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The Wahpeton times. [volume] (Wahpeton, Richland County, Dakota [N.D.]) 1879-1919, January 09, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024779/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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OFFICIAL
on
VOLUIOIZLIII
nansiEHB
memetED success
HOT SO MANY FARMERS IX AT.
TENDANCE AS EXPECTED, BUT
INTERESTING MEETINGS ARE
HELD
6000 STUMOR FUTURE
MEETINGS AND LECTURES OF
VARIOUS KINDS ATTENDED BY
BOTH FARMERS AND BUSINESS
MEN"
"Farmers Week opened up with a
good day Tuesday morning. All
meetings were held according to pro
gram as published in advance. The
attendance wa
at
not very large on
Tuesday, but as this was the first day
of the first "farmers week" ever pulled
off in the county, the number who at
tended would seem to indicate that
the idea has taken root and will in
time grow to large proportions.
County Agent Wolf, who originated
the idea of Farmers Week and who is
principally responsible for working
out the plans and doing most of the
preparatory work, expressed himself
as somewhat disappointed with the
attendance, which lie said he had
hoped would be about dbuble. With
the exception of Mr. Wolf, however,
most people seemed to believe that
the attendance was encouraging,
especially in view of the fact that in
the past it has been almost impossi
ble at times to get even a quoruir,
present to transact the business of the
various organizations.
Farm Bureau Meeting
Twenty men from almost every
section of
the
county
county met with
agent
tue
«t the City Hall at 19:00
o'clock Tuesday morning in response
to his Invitation, for the purpose of
forming a farm Bureau for the coaaty
As there may be some who do not
understand fully just what a Farm
'nreau is, Mr. Wolf was asked for a
Bureau is, Mr. Wolf was asked tor a
statement explaining the purpose of
the organization. He said:
"The Farm Bureau has for its pur
pose united agricultural action
throughout the entire county. Here
tofore the lineB of activity of the
County Agent's office have been de
termined by me alone, and I toe been
compelled to work pretty much on my
•wm hook, as it were. The Farm
Bureau is to remedy this situation.
It shoUld be composed of a represent
ative from every section of the coun
ty—not only farmers bid men in other
lines of business who are in touch
with the agricultural aeeds the
community—who should meet at {least
once a year to talk over the various
needs of the agriculture in fhe coun
ty, and to formulate plan and deter
mine the Uses of activity tto be foUow.
ed ly the County Agent's office and
others.
"1 sent owt over fifty iavitations to
men in various parte of the ceirety,
in addition to the general invitation
extended to all, and there were about,
tweaty pre
seat at tue meeting. Most
parts of the county were represent
ed."
These -present proceeded with the
organization of the Bureau, electing
the following officers: Barl Taw.
Walcott, president Joe A. Retake,
Hankinson, vice president Geo. P.
Wolf, secretary and treasurer. The
«Aew» with the following seven men
compose the board of directors: J.
P. Reeder, Wahpeton C. B. Paalsoa,
Wyndmere Nels Brolander, Lldger
wood Lar* Thoraen, Abercromble
Steve Moulton, Wahpeton J. Klos
teraan, Mooreton Wallace Maatkow.
ske, Mooreton.
The organization being completed,
bat little further was doae at this
meeting.
At Stock PavlUlon
At 1:30 p. m. Tuesday, at the live
stock pavillion at the Fair grounds.
Dr. McMahon, state veterinarian,
gave a lecture and demonstration on
the subject "The Horse—Colic and
Drenching." About thirty-flvte farm
era attended the demonstration, all of
whom pronounced it instructive and
valuable. It was believed that the
audience would be greatly enlarged
for Dr. McMahon's lecture yesterday
afternoon and today. Yesterday his
subject was to be "The Cow—Dehorn,
ing. Self-sucking, .the Cud, Bloat,
Drenching ." This morning (Thurs
day) at 10:30 hie subject will be
"Fttm Surgery—Soi$ Neck and
(Coatlaud on page four)
COMMERCIAL CLUB
UTILITIES PLANT
OTHER INDUSTRIES TO BE EN.
COURAGED TO LOCATE. IN
WAHPETON
emus BOND TOj
FATING OTHER PROGRESSIVE
MOVEMENTS ON FOOT FOR COM.
