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Great Falls daily tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1895-1921, January 11, 1919, Image 1

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GREAT FALLS DAILY TRIBUNE
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR.
GREAT FALLS, MONTANA, SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 11, 1919.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS.
MARTIAL LAW RULES IN BUENOS AIRES
BERLIN CITIZENS ENLIST TO FIGHT REDS
I General Handling Riots
Proclaims Friendly
Military Rule.
IMDB BURNS GNURGHi RIPS
IIP R. R.: HALTED BT RAIN
Buenos Aires, Jan. 10.—Gen
eral Delle Piane, commander of
the forces opposing the strikers,
has assumed a military dictator
ship and has taken over all the
forces of the government. This
action, it was explained, in no
wise constitutes a measure un
friendly to President Iriguyan.
A general strike was declared through
out the Argentine republic last mid
night. » *
At 1 o'clock this morning a thunder
storm and heavy rainfall cleared the
city's streets of idlers and within half
no hour the business center was as
quiet as if the disorders of the day and
the evening before had not happened.
Thore in close touch with the situa
tion believed that the respite was only
temporary.
City Suffers for Ice.
Early this morning there already were
indications of disturbances in the flow
of food supplies and other commodities,
«•specially ice. The temperature of the
last three day3 has been nearly 100 de
grees in the shade, adding to the suffer
ing of the public, which has been forced
to walk because of the transportation
shutdown.
Serious disorders followed the funeral
vday afternoon of five persons
killed in Tuesday's disturbances. A
thousand or more strikers burned a pas
senger train on the Pacific railway,
which ruus near the cemetery, then tore
up the track, paralyzing traffic on the
Trans-Andine line.
Trans-Andine line.
Barn Fire Apparatus.
They later burned a Catholic church
and the girl's school adjoining, throwing
images and pianos into the street and
leaving the 400 girl pupils without dor
mitories. The mob then burned a fire
department automobile carrying firemen
to the scene of the disturbances.
The district police station at the
Vasena Iron foundry was captured by
armed strikers, but it was asserted at
police headquarters at midnight, that
the station had been recaptured. During
the night the strikers entrenched them
selves around the Vasena plant.
The official socialist party organ, La
Vanguardia, will say this morning that
all the unions have decided to continue
the strike indefinitely as a protest
against Thursday's events and that the
government has disembarked marines
and sailors because it has no faith in
the army.
COURT REJECTS
SUIT TO ENJOIN
CABLE SEIZURE
New York, Jan. 10.—The
injunciion suit brot by (he
Commercial ('able company
and Ite Commercial Pacific
Cable Ompany against Post
master Burleson to restrain
him fron taking over for the
governnçnt their respective
cable lints was dismissed, to
day, by federal Judge Learn
ed Hand.
The cart's decision was
based on tie contention of the
United Stltes district attor
ney that tie court was with
out jurisdhion in the case,
inasmuch iü» the action was
undertaken V .v President Wil
son as an Executive act for
war purpose.
IRISH ASSEMBLY TIED UP
WITH 2k MEMBERS IN JAIL
Dublin. Jan. 10.— «constituent assem
bly will determine thitenns of a consti
tution for Ireland, >tm Fein plans for
the assembly are delved because 24 of
those recently elected ^ the British par
liament are in jail. \
Many meetings are ling held demand
ing that the imprisoneciincs be set free.
It is rumored that thetoverainent soon
will release them. 1
Nationality, the leadii Sinn Fein or
gan, says diplomatic cokderations may
prove effective, "but if demand is ig
nored, the Irish people lost. act soon in
a way the British goverrjent cannot ig
nore." \
The pejjee conterencel it continues,
500 BERLIN RIOT
TOLL; 200 KILLED
CITIZENS RALLY
Troops Succeed in Recovering Big-Provision Ware
houses, but Spartacans Are Still in Possession
°f Fortified Newspaper Plants.
Berlin, Jan. 10.—Five hundred fell in the five days of terror
that gripped Berlin when the Spartacans tried to overthrow the
Ebert cabinet and failed. Of those, more than 200 were killed,
j The Charité and other hospitals cared for 300 wounded yesterday.
