OCR Interpretation


The Bad Lands cow boy. (Little Missouri, Dakota [i.e. N.D.]) 1884-1886, February 21, 1884, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024777/1884-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

!*«3Rjl
v'^lOTStfc**»w-
-,l
r4«\s
4V'".
\s¥tf%r«--«?^
%itBJ "0
•?.„ rS ^fc^t
J%
•£lEWp
A D, CARPENTER,
^ATTORNEY,
DIOKINBON, DAK.
F. E. BENJAMIN,
HAND AN, DAKOTA.
Repairing of allkinds promptly executed.
Orders frota. out ot town receive my personal
and careful attention, :j
^J.A. FREEZE,
•5^
Contractor and Builder
~Ji
±.
UTTLE MISSOURI, DAK.
All kinds of Carpenter Work done with
neatness and dispatch.
Residence at Cantonment.
H. LYLE,
BARBER,
ghop situated In The Elk,
UTTLE MISSOURI, DAKOTA..
Fine Work Guaranteed.
T. B. BXLXXA, ProeWent. H. R. LTON, Cashier
M.LASQ, \ICO President.
OF MANDAN, DAKOTA.
"H e-
Paid-up Capital, $50,000
Surplus, $10,000.
Interest paid on Time Deposits.
General Banking- and Exchange Business done,
DAW McKENZIE,
1ITHI?
-AND-
LITTLE MISSOURI, OAK.
Work dono Dftatly and promptly
jobS
*£jl
Ws
«,
"vr'
& Yr
Kjnfe
h-ftMM'
J?
tip
wrs
NEI&ON'S
NEWS
LITTLE MISSOURI, DAK.
Late Papers^ Books,.
Magazines, Stationery, :.
tz} Confectionery, Nuts,
Cigars and Tobacco.
Brand new. and first-class stock.
——FOB-
.Of ALL KINDS,-.
Furnishing Goods, Etc.
*JOSEPS: OUSKELLEY
t6b
lead-
-/i ,'i JLITTLE MI8S0UEI, DAK.
/y.
I"1 ^"5^
FLOUR A SPECIALTY.
PYRAMID
"ft
'V",
Paxli'Hotel
Slif
Jr®
j.-\ ^5.
Little Missouri, Dakota:?
/iti
^^lieJPiQtieef'Hdie
Missouri, situated close
to the depot*
.•
HEADQXJARTERS
TOR TRAmiiKaUEKv
USS^jSS.I
XW-x-i&s
THE GENERAL
STORE
—0? THE—
N. P. R. C. CO.,
MEDORA, -'DAKOTA,
HAS A COMPLETE LINE OF
Grrocenes,
Dry Goods,
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
Hats, Caps,
—ALL KINDS OF
-t*-
0
CANNED GOODS,
Harness,
Saddles,
Tobaco and Cigarst
FELT SHOES,
OVERSHOES,
LARGE STOCK OF
BOOTS AND SHOES,
r:..».:,'-L.-.••-• ,.."v
FLOUR and FEED.
V7/tA
F. & MOOkfil 'Pxofe
3*,.
h$fcri£
Jfc
Mgf*
65®jl..
la met a
VOLUME I, NUMBER. LITTLE MISSOURI, MEDORA P. O., DAK., FEBRUARY 21, 1884.
everything that
^anyone needs.
The btiaine8s done is Wholesale ^nd R^
t»y.«nj(l hepee purchasers have
^he be^eSt ot kwpriQes,
-.
WESTERN
HOUSE,
Ttansient Rates per day. $1.50
Regular Board per^week, 6.00
A FINE BAR
connected with the house.
MICHAEL KNOTT,
KEEPS ALL KIXDS OF-
Wines, lipors and Cigars.
THE FINEST WHIS&ES
IN UTTLE MI880URL
ALL ARE MADE WELCOME.
THE ELK
THE FINEST GOODS.
COURTEOUS TREATMENT.
THE PIONEER SALOON
LITTLE MISSOURI.
—CHOICEST BRANDS-
LIQUORS & CIGARS.
JOHN NELSON,
Baa tbe Largest and Beet Stock ot
DRYGOODS,
4,1
*«*&»
„fs
PETER MALLOY, PROP
Little Missouri, Dak.
i.
CENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
,vf
Hats and Caps,
v\ •txt i11v v. -1*
jdBT'V T"
—m—
i,
UTtL& mmOUEI, DAKOTA.