XNG SUMMER
The Commercial Club at its regular
meeting on Tuesday evening took up
for discussion several matters which,
if carried out successfully, will aa
itaWlly advance tte progress due to
bit .this city. lite first matter of
Importance up for discussion was (the
proposition of nuking an effort to
secure the locating of the proposed
lfeertnihal elevator and mill at Wahpe
ton, and elsewhere -on this page will
be ifound the beat illustration wte
know of, why this plant »h«mild
be located here. From practically no.
Where in Che state does the grain
luoe :to be backhaatd on its way tto
Wahpeton adhere it will be stored or
made into flour, and thence started *n
its journey east to the seaboard Snr
expert. If any town in the state has
better claim for the Socation of thfc
enterprise, expense is transportation
due to direct route without backhatd
being the' foremost consideration, we
would like them to comeout and show:
Where they get it. Out of honesty
toward the people of the state, this
institution should be located in Wah
peton, and we believe that the com
mittee, consisting: of John Andrews.
August Bergman and F. E. Smith,
appointed to promote Wahpeton's in
terests la the matter, will liave but
little trouble in convincing t&e auth
orities of the advisability ot such, a
location.
The possibility of securing the loca
tion ot a hemp refinery, a braacb of
I the International Harvester
WAHPETON. HI
3)QMtN/oM OF
(Company
was also discussed, and it is quite
[probable that a concern of this kind
'will be located here.
In regard to the paving proposition,
gents, there's nothing to it. More
paving is going to be done this year,
and why not. Can any sane man
give a substantial reason for want
ing to wallow in mud instead of hav
ing a decent street on which to live?
The possibility now is that at least
8th and 6th streets will be paved
this year, the latter from the Science
School to the X. P. depot.
This would be an excellent move,
as 6th street especially, both north
and south, is sometimes practically
impossible. In conncetion with this
the city council will hold a special
meeting on January 20th, at which
time the proposition of considering
CA
vWahpeton
fWKSSS RESEftVE COMPANY
HAS SOCIAL EVENING
A sepeelal call was scent out by the
officers of the Citizens Reserve Com
pany announcing a social evening for
last Monday night, and the call was
responded to by a large number of the
members. The object was a 'sort of
get-together meeting for the purpose
of stimulating interest in the com
pany »nd keeping the same alive until
the return of all the boys from the
camps and oi^eneaa. The meeting
was tooth entertaining and instructive,
as the program contfiated mostly of
talks by men who have just returned
from ithe service, among whom were
Sgt. H. F. Murray, Wa. Early, L. B.'
Brown and Clyde Hautiken, the latter
having just returned fnom duty over
seas. Many interesting Zeatims were
brought out during the discourses
which dealt with army Bfe in general
from the time .of entering the
camps until the final discharge. Mr.
Hauslsen. who has been in the' over
seas airplane service, entertained the
audience for more than an hour ex
plaining the various mates and clas
ses of flying machines, engines, and
machine guns whhih were being used
at the front, aad if there is anything
that Clyde floes not know about
OOPWTT, WORTH DAKOTA, THUR8DAY, JANUARY 9, 1919
Illustrating the Advantages of Wahpeton as the Most
Fe as able Location for the N. Dak.Terminal Elevator
WAHPETON. NO. DAK., THE DISTRIBUTING POINT FOR THE NORTHWEST, WITHOUT A BACK-HAUL
The above illustration should be the means of pJacingWahpeton right up next to the foot lights when the time comes
for the State to select the location for the proposed terminal elevator and mill. A careful study of the map shows how
completely Wahpeton outclasses any other toWh in .the state, so far as shipping is concerned. Other wholesale and job
bing concerns would also do well to study the advantages offered by Wahpeton when seeking for favorable locations.
petitions tor paving 6th street will be
considered, resolutions for the eighth
street project being passed last year.
to due' to be hit by a
booming spirit during the coming
summer. All that is required Is to
sit tight, pull steady, and we will
place Wahpeton in the top row of
prominent cities of the state.
tthoBe
machines it must have 'been some
thing that the Germans ifibemsdves
kept up their sleeve
Card, ana Mrahmot, mrf. *,«.
balance of the program, except a shw$
business session, dnriag which it was
doeided to hold meetings every two
weeks hereafter, the next mooting to
b« held on January Mft.
LITTEL.TSCHAKCRT
WEDDING TUESDAY
#A very pretty wedding occurred in
this city Tuesday of this week, when
Miss Grace Littel, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Littel, of this city, and
Louis Tschakert, of Kent, were united
in marriage at the Catholic parson
age. by Rev. Fr. Haupt, of St. Mary's
church.
