred, there wits
ii ne^ii?t nee on the part of the defend
ant*, I heir *er\aiit*and agents, as made them
I- -| <iit*ihle to the plaintiff for the injury of
which he complains in this action?
Ii we consider the ease in reference only
1" the evidence in behalf of the demurree
and Hie inferences of fuel fairly dedueible
Hierejioui, and so much of the evidence in
heiiali oi i he demurrant a.s is not in eontlict
with the other evidence, which, as we have,
*ceii, i* the true rule 111 Mich cases, then, we
ilnnk, ihere was paljiably such negligence a*
made ihe defendants rcspou*ible.
A ?.cording to the evidence ko to be eon
*iiiejed, Hie plaintitl was at hi* house, some
lin hundred or six hundred yards from the
railroad, when the train passed by during
? he night in which ids horses vveie killed.
Hi* attention was attracted by the constant
*vln*tling of Ihe engine. He thought the
whi*ilmg was ea.*t ol the bridge, lie heard
1'lake,, blown down,and then continuous
'?!n-iliiig. the train did not stop where
Wind mate was Killed, but continued to
?i i*t ie from there, us il it was alter stock,
Mini ii got round the turn ol the hill through
eiji, and then commenced whistling
?liijeii louder and luster ; and tie heard the
'??m stop, which caused hitn 10 go there to
'ewbat. \vu* me matter. There was con
tunwus wHstlUvf from the time Ue first
I1!, 'teast of the bridge until the train got
to I ho cattle-guard, ex,-opt *ome momentary
intervals. He docs not think the speed was
slackened at the point where the blind mare
was killed, but he could not tell. Ue thinks
i?* I hrough at the usual speed, proba
bly a little faster, but could not tell. The train
was about an hour behind time. After tbe
blind mare was killed, and before the train
nMched the top of the grade. the engineer
-aw two or Hirer other horses some one hun
dred and Ally vnrds ahead on the track Hp
blew his; whistle for the purpose of scaring
them ofl lrom the point from which he
bom Mil he reach,,! ,he top of the gnX
^,;rrtm* mo,v ?r ,,um u,,mi h?***
within thirty or forty feet of the ?ittle
guard, Un the next day horses' tracks were
seen on the railroad from the crossing to the
cattle-sward, which indicated that horses had
been running from the time of the near ap
proach of the tram.
It appears that the engineer had ample
tune after seeing the first horse to stop the
engine before reaching the place where that
horse was. He commem-ed whistling east
ot the bridge, no doubt because he saw the
blind mare on the road some two or three
hundred yards ahead.
According to his own admission, he could
have stopped hisengine within that distance
though he wns going ?t the speed of seven
teen ,.r eighteen miles an hour. And so also
he could easily have stopped his engine after
seeing the other horses in full time to have
avoid,-d any injury of them. Instead of that,
he did not slacken his speed, according to
the plaintiff's evidence, from the time he
saw the tirst horse?indeed, from the
time he first blew his whistle on the
<tt-t side of Petei's bridge?until he got
entirely through to the cat tie-guard. Be
ing behind time, bis plan seems to have been
to dash through at fill! speed, whistling all
the wax, and thus scare the horses off the
tirt? k or else throw thnnoff with his engine.
The mare tlmt whs first killed did not move
from the pia,-e where she stood when she
was first seen by the engineer until she was
killed and thrown off the track by the en-j
uine. She was blind, in n decp'cut. and
could not get utl the road, and knew not
where to go nor what to do for safety. It
do.'s not appear that any of her limbs were
broken, nor was she run over by the train,
she was probably killed by the cow-catcher]
and thereby thrown off the track, out
of the way of the train, which con
tinued to go on without interruption.
In regard to the oilier horses,
they were not driven off the track, nor over
taken until they were stopped by the cattle
guards into which, it se?'ui>; they all were
forced and crowded, and where one of them
was killed and another disabled by I lie en
gine. The engineer well knew that therej
was no way of escape from certain destruc
tion to the horses on the track between the
crossing and the cattle-guard, except two
ways, one of which was by.getting ou the
*ide of the track until the train passed them,
and the other was by going out at the draw
bars, supposing that the bars happened to
be dow n at the time. He could not have ex
pected the hor>es to get on the side of the
track until the train passed them. They
were too much frightened for that by
the loud whistling of the engine,
the strong head-light, and the close
pursuit of the train, confined, as the track
was, between two fences, and running, as it
did, through deep cuts and ou embankments.
It was extremely improbable that the bars
would be down, and extremely improper in
the engineer, in so important a" matter, to act
upon the assumption that they were down.
Ue says " he thought when lie reached the
top of the grade and saw uothlng more of
tlie horses that they had gone out into the
plaintiffs field through the bars near the top
of the grade"; but he "does not recollect
that lie noticed that night whether the draw*
bars were opened or closed.'' He says " he
does not think his head-light would
have extended to the draw-bars, which
were about thirty feet from tbe track.'' The
evidence on the part of the plaintiff shows
that they were nearer than that, and could
no doubt have been seen by the engineer if
he had looked that way. lie ought to have
looked that way; and even if he could not
have seen them from the engine, he ought to
have ascertained certainly before he passed
fliein whether they were up or down. No
doubt they were up, and lie would have
a*?cer*ained the fact to 1?h so if he had looked
that way or made an examination. But,
whether up or down, it was his duty, not
seeing or know ing that the horses had made
their escape, to proceed with the train
very slowly from the burs to the cattle-guard,
a distance of .'MO or 400 yards, and thus
have avoided the possibility, as in that way
he would, of injuring the animals. Instead
of that he continued to go on in such speed
that he drove and forced all the remaiuing
horses into the cattle-guard, and killed one
and disabled another of them.
We think that, according to the evidence,
the engineer did not exercise reasonable
and proper care in running the engine to
avoid injury to Hie horses of the plaintiff;
that he was guilty of neglect, and even
gross lieglee', in regard to the same; and
that in consequence of such neglect two of
flic horses were killed and another one was
disabled. Thequestiou now to be consider
ed is. Whether tlie damage thus sustained is
damnum absque injuria or not: whether
the defendants are or are not liable therefor
to the plaintiff't
We think the defendants are so liable.
Their learned counsel, to show the contrary,
relied very much on the case of Kail road
Company vs. Skinner, 1!) IVnn. State Reports
?JOS, also reported in Redfield's American
Railway Cases. .'>47. We find no fault with
the decision of the court in that case nor
'iwilh a great deal of what is said by the
learned judge who delivered the opinion of
the court in the case; but we cannot assent
to what he says in conclusion?to wit ? " We
are of opinion that an owner of cattle killed
or injured on a railway has no recourse to the
eoinpauy or its servants." Surely this lan
guage could not have been intended to be
used in a general sense, but only in connec
tion with the rase before the court, for it
is directly in conflict with admissions con
tained in the same opinion, that a cotnpinv
is answerable " for gratuitous damages," and
" for negligence or wanton injury." At all
events, the conclusion is not true in a gene
ral sense, as is fully shown by theauthorities
referred to by the learned counsel for the
plaintiff. See 1 Redtlcldon the Law of Rail
ways, pp. 471, 474, 475, 477, 403, 4!KS, and
the cases cited, esjiecially Jackson cs. Rutland
and Burlington Railway Company, 2d Ver
mont. 130; and Central Ohio Railway Com
pany vs. Lawrence, til Ohio, N. S., C(>, the
observations of the court iu which case ap
pear to be very reasonable.
