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The Bad Lands cow boy. [volume] (Little Missouri, Dakota [i.e. N.D.]) 1884-1886, February 28, 1884, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024777/1884-02-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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-«ANDS
F.E.BENJAMIN,
NUMBER ^WC- *&8«mj$
:m
Cow
BOY,
A. T. PACKARD.
-Tint Cow Box 1b pot pnbliskofrAir fun but for
$2 per year.
sd Advertising Rates mado known on application*
Ah-. Standing Adverttaements payable quarterly.
Transient Advertisement and all Jpb work, mon
In tight
Address nil communications to
THf.BAo Lakos.Oow Boy,
J-TVJ,^.^.S6'VK
and Watchmaker,
-'.V*1 MANDAN, DAKOTA.
-v tj
K?.:MlCo^c^h^Builder
Sv
IBM
hf**"
L'
Shop situated in The Elk. A
«,v 'i^\"lHTTLE MISSOURI. PAKOTA.
Fine Work Guaranteed.
t"
7 SKUCES.rrosldent II K. LTON, Cashier,
LAKO,VIC
MDOT XHTfAMU D\\l
'i "JUwl
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
&i?#4 OF
OF jWANDAN, DAKOTA.
.r. Paid-up Capital, $50',000
«s Surplus, $10,000.
McKENZIE,
mm
Mauaii
—USAtZB 11C—
SMOKING & CHEWING TOBACCO
•^T
V^il» to* Vvi?
THE GENERAL
*v. &)
•fff? 1 /H •*5^^^"
MEBOKA, DAKOTA.
STORE
4^
(••Entered at the postaffico at Medora, Dak:, aa eoo
»••.. ond class mall matter.
A D. CARPENTER,
ATTORNEY/"/? 0
DIOKIN8ON, DAK.
—OF THE~""
^11
N. P. R. 0.00.,
**2K,
tfrxft
Repairing of all kinds promptly executed,-,
.Ordera from out of town-receive.my personal
and careful attention. 'T.
I
FREEZE,
i~ «.
LITTLE NlfSSOURI, DAKi
^JeS3
AU kinds of Carpenter Work done wltli
neatness and dispatch.
Roaldenco at Cantonment.
H. LYLE,
BARBER,
PAS A.COilPLEJE LINK OF
SffVi-'if!-.'
!Va
A
'"M.
if A
Grocenes,
-1 31-ii
ag
"paid 0 n'Tim IJppoeltn.
5
Genera! XcnkinK and Exchange Qnslneaa done.

LITTLE MISSOURI,.DAK.
^j'SWork done^ neatly and promptly
Toil
MAHAR & DRURY'S
MANDAN. DAKOTA^
The most pnpulftr rosort for a qnlot^amf ol bll
-llards or pool The bwt «ver thing :sv.
and tho fincot bar In the city
M. KLINE,
CIGAR MANDFACTDREB,
II
And Smokern' Articles,
MANBA3J, DAKOTA.
POOL HALL.
FINEST EAR IN UTTLE MISSOURI
1S?4?8r£
aBF
t^TBICTLT WB8T-CLAS&^
1
THE GENIAL JIM
l» la «oiut«Qt aitendwm^
OOD SITUATION
ml&
11.
.,
P**, VJt
i£*llf8
WESTERN
,VJ\
W'
SfwCjOods Wines, liquors and Cigars,
,wl __
Hats, Caps,
?ALLCKIKDS OF-
CANNED GOODS,
M*-* irte, ^-At
Harness,
_i-» O Iv
Saddles,
FELT SHOES,
OVERSHOES,
S«5
LARGE STOCK OF
BOOTS AND SHOES,
(Mftf.
ROBERTS^,^.
"t"
BILLIARD AND
¥i
In fact almost- everything that
foir&jS
8
We wtU tak« ttmllwl Kambgr of
Memto«hlt»»i'r«le8lipbr»a
ttotm mm 4. 6«»U*
tai^udhenoerparehi^ttrsjukTe
Bt«nl(JUtlCL|iailA»lO9..OKRUH 0 the benefit of low priirfsy,
l«»\'
HOUSE,-^
if 11
Vf
PETER MALLOY, Prop.,
\r.'.
