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Great Falls daily tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1895-1921, January 16, 1919, Image 1

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GREAT FALLS DAILY TRIBUNE
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR.
GREAT FALLS, MONTANA, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 16, 1919.
PRICE. FIVE CENTS.
Strike and Put U. S. on Russian Basis
Radicals in Mooney Congress Demand
Allied Council Decides
to Halt Rate of De
mobilization.
PEACE STEPS IS REJECTED
Seamen by Ban Plan
to Force Reparation
for U-Boat Warfare
London, Jan. 15.—In the absence
of a definite policy from the allies,
concerning the manner in which Ger
many shall., make compensation tor
tha dependents of submarine victims
among seamen, the executive commit
tee of the International Federation of
Seafarers has evolved a plan by
which the officials hope the peace
conference will be guided.
The committee has called an in
ternational conference in London, for
February 24, at which the British
delegates will present a resolution,
providing that the seamen will not
man ships going or coming from an
enemy country until the proper com
pensation is agreed upon.
London, Jan. 15.—The Central
News declared that, as a result
of the allied discussions in Paris,
the whole aspect of demobiliza
tion has undergone a sudden and
vital change, this being shown
in the drastic conditions demand
ed of Germany for a renewal of
the armistice.
"On authority of an unim- :
peachable character," says the 1
Central News, "it can be stated
that a situation exists in Europe
under which war may break out
again at any moment. The al- j
'lied war council has arrived at
a decision which means that the
British people have mistaken the
appearance of peace for reality.
TÎiis decision means that the
new British ministry must re
iMSp lhf> who p Sfhpmp nf :trmv
i
vise the whole scheme of army
demobilization.
"The decision is that Great
.Britain, in proportion to its mil
itary strength, must maintain
an army of occupation on the
Rhine for many months. If the
rapid increase in demobilization
recently announced were contin
ued, there would, in a few
months be no army in France to
undertake the obligations which,
oy common decision of the allies,
have been placed upon their
, i i m
shoulders.
PEACE CONFERENCE
IS OFF ON POLICY
THAT AROUSES STORM
I
Paris, Jan. 15.—The question of
vhetber the peace conference is to be '
Secret or wholly open to the eyes and !
»arg of the world, the settlement of i
vhich has been long awaited, was brought I
" focus, today, when it was announc-j
, .. , -i f f ■ i . i
oublie to a dail.v official communique
f „d hat a gentleman s agreement pre, ,
railed among the d< l" „ates not to discuss i
>r in any way gne information <»f the :
meetings in the foreign office !
Word to this effect was followed by •
m explosion of protests which quite j
(Continued on Par© Two). i
•d that an agreement had been mac
tonfine the information given to
ï to !
the :
WILSON IS FIRM IN REFUSAL
TO CONCEDE FIUME TO ITALY;
SLAV FUTURE REQUIRES PORT
; London, Jan. 15.—In commenting upon
he conference between Premier Orlando,
f ltalv, and President Wilson last
., " . •„ ,, ,.i. -.t
Priday, persons in touch with the Italian
jiission declare the _ premier was sur
Vised at Mr. Wilsons attitude, says the
faris correspondent of the Daily .Mail,
"President Wilson was firm in his re-j
iisal to recognize Italian claims beyond
"rieste and Trent, the correspondent
v rites. "It is known that r oreign
inister feonnino, of Italy, demands an
in portant part of the Dalmatian coast
is well as Fiume, while Premier Orlando
Vould be content to give the Dalmatian
'TSSt if sure of tiume. It is rej>orted
uut* eveu t j9u this point, Mr. Wilson was
ARGENTINA UNDER MILITARY DICTATOR
AS BOLSHEVIKI REVOLUTION SPREADS
m
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stret !t scene In Buenos Aires following publication of famous "Spurlos Versenkt" notfes, above; police headquarters, which
= * as a,,acked k> !,rll " rs ' * """ plaM de
N ationa l Prohibition Has
LS.
Been Ratified by 35;
Race to Be Final.
Washington, Jan. I">. Legislatures
'C» states- -one less than th
making a total of V2 in'two da
Of the 35 states that have taken acti
if '
OIK'
three-fourths—have ratified th<
tion constitutional amendment.
.state assemblies now in session are ex
pected to take action tomorrow, with a
probable race between .Nebraska. Missou
required i
prohibi- j
Several j
ri and Minnesota as to which would be j
thirty-sixth on the list.
Ratification was completed tv.day by
the legislatures of five states, Iowa,
lorado. Oregon, New Hampshire and
lays,
ction,
only 14 have certified their action to the
federal state department.