The bride wore a traveling suit and
was attended by her sister, Miss Lene
ata Littel. The groom, was dressed
in a dark blue suit and was attended
by his brother, Lawrence Tschakert.
The bride has grown to- womanhood
in this city and is one of our most
popular young ladies, and a leader
among her associates. The groom
has lived in Kent for a number of
years and is one of the leading young
men of that community. He has been
engaged in farming there for a num-
I. O. «. F. INSTALL OFFICERS
FOR THE CURRENT TERM
Last Tuesday night the Odd Fellows
lodge installed officers for the current
term as'follows:—
N. G.—R. L. Hawes, V. G.—C. B.
Zorn, Rec.-Sec'y.—E. P. Cox, Fin.
Sec'y.—B. W. Condit, Treae.—E. G.
Brummett, Warden—Chaa. G. Luick,
•Cond.—A. H. Burn son, R. 8. N. G.—
•Cbas. Formaa, L. 8. N. G.—R. X. Can.
Tiam, R. a V. G.—Jos. Prihoda, L. S. V.
S.—Jesse Baker, R. a a—H. M. Chris,
-.tensen, L. a a—A. W, Hoppert, I. G—
'G. Raamassoa, O. G-—«. J. Olson,
•Chap.—Jas. W. Potter.
G.
H. Noyes, D. IX a M„ of Cogs
well, was present and conducted the
installation ceremony, alter which
luncheon aad a short program was
bad.
XTTDE I1I1KO RACK FROM
SERVICE IS ENGLAND
The second man to return to Wah
peton from tte service overseas is
Clyde Haaskea, who arrived home the
W say*, the experience
was great paring Ms absence he
"deae" Londoa several times, and
among the other places visited by him
were Liverpool, Winchester, Bourne'
mouthe, Birmingham, and Shake
speare's home at Stratford-on Avon.
The aviation field at Baacombe Down,
where Mr. Hauskea was stationed dur
ing hie service in England, Is Attested
about 75 miles southwest of London,
and on the whole Clyde reports a very
Interesting trip.
INDIANS DEFEATED BY HIGHS
IN BASKET BALL GAME
The Wahpeton High School carried
off the honors Wednesday night by
defeating the Wahpeton Indians by a
score of 19 to 10, Schneller staring
for the High School by making five ot
the field baskets and one foul. Other
baskets were made as follows: Wolfe,
1 Lundy, 2 and Rice, 1. As this was
the first game of the season, the boys
did very well and we hope they will
do as well in the next game, which
will be with Casselton the latter part
of the week. Everybody turn out and
help them.
tr
VTA#
SIOUX falls
tier of years.
After the wedding ceremony a
sumptuous dinner was served and a
reception held at the home of the
bride to about fifty of the friendB and
relatives of the contracting partioB.
The couple were the recipients of a
large number of handsome and useful
gifts.
,Mr. and Mrs. Tschakert will leave
it once on a short wedding trip to
Watertown, S. D., and other points,
after which they will return to their
home on the groom's farm at Kent,
where they will reside. A dance and
recepttyn will be held at Kent on
their return.—Wilkin County Gazette.
inn rami
results
in
LOCAL MAN
WHILE ON
WITH WIFE
ACCIDENT
LOSES HIS LIFE
WAY DOWN TOWN
CAUSE
Mr. Flaherty
UNKNOWN
l'CAGEDY WITNESSED BY SEV
ERAL PEOPLE WHO ARE UN.
ABLE' TO DESCRIBE AFFAIR
At the moment of going to press to
night we learn of the sad accident in
which Patrick Flaherty, a local print,
er in the employ of the Richland
County Farmer, lost his life.
Mr. Flaherty and his wife who lived
in the Van Buran residence on Third
Street), South, were on their way
down town at about 7:30 o'clock, and
in some manner when crossing the
tracks Mr. Flaherty was struck by
the Great Northern passenger train
No. 13, Mrs. Flaherty who was walk
ing by his side, escaped being in
jured. No information in regard to
just how the accident occurred is
available, as Mrs. Flaherty, as well
as others who were hear by, are un
able to describe the affair. However,
II is a fact that the steam from the
engine had confused the couple, and
in view of the fact that they were
walking together, it is little less than
a miracle that Mrs. Flaherty escaped
the $ad fate which overtook her hus-
Mr, Flaherty came to Wajipeton
last summer from Lidgerwood, where
lie was employed on the Broadaxe,
and worked here on the Farmer force
for about two months, when he was
called Into the service. Just before
his departure, or about last August,
be was married to Miss Olive Richard
son, daughter of Rev. Richardson of
Ryder, N. D. Mr. Flaherty was phy
sically unable to remain in the army,
and consequently was rejected, re
turning to this city and taking up
their home here. Since their return
Mr. Flaherty has held a position
with the Breckenrfdge Gazette until
recently, when he again entered the
employ of the Furu:.*r.
was
a young
cere sympathy of her many
here in this hour of trial
man,
possessed of a i-uiet and pleasant
disposition, and his wife has the
sin­
friends
find be-
rea^emdnt.
