OCR Interpretation


The Bad Lands cow boy. (Little Missouri, Dakota [i.e. N.D.]) 1884-1886, October 22, 1885, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024777/1885-10-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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iyf.TMB'Cbw
%*fttj»n. ,--, .,,
AdrortUlne Rites minlo knojrtt on »lipllc«Uon.
St^dlnijAflMrtU^0nt«pay»MVwMt6riy-
»f In Right. §®JS'J'
AddreM all roniijhiifat'oas.to
'••.-'••v' r'-'' .'.THr BAb':LANpft'bow B6V.
Kntered at the
"ffoit&ffice"at "5feclora Dak., a
•••±••••.:-s ondctaBBwall maltor.
•':. DIOKIN80W, DAK.
Iff B-OOYLE, M. D., .1
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
(T.atoA, A.Surg«in,U. 8.A.) BELFIELD. UAK.
A.
T. PAOKABJ3^::mm
•:,.-'Sijfc
N-:: V.. -.
MEDdRA, OAK
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PI ,lf OTAKY .PTJBLioV'
MEDOUA. DAK.
F. E. BENJAMIN,
MtfAlJDAN, DAKOTA. •'i
Rftbalring ofalt kinds promptly Executed.
Oraers from' out of touii' r^elvd m.v |»ej8onal
a a re 6 I oh 1 5
-a -,v .-y -.--. •b •.
II. JR. Lrokj Pr'Wt^ H.- VANVLKCK,3r Caahier,
M.'
UrovVi«
Trtisiden

,, OF MANDAN, DAKOTA.
Int«i«£t ualU on Timfl Deptsit«.
XcD«ral uaakio^ uml JSxchanjp Bimineas ^one.
DAN. MCKENZRB.®|:'
LLLLLF
»-^P
if
Work doue neatly and promptly.# ','
D. FLYNN,
v--?
Mauufacturoranldoaler in
wf
'r Boob, Sho^i, Rubbers, Etc.
'^.5^...
Oustom Work and Bepalring a Spier-
MAIN STREET, MANDAN, DAK.
HARDWARE^
TINWARE,
er
vSIedot* Dakotn. ..
Ml kinds of tin and sheet-iron articles
madeand repaired^^i^^^
INSURANCE!
INiMIE
iS^i ,Ru
.tyind Siorm& and Mail!!
Medofa, Paki-
*•, «£,
:fr''-\''
vc»
'i £ii :-::Sii|S^'
fr*' ^'. r^: '••/•:/::v:v SS^s,?f a .JTrrr
V'
".-s-
HBIKKU, DAKOTA.
-. 9flH^.-bTO-:fiLAXn£'
.IIIS/.!'. SEEOTJB M^N'S'^NS AT
$R'$8, $7, $8. Nothing like it pan be
bought by any competitors, because they
have to buy their goods and PA* A JPBOF
IT. We make our own goods. DO .YOD
BEE THIPOINT?.
BEE OTJR'MEN'S 8UIT8 AT
$10, 'fll, ^i2,{ttiid ,#13,50i Latest Fall
and Winter patteras not old, shelt-woru
goods, bat made in our own .nianufae
tory, wliere^we kiiow how to make theiu,
for our own* trade. -We can save you 15
per cent, at the very, least, iwhicli we
save by making our own goods.
KI SEE OUB -HEN'S ?CITS AT .'
|13, $18 tuitl: $18. Our
5
ifffwfl^v&**£?sfr
competitors ask
you $20 and $30 for the samo goods.
Now, if you buy- for cash and: care enough
to look ai new house oyer before you buy
yonr Winter elothing, make it a point to
ioofi around and see whether we do what
we advertise and we will convince you
ihat we can give you more for a. dollar
than auy house west of Chicago.
SEE OCR EISE OF WILSON BROS.
wliite.Hhirts, from $l 'to $1.50. Fancy
shirts, with Collars attached or detached,
from SO (Mrttfi^io :$i 5ft v^Our lien's Ftan
nel. and Cashmere siiirt8, tliat we make
oureelvef, we sell from $1.25 to $3.50 nnd
sizes in length, to fit a iuan up eastern
Rliirts. tliut are, .li8rdljr l«rge enough to
.: SEE OOB TKDEBWEAB
in all grades of goods, colore,'weights
and quaflty, from ?1 to $4 a suit and
French Cashmere shifts and. drawers at:
$l,$5and$(ta«uit.
