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Great Falls daily tribune. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1895-1921, April 10, 1920, Image 12

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MISCELLANEOUS
FOUND
THE PLACE WHERE YOU CAN GET
the most stylish and durable suit
for the least money. Mikehasit, 301
Central avenue.
Oh, many a shaft at random sent
Finds mark the archer little meant:
And many a word at random spoken (
May sooth or wound a heart that s
broken. —Scott.
LOST
WHO
LOST THE
THE PARTY
opportunity to look well dressed, will
be well rewarded by calling at Mike
hasit's, 304 Central avenue.
If you were busy being right,
You'd find yourself too busy, quite,
To criticise your neighbor long
Because he's too busy being wrong.
—Rebecca B. Foresman.
HELP WANTED—MALE
WHEN LOOKING FOR A SITUATION
your best asset is your personal ap
pearance. Put on one of Mikehasit's
new suits and win.
304 Central avenue.
Call today
—Mikehasit
—: DETTER AND FOR LESS
304 Cantral Graat Falls.
HARGROVE'S FOR QUALITY
To Sweet Grass—To Sweet
Grasa. Let's Hurrah for her
flag. Most all the hoys have
gone up there—To bring back
a Jag.
There's Jim and Ed and George
and Bill.
They're all good scouts, you bet.
G. F. was dry, but, was ain't
still.
She's dry—? Not yet,—She's
wet.
aV
r r^
Should Old Acquaint
ance Be Forgot?
Today as the press that prints
this paper revolves at the rate
of 3000 revolutions an hour—
unsatisfactory substitutes for
wool are appearing almost as
fast—but we are clinging like a
vine of Ivy to the seed of our
success.
This is an ALL-WOOL institu
tion and we'll be the same tomor
row, next .vear and all the years
following, if you'll take the
trouble to look us up.
Hargrove Quality Clothes
$45 to $75
$55 to $85
New Neckwear arriving
daily.
fJ argrov(£$
The Store That Really Tries to
Please.
OUCH!
Mr. Saphedde—-Do you think men
have descended from monkeys?
Miss Caustique —Not very far.—Lon
don Tit-Bits.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS
RA.VKiy— 1 The body of David Rankin,
aged 59 years, a prominent rancher of
Splonkop, who died at the family home
Wednesday evening, is at the chapel of
the T. F. O'Connor company. The funeral
will be held from the chapel Sunday
afternoon at 2:30. Interment will be in
Calvary cemetery. Mr. Rankin had been
resident of Spionkop district for -5
years.
CROHN— 1 The body of William Crohn,
aged 9 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. William
Crohn of Dagmar, Mont., who died in
this city Friday morning. is at the
chapel of the T. F. O'Connor company.
Funeral arrangements will be announced
later.
C CK i ATI—The body of Josephine
Cukjati, the three-year-old daughter of
Joseph Cukjati, of Red Lodge, Mont.,
who died in this city last evening, is at
the chapel of the T. F. O'Connor com
pany. Announcements for the funeral
will be made later.
SINCLAIR —Malcolm Sinclair, aged 48
years, of Floweree, died at the family
home last evening. The remains were
removed to the T. F. O'Connor company
chapel and funeral arrangements will be
announced later.
T. F. O'CONNOR
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AHO MPAU1NO
•«Me Made te Year
Meaeàre. Extra Paats
A. 6. MARCHER COMPANY
IU rXNTBAL.
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HARRY H. McCOLE
Dry Cleaner.
Phone 9462
—Parcel Poat
—Offers Solicita*
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(MS NEXT WEEK
BIB SPOUTS EVERT
Great Falls Will Have One or
Two Teams in State Tourna
ment at "Y."
Great Falls is assured of at least one
team, and probably two. in the annual
state volleyball tournament to be held in
the Y. M. C. A. gym next week, and
probably a dozen entries from Great
Falls will take part in the state hand
ball tourney, to be held at the same
time.
