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The Wahpeton times. [volume] (Wahpeton, Richland County, Dakota [N.D.]) 1879-1919, July 25, 1884, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024779/1884-07-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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PIATT ft PuRCELL,
CavXMMMTAT-iAW,
E»t»te,
Lo«n
OrwotBi
*Ba Insurance Agents
J. C. Pyatt, Dept. Mtt. Atty.
Wrtpeton.Dakota,
fRIEDLAHDEB ft BESSIE,
Law, Collection and Real Estate, Insurance and
General Agency Business,
1. ®a'c0'a Ave, near 8d. Street, Wahpeton, Dakota.
Deutsche Advokaten.
s. A. SNYDER,
ATTORNET-AT-LAW, WAHPKTOK, DAKOTA.
Money to Loan on Real Estate and'Chattel
Security.
OVer Pelrce's hardware store.
McCqjPAber & Bogdrt,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW.
Special Attention Given to Collection.
A WAHFETOH, DAKOTA.
IR,. 3ST. TJSTE^
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Real Estate and Loans. Office in Howry's
new store.
WAAPETON, DAKOTA. nlv8
L. B. EVERDELL,
:,vl, Attorney at Law,
Office opposite the Minnesota House,
14 Breckenridge, Minn.
Ezra C. Valentine,
.14 Attorney at Law,
Real Estate Exchanged and Money to Loan.
Office in court house, Breckenridge, Minn.
Geo. D. Swaine, M. D,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Wahpeton, Dakota.
Diseases of women a specialty. Ofllce on Da.
kota avenue. 6
G. W. ARBUCKJjE, M. D.,
HOUKEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SORQSOK.
BKSOKINRISOK, ... MIKHESOTA.
Diseases of Women a Specialty, also the Eye
and Ear.
wahpeton calls, promptly responded to.
Qfficeand Reaience: Arbuckle's new building.
HENRY C. RENO,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON, Wahpeton, D. T.
Office over Howry's Bee Hive Store. Resi
dence, Dr. Hatten's house, Third street. w40
G. BARKOW, M. D.,
Pliysician and Surgeon,
Office over Martin Scliott's store,
WAHPETON, DAKOTA, nl
H. B. GRAND ALL,
Real Estate Ageift, Notary Public and Collector.
Farms and Town Lots for Sale.
COLFAX, Richland County, DAKOTA
GEO HANIiY,
SURGEON DENTIST
Office with Dr. Geo. B. Swaine, over Pelrce's
Hardware store, Wahpeton, D. T.
ANTON 6ILLES
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER
Shop on Dakota avenue, opposite N. Schott's
store. All kinds of repairing promptly attended
to.
Joseph C. Henvis,
Real Estate Office
GRAND VIEW FARM, D.T.
Parties located on goverment land. Money to
Loan and Final Proofs Made. June9
101
Dakota Avenue,
WAHPETON, DAKOTA,
REGISTER OF DEEDS.
Titles to lands investigated, and correct ab
gtracts furnished. Taxes paid for non-residents.
Collections made, and promptly remitted.
Lands bought and sold.
I will see that the tax is cancelled on the treas
urer's records, and the proper amount of tax
collected. My charges are $
1.00 for each receipt.
&
Proprietors of
EXCELCIOR MEAT MARKET.
Dealers in all kinds of fresh and salt meats,
hams, bacon and sausuge constantly on hund.
Cash paid for fut cattle, hides and furs. Meat
delivered to any part of Wahpeton and Breckin
idge, fre» of charge.
•Commercial Hotel
'WAHPETON, DAKOTA.
Good Accomodation Guarnteed to the transient
Public.
l»n.m
S0HM1TT,
MICHAEL
Wahpeton,
s*
Vol. 6.
10
RESTADBiHT MM,
ELI VACHON, Propr.
Opposite Opera Bouse. Feb. 27n47
JOHN M. RUGGLES,
Proorietor.
Money to Loan!
OS CHATTELS AND REAL ESTATE.
Funds always On Hand for Chattel Loans
Farm Lands City Property bought and sold.
Kellogg & Hyatt,
WAHPETON, DAKOTA.
O. WIENSMA, M. D.
Phy sician* and Surgeon,
OFFICE OVER MILLER'S DRUG STORE,
English, German and Scandinavian Languages
Spoken. n'2
WAHPETON, DAKOTA.