1
"f iw
.'iii
TJ
^.^
^Boto''Agphtri for
FINE BOOTS.
TROUBLE TO SHOW OUU GOODS
Jsp
W
OF FABGO.UAKOTAi.
fr &
V-
.u
Policies ifsuea, at vegula?
,Vr:
jbHBL
n?
igcas, with a full and complete line
f^,1eut8» ^ar^aUliila,
W
s^SSs*^
-t
jf 1
jH &&*?&.
.".......<p></p>AWAKEfe
We Know and Attend to our Business!
^f-ridote Agentsfpt*-r- '.•
:".v j, ^.BtTRTB1SlSl^1 and^UNAN^
WIU0HBROS.shirts: LADlESvBflOTS^ftHD SHOES!
:%HAT WE taEEP.
AN
ENTIBE jine of Men's, Youth's
Boy's and Children's Clothing, Suits,
Overcoats. Pants and Specialties in all
its details.
An entire line of Men's and Boy's Fur
nishing goods, comprising
RL'SDEBWEAB IN 200 PATTEBNS I
Clips in Silk, Plush, Muskrat or Seal
skin.
Trunks and Valises of every size and
description.
Ladies', Misses', and Children's Boots
and Shoes.
Fur coats in dog coon, seal, wolf,
iniuk and buffalo.
Stetson liats in all styles white or
blaek, brown or blue. .J
SILK, LINEN
AND
COTTONllANDKEBCHIEPS.
WHITE AND FANCT FTANNELS AND
COWMEN'S QVERSHIBTS.
63?" -Cotton, Merino, Lisle thread. Silk
wove and British seamless socks.- tXi4
Gloves and Mitts.'German socks. Wool
boots. Overalls, Chapps, Blankets and
Comforters.
J. i. CoUlti'S'Cheyenne Saddles. Robes,
iTariiess, Spurs, Bridles, .Tarpaulins,:
Slickers and in fact, a complete line in
those goods. (y-«
7
Subbor Goods of e\ ery description.
SUSPENDERS, V/
ililSCKWEAR,
SILK MUFFLERS,
1
*•?, 'Zzfi-i
-"fe .T. •-&?<
Vei"y Respectfully,
files City, Mont
WOOLEN SGARFS,
NORTHERN PACIFIC HOTEL!!
ARCH. BOYD, P(t0^,r
NEW HOTEL! NEW PROPRIETOR! ix
NEW FURNITURE! NEW ROOMS
The'Northern Pacific is brand-new throughout and th«
very best accommodations are furnished. A trial
is sure to please. In connection with
•the hotel is a bar, provided -with thd
very best quality of wines, liquors and cigars.
Give us .a call and we guarantee perfect satisfaction.
•imam.
Tif SPsfj# TP-
COLLARS & CUFFS.
FIRE, LIGHTNING, TORNADO, HAIL!
Paul-n,p Capital,
4T4' $100,000 .'t
11*11
ii
oA D. 6ofcxj«n, Yfo
Vice PfMldent,
vi
Treasurer,
0 Ai Lowill,Secretary
Uf
VI
ApmljVpdoM, DikoU
GOOD AGENTS WANTED!
ff® iff?
i?$L
fyiiif'
ColUns&co:
hranclfo! the Chejeiine Srfddlery House* are now
open
and ready for
ot paddltf, Chaparejos, Reatas,
Wagoli Covers, SliekSfs, Quirts,
Price Lists furnisUeii on appli&tioai Our gobds can
lound at alU^he lending stores tJuoujAout thS
Cduntryi,-
&e. Jfcc. Aci^^'rs,.
h^,
NEVER NAPPING.
vac SSfX.
i.v
4 AA,
Bo!a Agents fp*t
Stetson hms.
VC&V&GVE
Sole Agents for .r
—COLLINS & CO S.-
-r«:
'%^fS^i.ES"&
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW OUR GOODS I NO TROUBLE TO SHOW OUR GOODS
$Y, W. GORDON, Manager,
BOSTON ICLOTHINC, BOOT AND SH0E3tt0U8E.
4^ACTQRY, 031 Broadway, New York. -BRANCH STORES: Dayton, 0., Bismarck, Mandan, Dakote| Glendi* e,
Miles City and Billings, Montana.