Prices,, are Iowez than
fW:
f|l"ir v^^w-
be-
W
BAD LANDS COW BOY,
Br A. KFACKARD." 1
.r
Tnx Cow BOT Is not published fmrfim, but for
per yesx.
'Advertising Rates made known on application
Standing AdverUseme&to payable quarterly
TransientAdvertiaeitients and all Job work, mon*
eyinslght.
Address all comtnnni bations to
THS- BAOLANO8 Oow BOY,
V: MZXWSAI DAKOTA.
Entered at tiio post-office at Medora* Dak. as sec
ond dtflp mail matter.
Di'mond pick's Lariat.
Any more stories of Diamond Dfek
BeeWes that yarn of the^wolres at bay
Why, bless yoar glssuSd they crowd so thlcSC
That I might rattle thao^ in ftigy
What was the moonlet^4hlngvtiB tf6ne?
Well, Richard wastfrt'' mdony: nuoti
Kept his wits handy,i£*ry,cnff, V? .1
Struck pay-dirt withoui wasting patir
They called him raslg but he wasn't that
Cool he was as a gob of lead,
And under that floppipg yaller hat
He carried a wonderful levd head.
YouVe been down ttiejre on the Bio Grand-,
Wbere they've bniU'tbe Espanols bridge,.
That skates acrott thf alkAll sand
And m*er the water to the ridge?
Well, five years elnce^the bridge wasn't there,
The Denver andiUodldnt no,
There was only sjjnd and river and air,
And a 'dobe pocliloflat In tbe snn.
rod I were heitUng.it then
Sahcho Jimmy—rot his bide!
Three hundred steer.,'and only'two men,
On a
ranch six miles and a quarter wide. ..
The gramma skirted the edge of the donee, /...
And the river ran sti miles away
I tell yon, hoys, we had lively tnne.
Driving to water twice a day.
Thoeewide-hornedhrateawereaa'nglylot
Couldn't head them, we let them ran, ...
And the way they. BWoopfid, when the day was bet,
Down to the'rlverjtoaB lots o£ fnn.
They were slofihlng^ong one ecorChing day,1
Like wild hnll hnl&loes, over the sand,
When we saw a baby right in their way,
Fast asleep on.thoedge of the Grand'.
I knew it meant death my heart flipfiopped,
-I spurred to torn then» but,- true as Pm horn.
Those Mexican steers wonld never have stopped.
If I'dbeenOdirl^ tooting hb horn.
What did Dick dotHis spurs dng deep,
His broncho and I saw him wheel
With his lariat whirling tlie daisiest sweep,
His teeth set tigh^^nd his eyes like ste^l,
Tho loop swung oni:thlrty-feet away,
Hovered and setti^d down on the sand,
Making a noose'wfi^re the baby lay,
And then Dick n^aed in, band over hand,..
And yanked np th^ fchild and rode like eteam,
As the cattle mahed.on, hot and thick
Andthe hahy awpko with ahealthy scream,
Safe in the arms ot Di'mond Dick.
\Vell, it waa onlyn^ocblqbrat, -v',
A pl'son Mexican-Indinnanake,
Cut Di'mond Dick didn't think of that—
He'd saved a life with bis own at stake.
And I 'somehow thought,' with'
a choky wheeze,
Of Christ's own promlseby Galilee—
"As yon have done to the least of them,
.To a little child, you haTe done to me."
—[Billy TT. Buttes, the Colorado Cow Boy.
-#.•
Again and again is the fitness of the
Bid Lands for a cattle country brought
to our notice, We have now had about
three weeks of weather ranging from
zero to forty-eight below. Inquiry from
a large number of cattle men mokes al
most certain the fact that not a solitary
head of cattle, beyond a few calves, have
suffered in any way from the cold. On
the other hand, the cattle are in excellent
condition and able to stand 8 month
more of this weather. The reason for
this is that at no time are the cattle here
without grazing. Should there happen
to be an extra foil of snow and the coolies
become filled tiie cattle can find plenty of
grazing on the slopes of the buttes. On
the prairies, however, where there is a
far greater snow fall than in the Bad
Lands, an extra fall of snow will entire
ly cover'all the grass and it is only with
the-greatest difficultythat the cattle can
obtain a mouthful. Should a c'nist hap
pen to form and the prairie stockman
not liave plenty of hay, the cattle must
starve. This is not theory, but has been
demonstrated time and again. We have
yet to hear of a solitary head ever having
died in the Bad Lands from exposure or
lack of grass. Here the matter of expos
nre Croats for nothing, No matter which
way the wind is from there is always a
ravine or coolie near, into which the cat
tle can be enterely beyond its reach.
