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The Wahpeton times. [volume] (Wahpeton, Richland County, Dakota [N.D.]) 1879-1919, July 06, 1911, Image 1

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WAR ON TREATY IS
APPROACHING END
Five Republican SenatorBi United
With Demooratio Side, Can
Pass Various Tariff Bills
Washington, July 2.—T he
backbone of the progressive op
position to Canadian reciproci
ty seems wilted and a vote
probably will be taken within
two weeks and reciprocity
adopted. Then will come to
question of passing the house
re is a
through the Senate. The pro
gressive Republicans ins is
that they wish to adopt a free
list bill and also bills revising
all the important schedules, bat
the majority of the members
feel that such measures should
be framed in view of the Re*
publican principle ot protection.
ABANDON "REASONABLE PWSFITS"
PROVISION
The progressives seem will
ing to abandon the provision of
-the last National Republican
platform which calls for '"rea
sonable profits/' but they are
not willing to reduce the tariff
below the figures needed to af
ford protection sufficient to
cover the difference in the
wage cost of production.
Whether sufficient votes to paes
any tariff bills can be procured
under these eircumstaaces is
involved in speculation.
"We will not budge au inch
to meet the Republican insur
gents," said Senator Johnson
of Alabama, Democrat, todav*
"We voted for the insurgent
amendments to the Payne
Aldrich tariff bill, because it
was the only chance we had of
getting lower rates, but we are
not disposed to join with .them
again. We will stand by the
bills sent over from the House,
and will be glad to have the in
surgents' support in passing
them. If we are not able to put
them through this time, it will
be only two years when we will
have the votes in the Senate to
adopt these Democratic meas
ures."
NAY ME N THOROUGHGOING RE­
VISION
Only five progressive Repub
licans united with the Demo
cratic side, if the minority
forces can be kept intact, will
be required to pass the woolen,
cotton, free list and other tariff
bills. Should Senators La Fol
lette, Cummins, Clapp, Poin
dexter and Works vote for the
Democratic bills in the event
they are not able to get favor
able action upon the amend
ments they will propose, it will
mean thoroughgoing revision.
That there is a probability of
lis result is now being predict
ec
Bat no one is willing to ven
tare an authoritative prediction
as to what will be done. The
lack of effective leadership due
to the absence of a cohesive
majority makes the situation
muddled and the future most
uncertain.
p-\' HoutM lor Sal*.
f- I have several residences for
aale.
Modern and otherwise.
Good locations. Easy terms.
G. E. WALLACE.
About Appondloltlo
Wahpeton people can now
learn juat how Appendicitis
Starts
and bow they
«.li.jH^'v
u.& -*xirl4.,li' tc -j *v
can
EASI­
LY prevent it. Ask for the free
Appendicitis book at Henry
Milter & Co., Druggists.
rjs, fcV
Sg«}HV^
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k*
E. S. Cameron M. D. Keeney
and Mr. Larson left for Grand
Forks yesterday morning to
represent the M. B. A. lodge at
the state convention.
Prohn Bakory Sold
Joseph Smith and Carl Jacob
son have bought atid taken
possession of the Prehn Bakery.
These are two bright and prac.
tical young business men, and
we predict a prosperous busi
ness for this new firm
Harris—Hatch
A very quiet wedding took
place last Monday at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. G. I» Harris,
when their daughter, Lillian,
became the bride cf Warren
Hatch of Fergus Falls. The
bride is a graduate of our high
school, and the groom is a pros
perous business man of Fer
gus Falls. The Times joins
with their man? friends
wishing them a happy and
prosperous life.
Mothodlot Monfton
Mrs. White and daughter,
Cecil from Eyebrow are visit
insr with friends in Wahpeton.
