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Great Falls daily tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1895-1921, July 27, 1919, Image 5

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024808/1919-07-27/ed-1/seq-5/

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FOR MIM OF
IT,
State Livestock Commission Is
Advised of Additional Facil
ities for Feeding.
Helena, July 2G.—Information as to
additional pasturage facilities in S. nth
Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, AVwc.i
sin and other states available to M .1
tana cattle and sheep owners have
received by the Montana livestock mi
mission and given out by Secretary E. A.
l'hillips os follows:
Range at Towner. N. D„ for follow
ing: (Jeo. It. Verrailya, 2,000 head; JI a r -
vey Taylor, 200 head; H. Ii. Hudx, 100
Lead.
Hay for sale at Towner, N. I)., $13 ton
in stack.
F. II. Uyeland, Street er, N. I)., range
and winter feed, 200 cattle.
Frank Harris, l'ierrc, S. 1).. has pas
ture for 400 head.
T. W. Neiss. Howe I'. O., Stanley coun
ty, 8. !>., 200 head.
Wilber Travis. Itowe, P. O. Stanlay
County, S. !>., UOO head.
Harry Gray, Hanold. Hughes county,
S. I»., 300 head or more.
Mont Durkin. Knall 1*. O., Hughes
county. S. I 500 head.
00,000 acres fine grass, good water,
located Elmendorf Socorro county. Ad
dress C. L. Talmadge, San Antonio, New
Mexico.
Jos. Benesch. 12.'5S McKnight Itldg..
Minneapolis, Minn., 132 acres good pas
ture for sheep.
It. II. Glennna, Eau Claire, Wis., has
540 acres pasturage.
R. H. Ilardie, Towner, N. D., has
range for 500 cattle.
Mrs. Louis 11. Arnold, Big Timber,
Mont., Melville Rural Route, has 10(H)
acres ringe. Also 2(M> tons hay, timothy
and alfalfa mixed.
Granite County Farm Bureau, care J.
P. Sewport. Melbank, S. D., has pasture
for 1100 cattle.
Itasca county, Minn., offers extensive
range for pasturage. Address I.. W.
Huntley, secretary Itasca County Devel
opment association. Grand Rapids, Minn.
L. U. Wilkinson, 3714 I'illsbury ave
nue south Minneapolis, Minn., has pas
turage for from 7,000 to 10,000 head of
sheep.
Martin Bros., Melbank, S. !>., can han
dle 500 head cattle.
•Tno. Erickson, Wanbay, S. I>., can
handle 500 head.
•Tas. Daulton, Aberdeen, S. I)., can
handle 500 head.
Pasture at Lake Preston, S. I>.
Alex Mitchell, Wiliard, S. D., can han
dle 400 head.
Wm. Campbell, Summit, S. I)., can
handle 400 head.
Oscar Halseur, Summit, S. ]>., can
handle 400 head.
W. E. Triggs, Summit. S. 1). can haif
dle 400 head.
F. W. Whipple, Summit, S. D., can
handle 400 head.
Can pasture 4.000 or 5.000 sheep. Ad
dress E. M. McVicker. secretary < >nieda
Farms Co., 408 Security Bldg., Milwau
kee. Wis.
Write A. E. Houchin, 107 South Stev
ens St.. Spokane, Wash., concerning feed
for 3,000 head.
Dr. W. H. Dean. Elcho, Wis., pastur
age for 1.000 head sheep.
Awberry <>c Willis, 1211 Fifth south,
Lewistown. Mont., pasturage, 4.»HX) acres,
and 400 or 500 tons of good hay.
Thousands of acres cut over lands for
pasturage. Address Claude Cole, 215
Lumbermen's Bldg.. Portland. Oregon.
E. F. Kxtell. care First State Bank,
Harvard, III., 1S0O acres land.
l'asturage for from 200 to 2500 head
cattle. Address Roy 1>. Johnson, Lex
ington. Neb.
J. M. Malin, Logan, Mont., lias 330
acres good pasturage. Also 100 tons
hay.
IL W. Allen. Ft. Sisseton, via Sisseton,
S. D., pasturage 1,000 head cattle.
Summer and winter pasture for sever
al thousand cattle. Address F. M. Horn,
220 New England Bldg., Topeka, Kan
sas.