But the cases just cited from the Pennsyl
vania, Vermont, and Ohio reports were all
cases in which the animals destroyed or in
juied were all at the time going at large by
the neglect of the owner. If in such cases
the agents of a railroad company are bound
to exercise reasonable and proper wire in
running their engines to avoid injury to ani
mals on the track, a fortiori arc they bound
in such a case as the one now under consid
eration, in which the plaintiff was guilty of
no neglect in regard to his horses get
ting on the railroad; in which, when
they got upon the road, they were graz
ing upon his own land, through which
the railroad ra n, as it was lawful
for them to do; in which he had used
eveiy reasonable precaution to prevent them
from getting on the road by erec.iDg and
keeping up good fences and good gates, and
providing proper fastenings for the gates;
and in which they got through one of the
gates and ui>on the road, in the night time,
and without his default. Two of these
horses having been killed and another dis
abled in consequence of the neglect of the
engineer of the defendants in not exercising
reasonable aud proper care in running the
engine to avoid such injury, we tire clearly
of opiuion that the defendants are liable to
the plaintiff for the damage thus sustained
by bin).
We do not inctiu to "decide, because the
question does uot arise in this case, whether
and to what ex.cut and under what circum
stances a railroad company is liable lor
damage done to stock which happens to be
upou the railroad at the time by the default
ol' the owner of such stock. It will be time
enough to decide that question when it
arise;*. We mean only to decide that in this
case, in which the horses of the plaintitf
when they were killed and disabled hap
pened to be upon ibe delendauta' railroad
, ' -i . ? ?>.. ...
Without any default on the part of the]
owner, the defendants were bound to etfer*
else reasonable and proper iaire in running
their engine to avoid Injury to the wild
horses ; thut tliey neglected to u*e such rea
sonable and proper rare, In consequence of
which the damage was done of which the I
plaintiff complains; and that therefore he
has a right to recover in this action. j
If there be any public prejudice against
railroad companies in controversies of this
kind which tends to prevent them from ob
taining Justice, as 1* sometimes said to be
the case, it can hardly 1?e necessary to sav
that certainly this court does not partici
pate in any degree in such prejudice. Rail
roads are of great public utility, and indeed
are now indispensable as means of travel
and of commerce. Those who construct
them ought to be regarded as public bene
factors; and at all events their owners are
entitled to have their just and equal rights
secured to them by law and by the action of
courts and juries. They are charged with
the duty of carrying safely the passengers J
whose lives are intrusted to their care, and I
as they are held by law to a strict account a-1
bility for the faithful discharge of this duty, I
which is one of inirumount importance, they j
ought not to be prevented from properly
performing it by having to use means to
avoid injuring cattle which may happen to
be ut>on the road.
Hut subject to this paramount duty of tak
ing care of the passengers under their
charge, it is also their duty to be careful to
avoid injury to stock which may happen to
be upon their road, at least when there with
out the default of the owner of such stock.
Fortunately tor all parties concerned, the
means proper to be u?ed to avoid injury to
audi stock are generally the best means that
can be used for the safety of the passengers.
\Ve are of opinion that-the judgment of I
the Circuit Court is erroneous and ought to
be reversed, and judgment rendered lor the j
plaintiff on the demurrer to evidence.
Petersburg;.
A it ARK ENTERTAINMENT?GOOD SECURITIES? I
colon hi. r. \v. nu?HKS?stpdkn dkatu of a J
YOI'NO LADY?MAN PBRlUlSLY lNJlTRKO?I
WIIAT WHISKKY WILL MARK A MAN 1)0, AC.
[Correspondence of the Hiehinond Dispatch.J
Petersburg, August 1!), IST.'J.
A number of young ladies and gentlemen
of this city propose giving :tii entertainment I
at the Academy of Music, at an early day.
for the purpose of raising funds to aid in
the erection of a monument to the memory I
of Coloiicl .Joseph V. Scott; the highest rank
ing onicer from this city that fell in the late
war. A literary gentleman of this city is I
preparing a comedy of local hits to be acted
upon this occasion.
Mr. A. K. Aikins, recently appointed col
lector of city taxes in place or the late Mr.
Farrell, will present to the Common Council
to-morrow evening (a special meeting hav
ing been called for that purpose) his bond
with the following endorsers; Alex. Don
nan. Thomas .1. Gates, Wm. M. Tappcv,
W C. Lumsden, Alex. Steel, J.C. Smith,
and Hugh K. Smith. Better securities could
not have been obtained in this citv.
Colonel Robert \V. Hughes was in this
citv to-day, on his way lrom Jerusalem to I
Richmond. During his stay here lie was the
guest of lion. K. U. Greene.
The magniticent farm belonging to the I
estate of the late Charles Friend was ottered
at auction to-day, but was not sold-thc
highest bid offered being ?11) per acre.
Miss Julia Davis daughter of Mr. W imam
Davis, who resides in Dinwiddie county,
about three miles from this city, dropped j
dead suddenly la>t night. Just before the
fatal stroke she remarked to her mother that I
she felt as if her heart was on the point ol
leaping from her body. She then tell upon
a bed and expired immediately. Miss Davis
was between seventeen and eighteen years
of age.
This afternoon John Cbisell (colored), the I
street commissioner, and James h rev (al>o J
colored) were thrown from a buggy on Long
Market street, in consequence ot the break-1
in" of an axle-tree. Chisell clung to the
reins, and was dragged by the horse, which
took fright, over the pavement about two j
hundred yards when he succeeded in check
in"-the animal, lie is very seriously injured. I
A white man jumped in the river to-day
to re-cue a bottle ot whiskey, aud narrow 1} I
escaped drowning. , .
Dinwiddie court convened to-day, but no
business of interest to your readers was
transacted. The ease of Jim Coleman
(colored), charged wit h the murder of \\ yatt
Smith (also colored) while the latter was
stealing tobacco-plants trom him, did not
come up, as was expected. Robin Adair.
From Cumberland Counlj*.
[Correspondence or the Hiclnnond lMspaU-li.J
Ca Ira, Va., August 19,187?..
This community has been refreshed re
cently bv frequeut showers of ram, which
have" improved the crops ot tobacco and
corn very much. The farmers think now
that an average crop ot tobacco will be
10 John M. Ilamontrce, who escaped from
the Cumberland jail, has been captured, aud
relodged to finish hi* visit in the jail trom
which he escaped so mysteriously.
The nominees ot the Richmond Conven
tion take well here, and we will do our best
to elect them this fall.
The Baptists are carrying on a protracted
meeting at Tar Wallet (a chinch noted lor
| its large crowds), with good results.