These cross coolies and ravines feel al
most warm on- the coldest day and here
you will find the cattle as contented as if
in a barn. The prairie blizzards are en
tirely unknown.' At no place' can the
wind get a straight sweep of a mile. On
the prairie, during a blizzard, the cattle
are exposed to its fnll fury One of sev
eral days' duration is almost sure death
to the cattle. The cattle men of the Bad
Lands certainly have their-lines cast in
pleasant places.
Ai.'
The. Dakota delegates at Washington
are doing nothing besides making con
summate asses of themselves. The ad
vocates for the admission of North and
South Dakota as separate States and
those for the admission of Dakota as a
whole are all pressing their different
claims. To begin with, it is almost hope
less that a Democratic congress will ad
mit Dakota and that it will attempt to
harmonize the diffaitinces between the
delegations, and then take active meas
ures toward admitting Dakota in whole
or part, is entirely oAt ot the question.
No better reason could be found for re
fusing admission ty to than this very
wranglipg among opr delegates at Wash-,
ingtpn. We very much suspect that it ia
a deepJaid Democratic schemo to help
along this diaoord ai vrach as possiblo so
that Republican S^te may be kept but
of thfl Unlon as long as possible, At any
atjJ.featterly ior Q# p«ko(«
1
Boots and Shoes,
-*t£Y "V
mrr-i
delegates is stay at Washington any
jjer. It is disgraceful to Dakota that
the delegates are all so pig-headed that
they Cannot reconcile minor differences
and agree on at least one point. Come
tack home and hide your diminished
heads in shame.
Considerable excitement has been
caused by the probable opening of the
Slonx reservation for. homestead settle
ment, the reservation consists of the
tr$ct bounded by the Black. Hills on the
west, the Missouri river on the east, tho
Big Cheyenne on the north and the White
on the south. It contains 22,000 square
miles or over 14,000,000 acres. The res
ervation includes some of the best agri
cultural land in Dakoka, and for many
years longing eyes have been cast upon it
by would-be settlers. The bill is almost
c^tBintopasscoiigress.bctwUl contain
several restrictions The reservation will
beapened strictly for homestead settle
ment. Settlers cannot commute their
claims, but must live the five fall years
on their homestead. No pre-emption,
timber culture, or scrip entry can be
made. The' treaty provides for 23,000
cattle for the Indians, the probable value
of which in three years is estimated at
13,000,000. Each settler must also pay
twenty cents an acre in addition to his
homestead fee to make, up the amount
that the government may desire to ad
vance to the Indians. A quarter section
of land will be allowed for town site
purposes under the town site law. These
town sites may be every ten miles.
To make the matter perfectly plain, we
wishjto repeat what we said in our salu
tatory. We are not-the tool of nor are
we beholden in any way to any man or
set of men. Our whole outfit was pur
chased and our paper is edited and pub
lished' by and in the interest of A. T.
Packard. Marquis de Mores is the heav
iest advertiser as his interests are the
largest here and he will reap the great
est benefit through our publication.
Beyond this he has no interest whatever.
We are fighting here for our own inter
ests and wish it distinctly understood
that we alone are personally responsible
for every article that appears in our col
umns.]
This Is the last issue in which wo can
Call the attention of Bad Lands cattle
men-to the meeting to be held here Feb.
28, for the purpose of effecting a cattle
men's organization. That it will be uni
versally attended we cannot doubt. It is
for theTtoterest of every cattle man |o be
lifere and ha\re a hand in all therltfeii
tion that is passed. Every one should
come trepared to give thoughtful consid
eration to every point, as the first meet
ing will be. the most important of the
.organization. The plaee of meeting has
not yet been decided upon, but will be
soon..
There are very few who will not earn
estly hope that the report that Gen. Grant
will almost certainly be permanently
disabled and compelled to use crutches
as a result of his recent injuries, will
prove unsustained. His physicians are
said to fear partial paralysis of the in
jured limb. It wonld.bo painful to see
the great soldier and world-honored citi
zen crippled in the mature prime of a
life that has beon of such inestimable
service to the country, and who has so
grandly earned a period of physical ease
and enjoyment—[Fargo Argus.