The amendment, under its provisions,
becomes effective one year from the
date of its final ratification. Additional
legislation by congress is necessary to
make it. operative and groundwork" for
t j,j s already has bo%n laid. This legisla
tion will prescribe penalties for viola
tions of the amendment and determine
how : " il ' hy what agencies the law shall
he enforced.
Really Goes Dry July I.
If , ,,. ;f;
If tarification completed tins month,
many officials here believe the country
will become permanently "drv" next July
-j t ], ri 0 f w hich the special war time
|)rrihihition r ,neatly enacted hy congress
g 0( > x j n to effect. This law prevents the
manufacture and sale of intoxicants for
beverage purposes and remains in force
until the demobilization of the nation's
war armies is completed.
(Continued on Page Two),
nnwilling to give way.
"While the majority of the inhabitants
" f F;ir '' italian. that port is the
natural outlet for the Austrian Slavs.
lt lh erefore, claimed that a few
thousand Italians in Fiume are not to be
balanced against the needs for a sea
outlet for millions of Slavs. It is pointed
out that the commercial necessities of
the .Juço-lSlavs demand an outlet to the
Adriatic and that, if Italy ignores those
necessities, sh«^ may incur the enmity of
those populations and create a new
danger to the peace of Kurope. It is
supposed that President Wilson does* not
consider that Fiume, as a free port in
Italian hands, would meet the needs of
the Ju*>o-i5ia.y&."
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A. C. M. WILL GIVE PREFERENCE
TO SERVICE MEN AND MARRIED

It

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Butte, Jan. 15.—The Anaconda Copper Mining company,
the largest employer of labor in the state, this afternoon
announced that in respect to employment during the pres
ent period of curtailment when many of the company mines
are down, it will give preference to men with families and
to returned soldiers in the following order:
First—Married men and single men with dependents.
Second—Demobilized soldiers and sailors who were in
the employ of the company at the time of their induction
into the army or navy.
Third—Demobilized soldiers and sailors who were not
employed by the company before their induction into the
army or navy.
Single men without dependents and w T ho were not in
ducted into the army or navy must give up their jobs to
those in the preferred classes.
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Chairman Taft Angrily Yearns
for Authority to Enforce I)e
crees in Peace Times.
Washington, .Tan. 15. The authority
of the National War Labor board to eu
force its decrees, now that hostilities
have ceased, was challencged. today, by
counsel for the Bethlehem Steel com-.
pany who had been asked to appear to
answer complaints that awards made bv
the board during the war had not been
carried out.
Joint Chairman Taft, of the hoard,
(fuestioned the good faith of the com
pany, and said its present attitude
(Continued on Pace Two)
Bolshevists Urge
Assassination of
Carranza and Other
Leaders in Mexico
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 15.—A handbill
printed in Spanish and signed "Mexi
can bolshevists" was distributed here,
today, urging death of President Car
ranza, Villa, Feliz Dia-/., Esteban
Cantu, governor of Lower California;
Dr. Vazquez Gomez, Francisco de la
Karra and ail other political leaders
and rich men in Mexico.
Reported to Have Been Beaten
, for Remarks Reflecting
Upon Woman.
to The Daily Tribune.
('hoteau, ,lan. 15.—Because he made
remarks reflecting upon the wife of a;
-, . o„,„
re3ldpnt of l orulroy ' Sam MK ,ar011 '
rancher and farm worker, was set upon
and severely beaten by a crowd of men
at that place, according to reports that
have reached here, and it is feared that
he may have perished since from ex
posure and the effects of the injuries
inflicted upon him. He disappeared .Mon
day night after he was attacked and he
has not been seen since. lie had no hat j
and little clothing when he fled from his;
assailants in a pool hall at Pendroy and ;
he is supposed to have crawled into a !
culvert.
As McClaren was fleeing, it is report
ed that lie was struck in the back of the
head by a brick which nearly stunned |
him. Children, aping their elders, then j
began to throw stones at him. but he!
pleaded' with them for mercy, it is said,!
crying that he was "all in."
While McClaren aroused mob hostility
at Pendroy, he is reported to have the
sympathy of some of the ranchers of
that vicinity. It is said that a score of
the ranchers have been searching for
him. McClaren had a place of his own,
it is reported here, but lately he has
worked as a farm haud.
RIOTOUS REDS DEFEATED,
ROUT LABOR CONGRESS; ARE
LED BY W. F. DUNN, OF BUTTE
NATIONAL BOLSHEVIK COUNCIL
PROPOSED IN LABOR CONGRESS
Chicago, Jan. 15.—The Mooney labor congress has not
yet adopted any program or set of declarations, but scores
of resolutions embodying ideas, some of a revolutionary
character, have been offered by radical delegates. Among
the proposals made are :
For the organization of a national soldiers' and sailors' council to safe
guard the interest of labor during the period of reconstruction.