U'v
S 3
*£0^
MEDORAJ DAKOTA, OCTOBER 22,4885.^*
OTO^LAIJIB,^
Look at »ur Children's, Boy's and Youth's
Suits, Overcoats and Pants, from $1 to'
$10. We are the only house carrying an
extensive line of Boys' goods.
'Vfe
them. 0th6r dealers say there is no
money in boys' goods. Well, there is no
fortune in: them, but we want people to
know we have an entire line of every
thing pertaining to small^ar and res
pect tile trade enough toTttcoijMnodate
thfe public.- We elaim to be tile LEAD
IXQ HOC8E and keep a full-line of ever
ything.
Now we are uot,tenderfeet and do
not care to sell goods.at or below cost.:
PeopliB will buy it prices are low. We
care hot what our competitors may do or
say against us. We surely shall not say
aught against anyone, bnt we are bound
to sell our goods, and if low prices for
good, honest goods has any effect
HARNESS.
FBXD MLLLKB, Pres. Geo. Et-KnARDT, Tteae.
MILWA%kEE
^brewing
*k COMPANY,
j"
i: PROPRIETORS OF THE
it 1IAVE BEADY FOR DELIVERY
KEG & BOTTLED
BEER!
Addre««all Orderafir
MILWAUKEE BHEIW1KG CO.,
Bismarck, Dak.
The ADAMS & WESTLAKE
INTEROHANQCADLE
OIL, GAS and GASOLIHE
TO
•S^35fl
ST 0
YES IT'! .i'f
TH( MOST OOMPUm. OONVENItKT ANO CCOKOMICAL
OfOVM IN THE MARKET. -.
fir
Of all the dismal fallnres id the his
tory of American politics, civil-service
reform is the dismallest. The true heart
and sonl of politics always has been, is
and ever shall be, spoils. The Demo
cratic party nor the Republican party
could either live through an election. If
party leaders could not promise a dis
tribution of patronage. This is so evi
dent that even a child can see it and
the spectacle of one party trying to per
petuate itself Mn power and the other
trying, to regain power through the
transparent cry of "civil-service reform"
jrfould, be amusing i| it were,not
gnstlng.
.•»?
One effect ot the 'prairie fifes may be
exactly opp(gfte to tih&t was expected.
As is known, almost the whole country
for a.humbef of"miles east of,the Bad
Lands lias been burned. Tliis drove the
antelope both east and west from the
burned distriet and now it is doubtful it
those, .driven eastward will cross the
bnrneil country into the Bad Lands. If
they dp not, there will be far less, in
stead of iriore than formerly. It is now
thought that a large number wilt winter
in. the Kuife river and, Killdeer mount
ain country.
make
The'Northern Pacific, probably incited
by the opposition of the Canadian Pacific
on the north, the Union Pacific on the
south and the Northwestern to the east,
is leaving but iittle to be desired by cat
tlemen in the way of shipping stock.
Every other detail of the freight traffic
is made subservient to theoueend of
getting cattle through as quickly and in
as good •Condition as possible. Passen
ger trains have even been side-tracked
to wait for stock trains and not a min
ute islostfrom tlio time the cattle are
loaded, uptil they, are' turned over to a
Chicago road at St. Paul. We suppose
the principal share of the credit, in con
nection with 'Mr.' Hannaford, for this
expedition is due to Stock agent W'ilson,
than whom there is no one to whom we
would sooner cive it.
5
WE WILL DO THE BUSINESS.
EST- Now, we have given you an out
line of wholaud what we are.and what
we can do. We guarantee our goods to
be tile best in ^heir respective lines, and
makng onr goods, we surely can sell
them cheaper than a man can do who
goes East and brings them -out from
some jobbing house but simply call, see
and be c"ivinc«l.
A curious reversal of "the eternal fit
ness of things'V-is seen.in the fact that
there are in twentyrtwo states, 308,478
more women than men. The greatest
excess is in Massachusetts, where there
are 6S,205 more women. Iu all the Ter
ritories, except ti(e District of Columbia,
there iii a large excess of men. Iu Da
kota there is the largest excess of men,
29,415. In the whole of the United
States, there are, according to the census
of 1880,24,636,963 women and 25,518,820
men. Thus we see that "hope may yet
spring eternal" in the female breast
for, in the United'States and Dakota
there is Somewhere, a manly heart and
true for every husbandless female who
considers it her "spear to cling." Maid
ens Of Massachusetts, or at least about
half of you, come, to our arms, that is, to
Dakota's arms luid help our sturdy
pumpkin-rollers ...starve to death or. our
bashful cowboys to round up the lc&U
tins.