The following can handle some cattle
this winter and fall:
II. D. Woolf. Chas. D. Piper, Ilalph
Woolf, Geo. liolister, all of Bassett,
Neb.
The Minneapolis Civic & Commerce
association lias available 250,000 acres
land, suitable for sheep and cattle graz
ing. Address Jos. Chapman, care Min
neapolis Civic & Commerce association,
New Pumps Give Havre
Ample Supply of Water
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Havre, July 20.—The water situation
in Havre has been relieved by the in
stallation of new pumping station and
the tapping of 04p of the new wells.
The city allows property owners to use
water for irrigating purposes and there
is a good supply of water in the big tank
on the hill south of the city The boule
vards and shade trees about the city have
suffered greatly while the water was
turned off but there is hope still or sav
ing the trees.
Tourists by Hundreds
Pass Thru Havre on
Way to the Parks
Special to The Daily Tribun".
Havre. July 20.—Hundreds of east
ern tourists have passed thru Havre the
past week in cars en route to Glacie*
National park. Friday night r«iere were
21 cars in the city en route to Glacier
the cars coming from nearly every east
ern state. Many resident are also t-iking
advantage of the g.>od roads and spend
ng a few days at the park.
HILL VISITS GLACIER PARK.
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Cut Bank. July 20. Louis \V. Hill and
party passed thru here on No. 3. Friday
morning for (»lacier National park. They
were traveling in Mr. Hill's private car.
JONES WEATHER OBSERVER
Special to The I »ally Tribune.
Cut Bank, July 20.— W. J. Jones has
been appointed as the local weather ob
server by the government for the en
suing year. Mr. Jones is serving his
third year in this capacity.
MINNESOTA VISITORS
AT CUT BANK HOME.
S|'»cial to The Daily Tribun -.
Cut Bank, July 20.—A t Minette and
wife of Ulm and Miss Olive Minette of
Sauk Center. Minnesota, are guests at
the M. S. Bush boine. They are relatives
of Mrs. Bush.
HORSE CAUSE OF ARREST.
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown, July 26.—Ruck Jewell
was arrested yesterday 011 charge of
wrongfully taking n horse belonging to
Mr. Johnson of Hoosac. Jewell gave
bonds here and was released.
Tl
! TO ESTHOLISH THE
IDIÏÏ0F
j Attorney General Expects to Ap
ply for an Early Decision
in Elevator Matter.
Helena. .Tilly 20.—A test case to de
termine the validity of the $250,000 is
sue of state terminal elevator bonds,
passed up by private bidders when of
fered for sale by the state board of ex
aminers under authorization of the leg
islature, probably will be instituted
soon. Attorney General S. C. Ford says
effort will be made to have the state
supreme court hear the case without
the preliminary of going thru district
court.
If the bonds are declared valid, it will
remove all obstacles in the way of the
reported willingness of members of the
state land board to purchase the bonds
with state funds.
OF TIE STATE GATHER
TO MEET DEVALERA
Butte, July 20.—Prominent Irishmen
from many parts of the state gathered
here today to do honor to Eamonn De
Valera, president of the provisional Irish
republic who arrived at Butte last
night. The eminent Irishman was en
tertained at a breakfast at the Silver
Bow dub which was attended by sever
al hundred guests. It was after 12
o'clock when the breakfast was conclud
ed. Lieutenant Governor W. W. Mc
Dowell then gave the provisional Irish
president a formal welcome to the
state. He was followed by a number of
other speakers, President De Valera
concluding iu an address in which he
outlined the aims of what he termed
patriotic Irishmen who hoped thru the
help of America to establish a free gov
ernment for Ireland. De Valera today
visited points of interests around Butte
and conferred with local Irish leaders.
Helena. July 20.—The ban on the use
of the (Jerman language in Montana, for
church services or otherwise, continues
in force, along with all other orders is
sued by the state council of defense, ac
cording to statements issued following
the meeting of the council at the Capi
tol today.
Legal existence of the council con
tinues until three months after peace is
signed, under the law creating it, but the
governor is permitted to shorten this
period or lengthen it if he feels such ac
tion necessary. Since there is some
doubt as to what constitutes the signing
of peace, the council voted today to
leave the entire matter to the governr
Only $11.000 of the appropriation 01
$25.000 set aside by the legislature has
been spent by the council, according to
a report presented by Secretary Charles
I >. Greenfield. The council thus has a
cash balance of $14,000.