The Rural New Yorker describes an
easy manner of relieving choking cat
tle. It is to, with the thumb and fore
finger, squeeze the sides of the gullet to
gether below the obstruction until the
latter is.forced up to the jaws. Then a
quiek upward thrust should be given, or
the animal choked until it shows signs of
distress, when the hand should be quick
ly removed from tho throat, and in nine
times out of ten the obstruction will be
thrown entirely out of the animal's
mouth.
A Most Reliable Cure for Colic in
Horses.
The following was handed to us by
Baron A. von ,Steiger. He has tried the
remedy a number of times and it is inva
riably successful in curing the disease.
It would be well for those who have
horses, to save it, as the remedy is about
the only one requiring no drugs, and the
articlos to be used are generally near at
hand: "If a horse is attacked by colic,
the first thing to be done is to ascertain
the cause from which it appears. The
seat of the disease is generally in the
bladder or intestines. This is to be as
certained by inserting the pointed hand,
well. greased, into the rectum. the
bladder is over-full a slight pressure will
immediately cause relief. Should any
undigested food or other obstacle be
founa, it must immediately be removed.
In this case the trouble is with the intes
tines.. The obstacles then being removed
several syringes of cold water should be
applied. Then take a largo sheet* dip it
in cold water, wring it out well and wrap
it around the horse so that it will cover
everywhere between the fore and hind
quarters. Put three or four woolen blank
ets over this sheet and place them so that
no heat is allowed to escape. When the
horse lias sweated considerably re
move the coverings, avoiding all drafts,
and groom him thoroughly with straw
until he is perfectly dry and feels warm.
To do cthis effectually it will need the
assistance of three or four persons.
this time the colic will he remo\
Should the ease be more obstinate, con
tinue the syringing and apply the whole
manipulation over. It should be con
stantly borne in mind that the horse
mnst^never lie down, and that the syring
ilace every ten minutes
tag should take
or oftenor. If
P1
"»1
rtw »4,
•%-&•, Mi
remedy is carefully
followed out it is the best
iblo one known.
^,iuSfi
tf ••***•.
£a.
j£i!§51®%"
MiSiir
SPORtTN'G NOTES,
The Countem of Stamford paid £8,000
for Barcaldlne.
The Cleveland base-ball elub will have
a resepg team located at Akron, 0.
Commodore iKittson wishes to sell 36
of his Tacing horses, all in training*
The lightest jockey at the New Orleans
meeting was Rivers weight, 80 pounds.
Geo. W. Hamilton, of Fredonia, N.T., is
the champion jumper at 14 feet, 9 inches,
-v The Ohio river floods damaged the Cin
cinnati Union base-hall grounds, to the
extent of $3,000.
The Milwaukee curlers "bearded the
lion in its den", successfully, having won.
the international contest at HontreaL
Seven thousand dollars has been raised
to pay the expenses of the. .Philadelphia
cricket team on ita eoming tr^tp Eng
land.
It is estimated that 3,000 deer have
been killed in the Adirondacks hy the
use of dogs in the open season just
closed.
Cock-fighting is recognized as a legiti
mate sport at Columbia, S. C. Acock-fit
has been licensed and' is regularly at
tended- by all classes of citizens.
'Plunger" Walton will return to Eng
land in April and arrange his betting
losses. It will be remembered that he
left England last fall owing a large
amount
Mitchell will soon return from Eng
land and will then back himself to fight
any*man in America, Sullivan preferred.
He. has recently won about $7,000 in
England.
Rowell, Tint,' Haz®l aud Fitzgerald
are in training for the six-days' go-as
you-please, to begin at Madison Square
Garden, Feb. 24. It is the opinion that
the highest record will be broken.
The stock of the St. Paul club is now
all taken and there will be a good club in
that place this summer. Minneapolis
and Stillwater also belong to the North
western League and will have good
nines.
Rowing, like base-ball, is fast losing
the taint of dishonesty that has clung to
it since such men as Courtney were rec
ognized as leading exponents of' the
sport. Rigorous rules have put a stop to
most of the dishonesty.
The pool privilege at the opening
meeting of the Washington Park club, at
Chicago, was sold for $4,405 per day. The
official pools sold at the meetinjg must
aggregate $704,800 to make this sum
good.—[Mirror of AmeriewSperts..