For a referendum vote on the terms of peace.
Abolition of all restrictions on the issuance of passports.
For a general strike to compel the immediate release of political, in
dustrial and religious prisoners.
That the Russian. Austrian and German bolsheviki be given represen
tation at the Paris peace council.
For a uniform work day of six hours.
For a uniform lunch period of two hours in all lines of indastry.
Adoption of a modification of the I. W. W. idea for one big labor union,
by having one organization for each trade.
A plan to have all western labor organizations withdraw from the
American Federation of Labor, to organize a Western Federation of Labor.


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BLOW: KILLS
12, MES 51
Two Million Gallons Im
merse Ruins of Houses
in Sticky F luid.
of sheet iron which were impelled in op-;
posite directions. Two million gallons
of molasses rrtshed in a mighty stream j
B-ston, Jan. 35.—Probably a dozen]
persons were killed and fifty injured by
i the explosion of a huge tank of molasses
! on the waterfront off Commercial street,!
near Keanv Square, today.
A dull, mufled roar gave but an in
slant's warning before the top of the:
tank was blown into the air. The cir
culur wail broke into two great segments
over the streets and" converted into a 1
sticky mass the wreckage of sere ml i
small buildings which had' been smashed
by the force of the explosion.
The tank was located a short distance
from the Charleston bridge, where the
.
Charles river empties into the harbor,
One of the sections of the tank wall
fell on a fire house, crushing it. Three
I firemen, two of whom had been engaged:
in a card game, were buried in the ruins,
One was killed and the other two were:
injured.
! The explosion blow away two of the
; supporting pillars of the Atlantic avenue i
• elevated railway structure, demolished
j several buildings, blew an electric freight;
j ( >ar off the track, overturned a number
of heavily loaded trucks and killed about
a dozen horses.
A nearby tenement house fell in. Two
women and a man were taken from the
ruins, all injured.
TO
Vienna. Jan. 15.-—-A small body of
British troops arrived here Tues
day as tho convoys of a trainload of
foodstuffs, a present from the Brit
ish army in Italy to the women and
children of Vienna. Great crowds
Have the men a cordial welcome.
The supplies were sent, said the
commander, In récognition of the
fact that Austria had treated her
British prisoners with considera
tion, in contrast with the inhuman
treatment by Germany.
Three additional trainloads are to
follow.
drape Growers May
Fight Prohibition in
Twelve Other States
San Francisco, Jan. 15.—Following
the obtaining here, yesterday, of an
order temporarily restraining Govern
or William D. Stephens from signing
ratification of the federal prohibition
constitutional amendment, it. was said
at the office of the California Grape
Growers association, today, that sim
ilar action is possible in Arkansas,
Colorado, Maine, Nevada, New Mexi
co, Oklahoma, Oregon, Ohio, Utah,
Washington, Missouri and' Nebraska.
In these states, it was said, all leg
islative actions can be, under (lie law,
referred to the people.
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flLLNEWCDUNTY
BILLS THIS YEAR
w. M oses .
County division to
day received a body blow in the adop
«on, by tie senater. of a motion directing|
^e mlès committee to include m its
forthcoming: report a rule that no bills
sidered by the senate during the present
ses gj on
This action was taken at the same :
I
Decides Log Rolling in
Their Behalf Peril in
Bolsheviki Era.
By WARREN
Helena Jan. 15.
.
f «f th Ç <-reaty>n of new counties be con
R,,w,v1 hv ,ho
mimont tUni, Î. n ' — j
moment that the house was quibbling ov-,
or a report of the committee on new »
counties and divisions relating to the ere-j
ation of the county of Lake,
Senator («nose, of Deer Lodge county,j
took upon himself the task of introducing,
' n the senate the motion which would
render void all the work of the county ;
divisionists in both the house and the 1
senate and his motion was adopted bv a
vote of 2."» to IS. with two absentees. '
His motion, which went very thoroly
into the subject, follows: !
'Mr. President and Senators: '
"In view of. and considering, the vast
number of bills now introduced, and
others about to Ik » introduced, for the
creation of new counties within the'
state, I respectfully request the cartful
consideration of this senate of the un
avoidable results that will follow if my
motion does net prevail in its entirety.