There is a great deal ot chills and lever in
I this county. " Once-in-Awhilk.
A YAM-ABU: rNVBNTION? A NfcW Pke?s
which I'mnts 22,000 Pai-kks an Hui-r?Im
PUOVKMKNTS MAI)B.?Zo/<f/ort, .111]v 81.?For
fifteen years Mr. Hot'and Mr. Conquest, the
London manager of Mr. Hoe's works, have
been endeavoring to perfect a " Perfcefin"
Printing Machine/' and tliev liavc at las?
succeeded. The last difHeultv which stood
in their way?the perfect deliverv of the
printed sheets from the press?was only r?
eently surmounted. Now their machine, in
their belief, is perfect; and that it is per
fect. aNo in the opinion of others mav
tie judged bv the fact that the proprietors of
the Daily Telegraph decided to-day to have
ten of tin se new machines immediately con
structed for them, and to have them placed
in the new offices which they are about to
erect in the rear of their present premises.
The ten machines can he constructed in
about ten months; and in a year from this
time the Daily Telegraph, with its " largest
circulation in the world," will be printed
upon presses each one of which will be ca
pable of delivering twenty-two thousand
completed sheets per hour ! Does not that
take your breath away?
This new press seems to be an improve
ment upon the Walter, the Bullock, the
Marronetti, and all the other perfecting ma
chines in existence. One of its peculiarities
is the width of its cylinders?for they are
so wide that each cylinder will print two
copies at once?the roll of paper being made
double width, and the paper being cut in
two by a very ingenious device immediately
before it is delivered. Another peculiarity
is the perfect manner in which the perfected
sheets are delivered. They are laid down
in piles so accurately that one would
think the sheets had been put into
a press and trimmed. The Walter press,
on wnich the Times and Scotsman are print
ed, compels the pressmen to change the
blankets once in each two hours?this one
needs no such chance. The whole force
necessary to each of these presses is two
men and a boy?with them 22,000 perfect
copies are printed in one hour; and the
saving of wages as between this and the or
dinary ten-cylinder Hoe is as 15. to 84.
The only one of these presses now com
plete has been built for Lloyd's weekly
newspaper; and to-day at Lloyd's paper
mills at Bow its performances" were wit
nessed by a number of experienced news
jwper people, among them the proprietor
and engineer of the Daily Telegraph establish
ment. The press did the work it was engaged
to do; It printed 22,000 copies of Lloyd's
paper in sixty minutes, and never was there
better printing. The cost of the press is
?3,500; the leu ordered by the Daily Tele
graph will cost ?35,000; and the engines
aud other machinery for them will bring the
sum up to $200,000 in gold. The present
establishment of the Daily Telegraph is
about as perfect as need be, but it is all to be
thrown aside for these new presses, which,
although costing so much, will, in the opinion
of the owneis of the paper, save them
1 ggggsgg?
a yeiir,^ja^Rtrimrafflsge of en
abling them to j?o to press at 3 o'clock In the
morning Instead of at 12 M. In a word, if
this new machine realty proves to be what
it seems, it will become a necessity Jto everv
great newspaper establishment.?iVcic York
World. ;? .
The Aeronaut on tbc Water.
Mr. Donaldson started on Saturday, on a
trial trip to Long Branch, in a canoe which
Professor Wise and himself are to tike in
their larger boat in their proposed transat
lantic. balloon excursion. The canoe is four
teen feet in leneth and two feet four Inches
in width, in constructed of paper three
eighths of an Inch in thickness, and weighs
only sixty-eight pounds. Mr. Donaldson
paddled the canoe from the foot of White
hall street to Governor's Island. He then
hoisted saiI and started for Sandy Hook;
but on reaching Staten Wand he f oncluded
to pass the night there. He accordingly drew
up his craft on the shore, and wrapping his
blanket? around him, used the canoe as a
couch. He continued his voyage yesterday
morning, without accident, stopping at Co
ney Island and Red Hook, and landing in
front oi the Ocean Hotel at 4:30 P. M. As
the canoe approached the shore she was re
ceived by hundreds of promenaders on the
bluffs. She was bandied with great skill,
and rode the water like a sea-bird. As she
approached the shore a boy sprang into the
water to guide her through the surf, which
was very high; but in spite of his efforts she
was rolled over by a Inrge wave just as she
struck the beach, and the voyager was
thrown into the shallow water.?Ncto York
Tribune.
Missionaries fob China.?Miss Lottie
Moon, of Virginia, missionary under the
Board of Foreign Missions Southern Baptist
Convention, started ye-b-rJay morning for
China, with Miss Safford, of the Presbyterian
Church. The missionaries will sail from San
Francisco on the 1st. of September. The
ladies went to New York to take the train
for Sao Francisco. Two missionaries of the
Presbyterian Church, Rev. Messrs. Davis
and l'ainter, of Vinriniaand North Carolina,
will join the ladies in New York, and accom
pany them to China.?Baltimore Sun, VJth.
Improved Medium of Artificial Light for
tub Eves.?[New York Tribune.]? The
painful effect of some of the most usual
kinds of artificial light upon the eyes is well
known, even to mattv whose natural vision is
quite unimpaired. This Is attributed by re
cent investigators to the great proportion of
really non-luminous rays, or rays of mere
caloric bearing no illumination, which it
contains. It is Claimed to be demonstrated,
by accurate analysis, that In sunlight then
are 50 per cent, of such ravs, In gaslight
nearly 00, in electric light 80, and in kero
sene light as many as !)4. Without vouch
ing lor the eutire correctness of these figures,
the announcement lately made is worth re
peating?namely, that a German chemist
named Londsberg professes to have disco
vered that by passing any kind of artificial
light through a thin layer of alum or mica
these caloric rays are absorbed, while the illu
minating power of the true light rays is un
diminished and becomcs exceedingly mild
and pleasant to the evo.
Concerning the Restoration of Found
Property.? [From the Philadelphia Ledger.]
The moral obligations resting upon the
tinder of lost property are generally lost sight
ol' when the interest of the tinder happens
to conflict too strongly with his principles.
A tradesman writes to a contemporary that a
customer in his shop recently found a small
sum of money, whereupon a controversy at
once aro*e as to who it belonged to. One
claimed that the money, if not called for in
a certain time, should he handed over to the
shop-keeper in whose place it was found:
hut another claimed that it belonged to the
person who had found It. No?v, the ques
tion put to the editor was, Who has a legal
right to the money ? The editor very pro
perly answered that the money belonged
neither to the finder nor to the shop
keeper, but to the loser, and that, instead
of waiting for it to be called for, the
tinder should advertise it and take all
possible pains to discover the owner. There
is u good deal of loose reasoning on this sub
ject of finding lost articles, and also on the
subject of rewards for restoring them, but
the sound doctrine is to always do as you
would be done by?to take pains to restore
I he h)st article to its rightful owner. As to
the law of the subject, neither the finder
nor the shop-keeper should delay the work
of restoration by any quarrel about present
custody. Goods or money found upon the
public highway may be held by the tinder
against everybody but the rightful owner ef
the property, unless some statute declares to
the contrary. Goods or money found on
private premises may be held by the owner
of the premises against everybody but the
rightful owner of the lost pro[?erty. Thus
it will be seen that in any event where pro
perty is h>st by accident is concerned the
owner comes in ahead of every one else.