The programme of stakes for the Chi
cago mid-summer meeting has been an
nounced. The races last from July 17 to
Aug. 20,therebeingthree regular racing
days each" week. The other days will
probably be filled up with new events.
The winter meeting at New Orleans
has been a grand eucccss. Large crowds
attended and there was generally good
weather throughout Some of the win
ners are Princess, Manitoba, Sorrel Dan,
Centennial, Boulotte, Athlone and Fel
lowplay.
The famous trio Eole, Eolis and Eolite
were all sired by R." J. Hancock's stallion
War Dance. Mr. Hancock does not be
lieve in racing horses under the three
year old form. The three fnamed were
sold for an aggregate of $25,000 as un
tried colts.
Duncan C. Ross, of Cleveland, backer of
Mervine Thompson, means business in
his challenge to Sullivan. He will back
Thompson for from $1,000 to $5,000 to
fight Sullivan to a finish. Thompson
has many friends in Cleveland and can
find plenty of backing.
Birch lake, near Beaumont, Mich., is
one of the best lakes in the United
States for pickcreL They are of uncom
monly large size and bite voraciously.
Over 500 men are fishing in the lake, all
hired by one firm. The fish are shipped
to Buffalo and there packed in boxes and
barrels to supply the trade.'
Bicycling now occupies the proud posi
tion of being one of the best of our na
tional sports. No dishonesty has attached
itself to it and bicycle clubs composed of
the best citizens are to be found in near
ly every city of any size. It is expected
that the coming summer will witness a
remarkable growth of interest in bicycl
ing.
The full report of the Schtefer-Yignaux
bilb- -1 tournament indicates that better
bilf was played than ever before.
Tha* played was the balk-line cham
pion- ame. For those who have not
seenS^ jame played it is utterly impos
sible to realize its difficulties. Schtefer's
highest runs were 201 and 195: Vignaux*s
328 and 329, both runs being far ahead of
the record 24(5, made by himself at the
Chicago tournament The total scores
were: Vignaux, 3,000, average 4 5SM57
Schsefer, 2,868, average 42 5447.
The loss of stock on the ranges so far
this winter has been nothing, so fax as
we have been able to learn, and ifwedo
not have more than fifteen days of ex
tremely bad, stormy weather before
spring
tho loss Will not exceed one per cent in
numbers, and half of one per cent in
value of stock of all kinds on the ranges
ot the entire strip. Evidence of a mam
moth calf crop for the coming season is
showing up now, and dry COWB will be
held in a few weeks at about the regular
priee of cows and calves, as the ranchmen
think they can safely count on 90 and 95
per cent- of calves this sooeon. Tho old
cows are on their good behavior this
spring, and every one is happy.—[Cald
well, Ifcn* Jdurnal. f* -v.
V&Wv*fl
^y,yf4}^
PRICE $?-O^ JPER YEAR.
Not a JMi tbr tEe Dodft
.rralk about yer doods," eaia' a Texas
stockman on the Chi»go, Burlington &
Quinc?' trafik, "bat a leetle the doodesf
dood I ever seen wuz a feller theb cosne
down from Barton into our ketttrya year
ago las'"September."
"Hefdidtftjrtay in Texas long, I guesfc^
said a little nkttfri silk hat -1'
'Tea," he's t&ere now*
"I thought they wo«dd*t iet a dude
live in Texas."
"Waal, ni you how It wny we come to
let him stay.. He come down there "Witts
his peeked boots an* his tight -trousers
an' yaller kid gloves, it slingitf more
style than a new congressman on the
fo'rth o' July, an' a telUn' folks tbet his
doctorsaid Jifi'dgotth^donsujnption'an'
'd have to-lhre in a'warm climate.":
'Ali.yes.of course, youipitied ttie poor|^JcC
fellow, and let him stay
"Not eiaetly thet tat, as I wora-say
in' he'slung hiff sfyle like a Monnoir
walkitf by a United States marshal's of
fice. Waal, one night he come into
saloon where a lot of us wuz a-drinkin''
an"e steps up to the bar
aa'eays:
'Ah—
I say, bahtendah, give me a trifle of aw
wa*in lemonade.'- Bill Jackson snorted
right out, an' then says 'e, "BoyB, what
d'ye say? let's .make the do6d drink gin.'
It wuzago, so Billwalks up an' slaps
the dood on the back like he'd break 'im
in two. Bill's the best man on themus-^SS
cle in our hull kentry. 'Say,'
Wolves and Mountain Lions.