Cor. Dakota Ajreiae Bid Sixth Street.
Dakota
One Block from St. PM M. M. depot.
Good Sample Rqoids.
D. H. SMITH, Prop.
Dr. T. L. Taylor
SURGEON DENTIST,
hag permanently located tn Wahpeton, and is
—btnrr
prepared to do a j^eneral dentistry badness.
!JVr'
Best Oaality Teeth, SIS per Set Extmtiig Sic
V*
£7*i
Cleft palates ang all inegnlarities of children'*
teetl^i «hall receive the latest mode oi treatment.
=AUh wowt
w«baht*»,
'J*.
Wahpeton, Dakota.,
Wmz
News Notes.
Crickets are becoming a scourge
in Washington territory.
It is proposed to opoii buttermilk
saloons in Iowa to replace the beer.
Mrs. Garfield is in the east,
and has just arranged for the admis
sion of her daughter into a school at
Farrington, Connecticut.
The Henry Bill Publishing com
pany, of Norwich, Conn., .has been
granted an injunction in the United
States court against A. H. Smyth
& Co., of Columbus, Ohio, to restrain
them from selling Blaine's "Twenty
Years in Congress."
St. Vincent, 18: The Canadian
Pacific agent, J. A. Gordon, at the
transfer, has received notice that af
ter Sunday next, the 20th, no more
business will be transacted there for
the Canadian Pacific that Emerson
will be the terminus of the road,
and freights shall be billed to Emer
son instead of St. Vincent.
Kenosha, Wis., 14: Miss Emma
Kempf, the young lady whose cloth
ing caught fire while out riding with
a young gentleman at Racine yes
terday, died this morning at 10
o'clock. Shirley, whose cigar caused
the death of the girl, is nearly crazed
over the result of the accident.
Coroner Komas will hold an invest
igation.
New York, 14: James Reilly, the
suake charmer, died tonight from
the bite of a rattlesnake received
yesterday afternoon. The physicians
had given him until Wednesday at
4 o'clock to live. At noon lieilly's
pulse was almost imperceptible, al
though he was conscious, and com
prehended all that was said to him.
So quickly did the poison do its work
that the body did not swell as is
usual in such cases, but was covered
with an exact reproduction of the
mottled spots on the snake.
The following unique speech was
made by an Indian chief, Swift Bird,
at Union, Potter county, Dak., July
4th: "God made this ground and
the world. I see lots of people here.
I came to tell you of the past life of
the Indians here. Some time ago
there were no houses but Indian
houses. No white man lived here
then. Had lots to eat those days—
lots of meat. The buffalo are all
killed now and the Indians have
very little to eat now. My heart is
good to see so many people liere.
Treat me good. All Indians' hearts
good now. Trust in God for the
future. Good feeling with every
body. That's all."
Washington, 8: Miss Ilattie Snell,
a little girl of thirteen years, living
at Johnsonville, N. Y., where the
Episcopal society were trying to
raise money to build anew church,
conceived the plan of sending to the
statesmen at Washington to secure
aid. She wrote letters to nearly
everybody whose names appear in
the congressional directory, asking
each to contribute a few bricks. Her
plan was so novel that the responses
were very large, and among the con
tributors were President Arthur, all
the members of the cabinet, General
Sheridan, Vice President Edmunds,
Speaker Carlisle, many of the senat
ors and a large number of congress
men. Now she proposes to sell the
autographs which accompanied the
contribution.
About 8 o'clock Saturday evening,
H. P. Ernst of St. Paul was drowned
in White Bear lake. Ernst and a
man named Teauber landed in a
boat around the point of the-island.
Ernst proceded to take a bath, while
Teauber took a walk along the shore
to pick up shells and pebbles. When
Teauber returned to the place where
Ernst had been, he found his friend's
clothes on the shore, but the friend
was not to be seen. The body has
not yet been recovered. Ernst's wife
procured a divorce from Jiim at the
last term of district court, on the
ground of an adultery committed
with one Lena Krentt, After the
divorce was granted, on the 20th
day of June, Lena Krentt and Ernst
were both arrested for adultery at
the instance of the husband of the
former, and both were placed under
bonds to appear at the next term of
the district court for trial.