A Fine Sehmon.?On hist Saturday morn
ing ltev. >1. tJ. Michelbacher, of Richmond,
preached a sermon in the synagogue on
Union street to a larire and attentive audi
ence. Ilis remarks Were based upon the
divine injunction "Love your neighbor."
The sermon was delivered in German, and
displayed a depth of tbought, a thoroughness
of research, and a richness of expression rarely
listened to. We regret our lack of time to
furnish a translating of the outlines of this
master cflbrt.?retershurg Appeal.
One of the most notable, as well a* most
marked, personage# in the Convention is
I (iener.il Early?"old Jubal Early," as every
[ one here ealls him, either affectionately or
otherwise. Early is,'however, still very
popular among his old soldiers, and when
he first spoke in the Convention yesterday
lie was greeted with wild shouts of applause,
lie looks like an old patriareh?bent and
.stooping with the weight of years, walking
slowly with the aid of a short cane, his full
white beard flowing full over his breast, he
looks like u Kip Van Winkle waked a little
before his time. The old man's head is quite
linld, jiHt fringed with gray, and, surrounded
by younger and stalwart men, he was a con
spicuous figure in the Convention. Close to
him, however, where you can catch the gleam
of his keen, bright eye, you see that it Hashes
and lightens with all the lire of youth, and
that there is a large store of physical energy
and vital force yet in reserve. The old Gen
eral wears a plain suit of homespun gray,
the Confederate color slightly relieved, and
is constantly surrounded in the hotel and at
I he Convention with a group of hisadmiring
followers. Early speaks slowly and with
evident effort, which deprives the listener
of pleasure, jet with a good deal of effect
on the audience. Yesterday he was ap
pointed chairman of a committee to invite
Geueral Joseph E. Johnston to a seat in the
Convention, and his report a few hours later
showed how young and unregenerute with
loyalty is his heart. "General Job us ton
could not stop with us," he said," but there's
no harm done, for it gave us boys a chance
to give the old hero an old-fasbionid Con
federate cheer as he passed through the
city.*' And then the Convention took up the
cheer and repeated it enthusiastically for
both Early and Johnston. General Fitzhugh
Lee, the cavalry commander, and nephew of
the commander-in-chief, is also a prominent
figure in the Convention, though his popu
larity is derived, of course, to a great extent
froui his uncle. His personal appearance is
in no wise striking or impressive. Youthful
he appears, about thirty-five, of medium
height and weight, a full face, a round head,
thick auburn nair; there is nothing com
manding or effective in his presence and
bearing, and he would never be noticed in a
crowd. His speech, nominating Colonel
Withers for Governor, was, however, a tine
effort, graceful in compliment, temperate in
language, and effective in arguuieut.?Rich
mond Letter.
Social Responsibilities.?A gossipy book,
just published in London, entitled "Court
and Social Life iu Frauce under Napoleon
III," bus an anecdote of the late Jiuiperor,
vvbicb, if true, is very umeb to bis credit. A
" Code Napoleonof *ucb maxims as Louis
Napoleon is said to have propounded iu tbis
iutlauee would work a great reform iu tbe
matter of defining tbe responsibility of intro
ducing '? distinguished strangers." Wbile
Napoleon was in London 4< waiting bis des
tftrr be was watched hv French diplomatic
detectives. Three of ,the?e elevated gen
tlemen so far imposed apon the exile that
be Invited them to dinner, asking some
of bis English friends to meet them.
.After dinner the subject of horses ctme up,
and the conversation resulted In the pur
chase of a horse by one of the Frenchmen
from an English officer. The borse was
sent to the place designated, bnt tbe English
gentleman did not get bis money. Pnnce
Napoleon heard of tbe transaction after a
few clays, and immediately sent to the Eng
lishman a check for the price, saying that no
English gentleman should sell a horse at his
table and not be paid for it. u There were
swindlers." he said, " in all countries; but if
they made their way into good society, the
hosts which they deceived must, see that
their other guests did not suffer." If this
were the rule, pretenders and impostors
would soon be at a discount.
It is sometimes thought that Americans
are more easily imposed upon socially tban
any other nation. This is probably a mis
taken notion. An adroit ro^ue, who well
lays his plans, may succeed for a while in
any country, but more especially at water
ing-places and other fashionable public re
sorts. If tbe parties who gave them coun
tenance were held accountable, the rogue's
progress would be less easy. There is a
way to meet strangers with courtesy and
yet not indorse them. Undue reserve and
chilliness is not necessary, but due caution
is always to be observed, and no man or wo
man of proper culture and refinement will
resent the wisdom which declines to admit
them into confidence without proper vouch
ers or previous knowledge.?Philadelphia
Ledger.
William H. Linkins is appointed postmas
ter at Vicar's Switch, Montgomery county,
Va., vice Henry C. Russell, resigned. Charles
H. Wollz is appointed postmaster at Alle
ghany Springs, Montgomery county, Va.,
vice Miss Ellen M. Pickett, removed for
cause.
Tbe Challenger expedition has discovered
a desert in the bed of the ocean. It is a red
clay zone extending from theCanary Islands
to the the West Indies. It is :i lifeless track,
whose origin is yet a perplexity. Very soon
we will doubtless have fifty plausible scien
tific explanations of the phenomenon.
Czzerdook's trial postponed to October.
MACHINERY. Ac.
jyjACHLNERY Fojj SALE.
One 25 horse-power PORTABLE ENGINE and
BOILER,
* 'hi* "it horse-power PORTABLE ENGINE ami
UUll.Kit,
One 12 horse-power PORTABLE ENGINE and
ROII,KK,
One k lioiM'-puwcr PORTABLE ENGINE and
boiler.
Three 10 horse-power STATION' A R Y ENGINES, I
? >ne 0 horse-power STATIONARY ENGINE.
One3 horse-power STATIONARY ENGINE,
One 18 horse-power UPRIGHT BOILER,
One 10 horse-power UPRIGHT BOILER,
One PORTABLE GRIST-MILL, lour feet burr
stones;
One Fav ,fc Wood's DIMENSION PLANER,
twenty-four feet carriage.
AM the above are In perfect running order and are
as (rood :is new, and will be sold low and on easy
terms. Applv to GEORGE B.SLOAT,
Nos. 14'Jii. 1421, 142.",. 142* 1430. and 1432 Cary
street, ami Nos. 13 and 15 f-outli Flfteeuth street,
nu 0-2W*
I
ANE & BODLEY, ?
j
COHNEK JOHN AND WATER STBKETS,
CINCINN A T1,
manufacturers of STATIONARY and PORTA
BLE ?T HAM-ENGINES, CIRCULAR SAW
MILLS, with solid Iron frames, friction free,
wroiight-lron head-blocks, with automatic dogs.