[Twelve dead were carried from the chancellor's palace, Wednes
day, representing a loss among the defenders. The Reds suffered
the heavier loss, under the raking machine gun fire of the loyal
troops from the house tops and in the attack on the Anhalter
I station.
mm strike
jt h. ï.
Disorganization in Army
Return and Famine in
City Emphasized.
BIKER VISITS PORT TO
STUDY TIE SITUATION
Washington, Jan. 10.—Further gov
ernment action to end the strike of
marine workers which has tied up ship
ping in New York harbor awaited word,
tonight, from President Wilson in Paris.
I'rgent reports on the situation, sug
gesting the president take action to pre
vent. possible famine in the city and dis
organization of export movement to the
army overseas, were sent to him by the
department nf labor and the executive
offices of the White House, after gov
ernment representatives had failed in
efforts to compose the differences be
tween the boat owners and their employ
es. It was said the president's personal
influence with the workers was counted
to induce a resumption of work, pending
a settlement of the question.
Some Plan Developed.
Secretary Wilson and Hugh L. Ker
win. chief of the division of conciliation
of the department of labor, were in close
touch all day with department represen
tatives at the scene of the strike. A
new plan of action was said to be under
consideration, but its nature was not
disclosed.
Hope that the strike, at least so far
as it affects raijroad craft, would he
ended within 48 hours was expressed to
night by railroad administration offi
(Continneil on Paso Two)
LUDEMFF LIKE FLEA
NEXT, BUCK IN SWEDEN
Stockholm, Jan. 10.-—General Luden
dorff, former chief quartermaster gen
eral of the German armies, has applied
to the Swedish government for formal
pern ission for himself .and his wife to
stay a short time in Sw'eden. This ap
plication has been granted /for one
month
Soon after the collapse of the Hohen
zollern dynasty in Germany, it was re
ported that General Ludendorff had fled
to Sweden. A dispatch earlier in the
week said that he was living on a farm
in Sweden.
TWIN CITY CEARINGS.
Minneapolis, Jan. 10—Twin City clear
ings of the Ninth district federal reserve
bank today were $7,420,082.68.
"assembles Monday. There is no time to
be lost. The national assembly must act
at once."
LLOYD GE0RJE DUE
IN PARIS TONIGHT
Paris, Jan. 10.—(By the Associated
Press).—Duvid Lloyd George, the Brit
ish premier, will reach Paris Saturday
night from London, it was announced to
day. Arthur J. Balfour, foreign secre
tary, will arrive Sunday morning.
CALIFORNIA SENATE
RATIFIES PROHIBITION
Sacramento, Cal., Jan. 10.— The sen
ate of the California legislature voted
to ratify the national prohibition amend
ment today. The-vote was 25 to 14.
The Ebert government is steadily
gaining control. It has widened the bar
red zones within the city and has suc
ceeded in affecting a junction between
the troops from the provinces and those
already in the city. This has been
accomplished by the forces of General
Noske gaining control of the railways.
The government now has possession
of the inner city betweec. the Branden
burg gate and thel Friedrichstrasse. It
has also recovered the big provision
warehouses in the Koepnickerstrasse and
the Tempelhof, which the Spartacans
had occupied.
At 4 o'clock this afternoon the big
newspaper offices were still in the pos
session of the Liebknecht forces, but
they were losing hope, while the govern
ment was beginning to realize that ruth
less use of force was necessary to deal
adequately with the situation, still
perilous.
Civic Elements Enlist.
The civic ebments in Berlin are giving
Gustav Noske, who has charge of the
government's defensive measures, the
most active assistance and the govern
mental recruiting officers are busy sign
ing up volunteers. That the government
has picked up sufficient courage to meet
the situation is held to be unmistakably
due to the backing given by the bour
geoise elements.
The Ebert government fully realizes
that the test of strength in which it is
row engaged is a decisive one, as assert
ed in competent quarters. It proposes.
therefore, to assert its authority to the
limit. The cabinet is a unit in the con
viction that any compromise with or
concession would be bound to prove
costly, and it. is fighting in the defense
of the national assembly.
(Continued on race Three)
POLISH ARMY MARCHING INTO PRUSSIA TOWARD BERLIN
s-m
sas*
m
/I
yy
Polish machine gun company at target practice using guns taken from the disorganized Russian army.
iscus-ing now the advisabilitv of raising an army of oOO.OOO volunteers to stop the Polish and bolsheviki
east. The Poles have renewed their march toward Berlin. They have rescinded an agreement with
Germany is discussiiig now the advisability
aggression in the east. The Poles have renewed
the German government which called for cessation of hostilities,
miles from the German capital.