The statue of Margaret Haugliery,
the first monument ever raised in
thd United-States to a woman, was
unyeUed last week in New Orleans
in the presence of an immence audi
enee, including hundreds of orphans
from the asylum of the city. Mar
Shristian
iret Haughery was an unlettered
woman, who by her energy
and industry amassed a competence.
Although a devout and fervent
Catholic, she knew no creed and re
cognized no faith in the dispensation
o£ her benevolence. Although she
responded to all worthy calls for
assistance, she bestowed most of her
bounty on the orphans, and when
she died ehe was known as the or
phans' friend. The statue repres:
ents Margaret sitting in a chair
clasping an orphan to her side, while
her nand rests upon the child, who
is^bending forward, looking up into
£,3
her face. The pedestal surmount
ing the base is of Italian marble.
The group is also of Italian marble.
The entire cost of the decoration for
the grand pedestal and statue will
be 86.500.
Work on laying the huge iron
syphon under the Milwaukee river
will be completed in a few days.
The syphon is a.part of the special
sewerage of the city, and is the
largest submerged pipe in the world,
being fifty-two Inches in diameter.
Moorhead Department Argus, 21:
A game of base bail between the
Moorhead and Breckenridge clubs
took place on the Moorhead grounds
yesterday afternoon. A large crowd
wais present. The first inning at its
completion indicated that the Breck
enridge boys would just have to take
the game, the score standing five
to one in their favor. After this,
however, the Moorheads caught their
second wind, and caught it so effect
ively that at the end of the ninth
inning the score stood eleven to
eleven. A tenth inning was necess
ary, in the course of which Moor
head took seven runs and the game,
the Breckenridge getting but a scant
five. Frazee, of Fargo, did some
good work in the pitcher's box for
the Moorhead club.
Water Works.
The Wahpeton Water Co. propose
to run 200 FBEE SERVICES, (to the
curbstone line) to applicants fpr
water supply who reside or own
buildings along the lines of water
mains. Call at the office early, be
fore it is too late for a free service.
Office north east corner Dakota
avenue and 2nd street in rear room
of the old postoffice building, ltf
Wives aud. Barkeepers.
Wives who have drinking hus
bands should cut this out and paste
it on the looking glass. A western
journal has the following very prac
tical remarks for those who cannot
get along without frequent whiskies:
Liquar dealers pay on an average
two dollars per gallon for whisky.
One gallon contains an average of
sixty-five drinks, and at ten cents a
drink, Ihe poor man pays six dollars
and a half pet gallon for his whisky.
In other words, he pays two dollars
for his whisky and four dollars and
a half to the man for handing it
over the bar. Make your wife your
bar-keeper. Lend her two dollars to
buy a gallon of whisky for a begin
ning, and every time you want a
drink go and pay ten cents for it.
By the time you drink a gallon she
will have six dollars and a half, or
enough to refund the two dollars
borrowed from you to pay for
another gallon of whisky and a bal
ance of two dollars and a half. She
will be able to conduct future opera
tions oniier own capital, and when
you become an inebriate, unable to
support yourself, shunned and dis
pised by all respectable persons, your
wife will have enough money to
keep you until you get ready to fill
a drunkard's grave.
How Arrow-Heads Were Made.
A very interesting question, says
a writer in the Chicago Tribune,
that is ever presenting itself-..to the
white man is: IIow did the Indians
form their arrow-heads and spear
points? One writer will tell us that
undoubtedly they knew of a means
of hardening copper (unknown to
us) and Iron, and thus made tools
with which they, shaped tlieni.
Others, again, think this in advance
of the red man's knowledge, and as
sert that he used a fish-bone as a
chisel with which he chipped off the
edges of his flint but this fish-bone
like others, wouldn't go down. A
year ago I was visiting around Nip
persink and Pishtaqua Lakes where
the Fox Indians were formerly num
erous. I saw several mounds and
burial places and many arrow heads,
etc, in possession of the inhabitants,
having been plowed up in the fields.
On the shores of the Pishtaqua lake
limestone and granite are found in
great abundance, and occasionally
bits of porphyry I take it—some
with red and some with blue mark
ings. Among the heads I saw were
some that seemed to be made of
this material though varying some
what in color.