Our head-blocks are perfectly accurate, and will
set by fractions of one-sixteenth of an inch. Self
Feeding Lath-Machines, Bolting, Edging and Cut
Oil' Saws.
SHAFTING,
Ball-and-Sockot ndjustlble Hangers, Pulleys of
uniform weight, compressed Couplings, and Gear
ing of any face, diameter, or pitch. Scud for Cata
logue. LANE A BODLEY,
corner John ami Water streets,
my 30-M,W,F&wem Cincinnati. Ohio.
W
IL LI AM E. TANNER & CO.,
METROP0L1TAN WORKS,
CANAL 8TIIEET FltOM BLXTIl TO SEVENTH,
manufacturers of
ENGINES, BOtLKKS,
KAW-MtLLS. BAKK-HILLH,
OHIST-MIU..S, ri^ASTEIt-MlLLS,
GAS MACIIIN EltY, MILL-OKA III NO.
Stonk< pttkhs' tools, Including UUSH-HAM*
MKits of ail sizes, Ac.
R KI'A IK-WOKK solicited.
Freights to all (mints low.
Send for circular. oc 4
DEXTINTRY.
T^H. JUD. B. WOOD
has returned to the city.
Office No. 5 Ninth stkeet, two doors above
Main. an 20-lw
JOHN M Alio N Y,
DENTIST,
(FOKMKBI.Y OK WAYT & MA1IONY.)
Office, 625 Main street, between Sixth and Seventh.
fjv 1-eodamJ
.JOHN G. WAYT, I). P. if. G EO. G. WAYT, D. D. .S M. IJ.
^yAYT & SON*,
DENTISTS,
No. 104 Ninth stukkt, Richmond, Ya.
fjy l4-3m|
irRNITIIRI-AC.
Having e n i> a rg k i> my
house and increased my stock 1 am now
nil-pand to furnish 1'ARL?>r MJITS I mui f {fl
ifcOo to +.100 ; CHAMBER SUITS lroiu*2* to u;
LOUNGES of every description at reduced prices;
M ATTKES^FS of my own man ufiicl tire. lTphol
storing and Furniture"repaired: Chairs cane-sealed.
All goo<ls delivered free In tin-city limits. Call and
see me Jteforc purchasing elsewhere.
JAMES E. BKAG'L
an l<-3t* 201, Second and Broad streets.
T AM NOW FILLING UP WITHgk
-L FURNITURE of every deacrlpllou niy Ws
whole house, four floors?two over one huu-y
drt-d feet de?i>?which I am selling on reasonable
term-,and at reduced prices: Chamber Suits from
$2i to *.5u, Parlor from >rt5J to *30i, Walnut Lounges
of my own manufacture, Mattresses Feather Reds.
Upholstering, repairing, chairs cane-seated. Goods
delivered free in the city. J. L>. GaTEWOCII,
au 7-ani 310 Broad street.
I FURNITURE, FURNITURE, FURnT
TURE.?On hand and lauding per New York
steamer ?20,000 WORTH OF FURNl'l URE
of all descriptions, all of No. l quality, which I offer
for sale bv weekly or monthly lii'taluicuts?as cheap
as cau be bought In the city lor cash.
WILLIAM DAFFRON,
au 5-1 in No. 143S Main street.
/iREAT REDUCTION IN THE PRICE
U OF
CHAMBER,
PARLoR, and
DIN ING-ROOM FURNITURE,
until the 1st of Septemiier. Examine our stock be
fore buying. HAR WOOD A RITTER.
Jy 30-tSeptl Governor street, Richmond, Va.
DAIL\ REC'EIVIMt AND FUR- ff\
NISHING CHAMBER. PARLOR and PL
1?ISING-ROOM FURNITURE. HB|
Flue solid WALNUT, PAINTED,* fi
&TA1NED. and UPHOLSTERED GOODS.
MATTRASSES and BEDDING, of my own man
ufacture.
All of large stock at wholesale prices during sum
mer mouths.
ARTHUR RODNEY,
Warerooms, Governor and Franklin streets,
Jv 7 Richmond, Va.
QFFICE OF TIIE SHILLINGEK
ARTLF1CIAL-STON E PA YEMEN T
KOB TUB
STATE OF VIRGINIA,
NO. 912 MAIN STREET, RICHMOND, VA.
We are now prepared to lay down th?? above
named (lavement in the most artistic manner,and
in any design, pattern, or color desireo, and at a
cost far less liuiu that of flagging. We will also lay
court-yards, art as, cellars ol houses, floors of sta
bles, (tc^ueliig the celebrated English Portland ce
ment. thereby iusurlug great durability, entire free
dom from dust, smoothness of surlUcc, and beauty
of ttnlah, .to. . J ,
Parries wishing the above work done will please
applylmmediately, as this Is the most suitable time
of the year to nave the work done iu.
Couuty rights for sale.
Orders received at the otHce, 912 Main street.
tet-im I- B- TKRRKSdk CO
Book and job pk in ting neatly
DUNE AT THJS OFFIOK.
meeabtcii n?iwrtB(lrT?rBg.
|?0E NEW YORK.?The Olijsgggt,
M. Dominion stmmihip Company'# c!^--5wwew
mint <n#aim9htp WYA NOKE, Captain COUCIl, w)!l
sail FRID\Y. Angnst 22(1, ? 2 O'clock P. M. Posi
tively no freight received after 1 P. M.
Through hTiia of lading signed, and poods icr*
wsxded with dispatch to all points north, s mth.
east, and west, Close connections made with Canard
Line for foreign porta. Passenger accommodation*
unsurpassed. Farts #13; steerage, ; roond-trlp
tickets, #2n. For freight or paraig*. apply to
OEORGE W. ALLEN A. CO.. Aeent*.
an 2Q-at Company's Wharf. Rocketts.
]?OR BALTIMORE.
POWHATAN STEAMBOAT COMPANY.
Steamer STATIC OF MARTI,AND will leave her
w>arf on SATURDAY at 12 o'clock M.
Freight received up to ill o'clock a. M. Saturday.
For rn:lcht apply to
an '-'0-11 W. p. BRETT, Agent.
t?UR PHILADELPHlA.?
? The steamer J. S. GREEN, Oplalngfiftftfl
Pi. ATT, will receive frelsnt for the above port till
THURSDAY the 21st Instant at 12 o'clock.
Freight taken for Boston, Providence, and New
Orleans, also for Antwerp ami Liverpool rla Red
Swr mill American Steamship Lines, aud bills of
lading signed through.
Passage to Philadelphia, including meals and
stateroom, 410. W. P. PORTER, Agent,
an 50-2t No. iUit) Dock street.
T> a 1 L A D K L P HI A.
1 MONO. AM) NORFOLK STEAH-SkMbRB
SHIP LINK?FOR PHILADELPHIA TWICE A
WEEK?The steamers of this line will leave Rich
mond every MONDAY and THURSDAY at 12
o'clock M.. and Philadelphia every WEDNESDAY
and SATURDA Y at the same hour.
