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The Wahpeton times. [volume] (Wahpeton, Richland County, Dakota [N.D.]) 1879-1919, October 17, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024779/1918-10-17/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE
SIX
1
A new
program
to a
let Iron at
INEW ORDERS FOR ALL
PUBLIC EATING HOUSES
Food Administration Announces New anI Stricter
Food Program for Hotels, Restaurants and Boarding
Houses, Effective October 21st. Expect Cooperation
but Prepared to Make Orders "Effective.
for
a
or reelucc to obtain fats.
The
recent
^.
TO THE PUBLIC:
The following Is official information prepared at the
office of the Federal Food Administration upon instruct
tions from the United States Food Administration at
Washington and may be relied upon as official.
all public
nounced by the United States
eating
places,
Food
or
occasional patrons.
meal. Included in the definition
W
E. F. LADD,
Federal Food Administrator.
effecting October 21, is an­
Administration. The new rules apply to all
(places where cooked food is sold to be eaten on the premises and affect nine
million regular
The new regulations carry into effeet the recent announcement of the Food
Administration that in fulfilling the American promise to the Allies to send
them seventeen and a half million tons of food this year the public eating
iPiaces would be called upon "to undertake In many particulars a more strict
program than last year."
The general plan of the Food Administration with regard to the tm*
duct of public eating laces has been reduced to twelve definite "Qensral
Orders." These twei» rules furnish the specific measures by which ths
Food Administration plans to carry out, so far as public eating places are
concerned, the announced plan that for next year the American food pro
gram will be a direct reduction In the consumption of all food, particularly
the staples, rather than a series of emergency regulations such as meat
less and wheatless days and meals, and the substitution of one food for
another.
Concerning these twelve general orders the Food Administration in a circular
to the proprietors of public eating places says, "It has not been deemed advis
able or necessary at the present time actually to license the operation of public
eating places, but in cases where tb patriotic cooperation of such public eating
places cannot be secured by other means the United States Food Administration
will not hesitate to secure compliance with its orders through its control of the
distribution of sugar, flour and other food supplies.
"A FAILURE TO CONFORM TO ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ORDERS
WILL BE REGARDED AS A WASTEFUL PRACTICE FORBIDDEN BY
8ECTI0N FOUR OF THE FOOD CONTROL ACT OF AUGUST 10, 1917."
NEW ORDERS FOR PUBLIC EATING PLACES.
These general orders prohibit the serving of any breud that does not
contain at least the twenty per cent of wlieat flour substitutes, and of this
Victory bread no more than two ounces may be served to a patron at one
9eal If no Victory bread is served four ounces of other breads, such as
corn bread, muffins, Boston brown bread, etc., may be served. Bread
served at boarding camps is excepted as is bread containing at least one
half rye flour. No bread is to be served until after the first course is on
the table and no bread or toast may be served as a garniture.
Bacon is .also barred as a garniture and oniy one meat may be
served
of
mutton, pork and poultry. Not more than a half-ounce of butter is to be
ser\ort to one person at
a
limited to the saiue amount. "Double" cream is banned.
No sujrar lo\vls will be on the tables, a teaspoonful Is the limit for a
meal, and then only when asked for. Two pounds is the allowance to be
observed for each ninety meals served, including cooking.
No waste food may lie burned, but
all
RELY ON COOPERATION.
The Food Administration relics on the hearty cooperation of the vast
majority of hotel keepers and other proprietors of public en ting places to
observe these regulations voluntarily, but is prepared to use the full force of
its power iiyninsl the few who would interfere with the success of the plan.
paragraph in the circular says:
"We know that the majority of men in this class of business will welcome
this enforcement on the ground that it protects the patriot from the slacker
and jrives tie honest man who wants to save for the country protection from
the wrongful acts of his unpatriotic competitors."
Atii'iuion is specially directed towards the conservation of bread and butter,
cereals, meals, tilts, sugar, coffee, cheese and ice, to fresh vegetables and
fruits which should be served when possible, and to unnecessary suppers, teas,
luncheons iiml banquets, which are condemned as "fourth" meals. The Food
Administration desires as few fried dishes as possible.
Simplified service, with meats and vegetables fin one plate instead of
side dishes, and only necessary silverware, and simplification of the menu and
the menu card are urged as means of saving not only food, hut labor and paper.
The general bill of fare should be abandoned because the great variety of
dishes listed makes waste through spoilage. Simple bills for breakfast,
luncheon and dinner with limited dishes, changed from day to day for varietv,
are recommended, also the use of liors d' oeuvres. vegetable salads, fruits, sea
foods, made-over dishes and animal by-products, which save staples and utilize
many available foods.
The war program discourages the table d'hote meal except when confined to
few courses and small variety, as on the Continent. American plan hotels
should require guests to wrH« orders, and all menus should be in plain Kngiteh,
actually describing the food.
new regulations affect hotels, restaurants, dining cars, steamships,
clubs,
and other places where food is sold to be consumed on the premises. In
a message to the managers of such establishments the Food Administrator
fully
it
wnn
A':-'''"
y- .......
explains the food situation with reference to the war, and tells what the.
people of the United States must do in the way of saving food in order to make,
goad the-pledge
which, authorized by the President,
conference of food controllers.
meat are beef,
meal, and Cheddar (American) clieese
he
MUST PLAN FOR NEXT YEAR.
"There is «o prospect of a proper ending of the war before the cam
palgn of the uummer of 1919," says Mr. Hoover. "To attain victory we
must place in France three and a half million fighting men with the
greatest mechanical equipment that has ever been given to any army.