The remains will be taken to Ryder,
North Dakota, tomorrow morning,
and the funeral will be held at that
place Saturday.
A Syrian, known to his friends as
George, who is employed at the G. N.
roundhouse in Breckenridge, was
struck by an engine while at work
and though seriously injured, be may
recover.
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER
HILL
NUMBER 36
WIOLE WMLD MURKt
MINI'S GREAT LOSS
AFTER A LIFE OF STRENUOUS
ACTION, ROOSEVELT'S BODY IS
LAID AT REST AT SAGAMORE
LEAVES VACANCY IN NATION
PRESIDENT WILSON ISSUJS
PROCLAMATION, AND MILITARY
AND NATAL HONORS CARRIED
OUT IN SOLEMN REVERENCE
'Theodore Roosevelt's body has
been placed at rest in the little cem
etery between the Sagamore Hill
house, which was his home and the
quiet village of Oyster Bay, and while
he rests in peaceful slumber, when
we stop to consider the strenuous
life which he spent out of pure love
for the people of his country, It would
seem that the nation has lost a man
whose life and influence reflected in
reality as a sort of balance wheel for
the great machine which we designate
as our government.
Theodore Roosevelt was a flreater
and a fighter, but he fought for what
he thoHght w,as best for the people of
his party and his country. Being a
politician and a firm believer in his
own convictions, he was naturally at
times severely criticized, but we
doubt if ever a man was more sin
cere at heart toward the welfare of
his fjellowmau than wats Tlieotfore
Roosevfelt, and we bow our heads
in reverence to the memory of a man
of his class. A great spoke has
been knocked out of the wheel of
progress, which we trust will be re
paired, but will not be forgotten.
The President's Proclamation
Washington, Jan. 7.—The following
proclamation on the death pf Theodore
Roosevelt was cabled from Paris today
by President Wilson and issued to
night by the State Department:
"Woodi-ow Wilson, President ot the
United States of America:
A proclamation to the people o»' che
United States:
It becomes my sad duty to an
nounce officially the death of Theodore
Roosevelt, president of the United
States from September 14, 1901, to
March 4, 1910, which occurred at his
home at Sagamore Hi'.i, Oyster Bay,
N. Y., at 4:15 o'clock in the morning
of January 6, 1919. In his death the
United States has lost one of its most
distinguished and patriotic citizens,
who had endeared himself to the peo.
pie by his strenuous devotion to their
interests and the public interests ot
the country.
"As president of the police board
of his native city, as member of the
legislature aud governor of his state,
as civil service commissioner, as as
sistant secretary of the navy, and as
vice president, and as President of
the United States, he displayed admin
istrative powers of a signal order and
conducted the affairs of these various
offices with a concentration of etfort
and a watchful care which permitted'
no divergence from the line of duty he
had definitely se^ for himself.
"In the war with Spain he displa/ed
singular initiatives and) energy and
distingqished himself among the com.
manders of the army in the field.
v- /A#
:,-si
r-
M'r
ft
I
Ah
President,, he awoke the nation ti
the dangers of private control, whicht
lurked in our financial and industrial\
systems. It was by thus arresting
the attention and stimulating the pur
pose of the country'that he opened
the way for subsequent necessity and
beneficient reforms.
"His private Hfe was characterized
by a simplicity, a-vlrtue and an affec
tion worthy of all admiration and
emulation by the people of America.
"In testimony of the respect in
which his memory is held by the
government and the people of the
United States, I do hereby direct that
the flags of the White House and the
several departmental buildings be
displayed at half staff for a period of
80 days, and that suitable military and
naval honors under orders of the Sec
retaries of War and of the Navy be
rendered on the day of the funeral.
"Done, this Seventh day of January,
in the year of Our Lord, One Thou
sand Nine Hundred and Nineteen, and
of the Independence of the United
States of America, the One Hundred
aud Forty-third.
"WOODROW WILSON.
"By the President.
'Frank L. Polk, acting secretary of
state."

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