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Father of Former
Great Falls Woman
Is Dead at Bozeman
<
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Bozeman. July 20. William F. Mc
Cormick, who has made his home with
his son-in-law and daughter. Mr. and
Mrs. James P. Bole and family for the
past nine years, died suddenly from
apople xy. He was 7S years old and was
born in Pennsylvania, where he was a
successful farmer for many years.
Arrangements will not be completed
for the funeral until the return of the
daughter, Mrs. Bole, from New York,
where she and her daughter Margaret,
are visiting, having just returned from a
visit with a sister of Mrs. Bole in Val
dez. Alaska.
Besides Mrs. Bole and the daughter
in Alaska. Mr. McCormiek is survived
by a daughter in New York, a son in
St. Paul, a son in British Columbia
and a son who has just returned from
service in France.
Residence at Cut Bank
Destroyed by Fire
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Cut Bank, July 20.— The fire depart
ment was called out Thursday to the
north side of the traeks by a fire that
completely destroyed the A. J. Davis
residence. It was occupied by Wilbert
Fee and wife, who lost all their per
sonal effects as well as household furni
ture. The fire had gotten such a start
before being noticed that all the depart
ment could do was to confine it. to the
building and protect nearby homes. The
origin of the blaze has not been deter
mined. The building, a small one, was
covered by insurance but the contents
were a complete loss to Mr. and Mrs.
Fee, who were not at home at the time.
RETURNED SOLDIER WEDS
GIRL OF LEWISTOWN
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown. July 20. The marriage of
Miss Lois Wright and Oeorge W. Scoval
took place here this morning, ihe mar
riage being one of considerable public
interest. The groom, who is with the
Montana Flour Mills company, recently
returned from France, where he served
in the army, while the bride is very pop
ular Lewistown girl, the daughter of
Commissioner George F. Wright.
MY TEST MËANS A SURE FIT
I CAN SAVE YOU MONEY AND EYESIGHT
STROUSE,
OPTICIAN
OF 20 YEARS CONTINUOUS PRACTICE
18 SECOND STREET, NORTH
m
Chouteau County Petition Is
Waived—Question Hinges on
Percentage Decision.
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown. July 26.— The hearing on
the county division petition is now for
mally on before the commissioners; the
divisionists being represented as at
torneys'by Odell MeConnell of Helena:
Earl Wineman and A. D. Struot, of
Stanford, and J. J. Jewell of llobson.
Ralph J. Anderson and M. < - Groene
represent the protestants while Judge
II. L. DeKalb is the special legal ad
visor of the board. At the beginning
of the hearing the bond of the petiti
oners for $5,000, conditioned for the
payment of all expenses of the election,
should the division proposal be defeated,
was accepted. The sureties are II. N.
Woodward. W. C. Flitcroft, W. W. Gait.
N. B. Matthews. A. C. Edwards. Frank
Meredith, II. T. Goodell. G. W. Cowan,
It. Condon and G. J. Dunn.
Mr. Anderson, for the protestants,
made an offer to show that not a single
signer of the Chouteau county division
petition was a qualified elector within
the boundaries of the proposed county.
There were but a few signers to that
petition anyway and Mr. MeConnell con
ceded that there wore no qualified elec
tors among them and consented that
Chouteau might be eliminated at the
start.
Testimony is now being taken as to
whether or not the individual signers
of the Fergus county petition are quali
fied electors but the protestants are
expected to break in on this with a
showing upon the withdrawals from the
division petition.
It seems to be conceded by both sides
that the question is going to be decided
upon the contention that less than 5S
per cent of the signers of the division
petition are qualified electors. The in
dicatioiis are that the hearing may take
considerable time.
Lewistown Soldier
Makes Good Record in
Fighting and Athletics
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown. July lit!.—Tom MaeGowan,
who left the high school to go to France
! with the American army, came back yes
I t-rday with the rank of lieutenant and
j the reputation of being one of the finest
; athletes in forces overseas, lie served
1 21 months in France. At the Paris in
j ter-allied tournament he defeated the
former Olympian champion at shot put
j ting. Lieut. MaeGowan leaves tomorrow
' for Camp Lewis to be mustered out. He
! had two brothers in the army in France.