The monthly bulletin for September,
Of Lauren Dunlap, Commissioner of Im
migration for Dakota, is at hand and
reflects great credit on our worthy com
missioner. The following is a resumo
of the Bulletin: Tho weather during
September was extremely good all over
Dakota pleasant days being followed by
cool nights. Dakota has nine stations
for observing the weather and from
their reports it is learned that the mean
temperature for September'was 57.26 de
grees, the highest mean being 62.4 at
Yankton ami the lowebt, 53.1 at St. Vin
cent. The rain-fall-averaged 1.67 inch
es, the highest being 4.80 at St. Vincent,
the lowest, .14 of an inch at Bismarck.
Dakota's wheat yield for this year aver
ages' 96, as against 78 for Minnesota, 88
for Iowa and 77 for Wisconsin. Dakota's
wheat crop this year is about 25,000,COO
busiiels, out of a total yield for the
United' States of 351,000,000 bushels.
The Sioux Falls convention, for framing
a constitution for Southern Dakota, is
highly praised, too highly in fact when
it comes to a question of a supposed-to
be neutral territorial officer advocating
a measure that he' knows is strongly
opposed by at least half tho territory of
which lie is an officer. $30,000 has been
set aside for surveying 104 townships,
the work. to. done before July 1,1886.
The contracts are to be let by the Sur
veyor General of Dakota to the lowest
responsible bidders. There wero 4,547,
750 acres of land disposed of in Dakota
during the last year, out of 20,113,663
for the United States. The military en
campment at Fargo is spoken of and our
soldiers come iu for a large share of
praise. There are at present about 430
miles ot railtoad under construction, the
principal ones being tlie branch of the
Northwestern from Cliadron toward the
Black Hills and the James river Valley
road, between Jamestown and LaMoure.
Dakota's first territorial fair was held at
Huron,' beginning Septembei 29, and
was a pronounced success. The stock
exhibit Is cfpccially praised for its
splendid showing. The report intimates
that about half ..the Sioux reservation
will be opened for settlement during the
coming session of Congress, a consum
mation devoutly to be wished. Although
we could wish tlrat. Mr. Dunlap was not
so partisan in his championship ot
South Dakota, we can yet congratulate
(he Territory.-, at large on having
secured such an able and tireless worker
P5
1®$
::v
MAN UPAOTUtofiO
a*-"'
»h« Adun&WvUako JTfg. Oo.
6M*OAqo.
Ifc
^OSTOM,. as Mr. Danlap.&r his
OHM
wm
SIOCK NOTES.
"i
qu'btfitlOBs in %he Chicago market! 1
Extra prime beeves, 9 6/)0
Choice to.tani? shfypjjjpg,. Oft&a 5.10,
Good: to choice shipping,-...
.$4.40 8.25
Comnloii to good shippingH.$l^)[email protected] 465
Poor to lnadium steers _$3.40"[email protected] 4.00
Fair to choice eows,. [email protected] 3^0
Inferior to medium cows.. .$l.fe. 2.25
Poor to choice bulls.........11.50 2.70
Stockers, 550 to860 lbs*....$2.25 3^0
Feeders, 875 to l,l30 Ibs,.. .$3.20 3.80
Grass-fed Texahs.......$2.55 3.40
Slop-fed cattle :[email protected] 5^5
Northern wintered*: Texans...$2.75 3^0
Northern range [email protected] 4.75
Milch cows, $ iiead,.c:. .$25.00 60.00
Stock calves,...... Sii... ,$Q.OO @15.00
Our market' report shows a falling off
in Chicago prices in the past few days of
from ten to thirty cents. Most grade3 of
western range cattle sold from fifteen to
thirty-five cents lower. The: best Mon
tana range cattle sold from $4£[email protected], the
latter being the top .figure, except that
on Monday some choice 1445 pound cat
tle sold for 5.70. Far west cattle sold at
[email protected] The combined receipts of
cattle last week at Chicago, New York,
Kansas City and St. Louis was 83,874, an
increase of 7,400, the most of which
increase was. at Chicago. The receipts
of cattle for October to date in Chicago
show a decrease of 5,000 as compared
with a corresponding period last year.
The special cablegram -from Liverpool to
the Drovers Journal quoted best Ameri
can cattle ]Ac lb lower at 12J£c $
dressed.