4
Is
MEDORA,,
DAKOTA,
j*
4
siV
1
Little Missouri, Dale.
4 I
t. J" A
Ttansleit Rates per day. $1.50
Regular Board per week,: 6.00
TV FINE BAR
eoimectcd with the hoone.
MICHAEL KNOTT,
KEEPS ALL KINDS OF
THE FINEST WHISKIES
IN LITTLE MISSOURI.
ALL ABE MADE WELCOME.
THE ELK
THE FINEST GOODS:
COURTEOUS TREATMENT.
THE PIONEER SALOON
^J&S LITTLE MISSOURI'
,T«
*ibl—CHOICEST BRANDS—
LIQUORS & CIGARS.
HOTEL
0E MURES
-.r.rv-:
FLOUR and FEED.
G. W. Fi^ERXlDt Pro^.
m0S1
THE BEST HOTEL IN MEDORA, OAK.
Transient Rates, per day $2.00
Regular Board, per. week 6.00
feffj
/f LITTLE MISSOURI, FEDORA P. O., DAK., FEBRUARY 38, 1884^
^^jS|OCKMEN
lA^fM
Who Have-Gathered Here To
f'
Day {Consider Well
The Benefits of the Followiilg Article
Why not make this potet the Territori
al cattlo headquarters? The opportunity
Is within your grasp. if ^yon will only
make an eBort for ft. We hare here
evory natural and artifical advantage
tliat could hei^ted- Jh^cattle interests,
east of the Bad !tands are small and this
point is Virtually the finthest east and
consequently the nearest to a market.
The bulk of. the cattle business of West
orn lHikota is on or tributary' to the Lit
tle llissonri river. These two facts would
alone be sufficient-for establishing the
Tenitorial headquarters here. But in
addition we have the only railroad outlet
for the cattle interests of Dakota. Be
side these reasons the Northern Pacific
Refrigerator Car Co. furnishes a ready
market for. many cattle right at home.
Anyone of these facts would besufflcient
to bring the headquarters here, but the
four present an arrny of arguments that
is unanswerable Boyond all these facts
no other place h'as made active efforte to
be tho headquarters. All seem naturally
to look here as the best place. Tina
meeting could easily organize as a Bad
Lands association, pass all the legislation
required, and then resolve itself into a
preliminary meeting to issue a call for a
Territorial convention to be held here on
March 27 for' instance. This will give
sufficient time -before the general round
up to let everyvono interested know of
tho project and also to pass any motions
they may wish.to have actad upon by the
Montana association, which meets soon
after. Many Montana,-Wyoming and
Colorado cattle men would, undoubtedly
join the association, and, then, what is to
prevent this ^laie becoming, in the
course of timo, the cattle center of the
whole Northwest, -with a huge associa
tioi) having its headquarters here. Both
the above plans are reasonable and feasi
ble. A very little effort will secure the
first aifd timo will bo sure to bring the
losLt,,
THE COW BOY merely places these facts
before the attention of the cattle men.
It is for your and our own interests to
take-vigogous action upon them. Don't
let this opportunity go by, but strike
while- the iron is hot and the prize is
1
Vck^\
Lomted centrally, But a fwo
steps /rtwt depot.
\-wSfx
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LIVBHY 8TABL8 AND BAB IK COK
KKCTION WITH THK H0U8K
Firs t-Clasa A'ccomi»od«Unii for All,.