The Poles recently took Frankfort-on-the-Oder, fifty
— : "
TRIBUNAL TD TRY
EX-KAISER PLI
English Commission Said to
Have Taken Practical Steps on
Violations of Laws of War.
T/ondon, Jan. 10. Proceedings against
the former German emperor are advised
in a special report by a sub-committee
of the commission charged with inquir
ing into violations into laws of war ap
pointed two months ago. Plans for a trib
unal which will try cases in which viola-,
tions are alleged have already been sub-'
mitted.
Alt ho final conclusions may not be
reached in a majority of cases for some
months, it is said that it is not to be
assumed that practical steps have not
been taken to arrest offenders.
MINING ASSOCIATION
TO BE HELD MARCH 10-16
Spokane, Jan. 10.—The annual con
vention of the Northwest Mining asso
ciation, comprising mining operators of
northewestern states and British Co
lumbia, will be held here March 10 to
10. it was announced today by Frank C.
Bail tu, the secretary.
} \
English Papers Asking
Whether Premier or
Aides Will Rule.
FLEDGED TO KMM
OF LIBERAL REFORMS
London, .Jan. 10.-—The new cabinet of
Premier Lloyd George was announced
tonight. It presents few surprises. The
question the British newspapers are ask
ing is whether Lloyd George will rule
his cabinet, or whether his conservative
advisers will dominate him.
The majority of the members of the
cabinet in high places are conservatives,
r.otably Andrew Bonar Law. EarlCurzon,
Arthur J. Balfour and Viscount Milner.
Only four yci rs ago British party re
garded Lloyd George as the conserv
atives today regard the bolsheviki.
In the new cabinet, Lloyd George
takes the premiership and the portfolio
of first lord of the treasury.
The premier is pledged by his cam
paigning speeches to a sweeping program
of liberal reforms, particulr.rly the giving
of land and houses to workingmen and
discharged soldiers. His principal ad
visers are regarded us representatives
of land-owning interests, who, following
tradition, would place barriers in the
way of such reforms.
The ministers without portfolios,
(Continued on rage Two)
British Steamer Sunk
by Mine; Five Boats
of Survivors Missing
London. Jan. 10.—The British
steamer Northumbria struck a mine
off Middlesborough. Thursday, and it
is believed most of the crew was lost.
A boat with two survivors and eight
dead has been washed ashore at
Newton Abbott. Four boats which
left the ship with survivors are miss
ing.
] " ~~ "
This U. S. Law Was
Partly Made in France;
First to Be So Signed
Washington, Jan. «0.—Notice of the
signing, in France, by President W il
son, of the first bill sent to the
AY'hite House by congress after the
president sailed last month was cabled
today to Secretary Tumulty. It was
Hie measure authorizing the payment
of' transportation home of war work
ers leaving the government service.
in BIG MI
BUTTE
Latest Shut-Down Throws Out
750 Men; Many Leaving
for Coast.
Butte, Jan. 10.—The Pennsylvania
mine, employing 750 men. closed down
today for repairs making the eleventh
large mine in the district to close down
within a few weeks. There are now
several thousand men out. of work here
und many are leaving oil every train,
mostly for Pacific coa.st points, to seek
employment.
SHIPPERS OPPOSE
R. R. CABINET CHIEF
TO CONTROL LINES
State Commissioners and
Securities Owners Also
Shy at Plan of Secre-j
tary of Transportation.
, bommeree
Regional Rate Commis
sions Proposed, to Act
With Present Federal
and State Bodies.
Washington, Jan. 10.—Attitudes of
shippers' interests, railroad securities
owners, and state commissioners towards
railroad legislation became known in part
here, today, in advance of their presen
tation by representatives of the various
interests to tie senate interstate com
merce commission, next week.