I one of them having been twice wounded
severely.
Only Six Cars of
Farm Outfits Leave
Because of Drouth
< Special to The Daily Tribune.
Cut Bank. July 20.—Not over six cars
(of immigrants left Cut Bank that could
! be attributed to the drouth. However,
! several carloads of cattle have been
shipped to market, but these shipments
I would have been made later anyway,
being beef cattle. There is quite i-un
j siderable grain to the north of the city
that will be cut for hay, thus relieving
an otherwise unfavorable condition for
stock and will help those fortunate
enough to have it to tide their stock over
another yenr. Should rain come within
a reasonable length of time a very sub
stantial amount of spring wheat and flax
will yet be harvested in this locality.
GOES TO NEBRASKA
TO FIND PASTURE FOR
2000 HEAD OF CATTLE
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Cut Bank. July 20.—Russell Thorp of
the Galbraith Cattle company has gone
to Alliance, Neb., where he will try to
find pasture for the coming winter for
2000 head of cattle. The feed facilities
on the reservation, where the company's
stock is now located, will not be suffi
cient. ( »ther arrangements will have to
be made and Vie is looking for suitable
quarters in other parts of the country.
LEWISTOWN RED CROSS
NURSE HOME FROM FRANCE.
Special to' The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown. July 20.—Miss Cecil
Roach, a well known Lewistown girl
who served with the Red Cross in
France for eight months, returned home
yesterday. She was stationed in Paris
practically all the time.
VR00MAN BACK FROM FRONT.
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown, July 20.—Randall Vroo
man. son of John M. Vrooman, of the
Grass Range Review and a widely
known young man, returned home
yesterday from France where he serv
ed in the army.
MAIDEN FIRE IS CHECKED.
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Lewistown. July 26,— Telefone mes- i
sages from Maiden early this morning '
were to the effect that the forest fires
near there were being held in excel- j
lent shap. the only danger being from j
a high wind.
M I SSO U RIANS VISIT CHINOOK
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Chinook, July 26.—Mr. and Mrs. C. I'. :
Burks are here from Missouri, visiting;
at the home of their son and wife, Mr. j
and Mrs. F. M. Bulks.
CHICHESTER S PILLS
TIIK IMAMON'H RRAND. A
_ -10 oilier- H ut ®r Tour w
IlrnnUt. AiV firt'iri-CirEH-Tm S
diamond isua m» piLiAfciea
jreif i knows M Best, SifetlAlinji RellaM#
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
JAP SOCIALIST MEETING
SUPPRESSED BY POLICE
Tokio, July 26.—(By the Associated
Press)—A big mass meeting of the
newly organized associated labor union,
tailed to discuss improvement in labor
conditions, was broken up violently
I \\ eanesday when 8akae Osugi, a nrom
înent socialist, tried to address the au
dience. The police stopped the meeting.
Sunuay, July 27, 1919.
First Avenue South
BERGER'S
and Fourth Strest
Two New Assortments of Silk Dresses
have arrived—they include a
number of Advance Fall
styles. Specially Priced—
and
Here now are the first of the new season's styles. They
clearly show the tendency of Fashion in silhoutte, fabric,
color and trimming, giving you the first sure guide to in
telligent and non-wasteful purchasing.
Georgette, Crepe de Chine, Satin, Taffeta,
Messaline and Silk Jersey
are the materials in these two splendid assortments. All of these dresses are so attractive, so
prettily made of fine fabrics and so effectively trimmed, and they have the charm of newness
with the added attractiveness of unusually low prices.
"Bonnie B"
Slip-on Veils
Imported from France
No tying on—no pinning -no ad
justing. Worn with large or small
hats <>r without hats. Beautiful
colorings and patterns with new
est French scroll and flower spray
10c AND 25c
NEW PEARL EAR
BUTTONS
Just received. Three size? in
flesh, white and irredecent; very
popular now.
35c to $1.19
Cool Collars
To wear with
Dresses, Waists and
Suits
Just enough white to add that
touch of daintiness to Mylady's
neck. So much desired by the
well dressed woman.
A nice, fresh, complete stock of
georgette, crepe de chine and or
gandy collars in the shapes and
designs most desired, and you buy
them for less here.