Br
&&?*¥
K^^£k
}M
ir
Ik
Andf Act Accordingly. r'
We wisli to say a word or two in refer
ence to the Bad Lands as a sheep coun
try. The report of tbc death of many of
Marqnis de Mores' sheep lias been widely
published and heralded abroad as an evi
dence of the unfitness of. the Bad Lands
for sheep raising. Let us examine the
facts. Tho Marquis came here last May
and in the fall, judging J,hisio be a good
sheep country, sent men east to buy
a large herd. Right here we must men
tion that the whole thing was an experi
ment. -No sheep had ever been raised
here, there was.no data to be governed
by, and naturally, there was a mistake
made. The mistake in this instance was
iu^buying merino sheep.'shipping them
here late in the fail, and providing no
buildings for their protection. Anyone
of these reasons, viewed in the light of
the experience of the last two months,
would have been sufficient to make the
project a failure. The total loss, how
ever, has been, greatly magnified. It is
not at all likely that it Will reach 13,000,
and the experience gained is an ample re
turn for the loss. x)n \he other hand,
look at some of the successful sheep rais
ing in the Bad .Lands. Howard Eaton
hns some of tho Jaige, long-wooled varie
ty that also labored under the disadvant
age of being driven nponnew ranges late
111 the foil, bqt they have donq as well as
cattle This winter has been a severe
one on all kind? of stock, and the abdve
amply proves that the Bad Lands is a
sheep country, if .the right kind of sheep
are bred. Sheep cannot stand as much
exposure aa cattle and they need to get
acquainted with the range earlier in the
season*: With protection from storms,
and hay during the worst winter weather
sheep will undoubtedly prove remun
erative in the Bad Lands as oattle. In
the Bed river valley, where the cold and
exposure^ to storms are tar greater than
here, common Minnesota sheep do well.
The eame is true of Montana. Why,
than, should not' the Bad Lands, which
haa every nattual advantage, make a
better sheep country than either of them?
The cedar with whieh the Bad Lands
abounds 1b the ngulor leed-penetl varie
ty and makes excellent firewood, it is
easily cut, close grained, burns readily
and t6ralongtlme, and gives oft anin
tense heafc Inigplte of the fact that eoal
is so plenty mafty here prefer to bum the
cedar. If one haa team the cedar costs
nothing beside#* labpjo^cutthiij it.
JJT'f" ,VS»$ O
4
$
^#5^ OfcGrf
Never was there a more delightful
a
or
welcomo chinook than that of Sunday
and Monday As if by magic the grip of
Boreas was broken and the snow begun
disappearing fr6m the buttes in roaring
torrents of Wafer: The ice of the Little
Missouri river, three feet thick, was soon
covered with two to three feet of, wat&f/
and Tuesday, although it was again
freezing, four feet of water. A sigh of
relief has gone up from eveiy cattle
man in the Bad Lauds. Now all possible
danger is past. It is altogether likely
that not a solitary head in the whole Bad
Lands will die of exposure this, winter or
spring. This is the' record that "the
most God-forsakeu country on eattli, the
tail-end of frozen-up Dakota/' publishes
to the world. It speaks for'iteelfc
it%.
•. i,
*.
One of tlie mostf sensible thfnga 'done:
for along time by a. railroad, is that of
the Northern Pacific officials in conclud
ing to lower emigrant rates. The differ
ence in rates between the roads is almost
the exclusive reason for tho larger settle
ments in Southern Dakota. AU those
who have been in both sections readily
appreciate the vast superiority of North
ern Dakota. Up to this time,«h6w6ver,
emigrants.who had but littlemoney have
been almost compelled to go to Southern
Dakota.: V£i liavq never heard the right
idea expressed better than by our genial
Begis^r at Bismarck, Mr. Rea. He sayB:
The above clipping from an article
published in the Black Trills Journal
gives a very good idea of the opinion of
Deadwood merchants in respect to the
relative merits of the# Dickinson and
Medora routes.
It is very seldom that an appointment
is greeted, with less opposition than was
that of Judge Paimer to the vacancy on
the bench caused by the death of Judge
Kidder. There seems to be no doubt as to
the eminent qualifications of Judge Pal
mer, but some of our exchanges would
rather.liave had a Dakota man.
•Slrfc .Black Leg.
We hear of a few cases of. black leg
among calves on tho range, though no
one range reports more than half a dozen
cases. Without going into a scientific
discussion of the disease, or indulging in
any big words, we want to say to ranch
men that there is. very little tronble in
getting rid of the plague. After the dis
ease once takes hon of an animal it is. all
the same as a carcass, for it works rapid
ly. But the moment one of your calves
dies with it, round all of the balance np
and give them a sharp run for two or
three miles and back, driving
fast enough
to get up ah active circulation of the
blood. Keep this up for a week and yon
will have no more black leg. No losses
will occur from the time you commence
this process. Should the disease break
out again weclm later, repeat and keep it
up until grass comes. It is sometimes
difficult to get the calves together, but it
is the only sure way of saving them that
can be well resorted to on the open
range.—[N. W. Live Stock Journal.