The shippers ouposc establishment of
a secretary of transportation, the federal
incornoration of railroad companies, as
advocate] by railway executives, and
propose the following:
Kates sufficiently liberal to guarantee
proper maintenance of railways and
ample returns to security holders; gov
rrnment regulation by the interstate
commission; common use of
i terminals and other facilities ; co-oper
! atiou among railways to promote effici
: rnc.v of service, but with pooling and uni -
! fieation agreements subject strictly to
the Interstate Commerce commission and
I restoration of the roads to private
; < wnership as soon as remedial legisfa
j tion has been enacted.
Oppose Five-Year Control.
Railroad security owners oppose th3
: five-year extension of government con
trol, and urge return of the roads to
private management after enactment of
legislation paving the way for partial
I I nification. They are opposed also to th?
; executives' plans for creating a secretary
j of transportation, and for federal in
j corporation of railroads.
i Among the proposals of the state rail
! road commissioners are that state gov
ernments should retain their authority
! over intrastate rates and regulation,
that regional rate commission should be
created to assist the Interstate Com
; ii'crce commission, and that the federal
(ominission and state commissions co
< t-t erate in all matters of railway regula
(t'ontinued on I'age Three)
A. J. EHRLING QUITS
HUB TIKES JOB
Built Line to Pacific Coast and
Electrified It Over Conti
nental Divide.
Chicago. Jan. 10.- The resignation of
Albert J. Earling, chairman of the board
of directors of the Chicago, Milwaukee
& St. Paul railway, was announced today.
He built the St. Paul line to the Pacific
coast and made it the first line to use
electricity in operating over the conti
nental divide.
Mr. Earling is nearly 71 years old and
entered the service of ihe road when he
was 17 as a telegrapher.
It was announced that he will be suc
ceeded by Ransom M. Calkins, former
traffic manager of this road, who was
elected president in November, but who
for several months has been out of the
railroad and in charge of shipbuilding in
terests on the Pacific coast.
GERMAN AMBASSADOR
DEPARTS FROM SPAIN.
Madrid, Jan. 10.— (Havas.)—Prince
Max von Ratibor Corvey, German am
bassador to Spain, has left Madrid with
Ma family for Germany.
]
HOW ABOUT 1920?
'I'M FADING OUT'
SAYS M'ADOO
Albuquerque, N. M., Jan. 10.—De
scribing Iiis position as director gen
eral of railroads as a "hot poker,"
William McAdoo. enroute to Califor
nia, where he will begin his return to
private life, made a brief speech to
several hundred Santa Fe employes
here today.
"As director general T have been
handing you boys increased wages
and an eight-hour day, while 1^ have
been getting $1 a year and an 18-hour
day," said Mr. McAdoo. "I must go
quickly to private live—I am fading
officially."
"How about 1020?" asked a voice
in the crowd.
"I am fading out officially." repeat
ed Mr. McAdoo, with a grin.
Papers Not According to
Law, So Committee
Throws 'Em Out.
CM «STOCK
II
(By WARREN W. MOSES.)
Helena, Jan. 10.—That the Silver Bow
legislative contestants were practically
out of court, even before any hearing
could be conducted upon their claims,
was determined by the committee on
privileges and elections after having
looked over the papers filed in the matter
and after having inquired into the stat
utes governing such proceedings.
That the contest was not filed in ac
cordance with the law and that it would
necessarily be thrown out. with privilege
of reinstatement under the proper pro
cedure. was announced early today by
Chairman E. H. Cooney. As a matter
of fact, the contestants appear to have
adopted a proceeding set forth for con
tests of county officers and to have
wholly overlooked the fact that, the law
upon this subject has no bearing what
soever upon contests for legislative
seats.
When the papers were filed with the
secretary of state and transmitted by
him to the house of representatives,
they came open aifd not scaled, as is re
quired by statute. Strange to say, not
{Continued on Päse Two)
LUXEMBURG CROWDS
II EN! DUCHESS
Metz, Ian. 10.—( H avas) —A
la rge crowd paraded before the j
grand ducal palace in Luxemburg J
today, requesting the abdication of
the grand duchess and the proclama- i
tion of a republic.
A committee on public safety has 1
been appointed and quiet is being
maintained everywhere in Luxem
burg.
ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL
SERVICE FEBRUARY 9. !
Washington, Jan. 10.—Memorial serv- j
ic es for Theodore Roosevelt will be held j
at the capitol on February 9. The house !
today passed unanimously the concurrent !
resolution, adapted yesterday by the j
senate, authorizing committees to ar- j
range for the service.