49c to $2.85
A Wonderful Variety New
Silk Blouses
Many New Fall Styles Shown
Choice can be made from selections so
varied that every requirement is easily
satisfied. Should you desire a blouse for
some formal affair, selection will be just
as easy as the choice of a model for street
or afternoon wear, for our assortment
offers many styles. Not the least impor
tant feature is their reasonable prices.
Plain tailored and embroidered models in crepe de chine
of all shades at $3.98.
Unusual values in Georgette Crepe blouses, prettily em
broidered, and in many shades, at $4.98.
High class beaded and silk braided Georgette blouses in
the advance Fall styles at $6.45.
x
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New Ribbons for Summer
Ribbons for Dresses—Ribbons for Hats
Ribbons for Underwear—Ribbons for Everywhere
"Berger's" ever increasing ribbon section, now complete
with a stock of choice ribbons, and new assortments arriv
ing every week from the east.
Ribbons from the very narrowest up to the wide fancy
ribbons for bags, etc. Plain satins and beautiful patterns
in moire and wide fancy ribbons. Special bargains every
day.
All Coats, Capes and
Dolmans
Now
at
Half Price
And Less Than Half
The time for clearing away all
of' this season's finest ready-to
wear garments is here. New
merchandise will soon need the
room, and all garments 011 the
racks must exit, and the lowest
prices of the season prevail
half price and less than half
price.
There's a certain lot of very serviceable spring coats,
capes and dolmans, formerly sold up to $24.75, now on
sale at only
$9.95
Among them are fine velour coats, pretty navy blue capes
trimmed with black silk braid, and a variety of other equally
fashionable garments.
HANDKERCHIEFS
Women, and Children's
Lawns, linens and crepe de chine make nice gifts. School
handkerchiefs for children, new boxed sets and single from
5c up. All just received.
Middy
Ties
For summer wear. New and com
plete line. A wonderfully large tie
for the money, (.»ood quality of
messaline silk. Hltick, navy. pink,
giecn, cardinal, eopen, white.
49c
Middy
Ties
The Regular Three
Cornered
v .ood large si,e. nice finality silk:
cardinal, emerald, royal. Copen
hagen and black. 1 'omplete new
shipment.
59c
Men's Balbriggan or Porous
Knit Shirts and Drawers;
()5c values for only, OQf*
per garment 6 b wV
Men's Fine Ribbed White
Union Suits, all sizes, short
sleeves, ankle length; $1.00
T: 59c
Boys' Knee Pants. Large
line just received. Cordu
roys, khaki and cashmere
pants ; knickerbocker styles.
$1.25 to $3.45
Shoes On Sale Tomorrow
MEN'S
DRESS SHOES
Dull calf and gunmetal she
lace and blueher styles. Special
value at only.
$5.00
WOMEN'S
t FINE OXFORDS
Black kid lace Oxfor<fc: a beauti
ful well made style with Cuban
heel. ÇC QC
Kxtra special. fViVV
WOMEN'S
FINE OXFORDS
Fine black kid. patent leather and
brown kid. Kreuch heel and flex
ible soles. ffß QE
Speeial ^Vawv
Cash and One Price Only
*
177* 1 YSZ'JKTTKMVJ***
CUT BANK PEOPLE GO TO
WEEK END RANCH PARTY
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Cut Bank, July 26.—Tom Connolly is
giving a week end party at the Coram
ranch in the mountains. Among 'those
who went from Cut Bank were Miss
Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. M. J. llnlv.ir
son, Mrs. Henry Halvor»on. Dr. It. G.
Nelson and J. C. Shanaahan.
HARLEM RESTAURANTEURS
DISSOLVE PARTNERSHIP
Special to The Daily Tribune..
Harlem, July 26.—Claude Rogers and
Fred Wall, who have been associated to
gether in the restaurant business on the
north side of the track have dissolved
partnership. Mr. Wall retires from the
the firm and Mr. Rogers will continue
the business.
CHINOOK GIRL HURT
BY SICKLE OF MOWER
Special to The Daily Tribune.
Chinook, July 26.—Little Marie Van
der Weyst of Ilollandville, aged 11, had
her right foot badly cut by the sickle
of a mower yesterday morning, when
i she stepped in front of a machine on her
i father's ranch. She was hastened to
i town where the wound was dressed, and
! the foot can probably be saved.

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