Dakota as a Health Resort.
At the regular annual meeting of the
Chicago Academy of Homeopathic Physi
cians and Surgeons, a paper was read by
Dr. T. C. Duncan on "Dakota as a Health
Resort." Premising that the essentials
of a health resort are in its sources pro
ductive of diversion, deep respiration
and vigorous digestion, the doctor showed
that Dakota furnished such in a marked
degree, the water, air and other favorable
conditions contributing to the cure of
dyspepsia, diseases of the kidneys and
bladder, catarrh, bronchitis and consump
tion in its early stages, though in its ad
vanced stages the patient should seek a
warmer and less bracing air. Asthma is
also markedly affected by Dakota air,
which, moreover, is more beneficial than
that of Colorado, or other elevated re
gions in cases of heart disease, compli
cated by asthma, bronchitis or indiges
tion. The large amount of soda in the
soil makes the wheat of Dakota especial
ly healthful, while from its large amount
of nitrogenous elements the use of this
staple supplants tho demand for meat
Chicago Daily newB.
The friends of Mervine Thompson, the
Cleveland slugger, are ready to back him
for 925,000 against Sullivan. Thompson
easily knocked out Stewart, champion of
Canada, and Welch, champion of Penn
sylvania. Sullivan was challenged some
time ago by Ross, Thompson's backer,
but "nothing has been heard from the
"colchahed" slugger.
A Russian noble recently lost #400,000
at cards in a single night at Paris. He
lost the money at die Parisian club and
it is thought he was cheated out of tho
amount as recent discoveries et marked
cards have been made there, and somo of
Gie member hsve been. lncontinentlx
1
?iys
ON THE RAJKffi,
1-total of l,iS0. live caftliif SOi ilie
10,560 quarters of dressed be«f^the Sew Orleans races,
2,125 carcasses of mutton and SO
pigs were exported from New.Xork last
week.—[Stockman.
The numerous inquirteB-fMr good stock
ranches by men who are looking for loear
tions in the new West would, indicate air
active business in ail kinds of stock the
coming season.—[Boomerang:
There is aperfect unanimity Of pin
ion among all our exchanges relalive io
the condition of stock on the rang^. The
report comes, from all sides: that cattle
have-never been in better' eon^tiOn. at
•this season of the year.
Several subscribers ask for a remedy
te^eep lice off cattle. Qne^'jotiAee of
crudtt^cfirbolift add mixedin'on£quurt^
water and applied warn is recommended
asasure cure. It also poss^es healing
properties—{Colorado Farmer.'
Stock in this section is wintering
splendidly, and we hear of no losses in
the immediate neighborhood. We learn
however, that parties on the Upper Pou
dre have lost considerably, the loss occur
ring entirely among herds that have re-"
cently been brought from the Easfc
[Loveland Leader.
The Biver Falls Cattle Company, whose
range is on Powder river, will make a
"It I Was runnirig this thing would heas"y shipment of stock cattle to this
country early in tie spring. Several
members of the company are now in the
conduct it like a church festival. Noth
ing to get in anil five dollars to get out."
"The Deadwood merchants are deter
mined to make the Northern Pacific
route ft freight route, as quite a number of
thein are ordering their stocks from the
East, via Dickinson. There is, however,
an opinion among them that Dicjdnson
will not long remain the point of trans
fer of goods from the cars to wagons, as
Little Missouri station is much nearcf
the Hills."
East making purchases, and it is their
intention to ship no less than 2,000 head.
—[Miles City Press.