Freight? received dally (Sundays except?!) for all
parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware,
also for Charleston. Savannah, and New Orleans,
and hills of lading signed through.
Freight taken for Norfolk at moderate rates.
Passage to Philadelphia, Including meals and
stateroom, fw. W. P. PORTER, Agent.
No. 24ii."> Dock street, Richmond.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE A CO., Agents,
No. l'-i South Wharves,
jv is No. 14 North Wharves. Philadelphia.
TAMES RiVEli STEAMBOAT^HtBL,
'J COMPANY.
DAILY LINE FOR
NEW YORK, I'HILADKLPIITA, BALTIMORE,
NORFOLK. PORTSMOUTH, AND REGU
LAR LANDINGS ON JAMES RIVER.
ALSO,
VUE ok i/EAU and old point hotels.
CARRYING UNITED STATES MAIL AND
ADAMS EXPRESS.
On ami alter Mav sth. lsia. tliin rompaov will run
h DAILY LI NF. (Sundays excepted;, consisting of
their fast and elegant steMmers
JOHN* SYLVESTER. CAPTAIN A. Post:
ELIZA HANCOX. Captain Z. C. Gikfoud:
leaving Richmond at. 6 A. M. aad arriving here ai
4 P. M.
Passengers make sun; connection at Norfolk with
?ay Line for Baltimore, Phlladelplda, and New
York.
Fare to Norfolk 2 60
Faro to Norfolk and return 4 oo
Fare to Baltimore 8 CO
Fare to Philadelphia 0 50
Fare to New York 13 50
Fare to Vue tie l'Eau or Old Point.... 2 60
Faro to Vuedc l'Eau or Old Point and
return i oo
Tickets on sale on steamer* aud at Garlier & Co.'s
Ticket Agency, ??26 Main btrect. Baggage checked
through. Freight received dally for B??lon, Nor
folk and Portsmouth, and regular landings on
James river, from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M.
Freight for way-landings must lie prepaid.
L. B. TATUM. Geueril Agent.
Otllce: Company's wharf, Rocketta; branch of
tlce, Ninth and Main streets. Je 5
SPECIAL NOTLCK.-Sttttmeiv
0 SYLVESTER Is withdrawn for ?r
few days for repairs, consequently steamer leaves
MONDAY. WEDNESDAY, and F.KIDAY until
further notice. L. B. TATUM,
au 10 General Agent.
1 N M A N LIN E OF MAIL
X STEAM E ItS.
FOR LIVERPOOL AND OUEENST*>V\ N.
SAILING FROM NEW YORK EVERY THURS
DAY AND SATURDAY.
R ATES OF PASSAGE?l'AYAHI.E t.v GOLD :
First Caf)ln $85 and tioo
To Loudon no and 185
To Paris l(w and 1H
To Hamburg, Antwerp, etc.. 96 and no
Payable tn Cuhre.ncy?Outward Pfpaid:
Steerage?Liverpool, )
London, > $30 and i<3;
Queenstown, etc., J
Hamburg, Havre, ) -r ,
Antwerp, Rotterdam, ( 3j unn 3S
For further inioriuatlon, apply at the Company's
office, in lilchmond.
GEORGE W. ALLEN A CO.,
ap 12 Old Dominion Steamship Company.
N
ATIONAL LINK
STEAMERS.
WEEKLY TO QUEENSTOWN AND LIVER
POOL. FORTNIGHTLY TO 1.ON DON
(DIRECT), FROM PIERS 44
AND 47 NORTH RIVER,
NEW YORK.
These steamships are the largest In the trade.
Cabin passage, *80. *9., and * 100; excursion. fcltk
and tiso (currency): steerage. *29. Pirpaid steer
age tickets from Liverpool, Queenstown, London
derry, Glasgow, Cardiff, Bristol, or Loudon.cheaper
than' by any other route. For further Information
apply to F. W. J. HURST,
til) Broadway, New York; or
GEORGE W. ALLEN &. CO., Agents,
ap 23 Richmond. Va.
^NCllOK LLNE STEAMERS.<g|??
SAILING FROM NEW YORK
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
RATES:
CABIN PASSAGE?PAYABLB IN OOI.D.
To Liverj)ool, Glasgow, Londonderry, or
(Queenstown $75 and $8? I
To Loudon Mo ami 7o
To Paris 90 and (to
To Havre, Hamhuw, Antwerp 90 and DO
To Bremen, Gothenburg, Clirlstiania,
Ac 95 and H5
N. It.?Cabin rates for Wednesday's stcamets pay
able in currency.
STKKUAOK?PAYABLE IN CL'KItENCY.
Glasgow, Liverpool, Queenstown, or
Londonderry, to +30 from >j?2
I (amburg. Havre, Antwerp, to 35 from 36
Bremen. Gothenburg, Ac., to 3d from 40
Passengers oookeu to and from railway stations
or seaports in England, Ireland. Scotland. Norway,
Sweden, Denmark. Germany, France, Holland, Bel
gium, and the United States.
Passengers booked dikkct from Palermo, Genoa,
Messina,amlTrtesteto Nmw York.
For further in for mat ion apply to
HENDERSON BROTHERS,
7 Bowling Green, N. Y.,or
GEORGE W. ALLEN & CO., Agents,
Old Dominion Steamship Company, Rocketts.
ap 17
1
7*0K NKW YOKK.-OLI) LM)
_ MINK) N ST E A MSI 111' COM PA N Y..
The side-wheel steamships OLD DOMINION',
WYANOKE, ISAAC BELL. SARATOGA, NI
AGARA, ALBEMARLE, and II ATT ERAS leave
Ne* York for Norfolk. City Point, and Richmond
. very TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY
at 3 o'clock P. M.
Leave Richmond every TUESDAY, FRIDAY,
and sUNDAY at high tide.
These ships are entirely new. They have elegant
saloons, state-rooms, and bath-rooms.
The fare, accommodations, and attention are un
surpassed.
Freights for points lieyond New York forwarded
with dhpateh, and no charitc made except actual
expenses Incurred.
Close connections made with steamers lor all
southern and European ports.
For further information, apply to
GEORGE W. ALLEN & CO., Agents
office Company's wharf, Rocketts.
Captain Gkokok \V. ALLEN.
John F. Maykk.
DUI'tiS, MKDH im Af.
rru physicians.
Our supply of
NON-UUMANIZKD vaccine VIKUS
Issuspended during hot weather. We will order It
and have a fresh article whenever desired.
?I. blair. &35 Broad street,
a?ent for Vaccine Department
au 14 New York Dlsijennary.
inn OUNCES SULPII. QUININE.
lWV/ an 12 L. WAGN'EK, Pruwlst.
^JINEKAL WATERS.
allkghany,
white SULl'liur.
HE a LINO,
rockbridge ALUM, ?
blue LICK.
OA PON SI'KING,
congress,
getser,
o ? frederickshall BITTKR.
Supplies received direct. For sale at wholesale
and retail by I'UKCELL, LAI)I> A CO.,
au 4 Agents Virginia Springs Water*.
rjUJE HOME-MADE TKUSS.