At the close of the doings in
the circus tents on Tuesday a
large number of the men went
out to the Riverside Cemetery
and gathered around the brok
en Column over the dust of the
two men killed here fourteen
years ago. A short service of
a Memorial nature was engag
•ed in. Tiae men joined heartily
in the repeating of the Lord's
Prayer aed listened with rapt
attention to the numbers given
by Prof. C. C. Kirk's quartette
The Memorial address was giv
en by Rev. W. J. Hutcheson.
The church was used as a
rest rootn oja Tuesday. The
next time a gathering of a
similar nature comes to town
we intend making it generally
known that people who behave
themselves are invited to use
the church as a place of rest
and refreshment.
Miss Jennie Rieke left for
Portland, Oregon, on WVdnee
day.
The Douglasses write of en
joyable times on the Pacific
coast.
Mrs. Staton accompanies the
Wallace't to the lakes this
week.
The young people of the Ep
worth League, following their
practice of last year, will not
have any public devotional
meetings until the first Sunday
in September.
The lecture given by Dr. J.
M. Walters of Fargo on Friday
last was listened to by a large
audience.
Rev. Hutcheson gave his
lecture on "New Foundland"
on Monday night. When one
realizes that summer is heie
with all that summer means
empty homes and folks far
a a at an a
splendid. The choir is pleased
with the financial results ac
cruing to the sale of tickets for
this lecture course.'
Services at the usual hours
of 10:30 a. m., and 8 p. m.,' on
Sunday. All are cordially in
vited to come and to bring any
visiting friends with them.
A $100. Flno For Hunting With
out a Uoonto
Residence license can be se
cured ot the county auditor
for $1.00.
Non-residence license from
the State Board of Control for
$35.00.
I
)-f\ ^T ..K^- I. w.#***
REPORT ON STEEL
TRUST MADE PUBLIC
Huge Earnings of the Giant Cor
poration Are Shown. Big
Fees Charged
Capitalization by the United
States Steel corporation far in
excess of property values.
An average rate of profit fropi
1901 to 19 tO on the corporation's
actual investment, as computed
by the bureau, of 12 per cent.
An almost continuous de
crease in the corporation's pro
portion of the output of princi
pal steel products, but a mark
ed increase in its ownership or
control of iron ore deposits.
The bureau places the value
of the ore reserves of the cor
poration at $10(5,000,000, while
the corporation itself places
their value at $700,000,S)0.
To prevent ore from falling
auto the hands of independent
producers, or to prevent the
Hill interests from founding a
rival steel business, the corpor
ation granted to the G?eat
Northern road the Hill le&ses,
whicn guarantee the largest
royalties ev-er known in thtf oie
business,
Tne corporation controls 75
per cent of thu available ore,
and because of this ami it- con
trol of the transportation facili
ties in »h«s ordistrict, occupies
a commanding position in the
steel iridn»trv
MARRIED WOMEN AND CON'
TRACT8.
Switzerland is in an uproar as the
outgrowth of a recent decision of its
federal court. The decision was equiv
alent to a declaration that a married
woman in that country cannot be held
to any contract which she makes with
out her husband's approval. This de
cision leaves a bank which instituted
the litigation to whistle for $6,000
which was risked in a contract with a
married woman, whose husband was
not called into consultation when it
was made. As to what should be
done, differences of opinion prevail,
says the Milwaukee Wisconsin. Some
business men are for the enactment
of a law holding women equally liable
with men for carrying out the provi
sions of contracts. Others suggest
that all married women in Switzer
land shall bear a small official indel
ible tattoo mark' on their wrists so
that they may be1 recognized. The
finding of the Swiss court is by no
means without analogy. In respect
of contracts made by one Individual
being void without the consent of an
other it is matched by the law in this
country which prevents a husband
from selling the family homestead un
less his wife joins in the deed. After
all the Swiss situation is not so ter
rible for people in traiie.
It is figured that there are at least
ten billions of acres of well-watered
land In the tropics, and this would at
ip
gjesSpHML«
170,000,(100,000 pounds of bananas.