ROOSEVELT EXPECTED
TO LOSE ALL HIS SONS
Chicago, Jan. 10.—How Colonel Roose
velt longed to go overseas and teach
the German, kaiser a lesson in civiliza
tion was told, today, by Judge Ben Lind
sey, of Denver, who was the chief
speaker at the memorial meeting in
honor of tho former president, held
under the auspices of the Chicago As
sociation of commerce.
" "There is nothing that his imperial
majesty can do to convince me Ger
rrany's policy is right' ", the judge
quoted the former president as having
told him with regard to the reported
expressions of the late Count von Ilert
ling and Herr Zimmerman that Colonel
Roosevelt be invited to Germany to,
examine for himself the charges oi
Asked Former Lecturer
of N. P. League to
Start Attack.
OTHER UNES Fill 1921
Women Sit First Time
• in National Commit
tee Meeting.
Chicago, Jan. 10.—Bolshevism, anarchy
and socialism, were denounced today at
the meeting of the republican national,
committee, by Governor Burnquist, of
Minnesota, who said the hope of the
country for the future was in the elec-,
tion of a republican president. He also!
spoke of the activity of the Non-^
Partisan league in the Northwest ami
said the sympathy of the democratic
party had been with the socialistic?
organization.
Governor Burnquist was followed by
the Rev. C. R. Maxwell, who asked
chairman Will H. Hays to urge congress
to make an investigation of the activities
of the Non-Partisan league in the North
west. Maxwell was formerly a lecturer
for the organization and said that
Colonel Roosevelt, just before his death,
had advised him to take his request to
Chairman Hays.
Memorial to Rooseveft.
Acting on a suggestion made by
Chairman Hays, it was decided to appeal
to the republicans of the country to
erect a permanent memorial to Theodore
Roosevelt. It is planned to raise the
necessary funds by popular subscription.
The character of the memorial will b>
decided upon by a special committee, of
which W. B. Thompson, of Yonkers,
X. Y., is chairman. The other members
of the committee will b« named by
Chairman Hays later.
Members of the committee applanded
speeches attacking the democratic na
tional administration for what was
termed its socialistic tendencies and de
manding that tie railroads be returned
to their owners without unnecessary «de
lay. Scathing denunciation of bolshev
ism in every form was the keynote of a
majority of the addresses.
South Attacked as Tax Dodger.
Governor Beeckman of Rhode Island
referred to the recent victory of the re
publicans in congressional elections and
said that the people of the North were
tired*of paying 00 per cent of the taxes
and having it expended by the minority
of the South, which dominated the dem
ocratic national administration.
Governor Harding of Iowa criticised
the democratic national administration
for its extravagance and inefficiency,
and referred to W. G. McAdoo, federal
director of railroads, as '"the crown
prince."
Congressman Royal Johnson of South
Dakota, who appeared in the uniform of
an army officer, and others made similar
addresses.
Indorse Votes for Women.
After representatives from every
state had delivered addresses on tho
(Continu«! on Pate Two)
WILL REPRESENT
CREAT BRITAIN IN
PEACE CONFERENCE
London. Jan. 10.—Premier Lloyd
George. Andrew Bonar Law. chancel
lor of the exchequer; A. J. Balfour,
secretary of state for foreign affairs,:
and George Nicoll Barnes, privy coun
cillor. have been appointed plenipoten
tiaries to the peace congress by the
British cabinet, according to the Ex
press and the Mail.
William Morris Hughes, premier of
Australia; Sir Robert L. Borden,
premier of Canada, and General J^ewis
Botha, premier of the Union of South
Africa, will be colonial representa
tives.
j
:
;
j
j
\
1
German atrocities in Belgium. The judge
continued the quotation as follows:
" 'I hope some time to come to Ger
many as the enemy of his majesty, and
the kind of conference that will result
will not be to his liking' ".
Judge Iindsey told of the fortitude
Colonel Rposcvelt cxhibted in talkng of
the death of his aviator son. Quentin,
but that his words and attitude showed
a tremendous pride in his son's war
record.
" 'By George', he said," continued tho
speaker, " 'if this war keeps up another
year 1 won't have a son left But that
is the place for them. Right at the
front. Every one of them, by George, is
a boar for fighting*

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