Teams have been entered in the an
nual tourney from all parts of the state,
and from present indications, the con
test will lif the largest ever held in
Montana. The biggest list of prizes
ever offered has been put up this year.
The handball courts at the Y are said
to be the finest in the state and con
ducive to fast playing. As the dimen
sions of the courts and gymnasium as
well as the type of balls to be used, have
been sent to all of the teams entered,
every entry will be in a condition for
fast play.
More than 15 local mon are practicing
daily for the volleyball tourney, and
teams will be selected the first of the
week. A large number of handball en
tries have also been received. Chairman
in charge of the handball and volleyball
ticket sales reports much interest in the
contest and arrangements will be made
to seat large numbers of rooters at each
of the games.
The handball contests will start on
Wednesday, and the volleyball games
will probably start Friday afternoon.
The finals in both the handball and
volleyball tourney will be staged on Sat
urday.
NATURALLY.
She—Why do they put corn meal on
the dance floor?
He—To make the chickens feel at
home.—The Pith Panther.
DEATHS AND FUNERALS
ftOEBEL—The infant son of Mr. and
Mrs. Conrad Goebel of 519 Second avenue
southwest, died in this city Thursday
evening and the body is at the W. H.
George company chapel. Funeral ar
rangements will be announced later.
PORTER—The body of George Porter,
of the Montana Power company, is at
the W. H. George company chapel and
the arrangements of the funeral will be
announced as soon as relatives are
heard from.
•JAMES—Mrs. Mary Frances James,
aged 69 years, a pioneer resident of Cas
cade, died at home in Cascade yesterday
morning. The funeral will be held at the
Methodist church at 2 on Sunday after
noon. The Rev. J. H. Little, the Rev.
Mr. Armstrong, and the Rev. Lyman will
officiate. The interment in charge of the
W. H. George company will be in the
Chestnut valley cemetery.
People have won
dered why the name
of W. H. George Co. has
become a household word
in so many homes in this
county.
There is a reason.
Ask those whose loved
ones we have laid away,
they will tell you.
Day and night ambu
lance to all hospitals.
Lady assistant.
Triangle Club Wins
Baseball Game From
Young Men, 15 to 7
The Young Men's club indoor baseball
team was defeated by the Triangle club
aggregation on the gym floor of the Y.
M. C. A. Friday evening, 15 to 7.
The Triangle men led the playing;
throughout, making two runs in the first
inning. The Young Men's club register
ed only two runs in the first six innings,
but brought in five in the last three.
The losers in the contest have chal
lenged the winners to another game to
be played Friday evening, April 23, and
with two weeks practice, are confident
of defeating the victors in last night's
game.
The lineup:
Triangle club: Flannery. catcher:
Bragdon, pitcher; Crouch, fielder; Itog-;
ers, first base; Albright, second base;
Abrains, left short stop No. 1 : Ooodman.
left short stop Xo. 2; Elton, right short
stop.
Young Men's club: Melby, catcher;
Rowe, pitcher; Carr, fielder; Ensign,
first base; Sorenson. second base: 1 Iii
garde, left short stop Xo 1; Yeomans.
left short stop Xo. 2: Thompson, right
short stop.
The score by innings:
Triangle: 2 0 3 2 5 0 1 2 0—15
Young Men: 00200012 2— 7
Brucks, Chicago, Wins .
A. B. C. Championship
With Score of 3,096
Peoria. 111., April 9.—The 1920 Amer
ican Bowling congress tournament came
to a close here tonight with Brucks No. 1.
Chicago, winning the championship with
a score of 3,096. a new congress record.
The tournament had been in session
thirty days and nine hundred teams were
in the championship fight.
Three of the championships go to
C hicago, and the other to Milwuakee.
Indianapolis. Toledo. Cleveland, Detroit.
Pittsburgh, and St. Louis bowlers were
also big money winners.