1
collected some of the most flinty
looking pieces, and, while meditat
ing how a person without tools
would shape a *'liead" or "point"
from them, my eye rested upon a
pyramidal coral formation on a
piece of limestone. I wanted it. I
took a thin spall of granite as a
chisel and a gourd shaped cobble
stone as a mallet. Upon pounding,
I noticed the granite spalled off, al
ways leaving a sharp edge. Here
was the secret. Arrow-heads were
made by simply striking the flint on
the edge with a rounded surface,
and by directing the blow to one
side or the other, the edge could be
kept quite true. The thong-groove
is made by using a stone with a
sharp rounded edge. I made sever
al, and they all passed as -genuine,
except with those who were used to
handling them, and they would look
wise and say, "They look all right,
but the Indians never used that ma
terial in making them." I after
ward obtained a piece of flint, and
had no difficulty in shaping orfe.
Flint being hard and brittle, and
the fracture conchoidal, it is easy to
work, and is wby the red man se
lected it. F. M.
GOODMAN.
•t, .»
?&»*
Wahpeton, Richland Qounty, Dakota July 25, 1884.
Reuben Cleveland's Funeral.
The other day Win. Brophy of
McCauleyville received word that
Heuben Cleveland,, a brother-in-law
at Chicago had died, and he at once
set out to attend the funeral, Mrs.
Brophy's health not admitting of
the journey, which occured the 13th
instant at that city. "We notice that
the Inter Ocean and Tribune of Chi
cago give quite extensive reports of
the obsequies. In the course of the
Inter Ocean's remarks, said that Mr.
Cleveland was born at Montreal 1814,
and was consequently 70 years of
age, his parents being of English
descent, and settled in Connecticut
at an early day. He was married to
Miss Julia Slawson at Clinton, N.Y.,
when 18 years of age, and is a near
ralativo of Gov. Cleveland of New
York. During the war he went in
to the army and was captain of com
pany F, Eighth Illinois cavalry. It
seems that he was a pioneer in Chi
cago and was widely known and
much respected by everyone. Mr.
Brophy said this was the largest fun
eral procession he ever saw in Chi
cago. The Inter Ocean closed its
obituary as follows:
"Mr. Cleveland became a member
of the Masonic order in 1854 in this
city. At a later date he founded
Cleveland Lodge No. 211, which still
bears his name. He was a member
of Cleveland Lodge, Washington
chapter, Apollo commandery, Orien
tal. consistory and the Red Cross of
Constantine, being a 32d degree
mason. He was a member of post
28, G. A. It., and of the Veteran
Union League club. Mr. Cleveland
was a man whose loss will be keenly
felt by all who knew him and his
friends were legion."
The following is the notice of the
Tribune:
"The funeral of Reuben Cleveland
yesterday afternoon was attended
by a large gathering of friends and
members of the various associations
with which the deceased was con
nected. The procession formed in
front of the house of Ezra Cleveland,
No. 176 Walnnt street, and marched
to Park Avenue Methodist Episcopal
Church, where the funeral services
were held.
First came a body of the Grand
Army of tho Republic and Union
Veterans. After them was the
Apollo Comnjandery, No. 1, Knights
Templar, about seventy strong, un
der the command of H. T. Tiffany,
and headed by four drummers of the
Second Regiment. Next followed
some forty members of the Oriental
Consistory under II. II. Pond, and
about the same number of the Wash
ington Chapter. The Cleveland
Lodge, of which the deceased was
Master-Masou, turned out in force,
125 members marching in front of
the hearse.
The church was densely crowded.
The devotional exercises were con
ducted by the Rev. Samuel Davis,
and the musical part of the service
was exquisitly rendered by the
Apollo Commandery quartet, under
the leadership of Mr. C. C. Phillips.
Dr. Thomas spoke in touching
terms of the little group of mourners
present, and referred one by one to
the various orders which had come
to pay their respects to the memory
of the dead. It was tender and
affecting, he said, to see the Grand
Army of the Republic and the Union
Veterans place their flag about the
coffin of one who had never dishon
ored it, but had placed his life bet
ween it and dishonor. In alluding
to the deceased the speaker said that
he lived not to himself—his love
took in his neigbors, his country,
and all the orders represented. He
was unobtrusive and consistent he
made no great profession, and yet
in the sanctuary of his heart he tried
to be a true man to his house, his
order and his country.
The quartet then sang "Shall We
Meet Beyon the River?" and those
present were thereafter permitted
to file past the coffin and view for
the last time the face of the deceased.