With the staff of life produced in tbs
moist tropics, the entire temperate,
the subtropical and the dryer tropical
regions will be tree to produce cotton,
wool and necessary food crops, such
as juicy fruits, green vegetables, poul
try and* dairy products. Under such
conditions the world would support
166,000,000,000 human beings—Just 100
times the present population—and yet
tbs wise men fear tbs world's food
supply will run out because the wheat
lands of the temperate zones are about
all taketf up. Bananas csn bs dried
like figs and dates for shipment, and
they will keep under any proper con
ditions.
Except in the bleachers baseball can
be played in any language.
Warm weather hatches out vacation
plans.
For Salo
One fine 15 months old Hol
stean bull for sale cheap, ask
Sheriff Moody.
f-»''
11
A Weekly Newspaper Published in the Interests of Wahpeton and Richland County
VOLUME XXXV WAHPETON, RICHLAND COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1911 NUMBER 17
Wahpeton Times
Mr atid Mrs. Herbert Beck
er are injuring a visit fiom Mr
Bowers and family of Ketisal,
N. Dak. Mr. Bowers is a broth
er of Mrs. Becker.
A Narrow Eooapo
Max Cameron had a narrow
escape from electrocution last
Monday. While walking near
the Lutheran Bible school he
took hold of a guv wire that,
upon'which a 2300 volt primary
wire .was grounded. He was
unable to let go although the
current knocked him down, his
free hand being burned bj' com
ing in com.ic. with the ground.
Gilbert tii-t «.:«•, happened to be
riding by at. iiie time, came
to his assistance, jerking him
loose from U'.e wit'- am', melting
quite a sh.ei in return. If the
grounu had been dtiuip or had
the boysbt en ou a cement walk
at the ttme, they would doubt
less both have been killed.
It is a very dangerous ti.ing
to touch any wires that
hanging from poles around the
city. There is current on day
end night and some of them
are very htgh voltage. The
»*if« thing i* to keep away from
auyof the wires that might
possible be crossed with any of
the circut wires.
away by the street cleaning depart-
ment." The bug that spoiled the fish
ing when it came and snapped when
you stepped on it? We don't know—
but we are reasonably sure that the
English sparrow did not exterminate
them.
A.Kentucky man went violently in
sane while riding in a Chicago taxi
cab. It is calculated to have that ef
fect to watch the register shove up
the cost. Furthermore, the result
seems to have been a measure of
economy since it evidently cut short
the taxation of the taxi.
This is the time of the year when
certain people go to the suburbs on
Sundays and tear flowering shrubs
and trees to pieces while the own
ers thereof are not watching. It
is one of the very poorest ways of
satisfying a longing for the beautiful.
Massachusetts' oldest woman ad
vises against flirting if one wishes to
live long, as flirting is "a useless
waste of energy." Especially is this
true after one has passed one's nine
tieth birthday.
Prince LidJ, who is soon to be
crowned emperor of Abyssinia, has a
wife who is only nine years old. He
might at least celebrate his corona
tion by making her a present of a
new doll.
Germany has banned freak shapes
in shoes. Possibly because the war
lord discovered that they were spoil
ing feet for marching—hammer toes,
flat feet and the like.
As the news comes from Paris that
the harem skirt has been condemned
there, the sporadic but strenuous ca
reer of that garment may be consid
ered finally ended.
Doctors tell us that the household cat
Is a carrier of disease germs. We
know from experience that a cat in
the vicinity often causes insomnia.
Twelve million dollars' worth ot
peanuts were consumed in this coun
try last year. This looks like a rather
full grown Infant industry.
Anna Burrows of Columbia univer
sity tells us that cooking Is like golf.
And some of the biscuits we have met
remind us of golf balls.
For summer diarrhoea
children always give Chamber
Iain's Colic, Cholera and Diarr
hoea Remedy and castor oil,
and a speedy cure is certain.
For aale by all dealers.