*'Cattle Buiiisg in Uruguay.
Tlie republic of Uruguay is devoting
itself to cattle faitiiug on an extraordin-.
ary wholesale scale. One Of the leading
raisers, recently interviewed, has given
the statistics. Jiight million horned
cattle' 20,000,000 sheep, and 1,500,000
horses constitute the stock in trade of
this model but extensive pastoral repub
lic. The export returns show what a
heavy customer En^laud continues to be.
She takes 5 per cent of the total exports,
Brazil being debited to 20, France to 17v
tlie United States to 11, and all others to
the remaining 27. The country is most
prosperous and the tide of immigration
20,221 last year. Women arc,
however, in an alarming minority, and
constitute less tbajff a quarter of the
arrivals. Four thousand vessels sailed
in the same year from the port of Monte
video, with a registered tonnage of over
1,500,000. Next come statistics about
the catile. The average novillo, the
steer most used for fattening, gives 150
pounds of jerked beef, 68 pounds of salted
hide, and 40 pounds of grease, and besides
that there are the bone ash, the hair and
the borne. Business is done on such a
wholesale scale that everything is utiliz
ed. All his constituent parts thus
counted up, and allowed for, the novillo
brings in $20 a head, while the commis
sion for bringing to the packers, the cost
of killing and preparing for market is
about $4, leaving the net proceeds at $16.
It will be seen that such a business as
this is necessarily extremely profitable.
In the slaughter houses, called "eala
deros," 500 cattle a day are killed. A
lasso, one end of which is attached to a
steam winch, is thrown over tho horns
of the victim and the winch set working
tlie beast is summarily hauled up
agaiust abridge upou. which stands the
slaughter man, "who with a stab back
of and between tlie horns with a large
dagger-kuife cuts the spinal cord, and
the animal drops dead without a strug
le."—[Chicago TijilrcBe.
$ $ & S S
&•&**»
"*,
........
'^or SuleSi' #|l
Six cows, tvAlve two-year-old stoers,
ninety two and three-year-old heifere,
nine yearling- heifers and two bulls..
The stock is all in good condition and ls
from Minnesota and Iowa. Horses &nd
outfit with cattle, if desired. Stock
delivered here. Address,
?*°P AI. PACKABD,
Medora,
v~
,V'£ 'JS,
around to see the speet&ele.4 The young
man jumped from the wagon and tbu
swiftly to a steer, Which ho grasped firm
ly by the tail. Then, looking confidently
at us, lie gave (1m- tall a savage Jert,
There was some hitch. Ill the perform
ance'. 1fh^^te«»mjito4. turn* ermer-
Intense rage, ibm t^jfiilloli&aJe,
hi ui
on hta.lang. JJglUy polished liorwv^Sly i,
acquaintance still grasping the BtefetV*^
-tail tightly, ]$gl£0mi& ttud The
steer kicked ana beltowedi and tttrned
faster and faster after 1dm. The entirB
herd gathered, and stood in a vast circle,
looking at tlie grewsome ,. spectacle,
Soontiie taii-pullfalg yonnguan called
for help.- We eonld not have helped him
if liis life depended 6n' it- The herders
Jiad laughed uiitil they could hardly sit
in their saddles. I held on to ,the sides
of the wagon box to-~Veep from falling
out. Bare-headed, with' his -long hair
streaming behind him and ineessaut
calls for eid Roaring «ut. of his mouUi,
and an occasional: howl at tho contract
ing circle of eattle tiiat wer-e being excit
ed, to give varifety-t® the furious uproar,
my friend sped round and ronnd. And
the steer, with man bellows and intense
rage, chased his tail and the two-leggeil
animal tl:at liad presnmptonsly lasteced
on to It. Finally I recovered my
strength, and drove tlie wagon elose t»
the revolving pair. My friend loosened
his grasp on the tail and jnmped in.'
Before he was fairly in .the wagon we
wore galloping over the prairie with tho
enraged steer in hot pursuit. Five
Mr. Flurewalker rapidly collccts his
thoughts together and tries to concen- t%p
trate all tile faculties of his mind in
readiness for the first question, which ho
is a little fearful may be a poser.
THE TT1BST QUESTION.
"In sailing from Mozambique to the
Straits of Malabar, what are the varia
tions in the magnetic needle, and what
is the cause of these variations?"
How a Cowboy Tailed a Steer.