Jimmy Smith. Milwaukee, winner of
the title in the all-events, was the only
former champion to repeat Iiis former
triumph. Champions of 1919 for the
most part even failed to reach the
money winning divisions.
The leading prize winners, as announc
ed by the officials tonight, include:
Five men— Brucks No. 1. Chicago,
3.056, $1.000; Central Alleys, Indiana
polis, 3,056. $950; Woodville Times,
Toledo. 2,967. $800; Fleming Furniture
company, Cleveland. 2.947. $700.
Two men—M. Erickson-E. Krein,
Chicago, 1.301. $500; I). I)evito-F. l.uby.
Chicago, 1.273. .$4SO; II. Thoinas-II.
Votel, Pittsburgh. 1,269 $460; J. Nevaril
| A. Hartman. Chicago, 1,258, $440: A.
j Schultz-,]. Ilaack, Sheboygan. 1,257, $410.
Individual—J. Shaw. Chicago. 713.
I $300; S. Mercurio, Cleveland. 702. $275;
! B. Megowan. Evansville, 698, $250; J.
! Lellinger, Chicago. 692, $225; It. l'ekie.
| Chicago. 684, $200.
All-events—J. Smith. Milwaukee. 1,915,
$145.
Postal Receipts Show
Decrease From 1919
Postal receipts in the Great. Falls of
fice during the first quarter of 1920
show a decrease of $400 over those
during the same period in 1919. The
postal receipts for the quarter ending
March 31, 1920 amounted to $40.127.40,
while the receipts for the same quarter
in 1919 figured on a two cents postage
basis amounted to $40,529.08. This an
nouncement was made Friday by Post
master William Cluston after the quar
ter's work had been compiled.
Hay Takes Big Jump
Upon Helena Market
Helena. April 9.—Hay is quoted nt
$45 to $50 the ton in Helena and dealers
say the increased freight rates, which
went into effect April 1, are responsible.
The prices are said to be the record.
GREAT FALLS MAN WINS.
Helena. April 9.— Frank Hagrrty of
Great Falls won the annual cross-country
ruu of Montana Wesleyan co.le?e here
today, in a new local record. 8 minutes
43Vj seconds. The distance is one and
one-half miles, from a point on Mount
Helena to the school.
6IBB0NS DEFEATS ROPER.
Minneapolis, April 9.—Tommy Gib
bons, of St. Paul, outpointed Bob Roper,
Chicago, in a ten round bout here to
night. Gibbons weighed 170 pounds üpd
Roper 179. j
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F
MEET AT MISSOIIU
Great Falls High School Stud
ents May Hold Preliminary
Meet in This City Soon.
Entry blanks have been received by
the Great Falls high school for the sev
enteenth annual interscholastic track
meet to be held by the state university
at Miss'iiiia May 11 to 15. Nearly 75
higii school students are in training for
tli- event, according to Coach M. L.
Crouch.
Because of the cold weather, little out
side work lias been done by the local men
as yet. Some long distance running has
been done, but most of the men are
training in the gym. As soon as possible
however, outside work will be started.
Plans are being made for a prelimin
ary track and field meet to be held in
Great Falls, if weather conditions per
mit. By ellminiation, the contestants in
the state meet would be selected.
As it. is impossible as yet to pick the
faster men from among those who are
tryirg out, it is not known definitely how
many men will be entered from this city.
Ail entries must be returned to the uni
versity by May 5, according to I)r. .T. P.
Rowe. chairman of the inter-scholastic
co nmittee.
The raiiroads will not grant the high
school contestants a fate and a third
rate, so the university has had to cur
tail the paid expenses from each school
to one declaimer or debater an two ath
letes. Any school may send 10 athletes,
but the extra expense must be carried
by the high school they represent. It
is possible that from four to ei^ht men
will be entered from Great. Falls.
George Varnell, sports eaitor of the j
Spokane Chronicle, will again officiate
as starter for the fifth consecutive time,
and D. D. Bichards will act as clerk.