Parties in from Cherokee strip report
cattle in good shape and well scattered
out over the ranges. Plenty of good
grass, water and appetites are taking the
old sisters and families through in good
shape. The boys would not give one per
cent to hiave any one insure them ninety
per cent of calves from their entire cow
herds this spring.—[Caldwell Journal.:
The' grazing lands of Dakota, Montana,
Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, Eastern
Oregon and Idaho are estimated at 1,000,
000,000 acres. The Northern Pacific rail
road is now opening up a region capable
of supporting 5.000,000 cattle and 10,000,
000 sheep, Which when It shall bo fully
occupied, can export yearly 600,000 cat
tle, 1,500,000 sheep and 10,000,000 pounds
of wooL—[Northwest
A Dallas, Tex^ dispatch of the 7th says
that information has been received here
to the effect that GeOrge B. Loving, of
this State, who is now in England repre
senting the Texas Improvement Compa
ny, has sold a large amount of ranch
property situated in four adjoining coun
ties, on Double Mountain fork of the Bra
zos river, for $2,500,000. This is said to
be the largest live stock transaction ever
made.
It takes eleven pounds of milk to add
One pound of live weight to a rait and
an ox that weighs 1,300 pounds will con
sume twenty-two pounds of hay in twen
ty-four hours to keep from losing weight
It he is to fatten he must have just twice
that quanty, when he will gain two
pounds a day. This is one pound live
weight to eleven pounds of good hay. To
obtain fifty cents a hundred for his hay a
farmer must sell fat steers at $5£0 per
hundred pounds.—]N. W. L. S. Journal.
We received a call last week from a
young Mexican residing at Monclova,
Miguel Arguindegui, who is interested in
ranching in the state of Coahuila. He
reports a good season and says stock are
doing well. Speaking of selling cattle or
other stock.under estray laws,he says
they are sold whenever it is found that
the brand has not been recorded and
no owner appears. At any time within
six months the money may be reclaimed,
but after that time it goes to the public.
Brands should be recorded at the capital
of a state, whence they will be forwarded
to the different municipalities for gener
al recording.—[Texas L. S. Journal.
The one thing our Northwestern cattle
growers seem to be a "little off" in is the
placing of strange cattle upon their
ranges late in the season, so late that
they do not become familiar with their
surroundings until the winter is upon
them. During the warm, pleasant days
of tho late spring and early summer ani
mals will at once go to work on the in
viting green sward, and very soon be
come as if to the manor born. But late
in the Beason they have a disposition to
wander in search of other and perhaps
better ranges. They, are restless and
nervous, and do not take on fat prepare
tory for pature's trial season. In order
to withstand the rigors of our northern
climate, range animals need to be at
home. Dumb animals have nerves and
temperaments just as men have. They
don't want any cheap "boarding house"
experience. They want a regular home
table, at which they are masters of cere
mony. Ill order to acquire that con
tented feeling. they most he an the range
in time to learn all tho characteristics of
their surroundings* Then they are con
tented and happy. Under suoh conditions
wilt they take on fat and develop rapidly.
If ottr herd owners would get all their
cattle Mi the range by the middle of July
each year the mortality of the range
would be almost entirely overcomes Who
ever heard ot a native dying la this
wuntry from the vicissitudes ottbe cll
mate? Of course, there is an occasional
OOW dies in the early spring from the ef
fects of calf-dropping, but the buikofOte
losses are Confined ta^rawhldea," or late
*trir»ls,r-JJ{.W,.Ltve8tock Journal.
4 A
SPOKTIKfG NOTES.
ana will eftootfi
LraiM'Annaindo. the champion female
bicyelist, recently mado a mile in 3 min
utes andl2-8eetad8at Ban Francisco.
Five thousand dol&rs will be offered as
it purse for donble'^&dis at the next,
Sieetfll^of the Cleveland"#
«iation.
r$W*ltfg Jftfeo-
Seventy-five thousand dollars was r&v
cently paid by an Edinburgh-fish dealer
forthe exclustve'privilegB'of fishing in
a Sfcotch stream for on1? year. f.'-fs
The Syracuse pool tournameiit'ciosed'
wit&': Frey first, Malone second, Sutton'
tlr^ffi Frey and Malone will undoubted
ly pky for the championship for $1,000 a
side.
Tlie threc-legged raee reeord wasbro^
ken at Toronto, Feb. 10, by 3. Warwick
and J. Wright They reduced the reqri^^»
from 10% seconds to 9 1-S in a-3o-yard"S^
race.
The Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St Paul
and Stillwater base-ball dobs have been
organized and wijl all make a strong
fight for the Northwestern-League cham
pionship.