*. *V f, 'fS, *, ,. -v
V*Nt' i* "t
PROBABLE CHANGE
ON GAME BOARD
Fred Andrns of Fargo, it is Said,
Will Replace Olaf
Bjorke
When the newly appointed
board of game and tish control
holds its initial meeting in
Grand Forks this week, an im
portant change in the south
district is due to take place.
Olaf Bjorke, game warden for
that district.it is understood,
it to tis relegated in favor of!
Fred Anuius of Fargo.
The meeting of the new
board, which consists of W. E,
Byerly of Velva. T. 1). Casey of
Grafton and J. P. Lamb of
Michigan, was scheduled to be
held in the Forks Saturday,
but on account of the fact that
Mr. Byerly was unable to at
tend made a postponement ne
cessary.
Mr. Lamb was appointed Fri
day as the successor of Thomas
Griffiths of this city, while
Messrs. Byerly and Casey were
reappointed. Their first ap
pointment was made last win
ter. The appointments at this
time are made under the pro
visions of the new law just be
coming effective.
An inquirer wishes to know what
has become of "the old fashioned June
bug that used to swoop down on Chi
cago, die in countless millions around riputi, „D iv
the lampposts and have to be carted 1 Bjorke's homt- courtly would
Tbe people of Richland Mr.'
so ably tilled, since Burke has
been governor.
OF COURSE.
diver
Weeks—I once knew a man who r©
ally enjoyed moving.
Seeks—I don't believe it.
Weeks—It's a fact. You eee, b.4
lived in a houseboat..
-t-VT^v,
regret very much to 1 I ve Olaf ^'"esP'e architects, Fargo,
lose that position that lie lias
rth akota
com ai
call at the
5c 10c STORE
You will be surprised at the many articles
that can be secured from our 5 and 10
cent counters that you have been buying
at much higher prices.
Our stock consists of
Notions, Crockery, Tinware, Hard
ware, Enamel ware, Glassware,
Jewelry, Confectionery
The 5c & 10c Store
E. M. ANDEN, Prop. Wahpoton, N. Dak.
"z*
.•VI\v"
Company I leaves Friday
morning July 7th for the Mili
tary Post at Devils Lake, where
they will then go into camp for
ten days. Captain Thompson
takes about 35 men with him.
Ho Wao Killing Thorn Off
A teacher, wishing to im
press upon her pupils the popu
lation of China, said:
"The population of China is
so great that every time you
breathe two chinaman die."
In a short time a little boy at
the foot of the class was notic
ed by the teacher to be breath
ing and pufliug vigorously. The
teacher, much alarmed at his
I actions, inquired:
"What is the matter? What.
on earth are you doing?"
"Killing Chinamen," was the
I quick reply. "I don't like these
foreigners, so I'm getting rid of
them as quick as I can."—
Mack's National Monthly.
Gymnasium and Auditorium
Sealed bids will be received
by the State School of Science
board at the Science School
building, Wahpeton, N. D., un
til the hour of 2 o'clock p. m.,
July 13th, 1911, for the erection
of a gymnasium av.i
iutn including all labor and
material.
All bids must be in strict ac-
corda,u,e
JF
ts -«**•£.
r$
with plans and speci-
rel)f*ref'
4$
hy Haxby &
must be ac-
with a certified
check cf per cent v.f bid pay
able to CharJes Quinn, presi
dent, as an evidence that the
bidder will enter into contract
to erect the building.
Bids for the heating, plumb
jing, wiring and ventilation
must be included in the gener
al contract.
Plans can be seen at the
I Science School building, Wah
peton, Builders' Exchanges,
IAargo and Grand Fork?, N. I).,
in a is a S a
Minn., and at the ofiice o.f the
architect?, Fargo, N. Dakota.
The Board reserves the right,
to reject any and all bids.
By order of the Board.
HAXHY & GILLESPIK,
Architects,
Fargo, N. i.
See the dishes at The Time-s
hen in Wahpeton
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