Having received the agency of the IIOME-M AI)E
TKUsSS. I am prepared to furnish ail who are in
want. It Is the moat <X>MF< >KTA BLE aixl OUBA
BI.E TitUSS in use. as also it is the cheapest.
Kvery truss warranted to give entire satisfaction,
or the money refunded. For further Information
call at ? Kit A YSEKX Drue fctore,
comer Eighteenth and Franklin streets,
Jy52^>odlm Itichmoud. Va.
YTblTOKS JO THE St*RLN?S> should
have with them FOUGKKA'S ready-MADE
MUSTARD-PL AST KKS?prompt In acting, clean,
and will keep uood in any climate; the improved
WAX K!<*lVr-LIGHTb, or TAPERS, to burn iu
the bed-cbami?r?last eight hours, and are free
from any disagreeable odor. For sale al
MEADE <& BAKER'S Drug Store,
jy Id 919 Main street.
pott INFANTS AND INVALIDS.
KACAHOtiT des AHAntLS, genuine French:
L nemo's Food fok Infants, by Savory & Moore,
London;
LikuiO's Foon Koit Ink a nts, by Nichols, Boston;
Lacteous Faiuna,substitute for mother"* milk;
PHEl'AHED ENOUbU BaHLEY. lu one-pound tin
catui;
* Pit ei*akei> Scotch Oat Meal, it oae-pouod pack
ages:
fc"u?n Bermuda Ahkow-Koot,Tapioca, Saoo,
Ac., Jcu , for sale at
MKAD4 A BAKER'S Drug Store,
jy IS 919 Main street.
Book and Ton work~nkatly j
DON* AX THia 07FIC3. _ J
A*n Wkldow Route, }
GEJTKK4L MATTAOBtt'j) YlyflCI, >
__... Ricimoro, Va., July ?. 1*73. )
T^SwESA188 m TflI8 MOUTE nut
?h? ? w3?ftr?8S.,tt,S
ntSA^.rrota?SBWAfi
RETUUNINO MAIL TRAINS l?.v? Weldon ?t
L4fl A. >1. and 4:lo I*. sr., ana icare I'tttetban at
4:55 A. Al. anil 735 P. M. H *
TheSUNDAYEXWRSTOV T??WS between
Richmond and Petersburg leav? both places at ?
A. IyI. aim! G P. M.
V?H Train* win not rtin on SKNDAYS,
and the 7:.>5 P. M.fflail Train will not leave Prter*
buw on hnmtays, and (Ik? 5 A. 31. Train will not
leave Richmond oil Mondays.
The MAIL TRAINS will not stop between Rich
0ht"ter I efersb?"'K except at Manchester and
Passengers for Norfolk will take the train leav
ing Richmond at 1:20 P. M.
I a^?Kcrs from Clover Hill will leave at t A. M.
?"x%p[ns;:,ssve Kichmyud ??inw i'm- *??>
will take their meals at .farratt's Ho
lio rwJrav,u? I'?te"burp will start from
tn?iVf??,'lnKt?n-Strwt depot.
attached2,?n m P?}j?{\K s*'>?PING-CARS are
atucned to all the Night, Mail Trains.
THOMAS |f. WYNNE,
? " General Manager.
0!
KlCHx.lJ.NL', VUKK RlVtLll AND CHESAPEAKE)
Railroad < 'impamy, >
Richmond. July 21, 1373. )
N AND AFTER THIS DATE PAS
SENGER and FREIGHT TRAINS on this
road will run as lollows:
p,'!w ^'i^n T,1:aI!S for w?fit leaves
Richmond at 3 P. M.. and train from West Point
will arrive at Richmond at 10:30 A. M. c. lly (SUn
dav$ excepted).
The pplernt Id steamer SUE, Captain A.CMckle.
has been placed on the route between Went Point and
Baltimore to run In connection with this road and
wlllniake three trip;. a week, leaving West ??>|nt
IULSDAVS, THURSDAYS, and SATURDAYS
,m V,*? arrival of the train, which -leaves Richmond
at 3 i. .4.. arriving at Baltimore next mornlne In
ample time to connect with trains for the Norih
and \Vm; and leave Baltimore MONDAYS. Wfc'D
^ S. and FRIDAY S at 1 P. M., connecting
it W est Point with the train due at Kichtnoud at
lo~to next morning.
Fare to Bal ti more, $5: colored people, $4.
. KLIGIJT TRaIN, with passenger car attached,
for through freight only, leaves Richmoud Tnes
.s\ Thursdays, and Saturdays at 4 A. M. Tlurough
trelght receIved <1miIv till 4 p. M.
FKtlGIir TRAlJf, with passenger car attached,
ror freight between Richmond and West Point!
leaves Richmond on Mondays, Wednesdays, and
r rldays at d A. M. Local frrlght received Tuesdays,
lhursdays, and salurdavts till ? P. M.
EDW. F. FOLGKR,
... ... .. General Freight and Ticket Agent.
. N. Bkagk. Master Transportation. Jy 21
Richmond, fiirdkrickmicbo and Potomac
Kajluoad Company, Okkiceof
General Ticket and Fhek;ht Agent,
Richmond. June 10, 1873. j
SCHEDULE OF TRAINS.
RICHMOND, FREDERICKSBURG AND POTO
MAC RAILROAD.
l|P DAY MAIL leaves By rd-Street station 6:40
UP NIGHT MAIL leaves Byrd-Slreet station 9:4*
I. M. (except on Sundays.)
UP ACCOMMODATION leaves Broad-Street
station 0 p. St. (except on Su inlays.)
DOWN DAY MAIL arrives at Byrd-Slrectela
tion at 1:0$ P. M.
DOWN NIGHT MAIL arrlvesat Byrd-Streetsta
tion 4:40 A. M. (except on Mondays.)
DOWN ACCOMMODATION TRAIN arrives at
Broad-Street station *1:37 A. M. (except on Sun
davs.)
FREIGHT TRAINS leave Broad-Street station on
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at e:tS A. M.,
connecting at Quantlco with the Alexandria and
Fredericksburg r.dl way. Returning, arrive at Broad
Street station on Tuesdays. Thursdays, and Satur
days at l:40 P. M.
By order of General Superintendent.
r ? J- B. GENTRY,
r(> 111 General Freight and Ticket Agent.
Richmond and Danville Railroad Co.,)
Office Engineer and slter int endknt, >
Richmond, Va.. June 13,1873.)
C^J.0 I N (t WE ST.?The Lynchburg and
J Danville Passenger Train daily (except Sun
days) leaves Richmond at 9:15 A. M.: Burkevlllo at
t:"o P. M.; arrives at Lynchburg 4:45 P. M. and ar
rives at Danvillrat 6 P. M.
Sundty Lynchburg Passenger Train leaves Rlch
moudat R.*25 A. M.; arrives at Burkcvilleat 11:28
A. M. and Lynchburg at 4:40 P. M.
Through Mall and Passenger Train leaves Rich
mond dully at 1:05 P.M.; leaves Danville dally at
P^l'' urr^ves at Uitcnslwro1 dally at 11:10
GOING EAST.