The Rowell-Fitzgerald six-days' go-as
you-please race at New York is'off. No
other contestants entered, but it is ex
pected that the race wQl" take place dot
ing ApriL...
To avoid confusion, the next turf con
gress will probably decide that no two
race horses shall have the same name. In
case they do the suffix "Q" must bo
added to the younger.'
The Iowa circuit is a« follows: Cedar
Rapids, June 10.-13 Marshailtown, June
17-20 Council Bluffs, June 24-27 Des
Moines, July t-jb' fhe purses at each
meeting aggregate $6,000.
The fastest trotting records are as fol
lows: Jay-I^e^SB#,' for five-year-olds,
2:I05£ Bonita, lor four-year-olds, 2:185^
Hindoo Rose, for three-year-olds, 2:19}^
Wildfiower, fortwo-year-olds, 221.
Dan 0*Leary, the pedestrian, has re
turned from Australia! He lias already.
made a match with Schmehl and believes' 7^
he will win it, as he is in good condition 3*J||
The race will be a handicap, OXeary to sT
walk 275 miles and Schmehl 250.
Slisefer is on his way back from Paris.
Since his public games there with Vig
naux he lias beaten liim several times in
private. He has renewed his challenge to
Vignaux and- another- series of garner -"v/'
will be played soon between them for tie?
championship of tho world.
They Made a Mistake. ?!|i
A rustic-looking man sat in the smok
ing car of the Omaha train last Thursday
night, when another rural-looking person
came in.
"Js this seat taken?" said the new
comer. s?
'No, sir sit right down sit riglit' -v
down," said the other making room for
him. 9
Soon the two old farmere were in con
versation.
••Where are yon from?*'
"I live ne» Biida. Where do you hail
from?"
"Fm a pretty near'neiglibor ot yours Ili
live near Kewanee."
"Farming?"
"Tefc' Are you?" :,v-f
"Yes fanning and stock."
"Been to town with stock?" S
"Yes brought np a hundred head of:®
steers." S
"I brought hogs."
And so the conversation ran on until .•
just before the train reached Mendot«,«w^^|
an a re el
acquainted. Presently another man who3''
looked like a merchant came in and was..
surprised to see one of the old farmers. -S
"Well, well, well," said the new man, s:jj
"Pm glad to see you maybe you can help?
me out of a little embarrassing trouble. .
I want to pay a man on the train a littler '1
bill before I get off at Mendota, a.nd
haven't mon&y enough. If yon will tet^~l|
me have *$100 on my check Til be very
much obliged." ,|
"Certainly, rjn^ glad to doit,"andout'f
came Die tanner's pocket-book. But,!
alas, he only had «»in sntbll bills and a
beautiful orisp $S00 failL
"You're perfectlywelcometo the $40 if
that'll help you out, or the $500 bill if
yon can get it broke."
"Perhaps your friend can help lis out
the
$10
will ltardty answer" said the
merchant, and then be apologized for
making bo mueh trouble.
"Woll," softly said, the other fanner,
who until now had been silently looking
on, "I cant change a tSOO bill. bot can
give yon another for it, and I think it
came out of the same hatch and Was'
printed on tho same press."
Aadturaing to the other old farmer Tie
added: "H your partner hadn't «mie
Just aa he did, mtM would have been
here in a minute. I've been getting-1
raady to work you on the sanw ganuC^
ever since we left Chicago.^ -*l,
At Mendota four very much disRtwteft
a
stood aronnd ln Oie c^d WaitiBg for«- a
tmfai returnlng.to %leo#a.- ''itlyly.
S ii
1
1
•ft'V I
Pm
wl¥y?-y^
PRICEr1 $2.00 per YEAK ",
•S™ ~*u ',
r".'
JBW
4o&e(MWtotaBd Bixamos wiitwres^
tW aooft'^k Ne# Otfeahs for$2£0Q a side.
tYoA&rr Ski: fev Philadelphia
bot)i* t&g(ck i9m for fl.OOOa,
The^wukw«url^:^4vedaniotaft
tion npon their return frmi tfair vfefj)r?
ip Montreal.
fourteen hundred robins were- killed
with sticks by a party of Baton Rougo?
pot-huntcra recently.
z,, u:*£v\
A
1
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