The Denver News, of Feb. 6, says:
E. Brown, who- came in from inspecting
cattle along the Kansas Pacific, says that
the coyotes of late have become very bold
being driven to it by hunger. The gen
tlemen saw large droves of them roasting
about the prairie. While out a few miles
from the railroad on Friday, being on
horseback, he witnessed a very exeiting
race between two coyotes and an ante
lope. He kept pretty well in sight of the
trio, the coyotes holding their own with
the antelope, but were unable to over
take it The antelope approached a wire
fence and for some reaSon did not jump
it hut making a sharp turn started in a
diagonal course. This brought the coy»
otes considerably nearer and seenw'
ingly encouraged, they gained rapidly^
the antelope, finally overtaking it One
fastened itself on the hamstring and the,
other set its teeth firmly in the shoulder,
and soon succeeded in bringing the ante
lope down. While returning from the*
scene of this race Mr. Brown saw a pai^,
of coyotes attack a calf that became sep-*"
arated from the herd, and before he couht
get to them they had succeeded in killing
it Aa soon as the horse and rider had'
gone a short distance the coyotes returned
and began devouring the calf. ..
Mr. Brown.said the wolves ahd moun-?
tain lions were playing sad havoc among
young cattle that are not closely guarded,
Several instances were related where lions
had strayed down from the wuwmtntmiA' -'i
being driven into the vaUejshy huaget.

siKii
I
sayB
1
ti-
Bill,t5a§
•you'd better drink gin.' 'Aw—but it is {.
wa'm lemonade I desiah,' says the dood. ^i
•Waal,' says Bill, 'wa'm lemonade don't&?5S%
go in these 'ere parts you drinks gin orS^|
you drinks nuthin you hear me.' It—
ah—seems to me you*r mistaken,' says:^^
the dood, *ithout seemin' to see there wuz
trouble ahead 1 want to—aw—dwinkjlfe
wa'm lemonade,' an'he recb. out fur thej-fe
glass. Bill wunk at the rest on tB^an'gSfe
says to the dood: D'ye know what
a-goin' to do ef yon tries to drink
thing hut gin? *WeaUy, I do not, malr^fha
deah boy.' 'Waal,' says Bill, Tm a-goin"
to stand you on yer head in thot air box
o' saw dust' 'Aw—that would not be
wight,'says the dood, a tippin' up liia
glass to drink. Bill rechont an' grabbed
'im hy the neck, an* I never see a man .»2
get licked so quick."
"Bill was too much for him, was heT"^^
"No siree, it wuz t'other way. It wuz$fe$
Bill thet got licked. Jerusalem an' Gin
'ral Jackson, but how thet dood did jump
about! An' every time- jumped
fetched Bill one on the«y»er nnder^
ear w,along?.ajgJ4«wJ
^t within gunshot nv'iaa. Vbyvthetair^t
flood laimore tricks for Ottu'then Bur"
ever dreamp' uv. Fnrst he'd be behind,
Bill an' then on top nv 'im.an' then un-^
wi
mss
A
der 'fin, an' every tikne Bfli opened. a» *'.
eye the dood stuck a fist in it—erry gstjfc
didn't make no diffie'nee to him. He WB7i
just about es handy with his thumpers
any. man needs to be in this world. It
didnt take him more'n a minute to go^
all around Bill an' over 'im an' through
'im in the bargain an''then when he hei
Bill pretty well licked- he took him the
allfiredest crack on the nose an" sent 'im
over in the- corner behind the ice-box I
like a bundle o"oId clo'es,"
"What he- do then?" 1
"Wy, he-jest turned ciounranrbrushed
the sawdust off hs knee where he'd ducked
down to come up under Bill, an'sayB he:
'Gentlemen, will you aH join me—aw—
in a wa'm lemonade?- An' wo jined 'im
too quick.
"Yes, he's there yetr an'' I guess he kin
stay unless the consumption gits away
with'im. There hamt nuthin'down there T?
thet kin-do it, thatV sure."—[Mirror of
A an S or a
/1'
He says that during tho past two month*'
a a so S el to so
cattle that had been killed by Uie lenh. -.
eious brutes.
Attention Stocbueity
A "round-up" meeting will lie held 4
Little Misaouri crossing KorOttrePaeiflit
R, on Thureday, F'eb. 38,
Kt
10 *.
PSease be on hand promptly.
HOWAHD
TSJlVM.

xml | txt