The f.ynchhurg and Danville Passenger Trains
dally (except Sundays) leave Lynchburg at H:15 A.
M.; leave Danville at 0:15 A.M.; leave BurkeviUe
at 11:35 A. M.: arrive at Richmond at 2:25 P. M.
The Sunday Lynchburg Passenger Train leaves
Lynchburg at 8:15 P. M.; leaves Burkevillu at l:lv P.
M.: arrives at Richmond at 4:17 P. M.
T he Through Mall and Passenger Train leaves
Greeusltoro' dally at 8:15 P. M.; lestves Danville.
daily at 11:17 P. M.; arrives at Richmond daily at
645 A.M.
The Through Mail and Passenger Trains going
South connect at Grecn*l?oro' with train* on the
North < 'arolina railroad for all pilnts south.
The Lynchimrg Trains connect at Burkevillu
rlth train on the Atlantic. Mississippi and Ohio
railroad for all points southwest and sou III.
Through tickets to all points south and southwest
can he-procured al the ticket ofllcu In Rlehinond,
and of |{. F. WALK Kit. Jigeut ol' the Atlantic, Mis
sissippi ami Ohio railroad, No. lJ&j Main street,
1C Icll luoild.
Papers that have arrangements to advertise the
schedule of Uila Company will please print the above.
T. M. R. TALCOTT,
Je 1.1 Engineer and Superhitendent.
(1HESAPEAKE AND OHIO BA1L
V.'' ROAD.?On and after 5th May, 1873, tin; ptutteu
ger trains will run as follows:
WESTWARD.
MAIL TRAIN.?Leaves Richmond ?ao A. M:
DAILY exeept Sunday, coiineeting with W.,
Va., M. & (?. S. railroad at (iordousvllle and Char
lottesville. and arrives at White Sulphur Springs
at h *05 P M
KXPRKSS TRAIN.?Leaves Richmond at 10 P.
M. daw.Y exeept Saturday,connecting at Gordons
vllle With W.f C., Va, M.G. S. railroad trains for
Lynchburg and southwest, and arrives at Hunt
ington at 5r20 P. M. next day. Steamer leaven Hunt
ington on arrival of the train, and arrives at Cin
cinnati at C o'clock next morning.
This train stops between Richmond and White
Sulphur only at Junction. Gordousvljlc. t'lmrlottes
vllle, Staunton. Goshen, MIIIImiI'o% and Covington.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN?Leaves Richmond
at 5:lo P. M. daily except Sunday, aud arrives at
Gordousville at s:45 P. M.
EASTWARD.
Steamer leaves Cincinnati at 4 P. M. daily ex
cept Sunday, and arrives at Huntington at 9 A.
M. next day, connecting with express train.
EXPRESS TRAIN?Leaves Huntington atloA.
M. daily except Sunday, and arrives at Richmond
al 4:30 A. M. next day, connecting with trains
going south and with James river steamer for Nor
folk. This train stops between White Sulphur ami
Richmond only at Junction. Gordons vllle, Cliar
lottesvtlie, Staunton, Goshen, Mlllboro', aud Cov
ington
MAIL TRAIN.?Leaves White Sulphur 5:55 A. M.
daily except Sundays,connecting with \VVa..
, M. ,t.G. S. railroad at Charlottesville and Gordon*
kiile, and arrives a' Richmond 5 P.M.
ACCOMMODATION TRA IN.?Leaves Gordons*
vllle ?:5o A. M. DAILY except Sundays, connecting
at Gordonsvllle with \V., Va., M. & G. S. railroad
train from Lynchburg and southwest, and arrives at
Richmond It>:l5 A. M.
For further Information Inquire at (he company's
iftlce, 011 Broad near Seventeenth street.
A. H. PERKY, General Su|Hirl? ten dent.
James F. Nethehland, General 'ileket Agent
my 3
c
1VV6 KA\< F
1ITY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OK RICHMOND. VA.
OKKK'K. 1113 MAIS ?TKKKT,
(under Hie banking-house ofLancaster Jfc <;o.)
ASSETS 1 .">0.000.
InsuresntmiiiM I,OSS OR MAMACE BV FIRE
ON BUILiJlNtiS. MERCHANDISE. HOUSE
HOLD 1' UK MTU RE,and other 1 usurahlc prnpcrt y.
A.SA SNYDER, I'rvfldcui.
aii 5-3m K. It. MEAPE. Secretary.
Royal firk insurance company
OF LIVERPOOL ANl/LONDON.
CAPITA J *10.000.000;
I leposlted with Treasurer of Vlrgiid*. ?tfl.ooo.
IMPhRIAL KIKE INSURANCE COMPANY OK
LONDON.
CAPITA! #?.000.000.
Oe?o?lted with Treasurer of Vlririuln, *5o.ooo.
Shareholders personally res|>ons?ble for the obli
gations of the above companies.
Representing the above staunch old KukHi^ com
panies. w? solicit the patronage of the public upon
their uu<|ue*tlnual>lf security. prompt and Ulieial
settlement of ail claim*, and heavy income.
JOHN H. CLA1BOKNE I CO.. Agent*,
No. 110e? Main street.
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COSll'AN V OK
NK\V YORK.
CASH ASSETS OVER *00.000.000.
Cash dividends. surpassing all others, atfirst an<l
w.ru anniversary of iwllclea.
Premiums jtayabie annually, semi-annually, and
quarterly.
Tlie oldkst, lakgkkt, aud cuKAi'KST conpauy
In the Uulted Slates.
JOHN If. CLAIBORNE, Ajcrnt,
se 21 N'o. 110* Main mmt.
\7OJiTJl BRITISH
AND
MERCANTILE INSURANCE COMPANY.,
OF
LONDON AND EDINBURGH, G. B.
Capital, 910,000.000 in gold; irive?tc<l in the
Uulted Ntate* over il.500.000: with the
Treasurer of Virginia, 950,000 In United States
bonds.
iinvlux been appointed ajents to the above-named
company, we are prepared to Issue Its policies
against Iooa or damage by Are on buildings, nier
chandbM'. and personal property of all ilmb, on the
most liberal term*.
Lotttea equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
D. N. WALKER <tCO?
ocT No. 1014 Main street.
PIAm OH?AK?. 4e. .
jpiANO, MUSIC, Ac,
I will ??'I1 a remarkably fine, all roaud-coruervU.
ARloN i'lANo, 71 octaves, lull sJze, and line tone
and power.
This Instrument is pronounred by unquestionable
iintv-. to be iH)ual to auy in the state. I will sell on
accommodating terms, having derided to chaoge
my biuluca*.
Also, for rule a stock of select MUSIC assd MU
SICAL iNbTRUM EN'i S generally. aud one supe
rior second-hand MEl.0DEON.aud one cheap ?e
comi-hand PIANO.
Apply at No. ltf Ninth street, Richmond.
auVeodrft P.RCOWAttDIX.

xml | txt