While we expect the position on the western front may be improved,
from a millta point of view, between now and then, there can be no
hope of a consummation of the end that we must secure until another
year has gone }y."
The Food Administrator points out that this accomplishment In 1919 will
•ave a boat of Anerican lives that will have to be sacrifled -if the war continues
until 1990. To strike the final blow in 1919 means that we must not only find
the Ben, shipping and equipment for this gigantic army, but that our own
army, the Allied armies and the civil population of the Allied countries must,
in the meantime, bars amide food if theig strength is to be maintained. "We
can do all these things," he declares, "and I believe we cau bring this business
to an and if every man, woman and child in the United States tests every
action every day sad hour by the one touchstone—Does this or that contribute
to winning the wan?"
"We must appieclably decrease our own Imports of food, notably sugar,
coffee and tropica) fruits," he says, and points out that while our wheat pro
duction this year
is
must be saved to feed animals
A
In
gave to the Allies at
better than last, our production of other cereals is less,
and our resources are no greater than last year. "However," he says, "it is
possible for us to five Europe its vastly increased requirements and at the
time have a margin over the quantity necessary to maintain our own
health and strength."
The Food Administrator finds we shall apparently have sufficient sugar to
take care of the present rate of consumption and to provide for the extra drain
of tha Allies, and sufficient coffee if wastefulness in brewing the beverage is
Of our own products there must be a reduction in consumption
of foodstuffs and of meats and fats that is to say, pork, beef,
dairy products and vegetable-oil products. Stress Is laid, however,
the fact that the rood Administration does not wish curtailment in the
of «llk for children.
Patriotic proprietor of public eating-places demand enforclble rules for'
lalnst the slacker In their business. The Federal rood
of the various states will enforce these orders against those
•ut sufficiently patriotic to follow
the
iv •T..
IN
Sh
TOT WAHPBT0N mOB
Me •r .iMn for »«b 1
EdUC*til',l*V'fp'-
1
Hiomanui.Mitam SSSiSH
'Mention a* Loader Whea WritingAdvertise*
By Henry Gteorge
(Original Single Tax Advocate.)
"I do not propose either to pur
chase or to confiscate private
property in land. The first would
be unjust the second needless. Let
the individuals who now bold it still
retain, if they want to, possession of
what they are pleased to call THEIR
land. Let them continue to call it
THEIR land, let them buy and sell
and bequeath and devise it. We
may safely leave them the shell, if
we take the KERNEL."
"It is not necessary to confiscate
land it is only necessary to confis
cate the rent. In this way the state
may become the universal landlord
without calling herself so."
POLITICAL ADVERTISING.
I
THAT THE LEADERS OF THE LEAGUE HAVE OFFICIALLY HERALDED
Frederic C. Howe's Book, "The High Cost of Living" as "The League Text Book," it
is certainly Fair and Proper to quote from it as correctly voicing the sentiment of the
league leaders. Here is whaV'The League Text Book" says:
"TS
Slv»
"Of all tfie measures proposed for the solution of these
problems the taxation of land values is the simplest and most effective.
"This reform, known generally as the single tax, is com­
paratively easy to inaugurate. It can be put into effect by the legislature of any State or by
a county where home rule in taxation exists, by an act which exempts from local taxation
all houses, barft*, improvements, growing crops, machinery, and personal propertv of
every nature. BV merely exempting these kinds of property from taxation ffll taxes will au
tomatically fall typon the land. No other taxes will be levied. As a result the taxes on land
will be automatically increased."
"If the tax upon the land was increased to 2 percent, on
the actual value it would become such a burden that owners would seek same means of
escape from it. A tax rate of 2 per cent on land valued at $100 an acre would amount to $2
per acre."
"For as taxes on land are increased the PRICE of the
LAND DIMINISHES. If the tax amounted to 5 or 6 per ceiit of the selling value, land would
have VERY LITTLE VALUE. And the taxation of all land values up to the full amount of
the rental values is the aim of those who believes jn the single tax philosophy."
"Leave Them The Shell—
We Take The Kernel
Frofai Statement of Henry George, Original Single Tax Advocate
Missouri Defeated the Single Tax, 508,137 to 86,647
_y..
v\
£im
kfhifcTt
A LEAGUE TEXT-BOOK
*ram. Can you hold your own in argument? Can you answer these
questions Don you wish a thousand times that you knew more facts
and could put up a better argument?
ktn take
ftrht
utbook. IWWIT
it was worth
yoo.Uy ammunition for thte
9BS-1I
.? textbook.
it told for 1.60. Whil«
lUihlkl™*'" wr •ria ta at Taa caa't ilM to b* withwrt
THE NATIONAL NONPARTISAN LEAGUE,
Bndirott Bide., St Paul. Mine.
Enclosed find (1.N for which plfw tend nr Bowt'i "Bl(t Cost of Liviar."
NilWrn
Addrtw.^..,^,^,..,^,.,,^—
HIUTART AIRSHII
MRMNUl
Bead carefully the words of Frederic Howe and Henry
George,—Think of the possibilities of unlimited public debt.
It is only fair that idle land be taxed to pay its fair
snare of cost of development but wouldn't it be wiser to sup
port the idle lands tax measure now pending in Congress
instead of exempting improvements and personal property,
mortgages, notes, etc., from taxation?
As taxes increase land values decrease.
Single Tax is a Part of the Program of State-Wide
Socialism
Think This Over Carefully
JOINT CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE
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