The pall-bearers were: T. T. Gur
ney, John Murphy, Charles C. Crane,
P. J. Hussander, T. P. Pen-it, P.
McDonald of the Cleveland Lodge,
J. J. Buniton, F. W. Tourtellotte,
G. Heinrichs, J. E. Loomis, John
Maclean of the Apollo Commandery,
and W. II. Mead of the Chicago
Commandery."
And here area few lines written
by a gentleman who .knew and
esteemed the veteran soldier and
citizen:
BEUBKN CLEVELAND.
As each hroad oak grows old and disappears
Within the forest green,
So, one by one, our western pioneers
Pass from this lowly scene,
One more has gone to rest whom many knew,
Whom many honored here
Whose soul waskind,
whose hearty grasp was true
Whose friendship was sincere
Who lived not for himself who'saw above liiin
Something more grand than gain [him
Who leaves behind a thousand mends who love
Who part wltii him in pain.
Hejielped with Willing hands to grandly rear
Our city from the wild
That art, that cultdre and refinement here
Might have a hoasenjid guild.
O, strew his bier with (lowers fragrant beauty
And write above his grave:
A Soldier who came at the call of duty,
The nation's life to save.
Not one who struggled with a proud ambition
To glitter in the van.
But one who filled with honor each position
Of culaen*ndman.^
^H-\j 4,3rv
'V
rvt"
ffitV -V.
vJUS
uuApiwwirtiMw^
if %'''•$ if
W. A.
Respectfully,
OK
SEELY
car orders solicited. [wsi] Wahpeton, Dakota,
F. H. BUTLER &. CO.,
—Airl the—
DEALERS IN
Lumber, Sash, Doors,
Building Paper, Etc., Etc., Etc.,
At Wahpeton and Wyndmere, Dak,
JOHN NELSON'S
Before buying your SPRING GOODS go to JOHN NESLON and get
his prices on
Spring Goods,
SILKS, CASHMERES, HUNTINGS, GRENADINES, NUNS' "VEILING, WHITE
GOODS, HOSIERY, GLOVES, LACES, EMBROIDERIES, BUTTONS, NECKWEAR,
of all kinds, Ladies' und Misses' JACKETS and CIRCULARS, etc.
Shoes,
A Fine Assortment of Gentlemens', Ladies' and Childrens' SHOES and
SLIPPERS, including the Very Best Makes of FRENCH KID SHOES.
Carpets,
Do not send your orders out of .town for CARPETS I can sell you any
kind, from a HEMP or COTTON up to the very finest grades of BODY
BRUSSELS, at priccs to compare very favorably with Chicago and New
York markets.
Furnishing Goods,
I also carry a complete line of GENTLEMENS' FURNISHING GOODS, HEADY
MADE CLOTHING, and all the latest novelties in SPRING HATS.
Groceries,
My Grocery Department contains all the best brands of CANNED and
DUIED FiiviTti, carefully selected stock of TEAS and COEFEES, PATEXT
I ROCESS and other grades of FLOUR, PORK, HAMS, BACON, etc.
Stock Always Fresh.
NEW and FRESH GOODS in this Department arriving almost every day.
FKEE DELIVERY.
Pioneer Tailoring Establishment
Of Iliclihind County,
With tbnuks to my Customers, I havo a Gooil
Business ami a Promising Future.
E. RISC
HARD,
Our Tailor,
Has the Latest and Best Patrons and System the
country affords, and Guarantees8ati8fucti6u.He
carries the Largest and Most Complete Llnfl of
Clothes for Gentlemens' wear.
Every tourist makes it a point to leave his
measure with this House.
Prices Positively the LOWEST,
And all Work
GUARANTEED TO FIT.
JOHN NELSON.
LOMNG
1
%4
•a?' ./fc.w''* a?
ii
*k:Ti
& Co.,
DEALERE AKD JTOHBER8 Of F1R8T CLASS
FAR! MACHINERY, BUGGIES AKD WAGONS,
Paints, Oils, Glass, Belting and Mill Supplies,
Wagon Makers* nnd Blacksmiths' Materials,
Lumber Coal,-Lime, Hair and Cement.
3
DAKOTA AVENUE,
Opposite MERCHANTS HOTEL.
The Largest Stock of
CLOTHING
Gents' Furnisliiiiff Goods,
BOOTS and SHOES,
HATS and CAPS,
TRUNKS & VALISES.