On Tuesday, May 11. athletes will be
registered and inspected, nud on Wed
nesday the English council and debate
will be held. On Thursday, the declama
tion contest and track and field meet,
and a May dance by university women
will be held. The finals in th» track
meet will be held on Friday, medals will
be awarded, and a dance wiil be held for
the athletes in the evening. A business
meeting will be held on Saturday.
Local school officials have not an
nounced as yet whether or not a debat
er will be entered from Great Fails this
year, but it is probable that this city will
be represented in the annual debate and
declamation contest for state honors.
Jury Is Deadlocked
Trial Big Horn Man
on Rustling Charge
Hardin. April 9.—After nearly 48
hours of deliberation, the jury in the case
of Ü. 1'. McKinley, charged with rustling
an entire train-load of cattle, this after
noon reported that it was unable to
agree and was discharged by District
Judsce C. A. Taylor. The trial of Charles
C. Blankenship, accused with McKinley,
began yesterday and is expected to go to
the jury Monday. Cole Powell, also in
cluded in the original charges, Itas been
discharged on motion of the prosecution.
Blankenship, McKinley and Powell, are
well known stockmen of this district.
An Election Is Held
Without Candidates
Cascade, April 9. —Election day in
Cascade was a tame affair, with no
candidates in the field and no names
upon the official ballots.
When the few votes cast were count
ed they showed Alfred Briscoe and
Oscar Bread.v to have been re-elected
aldermen of the first and Third wards,
respectively. Frank Zonker will suc
ceed Harvey Hall as alderman of the
Second ward after the first meeting of
the city council in May.
STECHER THROWS FINN.
New York, April 9.— Joe Stecher,
heavyweight catcn-as-catch-can wrestling
champion, threw Fred Pilakoff, of Fin
land with a body-scissors in 22 minutes
and four seconds tonight. Stecher weigh
ed 208 pounds and his opponent 210. Jim
Londos, the Greek title holder, forced
Jack Samson, of Chicago, to quit with an
arm scissors in 54 minutes and 57 sec
onds. Samson had an advantage of 33
pounds over Londos. who weighed 190
pounds.
T SAY OF TN
PARENTS AND SONS
AND THOSE WHO HANDLE THE FAMILY FINANCES OR
ARE DEPENDENT UPON THEIR OWN RESOURCES—WITH
AN EYE TO THRIFT—TO YOU THIS
SPECIAL MESSAGE IS DIRECTED
Conceding the Point That You All Know
THE LIEDHOLM QUALITY
UTILITY km PRIC
Are the Next Serious Considerations.
Lot
One
Lot
Two
Lot
Three
Lot
One .
Lot
Two .
Lot
Three
Lot
Four
Prices Like These for 1st Grade Merchandise Have Been Unheard of
in Years.
OVERCOAT
§16.50
.75
M
$49.50
TODAY IS YOUR OPPORTU
Store Opens 9:30; Closes at 6
We will wait on those in before closing time, no matter
if it takes till midnight.
Plenty of the articles mentioned and in most all sizes.
Starched Collars today 2 for 25c. Silk Shirts $7.35,
$9.15, $11.85» $14.50—lots of 'em. Madras Shirts, beau
tiful patterns, all wanted colors and sizes—long on 14,
14J, 151, 16 and 16*.
Dress Shirts $2.35. Heavy Flannel Shirts $4.95. Beau
tiful Neckwear and plenty of it, $1.15, $1.65, $1.95 and
up. Sox $2.35 the box. Silk Lisle $2.65 J dozen. Silk
Pajamas $7.85. Outing Flannel $2.35. Cotton Sweater
Coats 50c. Wool Jerseys $3.65. Summer and winter
Underwear less than wholesale.
CAPS—i PRICE—HATS
Smoking Jackets, choice $4.00. Vests $2.35.
Plenty of Merchandise
All Our Own-Marked in Plain Figures
SALE ENDS TODAY!
©HOL
219 Central
Great Falls

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