Ill Kansas, during the days when the
cattle growing excitement ran high
there lived the most-reckless, dare-devil
sot of young men, writes a Texas corres
pondent to the Pittsburgh Dispatch, I
have ever met. There."were no old men
among them. A -man of forty was look
ed upon as a patriarch, one who was enti
tled to be a' candidate tot admission to
the home of the aged and infirm. These
young men rode up and down the Texas
cattle trail from Trinity river to the
Republican. When in Texas, to gather
their herds, they rode furiously they
hunted panthers they conrsed loafer
olveS they ate mavericks without
number, and on the ronnd-up they were
tlie most reckless ot all the hard-riding
meii that -gathered on Uie southern
ranges. Wlien tliey returned to Kansas
with their cattle they had many stories
about .the skill of the Texas cowboys to
relate. A young acquaintance of mine
told me of the Texas cowboys tailing dvil-eerviee, questions totlie P»sideB^|
Bteeis. that is, riding alongside a run
ning steer and grasping his elevated tall,
and by giving it powerful lifting jerk,
throwing the- steer heels over head,
much to his discomfiture and subsequent
r' 'i
3 4 &1
1
1
A,
PRICE
J- -iffii'AA&i
"r\va'
$aw» PER
YEAR
\f i-
I
young man offered to perforin the trick. V'li-'yj4 *4. -S 5
We got into wagon and drme to where
my
herd vras graiiBg, The cattie Were i\"i
just off the trail Aid were aofc strong. '^'j
My friend eontempiuoely said .there rmen
no need of .»*-'*•
er'e ponies to "taii" those steers lie conld V1
do It on foot The herders gathered
-'U
*J^-RSl£n'igSt
tf ^11
^•3
ot
the herders quickly roped the steer, and
one of tlie funniest scenes I ever saw ou
the range -was at an end. Afterward my
friend mounted a pony and neatly ^tail
ed" that steer with great satisfaction to
himself and- damage to the animal anil
my pocket-book.—[Texas Lfi. JonrnsL.
Civil-Service Excrcinatiou.
Mr. James Flurewalker, having become
tired of machine politico, aspires to A
permanent, official position under the
Federal Government, and having had'
several yetdj^ experience as a sugar
expert, lie ai^fes for the office of Sugar
Inspector in tlie customs service. In
due time he is summoned before the Civ
il Service Examining Board. Feeling
confident of his general intelligence, and
of his special qualifications for the posit
tion, he presents himself for examina
tion wearing an easy ancl benignant
smile.
$r
Mr. Flurewalker requests a repetition
of the question. It is repeated--twice—
three times—but Mr. F. is too flurried to
reply.
Perhaps you can tell us where Moz*
amttique is?" says one of the examiners, -t -s^
Oh yes! Of (ourfie. Why.it is off to the
eastward somewhere—an archipelago or
a peninsula, or something. It is some- "v|
where near Mesopotamia." v..
"That will do sir." .i
"What is the rule in Shelly's case?" isil
"Eh! in Bhellj's case?"
"Yes sir." :«j|
"Well, I suppose it's the same rule as
with any other man. If he is squarely ssyfaf
elected, count him in. I never heard
that Shelley had any particular pull."
"That will do, sir."
"Describe the process of germination ~:tf
in a seed." '^''^1
"In a seed?"
"Yes, sir."
"The process o{ what?'
"Germination.", $
"Oh! the progress of the German
nation! Well since the battle of Koen
iggratz and the war with France
there—"
"Tliat will do." -H M,
"What is meant by the precession of a'b&
the equinoxes?" ,,
"The equinoxes?" ,, ,1
"The procession of the equinoxes
"No! the precession of the equinoxes."
"Never heard of it What does it
relate to?"
"Cosmogony."
"Wliat?"
"Well, astronomy-"
"0! I see now, ,gentlemeti yott mast
have made a mistake. am not air
applicant tor an astronomical position
I only want to be a sugar inspector*
"That will do sir. We are
aware of that Now t»y attention
answer our questions. n.'ws
"Explain the rel&tiou of .ttie molecu
lar theory to the nebular hypothesis."
"No, I Uuuik yon, I had rather no^fij:
perhaps yon ha^ better put some of you^i
and some (A his- Cabinet Whea
pass Iwill call aroand again." fsfeg
"Sir, you may go."
And
nr.
Finrewriker
"i
i-l
':goe»4ye^"'lifeS
goes back to machine
York Telegram.
S
w'.
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