All at Bottom Prices! Remember the Place,
A. &M.S$ern,
WAhpeton and Fargo, Dakota.
*«&«
t» VM
7r«i*fGotoK
We«t
Ho.#
780pm
SOSpM
15pm
,950pip
1047pm
ISOIam
118»m
8«Mtn
4 Stem
mma
780am
18am
9 Stem
LOASTTM
19.16pm
180pm
fMpn
4&Bpw
«V^i'
*=, Hit
y^'t
-i Hf ^.r,
.. Bt.Pavl/..
Howard Lin
..Utch$»M.
..WUjUaar
.. .Benton,..] Iig§*
... Morris ...i*M|H
TralnsOolug
West.
NO. 16.
8 07 a
A18 am
700 am
740 am
7KB am
1035 am
IS SOp
12 IS
IM10M
to (Kpm a
.... Wnbpeton.....
...... Wafo«tt_..,v.
.....Davenport......
Everest".... '.
..... Casselton.....
MayvUle.......
......Portland......
........Hope......
•40JP*
4mpm
#wj
8I(p
at
Trains ran to Hope
Mondays, Wednesdays And Friday*,^
Tralcs ran to Portland
Tuesdays, Thursdays and 8atttrdayn.
Northern Pacific*
PASSENGER TRAINS
Eest Leaves Wahpeton .v. .'. 7:00 a
Arrives at St. Paul 6:SO pm
tLeaves St. Panl 8:S8am
West Leaves
Arrives at Wahpeton
Daily except snmuy.
St. Paul freight arr. at Wahpeton.^.... 2K5pat
Milnor accom'dation leaves 2:10 pm
A ttitltrao t!7
D1IV\A^
Daily except Sunday.
PULLMAN SLEEPnvO CA&S
are run without change on all trains from At.'
Panl and Minneapolis and Fargo and Dulntfa,
for beauty and comfort these cars are ntasnr.
passed.
ZLEOANT HOATOir CHAIR CAM.
on day trains between Fargo and Maudan. ThesC
ears are fixed with new reclining chairs, and
oUter spelal attractions to the traveler.
SUPZ'RD DIJfINO
CAM
without exception, the iinest on the continent
are run on all trains. First-class meals, 7Bc.
Tlie Hoi Bit
Near Kotschevar Bros, store.
LUNCH
Served at all times, consisting of
O S E S
In tlielr Various Forms,
Wines. Liquors & Cigars
will. NORTHEY.
J. R. BUXTON,
Attorney at Law,
Money to Loan on Real Estate,
Final Proof? Made,
•And Collections Made.
Suits Prosecuted and Defended in all Courts of
Dakota and Minnesota.
Office one Door west of Bee Hive
Store.
WAHPETON, DAKOTA.
MONTREAL LAUNDRY
(Opposite Catholic Church.)
Wahpeton, Dakota,
1
Free of Charge to any part of
The City.
Will be Starched untl Ironed, or will deliver
dry, not Ironed.
Special rates to
pU #*3
Families.
"YV. E. IIAIsLY, Proprietor,
H. G-. ALBRECHT,
HARNES MAKER.
DEALER IK
Saddles, Collars, Blankets
Fly Nets, Ox Harness, Wlups, Brushes aud
Currie Combs, &c.,
Opposite Post oilice.
WAHPETON,
Dakota
H. A. "WORKMAN,
IS
M*rcscrilion§ Carefully Com
pounded.
Opp. John Nelson's Store.
WAHPETON, DAKOTA
B. C. BERG
Has at Uie Northern Pacific depot, Wahpeton.
Dukotn, sulllcient supply of the famous
O W O O
X)
From Underwood, Ottenail County, Minnesota,
constantly on hand.
Better quality than anywncre eise in town.
Orders for car load lots promptly attended to
Come and examine before purchasing.
All at Lowest Prices.
Lxxxii
b. C. BERQ
BOWLING-
ALLEY
And Sample Room,
JoseM Mesh, Proprietor
Corner See#ad Street awl Batota iveue.
Klegant Sample Boom and finest Double Bow*
ling Alley tlie northwest. S8wl5
Wahpeton, Dakota.
Continental Hotel
CHARLJp BRANDON,
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with the Heme* .'
THIRD STREET,
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