22 Divisions Invite Trading.
"Some 22 county divisions will be be
fore this legislature, tor consideration by
both the house and senate. Of this nuin
her, several are undoubtedly justified in
asking for their creation. But the past
experience of all sessions of tho legis- ;
lature of Montana demonstrates the im
(Continued on Vnge Two).
GREECE WANTS LANDS HOLDING
25 PER CENT OF HER PEOPLE;
SIGHS FOR CONSTANTINOPLE
Paris, Jan. 15.—(By The Associated!
Press )- Greece has laid before the
peace conference a memorandum signed
.
by Premier A enizelos. setting forth the
claims of Greece in the settlement of the
war. The memorandum says the Hellenic
nations consist of 8,256.000 persons, of
whom 55 per cent live in the Kingdom
Greece and the remainder outside its
limits.
Wishing to reunite the Greek popu
lation in the Balkans, Asia-Minor and
the islands adjacent to the kingdom.
Greece asks, first, northern Epirus.
which contains 120.000 Greeks against
80,000 Albanians.
As a second demand. Greece asks for
Thrace, without Constantinople. Thrace,
according to the mémorandum, is peopled
largely by Greeks.
"Since Constantinople, according to
the Twelfth point of President Wilson's
program, cannot remain under Turkish
rule," the memorandum declares, "the
natural solution would be to award Con
stantinople to Greece and to establish
international guarntees for the freedom
the strait/ "
Real Fight for Control
Due Today, on Resolu
tions; Radical Chiefs
Call Caucus to Hold
Rampant Followers.
Bolshevik Ideas Wild
ly Applauded; Peace
Referendum Demand
ed; Federation for West
Advocated.
Chicago, Jan. 15.—Led by W.
F. Dunn, of Butte, Mont., sôcial
ists and members of the I. W. W.
after meeting defeat, today, in
the organization of the National
Labor Congress called to adopt
a program for obtaining a new
trial for Thomas J. Mooney and
Warren Billings, made a deter
mined attempt to capture con
trol of the body later in the day.
With the gallery packed with
radicals, they did about as they
pleased at the afternoon session,
until the proceedings were ended
by an early adjournment. The
conservatives were compelled to
change their plans in several
particulars because of the unex
pected show of strength made by
he radicals.
Tonight, both sides claimed a
majority of the delegates, but
nobody seemed certain what ac
ition would be taken tomorrow',
when the committee on resolu
jtions is expected to report.. At
today's session, every mention
of socialist or I. W. W. principles
was loudly cheered by delegates
spectators.
Oi?T>C HfKTTÏ F TO
1 TTAI IAV MTWIOV
UALIAIS MISSION
. „
A letter was read from two members
or , Italian labor commission appoint
ed by the government of that, country
^ request of the American Federa
tion ot Labor, expressing sympathy with
tion ot l.anor. expressing sym
the Inoveluetu t0 ai(1 Mooney and asking
^ g^ted as fraternal delegates in
the convention.
Chairman Nolan recommended that
the request be granted, but the reading
of the letter caused a hostile demonstra
tion on the part of the radicals, who de
elared that the two Italian labor repre
sentatives had been repudiated by the
bolshevik element in that country.
After a heated discussion of nearly an
hour, the motion to permit the commls
signers to sit iu the convention was
y oted down.
Invite Debs to Address Congress,
point ment of "a committee ou resolutions,
which was about equally divided between
the conservative and the radical factions,
Apparently nearly every radical dele
gate had at least one resolution for près -
entation to the committee. One delegate
(Continued on I'aee Four)
The radicals followed up their victory
by putting over a motion that Eugene
V. Debs, socialist leader, recently con
victed for violation of the espionage law.
be invited to address the convention. The
radicals cheered for several minutes at
the adoption of this motion. It is said
that Debs will decline the invitation.
At the opening of the afternoon ses
sion. Chairman Nolan announced the up
"But if a society of nations is estab
Iished immediately." the memorandum
f ntinnes - '•Constantinople nÜKht in con
sequence of great international interests
connected with the possession of the
straits be formed as a separate entity
by the society of nations, which would
nominate its governor for certain fixed
periods."
The third territorial claim made by
Greece is for vilayets in Asia Minor.
These have a population, it is said, of
1,182,000 Greeks against 1,042,000 Mo
hammedans and are claimed to be both
"geographically and historically iutegral
parts of Greece."
The Armenian provinces with Russian
Armenia, the memorandum says, should
be erected into a separate state, organiza
tion of which should be entrusted to one
of the great powers by the society of
nations.
All islands in the Near East which
are ethnographical!}-, geographically and
economically Greek must return to the
Hellenic state. These should include
islands which, according to the treaty
made in London in April, lt >15, are U»
annexed to Italy.

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